Lehrveranstaltungen WiSe 2016/2017

English-Speaking Cultures / Englisch, B.A.

Veranstaltungen anzeigen: alle | in englischer Sprache | für ältere Erwachsene

Very important information for advance registration, please read

(Profilfach / Komplementärfach / Lehramtsoption) und Bachelor Bildungswissenschaften des Primar- und Elementarbereichs (English-Speaking Cultures/Englisch)
Please be aware that advance registration for all courses offered on Stud. IP. is mandatory.
All Students enrolled in the study programme English-Speaking Cultures (BA E-SC) are required to register for courses in advance and in a timely fashion! (Students enrolled in their first term need to register until the last Friday before the start of the lecture period)
Please register on Stud.IP:
You select a course of your choice and apply for participation. Your lecturer will either accept or reject your application, depending on the number of students permitted to take one class. The registration process is complete, when you receive a confirmation email. Courses offered in the winter term are available in our online course programme from July 30th onwards. Courses offered in the summer term are available from December 30th.
Registration deadlines on Stud.IP:
For courses offered in the summer term: March, 15th
For courses offered in the winter term: September, 15th
For courses offered for first semester students: last Friday before the start of the lecture period
Comment:
This registration process supports students and faculty members alike. For health and safety reasons the number of students who may register for one course is in some cases limited due to room size. Early registration therefore allows students to make alternative arrangements, i.e. to select another course of their choice before the start of the lecture period.
Registration for Academic Exchange students (Erasmus, Free Mover, international students):
We would like to advice academic exchange students to register for courses via Email. Please identify the relevant faculty member or lecturer and send your email registration request directly to the faculty member offering the course you wish to join. Please follow the link for a detailed list of all contact details: http://www.fb10.uni-bremen.de/anglistik/personal.aspx
VAK Titel der Veranstaltung DozentIn
XXX (Profilfach / Komplementärfach / Lehramtsoption) und Bachelor Bildungswissenschaften des Primar- und Elementarbereichs (English-Speaking Cultures/Englisch)

Vorlesung
N. N.

LEHRVERANSTALTUNGEN DES 1. JAHRES (PO 2011)

Basismodul A: Englische Literaturwissenschaft (6 CP)

Modulbeauftragte/r: Dr. Jana Nittel, jnittel@uni-bremen.de
VAK Titel der Veranstaltung DozentIn
10-76-1-BA-01 Introduction to English Literatures Part I (in englischer Sprache)

Seminar

Termine:
wöchentlich Mo 08:15 - 09:45 GW2 B2890 (2 SWS) Gruppe A
wöchentlich Di 10:15 - 11:45 GW2 B2900 (2 SWS) Gruppe B
wöchentlich Mi 16:15 - 17:45 SFG 1030 (2 SWS) Gruppe C
wöchentlich Do 10:15 - 11:45 SFG 2010 (2 SWS) Gruppe D

This introductory course will attempt to offer students access to literary studies at university level and try to balance scholarly considerations with aesthetic enjoyment. It is the first part of a two-semester module, which will continue in the following Summer Term (Part II). In this first semester, we will look at the basic concepts not only of literature itself but also of the science of literary criticism /Literaturwissenschaft. As we read our primary texts, we will be able to look at questions of literary genre (poetry, drama, narrative texts) and literary history (different periods and different national contexts). In addition, we will look at current theories of literature and of course strategies of interpreting and analysing literary texts in a systematic, scholarly way, thus laying the theoretical and terminological groundwork to the study of literature, both from a methodological and a historical perspective.

The course will run as four groups. All students are required to register on Stud.IP for one of these four groups A, B, C or D by selecting the option “Participants/TeilnehmerInnen” on Stud.IP, followed by “Functions/Groups”. Please select only one group and be aware that the number of students who are permitted to sign up for each group is limited (room size) and that your registration is mandatory.

A: Monday: 08:15 - 09:45, weekly (from 17/10/16), GW2 B2890, Lecturer: Dr Jana Nittel
B: Tuesday: 10:15 - 11:45, weekly (from 18/10/16), GW2 B2900, Lecturer: Dr Jana Nittel
C: Wednesday: 16:15 - 17:45, weekly (from 19/10/16), SFG 1030; Lecturer: Cedric Essi
D: Thursday: 10:15 - 11:45, weekly (from 20/10/16), SFG 2010, Lecturer: Dr Jana Nittel

In addition, we would like you to register for:

a) Tutorials “Übung zum Seminar Introduction to English Literatures Part II”, VAK: 10-76-6-GS-04 [General Studies: 1-3 CPs] on Fridays 08:15 a. m. – 9:45 a. m.
b) Mobile Lectures/Digitales Lehrangebot: “Key Developments in Literary Histor(ies) and Literary Criticism in English”, VAK: 10-76-6-GS-06, [General Studies: 1-3 CPs]

Please download a copy of the learning compact for further details such as requirements, weekly schedule, select bibliography, reference only section in the library, modes of assessment and the exam schedule (“General data folder” on Stud. IP).

Module description: http://www.fb10.uni-bremen.de/anglistik/ba2/module.aspx
Departmental extended reading list (Literatures in English): http://www.fb10.uni-bremen.de/anglistik/literaturwissenschaft/default.aspx

Required reading materials (you will need a copy of these books for class):

Joyce, James. Dubliners (Italics). Ed. Margot Norris. Norton Critical Editions. New York: W. W. Norton, 2006. Print.
Miller, Arthur. Death of a Salesman (Italics). Eds. Manfred und Gunda Pütz. Stuttgart: Reclam, 1986. Print.
Nünning, Vera and Ansgar. An Introduction to the Study of English and American Literature (Italics). 2nd. Ed. Stuttgart: Klett, 2014. Print.
Pope, Rob. Studying English Literature and Language: An Introduction and Companion (Italics). Third Edition. Abingdon: Routledge, 2012. Print. (also course book for Part II)
Shakespeare, William. Hamlet (Italics). Ed. Robert S. Miola. Norton Critical Editions. New York: W. W. Norton, 2010. Print.

Copies of the texts are available for purchase in the Campus bookstore (Universitätsbuchhandlung Bremen: www.unibuch-bremen.de)

Requirements:
  • regular attendance, informed participation in class discussion,
  • in-depth knowledge of the selected reading material,
  • homework assignments and group presentation in tutorial sessions.

Students will take a final written exam.

Dr. Jana Nittel
Cedric-Akpeje Essi

Basismodul B: Englische Sprachwissenschaft

Modulbeauftragte/r: Prof. Dr. John Bateman, bateman@uni-bremen.de
VAK Titel der Veranstaltung DozentIn
10-76-1-BB-01 Introduction to English Linguistics 1 (in englischer Sprache)

Seminar

Termine:
wöchentlich Fr 10:15 - 11:45 SFG 1040 (2 SWS)

Einzeltermine:
Do 16.02.17 10:00 - 12:00 GW2 B1410
Do 16.02.17 10:00 - 12:00 GW2 B1400 NUR Mi. - So.
Do 16.02.17 14:00 - 18:00 GW2 B1400 NUR Mi. - So.
Do 16.02.17 14:00 - 18:00 GW2 B1410

Linguistics is the scientific study of language and communication. It deals with all aspects of how people use language and what they must know in order to do so. The purpose of this class is to give a systematic introduction to the variety of ways in which language can be examined scientifically. Students will be introduced to and equipped with the fundamental concepts, the adequate terminology and methodology for linguistic analysis. The class will thus provide an overview of the core areas of linguistics – phonetics and phonology (the study of speech sounds), morphology (the structure of words), syntax (the structure of sentences), semantics (the study of meaning) and pragmatics (the study of meaning and language use in context). Taking a contrastive German-English perspective whenever possible, this course will also cater for the needs and interests of students who want to become teachers of English.

READING
The following books, available in inexpensive paperback editions, are recommended (but need not be purchased as the key readings will be made available on the university’s e-learning platform Stud.IP):
  • Plag, Ingo; Braun, Maria; Lappe, Sabine and Mareile Schramm (2015), Introduction to English Linguistics. 3rd ed. Berlin: Mouton de Gruyter.
  • Finegan, Edward (2011), Language. Its structure and Use. 6th ed. Boston/MA: Thomson Wadsworth. (several other editions and publishers)
  • Kortmann, Bernd (2005), English Linguistics: Essentials. Berlin: Cornelsen.

Essential preparatory reading before the first meeting: Finegan (2011), ch. 1

ASSESSMENT
  • regular attendance and active participation in in-class data analysis and discussion
  • careful reading and preparation of assigned readings for each session, reading assignments
  • final exam ("E-Klausur")

Prof. Dr. Marcus Callies
10-76-1-BB-02 Introduction to English Linguistics 1 (in englischer Sprache)

Seminar

Termine:
wöchentlich Do 08:00 - 10:00 GW2 A4330
wöchentlich Do 12:15 - 13:45 SFG 1040

Linguistics is the scientific study of language and communication. It deals with all aspects of how people use language and what they must know in order to do so. The purpose of this class is to give a systematic introduction to the variety of ways in which language can be examined scientifically. Students will be introduced to and equipped with the fundamental concepts, the adequate terminology and methodology for linguistic analysis. The class will thus provide an overview of the core areas of linguistics – phonetics and phonology (the study of speech sounds), morphology (the structure of words), syntax (the structure of sentences), semantics (the study of meaning) and pragmatics (the study of meaning and language use in context). Taking a contrastive German-English perspective whenever possible, this course will also cater for the needs and interests of students who want to become teachers of English.

RECOMMENDED LITERATURE (please buy this book):
Kortmann, Bernd (2005), English Linguistics: Essentials. Berlin: Cornelsen.

Essential preparatory reading before the first meeting: Chapter 1 from Finegan (2011). This chapter is available for download on Stud.IP. Reference:
Finegan, Edward (2011), Language. Its structure and Use. 6th ed. Boston/MA: Thomson Wadsworth. (several other editions and publishers)

ASSESSMENT
  • regular attendance and active participation in in-class data analysis and discussion
  • careful reading and preparation of assigned readings for each session, reading assignments
  • final exam

Dr. Anke Schulz
10-76-1-BB-03 Introduction to English Linguistics 1 (in englischer Sprache)

Seminar

Termine:
wöchentlich Mi 12:00 - 14:00 GW2 B2880

Linguistics is the scientific study of language and communication. It deals with all aspects of how people use language and what they must know in order to do so. The purpose of this class is to give a systematic introduction to the variety of ways in which language can be examined scientifically. Students will be introduced to and equipped with the fundamental concepts, the adequate terminology and methodology for linguistic analysis. The class will thus provide an overview of the core areas of linguistics – phonetics and phonology (the study of speech sounds), morphology (the structure of words), syntax (the structure of sentences), semantics (the study of meaning) and pragmatics (the study of meaning and language use in context). Taking a contrastive German-English perspective whenever possible, this course will also cater for the needs and interests of students who want to become teachers of English.

READING
Recommended literature (please buy this book):
Kortmann, Bernd (2005), English Linguistics: Essentials. Berlin: Cornelsen.

Essential preparatory reading before the first meeting: Finegan (2011), chapter 1
Finegan, Edward (2011), Language. Its Structure and Use. 6th ed. Boston/MA: Thomson Wadsworth. (several other editions and publishers)

ASSESSMENT
  • regular attendance and active participation in in-class data analysis and discussion
  • careful reading and preparation of assigned readings for each session, reading assignments
  • final exam

Alexandra Kinne
10-76-1-BB-04 Introduction to English Linguistics 1 (in englischer Sprache)

Seminar

Termine:
wöchentlich Mo 14:15 - 15:45 GW2 B2890 (2 SWS)

Einzeltermine:
Mi 09.11.16 10:00 - 12:00 SpT C3140
Mi 23.11.16 10:00 - 12:00 SpT C3140
Mi 14.12.16 10:00 - 12:00 SpT C3140
Mi 25.01.17 10:00 - 12:00 SpT C3140

Linguistics is the scientific study of language and communication. It deals with all aspects of how people use language and what they must know in order to do so. The purpose of this class is to give a systematic introduction to the variety of ways in which language can be examined scientifically. Students will be introduced to and equipped with the fundamental concepts, the adequate terminology and methodology for linguistic analysis. The class will thus provide an overview of the core areas of linguistics – phonetics and phonology (the study of speech sounds), morphology (the structure of words), syntax (the structure of sentences), semantics (the study of meaning) and pragmatics (the study of meaning and language use in context). Taking a contrastive German-English perspective whenever possible, this course will also cater for the needs and interests of students who want to become teachers of English.

READING
The following books, available in inexpensive paperback editions, are recommended (but need not be purchased as the key readings will be made available on the university’s e-learning platform Stud.IP):
Plag, Ingo; Braun, Maria; Lappe, Sabine and Mareile Schramm (2015), Introduction to English Linguistics. 3rd ed. Berlin: Mouton de Gruyter.
Finegan, Edward (2011), Language. Its structure and Use. 6th ed. Boston/MA: Thomson Wadsworth. (several other editions and publishers)
Kortmann, Bernd (2005), English Linguistics: Essentials. Berlin: Cornelsen.
Essential preparatory reading before the first meeting: Finegan (2011), ch. 1

ASSESSMENT
regular attendance and active participation in in-class data analysis and discussion
careful reading and preparation of assigned readings for each session, reading assignments
final exam ("E-Klausur")

Dr. Inke Du Bois
10-76-1-BB-05 Introduction to English Linguistics 1 (in englischer Sprache)

Seminar

Termine:
wöchentlich Mo 16:15 - 17:45 GW2 B2890 (2 SWS)

Linguistics is the scientific study of language and communication. It deals with all aspects of how people use language and what they must know in order to do so. The purpose of this class is to give a systematic introduction to the variety of ways in which language can be examined scientifically. Students will be introduced to and equipped with the fundamental concepts, the adequate terminology and methodology for linguistic analysis. The class will thus provide an overview of the core areas of linguistics – phonetics and phonology (the study of speech sounds), morphology (the structure of words), syntax (the structure of sentences), semantics (the study of meaning) and pragmatics (the study of meaning and language use in context). Taking a contrastive German-English perspective whenever possible, this course will also cater for the needs and interests of students who want to become teachers of English.

READING
The following books, available in inexpensive paperback editions, are recommended (but need not be purchased as the key readings will be made available on the university’s e-learning platform Stud.IP):
Plag, Ingo; Braun, Maria; Lappe, Sabine and Mareile Schramm (2015), Introduction to English Linguistics. 3rd ed. Berlin: Mouton de Gruyter.
Finegan, Edward (2011), Language. Its structure and Use. 6th ed. Boston/MA: Thomson Wadsworth. (several other editions and publishers)
Kortmann, Bernd (2005), English Linguistics: Essentials. Berlin: Cornelsen.
Essential preparatory reading before the first meeting: Finegan (2011), ch. 1

ASSESSMENT
regular attendance and active participation in in-class data analysis and discussion
careful reading and preparation of assigned readings for each session, reading assignments
final exam ("E-Klausur")

Dr. Inke Du Bois

Basismodul C: Kultur- und Sprachgeschichte der englischsprachigen Welt

Modulbeauftragte/r: Dr. Karin Esders, esders@uni-bremen.de und Dr. Inke Du Bois, dubois@uni-bremen.de
VAK Titel der Veranstaltung DozentIn
10-76-1-BC-01 Key Moments in the Cultural History of the English-Speaking-World (in englischer Sprache)

Seminar

Termine:
wöchentlich Mi 12:15 - 13:45 GW2 B2890 (2 SWS)

This course aims to introduce students to key moments in the social and cultural histories of English-speaking countries. In analyzing selected case studies from the Renaissance to postcolonialism we will take special interest in cultural encounters and their dynamics of difference and power. A range of texts and artifacts such as scholarly and fictional works, paintings, advertisements, moving pictures and photographs will be examined, employing a choice of theoretical and analytical concepts.

The course will run as four groups (A-B-C-D); students have to choose one of them. It is the first part of a two-semester module which will continue in the following summer semester as "Key Moments in the Linguistic History of the English-Speaking World". All primary and secondary texts will be available for download in Stud. IP.

Requirements:
  • Regular attendance and oral participation
  • In-depth knowledge of the reading material
  • Written summaries of key ideas of selected texts from the syllabus, to be handed in on the day of the respective session (max. ½ page each = max. 300 words)
  • Oral group presentation
Please note that prior enrollment via Stud. IP is mandatory.

Dr. Karin Esders-Angermund
10-76-1-BC-02 Key Moments in the Cultural History of the English-Speaking-World (in englischer Sprache)

Seminar

Termine:
wöchentlich Do 10:15 - 11:45 GW2 B2900 (2 SWS)

This course aims to introduce students to key moments in the social and cultural histories of English-speaking countries. In analyzing selected case studies from the Renaissance to postcolonialism we will take special interest in cultural encounters and their dynamics of difference and power. A range of texts and artifacts such as scholarly and fictional works, paintings, advertisements, moving pictures and photographs will be examined, employing a choice of theoretical and analytical concepts.

The course will run as four groups (A-B-C-D); students have to choose one of them. It is the first part of a two-semester module which will continue in the following summer semester as "Key Moments in the Linguistic History of the English-Speaking World". All primary and secondary texts will be available for download in Stud. IP.

Requirements:
  • Regular attendance and oral participation
  • In-depth knowledge of the reading material
  • Written summaries of key ideas of selected texts from the syllabus, to be handed in on the day of the respective session (max. ½ page each = max. 300 words)
  • Oral group presentation

Please note that prior enrollment via Stud. IP is mandatory.

Dr. Karin Esders-Angermund
10-76-1-BC-03 Key Moments in the Cultural History of the English-Speaking-World - Monday (in englischer Sprache)

Seminar
ECTS: 3

Termine:
wöchentlich Mo 16:15 - 17:45 SFG 1030 (2 SWS)

This course aims to introduce students to key moments in the social and cultural histories of English-speaking countries. In analyzing a range of case studies from the Renaissance to postcolonialism we will pay particular attention to historical shifts and cultural encounters and their dynamics of difference and power. We will draw for our discussions on a wide variety of sources, such as scholarly and fictional texts, paintings, advertisements, moving pictures and photographs, and will apply a range of theoretical and analytical concepts.

Students are required to enrol in one of the four parallel courses on offer. This seminar is the first part of a two-semester module which will continue in the following summer semester as "Key Moments in the Linguistic History of the English-Speaking World".
Please note that there is an optional tutorial for this seminar: 10-76-6-GS-05 Übung zum Seminar "Key Moments in the Cultural History of the English-Speaking World".

All reading material will be made available for download in StudIP.

Requirements:
# regular attendance and active participation
# in-depth knowledge of the reading material
# one oral group presentation
# a portfolio of written summaries of key ideas from the assigned texts (ca. 300 words each)

Please note that prior enrolment via Stud.IP is mandatory.

Irmgard Maassen
10-76-1-BC-04 Key Moments in the Cultural History of the English-Speaking-World-Tuesday (in englischer Sprache)

Seminar
ECTS: 3

Termine:
wöchentlich Di 12:15 - 13:45 GW2 B2880 (2 SWS)

This course aims to introduce students to key moments in the social and cultural histories of English-speaking countries. In analyzing a range of case studies from the Renaissance to postcolonialism we will pay particular attention to historical shifts and cultural encounters and their dynamics of difference and power. We will draw for our discussions on a wide variety of sources, such as scholarly and fictional texts, paintings, advertisements, moving pictures and photographs, and will apply a range of theoretical and analytical concepts.

Students are required to enrol in one of the four parallel courses on offer. This seminar is the first part of a two-semester module which will continue in the following summer semester as "Key Moments in the Linguistic History of the English-Speaking World".
Please note that there is an optional tutorial for this seminar: 10-76-6-GS-05 Übung zum Seminar "Key Moments in the Cultural History of the English-Speaking World".

All reading material will be made available for download in StudIP.

Requirements:
# regular attendance and active participation
# in-depth knowledge of the reading material
# one oral group presentation
# a portfolio of written summaries of key ideas from the assigned texts (ca. 300 words each)

Please note that prior enrolment via Stud.IP is mandatory.

Irmgard Maassen

SP-1 Basismodul: Sprachpraxis/Practical Language Foundation Module (Part 1) (nur für das Wintersemester)

Modulbeauftragte/r: Penelope Ann-Scott Murdock, Kontakt: murdock@uni-bremen.de
VAK Titel der Veranstaltung DozentIn
10-76-1-SP1-01 University Language Skills 1a (in englischer Sprache)

Übung

Termine:
wöchentlich Di 10:15 - 11:45 GW2 B1632 (2 SWS)

University Language Skills 1 (ULS 1) consists of 2 SWS per week.

ULS 1 is the first half of the SP-1 introductory module. As such, it establishes the foundation for what you will do in ULS 2 during the summer semester. To earn credit for the SP-1 module (9 CP in total), you are required to earn 60% or more on written assignments given in both ULS 1 (1000 words; 3 CP) and ULS 2 (2000 words; 6 CP) respectively.

The emphasis during ULS 1 in the winter semester is on audience focus, planning, and organising an academic essay. Primary objectives of this class include conveying how to compose texts which demonstrate even more clarity, eloquence and structure than those you could compose at the beginning of the course. Throughout, the pre-writing, editing, and revision processes will be paramount. For further detail, please consult the course description hand out.

Literature: While required hand out material will be made available via StudIP, there are three textbooks we will also work with in ULS 1. Those textbooks include Writing Academic English, What’s the Difference, and English Collocations in Use.

Please note: Interested E-SC students are required to register for this class via StudIP.

Dr. Penelope A. Murdock
10-76-1-SP1-02 University Language Skills 1b (in englischer Sprache)

Übung

Termine:
wöchentlich Mo 08:15 - 09:45 GW2 B1632 (2 SWS)

University Language Skills 1 (ULS 1) consists of 2 SWS per week.

ULS 1 is the first half of the SP-1 introductory module. As such, it establishes the foundation for what you will do in ULS 2 during the summer semester. To earn credit for the SP-1 module (9 CP in total), you are required to earn 60% or more on written assignments given in both ULS 1 (1000 words; 3 CP) and ULS 2 (2000 words; 6 CP) respectively.

The emphasis during ULS 1 in the winter semester is on audience focus, planning, and organising an academic essay. Primary objectives of this class include conveying how to compose texts which demonstrate even more clarity, eloquence and structure than those you could compose at the beginning of the course. Throughout, the pre-writing, editing, and revision processes will be paramount. For further detail, please consult the course description hand out.

Literature: While required hand out material will be made available via StudIP, there are three textbooks we will also work with in ULS 1. Those textbooks include Writing Academic English, What’s the Difference, and English Collocations in Use.

Please note: Interested E-SC students are required to register for this class via StudIP.

Dr. Penelope A. Murdock
10-76-1-SP1-03 University Language Skills 1c (in englischer Sprache)

Übung
ECTS: 3

Termine:
wöchentlich Mi 14:15 - 15:45 SuUB 4320 (Studio II Medienraum ) (2 SWS)

SUMMARY
ULS 1 is the first half of the 'SP-1Sprachpraxis Basismodul' introductory module. As such, it lays the foundations on which you build in ULS 2 during the summer semester.

ULS 1 requires you to use English in an academic context at university level. The emphasis is on audience focus, especially with regard to academic writing. Learning how to plan and structure your essay prior to the actual writing process is the first step. You will learn to see writing as a recursive process, which not only includes planning, pre-writing and writing but also editing and revising your texts. Consequently, you will be expanding your English language skills regarding grammar, vocabulary, and register to be able to produce text in a convincing and persuasive academic style; some short quizzes help you check your progress. Finally, in-class discussions of (your) texts, group work, and peer feedback on writing assignments allow you to practise all four language skills.

The first class meeting will provide you with information regarding class requirements, books and other material you will be working with during the semester to support your language-learning process. Hand out material will be made available via StudIP; the textbooks we will work with in ULS 1 are entitled 'What's the Difference?' and 'English Collocations in Use'. What's the Difference is available for sale from all practical-language teachers; "Collocations" is available at the University bookstore.

To earn credit for the SP-1 module (9 CP in total), you are required to earn a minimum of 60% or more on the written assignments given in both ULS 1 (1000 words; 3 CP) and ULS 2 (2000 words; 6 CP) respectively.

N.B.:
1) This course is not open to ERASMUS students below a B2 English level.
2) Students in situations of exceptional hardship (who can indeed only take part in a specific class) are asked to contact the teacher directly. Please do so well BEFORE the end of the registration procedure (i.e. BEFORE October 14, 2016). You will need to provide proof of the time conflict you have.

REGISTRATION
Via Stud.IP
Advance registration deadlines on Stud.IP:
For courses offered in the winter term: September, 15th
For courses offered for first semester students: last Friday before the start of the lecture period.
Stud.IP registration
1. In order to register via Stud.IP, it is imperative that your personal settings on the platform indicate that you are an English-Speaking Cultures student.
For detailed instructions in regard to how to set this up, please see: https://elearning.uni-bremen.de/
Click on: “Stud.IP –FAQ,” scroll down to and then click on “Stud.IP für Studierende…” and follow the instructions provided under “Sie belegen leider keinen passenden Studiengang!”
2. Students who have missed the the deadline on 14th October need to check Stud.IP for classes which have seats available, and go to the session in the first week of teaching.

3. Should you not receive a seat in your class of choice on October 13th, all is not lost. Please proceed by first consulting StudIP to determine where seats remain available. (By simply clicking on the link to each respective parallel class and scrolling down to the "Number of Participants" section, one can see how many seats remain open.) [Comment by Michael: select one of those classes where there ARE still places available, come to the class meeting in the first week of teaching, and then make sure you FORMALLY register for that class.]

Katja Müller, M.A.
10-76-1-SP1-04 University Language Skills 1d (in englischer Sprache)

Übung
ECTS: 3

Termine:
wöchentlich Do 10:15 - 11:45 SuUB 4320 (Studio II Medienraum ) (2 SWS)

SUMMARY
ULS 1 is the first half of the 'SP-1Sprachpraxis Basismodul' introductory module. As such, it lays the foundations on which you build in ULS 2 during the summer semester.

ULS 1 requires you to use English in an academic context at university level. The emphasis is on audience focus, especially with regard to academic writing. Learning how to plan and structure your essay prior to the actual writing process is the first step. You will learn to see writing as a recursive process, which not only includes planning, pre-writing and writing but also editing and revising your texts. Consequently, you will be expanding your English language skills regarding grammar, vocabulary, and register to be able to produce text in a convincing and persuasive academic style; some short quizzes help you check your progress. Finally, in-class discussions of (your) texts, group work, and peer feedback on writing assignments allow you to practise all four language skills.

The first class meeting will provide you with information regarding class requirements, books and other material you will be working with during the semester to support your language-learning process. Hand out material will be made available via StudIP; the textbooks we will work with in ULS 1 are entitled 'What's the Difference?' and 'English Collocations in Use'. What's the Difference is available for sale from all practical-language teachers; "Collocations" is available at the University bookstore.

To earn credit for the SP-1 module (9 CP in total), you are required to earn a minimum of 60% or more on the written assignments given in both ULS 1 (1000 words; 3 CP) and ULS 2 (2000 words; 6 CP) respectively.

N.B.:
1) This course is not open to ERASMUS students below a B2 English level.
2) Students in situations of exceptional hardship (who can indeed only take part in a specific class) are asked to contact the teacher directly. Please do so well BEFORE the end of the registration procedure (i.e. BEFORE October 14, 2016). You will need to provide proof of the time conflict you have.

REGISTRATION
Via Stud.IP
Advance registration deadlines on Stud.IP:
For courses offered in the winter term: September, 15th
For courses offered for first semester students: last Friday before the start of the lecture period.

Stud.IP registration
1. In order to register via Stud.IP, it is imperative that your personal settings on the platform indicate that you are an English-Speaking Cultures student.
For detailed instructions in regard to how to set this up, please see: https://elearning.uni-bremen.de/
Click on: “Stud.IP –FAQ,” scroll down to and then click on “Stud.IP für Studierende…” and follow the instructions provided under “Sie belegen leider keinen passenden Studiengang!”
2. Students who have missed the the deadline on 14th October need to check Stud.IP for classes which have places aavailable, and go to the session in the first week of teaching.

3. Should you not receive a seat in your class of choice on October 13th, all is not lost. Please proceed by first consulting StudIP to determine where seats remain available. (By simply clicking on the link to each respective parallel class and scrolling down to the "Number of Participants" section, one can see how many seats remain open.) [Comment by Michael: select one of those classes where there ARE still places available, come to the class meeting in the first week of teaching, and then make sure you FORMALLY register for that class.]

Katja Müller, M.A.
10-76-1-SP1-05 University Language Skills 1e (in englischer Sprache)

Übung

Termine:
wöchentlich Mo 14:15 - 15:45 GW2 A4020 (2 SWS)

ULS 1 and ULS 2 together form the SP-1 'Basismodul', the practical-language module of your first year of the E-SC BA degree. ULS 1 (Winter Semester) lays the foundations on which you build in ULS 2 (Summer Semester). Successful completion of ULS 1, where we meet once a week for 90 minutes, involves some 90 hours of work and earns you 3 Credit Points; in ULS 2, we meet twice a week for 90 minutes each, you do some 180 hours of work, and can earn 6 Credit Points.

The 'mantra' for ULS 1 is "audience focus": How to write a good academic essay that gets your 'message' across to your reader in an easy-to-understand manner, provides the necessary supporting information and examples, and makes your view persuasive and convincing. We will explore various aspects of essay-writing: collecting information and ideas; organizing and planning your essay; writing it; editing and revising it - all with your potential reader in mind. Finally, in-class discussions of (your) texts, group work, and peer feedback on writing assignments allow you to practise all four language skills. We will also work on expanding and developing your English-language resources, so that you are in a position to select the most appropriate formulation from a wide range at your disposal.
To earn credit for the SP-1 module (9 CP in total), you are required to earn a minimum of 60% or more on the tests and the written assignments given in both ULS 1 (1000 words; 3 CP) and ULS 2 (2000 words; 6 CP) respectively.
At the first class meeting you will be provided with information regarding class requirements, as well as the books and other material you will be working with during the semester to support your language learning process.
Registration for this ULS1 class: There will initially be 17 places open for this class, allocated on a random basis. Register in Stud.IP for the class by 6 p.m. on Thursday, 13th October, following these instructions (quoted from the module co-ordinator, Penelope Murdock):
‘1. In order to register via Stud.IP, it is imperative that your personal settings on the platform indicate that you are an English-Speaking Cultures student. For detailed instructions in regard to how to set this up, please see: https://elearning.uni-bremen.de/
Click on: “Stud.IP –FAQ,” scroll down to and then click on “Stud.IP für Studierende…” and follow the instructions provided under “Sie belegen leider keinen passenden Studiengang!”
2. Once the registration process ends on October 13, 2016, you will automatically be notified (via Stud.IP) whether you have a seat in your group of choice.
3. IMPORTANT NOTE: Those students in situations of exceptional hardship (who can truly only take part in a specific group despite the other parallel sections) are asked to contact the class instructor [i.e. me! Michael] directly. Where feasible, please do so BEFORE the end of the registration procedure (i.e. BEFORE October 13, 2016). In such situations, you will be given the opportunity to plead your case (provide proof of the conflict you have) and an effort will be made to accommodate your request where feasible.
4. Should you not receive a seat in your class of choice on October 13th, all is not lost. Please proceed by first consulting StudIP to determine where seats remain available. (By simply clicking on the link to each respective parallel class and scrolling down to the "Number of Participants" section, one can see how many seats remain open.) [Comment by Michael: select one of those classes where there ARE still places available, come to the class meeting in the first week of teaching, and then make sure you FORMALLY register for that class by doing as follows:] Then, on Friday October 21, 2016 (time and location to be announced) you will have an opportunity to register for those classes which are not yet full.
Should you have any other questions, comments, or concerns, please contact the SP-1 module coordinator: Ms. Penelope Murdock (murdock@uni-bremen.de).’

Michael Claridge, M.A., Dip.Ed.
10-76-1-SP1-06 University Language Skills 1f (in englischer Sprache)

Übung

Termine:
wöchentlich Do 16:15 - 17:45 SFG 2020 (2 SWS)

ULS 1 and ULS 2 together form the SP-1 'Basismodul', the practical-language module of your first year of the E-SC BA degree. ULS 1 (Winter Semester) lays the foundations on which you build in ULS 2 (Summer Semester). Successful completion of ULS 1, where we meet once a week for 90 minutes, involves some 90 hours of work and earns you 3 Credit Points; in ULS 2, we meet twice a week for 90 minutes each, you do some 180 hours of work, and can earn 6 Credit Points.

The 'mantra' for ULS 1 is "audience focus": How to write a good academic essay that gets your 'message' across to your reader in an easy-to-understand manner, provides the necessary supporting information and examples, and makes your view persuasive and convincing. We will explore various aspects of essay-writing: collecting information and ideas; organizing and planning your essay; writing it; editing and revising it - all with your potential reader in mind. Finally, in-class discussions of (your) texts, group work, and peer feedback on writing assignments allow you to practise all four language skills. We will also work on expanding and developing your English-language resources, so that you are in a position to select the most appropriate formulation from a wide range at your disposal.
To earn credit for the SP-1 module (9 CP in total), you are required to earn a minimum of 60% or more on the tests and the written assignments given in both ULS 1 (1000 words; 3 CP) and ULS 2 (2000 words; 6 CP) respectively.
At the first class meeting you will be provided with information regarding class requirements, as well as the books and other material you will be working with during the semester to support your language learning process.
Registration for this ULS1 class: There will initially be 17 places open for this class, allocated on a random basis. Register in Stud.IP for the class by 6 p.m. on Thursday, 13th October, following these instructions (quoted from the module co-ordinator, Penelope Murdock):
‘1. In order to register via Stud.IP, it is imperative that your personal settings on the platform indicate that you are an English-Speaking Cultures student. For detailed instructions in regard to how to set this up, please see: https://elearning.uni-bremen.de/
Click on: “Stud.IP –FAQ,” scroll down to and then click on “Stud.IP für Studierende…” and follow the instructions provided under “Sie belegen leider keinen passenden Studiengang!”
2. Once the registration process ends on October 13, 2016, you will automatically be notified (via Stud.IP) whether you have a seat in your group of choice.
3. IMPORTANT NOTE: Those students in situations of exceptional hardship (who can truly only take part in a specific group despite the other parallel sections) are asked to contact the class instructor [i.e. me! Michael] directly. Where feasible, please do so BEFORE the end of the registration procedure (i.e. BEFORE October 13, 2016). In such situations, you will be given the opportunity to plead your case (provide proof of the conflict you have) and an effort will be made to accommodate your request where feasible.
4. Should you not receive a seat in your class of choice on October 13th, all is not lost. Please proceed by first consulting StudIP to determine where seats remain available. (By simply clicking on the link to each respective parallel class and scrolling down to the "Number of Participants" section, one can see how many seats remain open.) [Comment by Michael: select one of those classes where there ARE still places available, come to the class meeting in the first week of teaching, and then make sure you FORMALLY register for that class by doing as follows:] Then, on Friday October 21, 2016 (time and location to be announced) you will have an opportunity to register for those classes which are not yet full.
Should you have any other questions, comments, or concerns, please contact the SP-1 module coordinator: Ms. Penelope Murdock (murdock@uni-bremen.de).’

Michael Claridge, M.A., Dip.Ed.
10-76-1-SP1-07 University Language Skills 1g (in englischer Sprache)

Übung
ECTS: 3

Termine:
wöchentlich Mi 16:15 - 17:45 GW2 A4020 (2 SWS)

ULS 1 and ULS 2 together form the SP-1 'Basismodul', the practical-language module of your first year of the E-SC BA degree. ULS 1 (Winter Semester) lays the foundations on which you build in ULS 2 (Summer Semester). Successful completion of ULS 1, where we meet once a week for 90 minutes, involves some 90 hours of work and earns you 3 Credit Points; in ULS 2, we meet twice a week for 90 minutes each, you do some 180 hours of work, and can earn 6 Credit Points.
To earn credit for the SP-1 module (9 CP in total), you are required to earn a minimum of 60% or more on the tests and the written assignments given in both ULS 1 (1000 words; 3 CP) and ULS 2 (2000 words; 6 CP) respectively.

The purpose of ULS 1 is to introduce you to the skill of writing academic essays. You will learn that writing is a process which consists of different steps, including planning, pre-writing, writing, editing and revising. We will be focusing on how to structure a good academic text and how to develop relevent, interesting and coherent ideas. This process will call on you to review your own language and style, learning how to identify your challenges and work on them both independently and in class. In this way, you can expand your language skills while learning to write coherently, convincingly and with the necessary reader focus.
Literature: Required hand out material will be made available via StudIP; the textbooks we will work with in ULS 1 are entitled "What’s the Difference" and "English Collocations in Use". What's the Difference is available for sale from all practical-language teachers; "Collocations" is available at the University bookstore.
Erasmus students are welcome to join the class as long as they have can demonstrate a B2 level.
Registration to be completed via StudIP by Friday 14th October 2016 10 am.

Lisa Nehls
10-76-1-SP1-08 University Language Skills 1h (in englischer Sprache)

Übung
ECTS: 3

Termine:
wöchentlich Fr 10:00 - 12:00 SFG 2030 GW2 B3010 (Kleiner Studierraum)

ULS 1 and ULS 2 together form the SP-1 'Basismodul', the practical-language module of your first year of the E-SC BA degree. ULS 1 (Winter Semester) lays the foundations on which you build in ULS 2 (Summer Semester). Successful completion of ULS 1, where we meet once a week for 90 minutes, involves some 90 hours of work and earns you 3 Credit Points; in ULS 2, we meet twice a week for 90 minutes each, you do some 180 hours of work, and can earn 6 Credit Points.
To earn credit for the SP-1 module (9 CP in total), you are required to earn a minimum of 60% or more on the tests and the written assignments given in both ULS 1 (1000 words; 3 CP) and ULS 2 (2000 words; 6 CP) respectively.

The purpose of ULS 1 is to introduce you to the skill of writing academic essays. You will learn that writing is a process which consists of different steps, including planning, pre-writing, writing, editing and revising. We will be focusing on how to structure a good academic text and how to develop relevent, interesting and coherent ideas. This process will call on you to review your own language and style, learning how to identify your challenges and work on them both independently and in class. In this way, you can expand your language skills while learning to write coherently, convincingly and with the necessary reader focus.
Literature: Required hand out material will be made available via StudIP; the textbooks we will work with in ULS 1 are entitled "What’s the Difference" and "English Collocations in Use". What's the Difference is available for sale from all practical-language teachers; "Collocations" is available at the University bookstore.
Erasmus students are welcome to join the class as long as they have can demonstrate a B2 level.
Registration to be completed via StudIP by Friday 14th October 2016 10 am.

Lisa Nehls
10-76-1-SP1-09 University Language Skills 1i (in englischer Sprache)

Übung
ECTS: 3

Termine:
wöchentlich Do 10:15 - 11:45 GW1 A0010 (2 SWS)

ULS 1 and ULS 2 together form the SP-1 'Basismodul', the practical-language module of your first year of the E-SC BA degree. ULS 1 (Winter Semester) lays the foundations on which you build in ULS 2 (Summer Semester). Successful completion of ULS 1, where we meet once a week for 90 minutes, involves some 90 hours of work and earns you 3 Credit Points; in ULS 2, we meet twice a week for 90 minutes each, you do some 180 hours of work, and can earn 6 Credit Points.
To earn credit for the SP-1 module (9 CP in total), you are required to earn a minimum of 60% or more on the tests and the written assignments given in both ULS 1 (1000 words; 3 CP) and ULS 2 (2000 words; 6 CP) respectively.

The purpose of ULS 1 is to introduce you to the skill of writing academic essays. You will learn that writing is a process which consists of different steps, including planning, pre-writing, writing, editing and revising. We will be focusing on how to structure a good academic text and how to develop relevent, interesting and coherent ideas. This process will call on you to review your own language and style, learning how to identify your challenges and work on them both independently and in class. In this way, you can expand your language skills while learning to write coherently, convincingly and with the necessary reader focus.
Literature: Required hand out material will be made available via StudIP; the textbooks we will work with in ULS 1 are entitled "What’s the Difference" and "English Collocations in Use". What's the Difference is available for sale from all practical-language teachers; "Collocations" is available at the University bookstore.
Erasmus students are welcome to join the class as long as they have can demonstrate a B2 level.
Registration to be completed via StudIP by Friday 14th October 2016 10 am.

Lisa Nehls
10-76-1-SP1-10 University Language Skills 1j (in englischer Sprache)

Übung

Termine:
wöchentlich Mo 08:15 - 09:45 GW1 B2130 - gesperrt ab 01.10. - (Ersatz A1260) (2 SWS)
Anne Kirkham, M.A.
10-76-1-SP1-11 University Language Skills 1k (in englischer Sprache)

Übung

Termine:
wöchentlich Mo 10:15 - 11:45 GW1 A0150 (2 SWS)
Anne Kirkham, M.A.
10-76-1-SP1-12 University Language Skills 1m (in englischer Sprache)

Übung

Termine:
wöchentlich Mo 12:15 - 13:45 GW1 A0150 (2 SWS)
Anne Kirkham, M.A.
Dr. Penelope A. Murdock

LEHRVERANSTALTUNGEN DES 2. JAHRES (PO 2011)

D-1a: Aufbaumodul (6 CP) (nur für das Wintersemester)

Literatur- und Sprachwissenschaft (3 CP + 3 CP) (1PL = Term paper/Hausarbeit)

Es gilt zu beachten: Laut SK-Beschluss (E-SC) vom 21.11.2012 ist die Pruefungsleistung im Bereich "Key Topics in Literature" zu erbringen = Schriftliche Hausarbeit/Term paper.

Modulbeauftragte/r: Prof. Dr. Sabine Broeck, broeck@uni-bremen.de
VAK Titel der Veranstaltung DozentIn
10-76-3-D1-01 Key Topics in Linguistics: Comparing British and American English (in englischer Sprache)

Seminar

Termine:
wöchentlich Di 10:15 - 11:45 GW2 A3390 (CIP-Labor FB 10) (2 SWS)

“England and America are two nations divided by a common language.” (George Bernard Shaw)

This seminar explores the linguistic differences between the two main reference varieties of English, British English (BrE) and American English (AmE). We will examine these differences on various levels of language use, e.g. phonology, spelling, vocabulary, phraseology, grammar, and pragmatics. We will also look at the assumed widespread influence of AmE in terms of an “Americanization” of orther varieites of English. In addition, we will investigate patterns of language change in the two varieties under study. In the course of the seminar students will carry out small-scale empricial research projects based on computer corpora to examine differences between BrE and AmE in a data-driven, empirical way.

READING
The course will not be based on one single textbook, but key readings will be made available on an electronic bookshelf on the university’s e-learning platform Stud.IP.
Preparatory reading before the first meeting (available as PDF on Stud.IP after registration): chapter 8 in Svartvik, Jan & Geoffrey Leech (2006), English. One Tongue, Many Voices. Basingstoke: Palgrave Macmillan.

ASSESSMENT
  • regular attendance and active participation in in-class data analysis and discussion
  • careful reading and preparation of assigned readings for each session, reading assignments
  • oral presentation and/or term paper

Prof. Dr. Marcus Callies
10-76-3-D1-03 Key Topics in Linguistics: Pragmatics (in englischer Sprache)

Seminar

Termine:
wöchentlich Fr 10:15 - 11:45 GW2 A3340 GW1 C1070 (2 SWS)

For communication to be successful, it is not enough to know the meaning of words. We also need to understand what a speaker or writer meant to say with these words. This only works if we share assumptions and expectations with the speaker or writer. As Yule (2006) puts it, "Pragmatics is the study of 'invisible' meaning, or how we recognize what is meant even when it isn't actually said or written". In this class, we will take a look at speech acts (Austin 1962), the cooperative principle (Grice 1975), positive and negative face, implicature, presupposition, reference and information structure. After getting familiar with the concepts, we will conduct our own small-scale studies. At the end of the semester, you will know how the magic works: Not only how to do things with words, better still, how to do things without words.

Requirements
Regular attendance, active participation in class, weekly reading assignments and exercises.
BA ESC D 1a Presentation (unbenotete Studienleistung)
BA ESC D 1c Term paper (benotete Prüfungsleistung)

Recommended Literature (no need to buy any)
Archer, Dawn & Karin Aijmer & Anne Wichmann. 2012. Pragmatics: An Advanced Resource Book for Students. London: Routledge.
Cutting, Joan. 2015. Pragmatics: A Resource Book for Students. 3rd ed. Routledge.
Horn, Laurence & Gregory Ward (eds.). 2004. The Handbook of Pragmatics. Oxford; Malden MA: Blackwell.
O’Keeffe, Anne & Brian Clancy & Svenja Adolphs. 2011. Introducing Pragmatics in Use. Routledge.

Dr. Anke Schulz
10-76-3-D1-04 Key Topics in Linguistics: Language and Gender (in englischer Sprache)

Seminar

Termine:
wöchentlich Mo 12:15 - 13:45 GW2 B3010 (Kleiner Studierraum) (2 SWS)

This course will deal with the principles underlying language use, with a specific focus on differences and the construction of gender and sexual orientation. We will learn that gender is seen as a dichotomy in some research such as sociolinguistics and that other research claims that gender interactional patterns are not a reflection of the individual’s nature but rather of some performance that the individual is accomplishing. According to this view, "gender is doing, not being." But also there is more to know about the different research methodologies of language, sex and gender categories. These include Sociolinguistics, Conversation analysis, Corpus linguistics, Critical discourse analysis, Discursive Psychology, Feminist Post-Structuralist Discourse Analysis and Queer Theory. Subsequently, students will be required to develop a project of their own, analysing the language used by people of different gender, sex or sexual orientation in a particular communication situation of their own choice.

Dr. Inke Du Bois
10-76-3-D1-05 Key Topics in Linguistics: Applied Linguistics (in englischer Sprache)

Seminar

Termine:
wöchentlich Mi 08:30 - 10:00 GW2 B2890 (2 SWS)

Applied linguistics involves „the theoretical and empirical investigation of real-world problems in which language is a central issue“ (Brumfit 1995:27).
Even though language teaching and learning is often seen as the core area of applied linguistics, in this class we want to focus on some of the other branches. One area where language may create, or solve, problems is its use in forming and maintaining public opinion. The UK’s newspapers’ contribution to the outcome of the Brexit vote is certainly an impressive example. Another area is the use of language by criminals, in police investigations and in court; this is the area of forensic linguistics.
In this class, you get to know the basic theoretical concepts of applied linguistics. You will learn to choose the appropriate method for answering different research questions, e.g. questionnaires, interviews or corpus studies. Finally, you will practice your skills as researchers by conducting a study of your own favourite real-world language problem.

Requirements
Regular attendance, active participation in class, weekly reading assignments, possibly some exercises.
BA ESC D 1a Portfolio (unbenotete Studienleistung)
BA ESC D 1c Term paper (benotete Prüfungsleistung)

Recommended literature (no need to buy any)
Coffin, Caroline & Theresa Lillis & Kieran O’Halloran. 2010. Applied Linguistics Methods: A Reader. London; New York: Routledge.
Cook, Guy & Sarah North. 2010. Applied Linguistics in Action: A Reader. London; New York: Routledge.
Hunston, Susan & David Oakey. 2010. Introducing Applied Linguistics: Concepts and Skills. London; New York: Routledge.
Loewen, Shawn & Luke Plonsky. 2016. An A-Z of Applied Linguistics Research Methods. London; New York: Palgrave Macmillan.
Olsson, John. 2004. Forensic Linguistics: An Introduction to Language, Crime and the Law. London; New York: Continuum.

Dr. Anke Schulz
10-76-3-D1-06 Key Topics in Linguistics: Grammar-based methods for textual analysis and critical reading (in englischer Sprache)

Seminar

Termine:
wöchentlich Mo 14:15 - 15:45 GW2 B3009 (Großer Studierraum) GW2 B3010 (Kleiner Studierraum) (2 SWS)
Prof. John Arnold Bateman, Ph.D.
10-76-3-D1/WD1-08 Key Topics in Literature: Transmedial and Transmedia Storytelling: The Case of Sherlock Holmes and Dr Watson (in englischer Sprache)

Seminar

Termine:
wöchentlich Do 12:15 - 13:45 GW2 B3010 (Kleiner Studierraum) (2 SWS) Seminar

Sir Arthur Conan Doyle (1859-1930) as highly prolific and technologically minded author, produced an impressive body of work including plays, romances, poetry, non-fiction, science fiction stories and historical novels, in addition to his collections of detective fiction stories featuring the most memorable and certainly best known of the epistemological detectives, Sherlock Holmes. Since his first public appearance in the A Study in Scarlet (1887), a global audience continues to enjoy the adventures and living habits of the eccentric persona of the detective. This immense popularity was not only further spurned by the corpus of non-canonical Sherlock Holmes works and several fictional biographies, chronologies of Holmes’s life and the London of Sherlock Holmes, but most prominently by the character’s effortless shift from page to stage, to radio and to screen, in other words, the process of storytelling, canonical or non-canonical, across various media and genres, such as film, animated film, TV series, radio plays, audio books, graphic novels, cartoons, and video games, constituting the transmedial world of Sherlock Holmes. Every subsequent media shift (written to audio-visual) or retelling of the Sherlock Holmes prose narratives as filmic narratives offered its makers and producers multifarious ways of manipulating and shaping what Stephen Knight termed “the traditional image of Sherlock Holmes”: “[the]deerstalker hat, a checked Inverness cape, large curved pipe and a magnifying glass” (368).

Divided into four areas of critical inquiry (novel, feature film, TV series and graphic novel), and drawing equally on traditional as well as contemporary ideas, that have emerged in the fields of crime fiction, (post) classical and transmedial narratology, filmic and television storytelling, Transmedia Fandom and Comics studies, we will trace the transformation of our cherished key figures, discuss the effects of audience participation and explore the nature of narrative, in general, and that of the analytical detective fiction narrative, in particular (plot, character and space) in differing media and genre formats.

Since some of the participants are required to submit a research-based term paper, we will use parts of our seminar discussions to the development of topics, the formulation of a thesis statement, as well as considerations about the methodological approaches of writing such a paper.

For Non-E-SC students and academic exchange students: Please contact your lecturer if you require more than 3 credit points.

Additional secondary sources can be accessed in the "Semesterapparat", a reference only section on the third floor of the library building. A number of DVDs will be available in the “Semesterapparat” in the “Mediathek”, located on the fourth floor of the library building: http://www.suub.uni-bremen.de/standorte/zentrale/mediathek/.
For the availability of primary sources, please check the “Information” section on Stud.IP. A reader with selected secondary text materials will be made available for download on Stud. IP. You may wish to check the learning compact for further details such as requirements, weekly schedule, select bibliography and modes of assessment ("Allgemeiner Dateiordner" on Stud. IP).

Please note that prior enrolment via Stud.IP is mandatory. Deadline: 15 September 2016.
Assessment:

• regular attendance, informed participation in class discussion,
• in-depth knowledge of the selected reading material,
• homework assignments,
• presentation of research paper or group project,
• term paper.

The requirements as formulated above may vary depending on your overall degree program.

E-SC students - Please check the departmental website for guidelines on modules and exams: http://www.fb10.uni-bremen.de/anglistik/ba2/profil/studienplan.aspx

Please be familiar with the following materials:

Novel/Short Story

Doyle, Arthur C. "A Study in Scarlet”. Sherlock Holmes: The Complete Illustrated Novels. (Italics) London: Chancellor Press, 1987. 1-108. Print.

---."A Scandal in Bohemia”. Sherlock Holmes: The Complete Illustrated Short Stories. (Italics) London: Chancellor Press, 1985. 9-28. Print.

Feature Film

Sherlock Holmes (Italics) (USA, D 2009). Director: Guy Ritchie. Warner 2010. DVD.

TV Series

Elementary (Italics) – Season 1. (US, CBS 2012). Created by Robert Doherty. DVD.

Sherlock (Italics) – Season 1. (UK, BBC 2010). "A Study in Pink”, “The Blind Banker“, “The Great Game”. Created by Mark Gatiss and Steven Moffat. DVD.

Graphic Novel

Doyle, Arthur C. A Study in Scarlet. A Sherlock Holmes Graphic Novel. (Italics) Illustrated by I.N.J. Culbard. Text adapted by Ian Edington. New York City: Sterling (Reprint Edition), 2010. Print.

Dr. Jana Nittel
10-76-3-D1/WD1-10 Key Topics in Literature: New American Classics (in englischer Sprache)

Seminar

Termine:
wöchentlich Do 14:15 - 15:45 GRA2 0080 (2 SWS) Seminar

Einzeltermine:
Mo 16.01.17 16:00 - 20:30 GW1 B0100

This seminar will be an excursion into close reading, and lots of it. We will read and study a series of post-2000 US American novels which have been nominees or winners in prestigious literary contests, such as the Pulitzer Price - thus, new "classics". Reading all the texts, preferably before semester beginning, will be a prerequisite; we will study them together in class, based on group or individual student presentations of each one. Which, and whose AMERICA do these novels represent? Which paradigmatic conflicts do they commit to cultural memory with their writing? Which contemporary or historical features of US American life and society do they draw readers' attention to? Can we discern shared aesthetic features of these texts?
The texts are, in no particular order:
Marilynne Robinson, Lila
Jesmyn Ward, Salvage the Bones
Chimamanda Adichie, Americanah
Richard Ford, Let Me Be Frank With You
Margaret Verble, Maud's Line
Maceo Montoya, The Deportation of Wopper Barraza: A Novel
David Anthony Durham, Walk Through Darkness

Prof. Dr. Sabine Bröck
10-76-3-D1/WD1-11 Key Topics in Literature: The Fabric of Slavery (in englischer Sprache)

Seminar

Termine:
wöchentlich Di 14:15 - 15:45 GW1 B1070 GW2 A3570 (FB 10 Besprechungsraum) (2 SWS) Seminar

Einzeltermine:
Mo 30.01.17 17:00 - 20:00 GW2 B1216

This is part one of a two semester class; each class may be taken separately, however. This winter semester we will, based on a general introduction to the history of New World enslavement, as well as on an introduction into the theory of representation (see Stuart Hall) watch and study three recent, very different films about modern enslavement:

Tarantino's Django Unchained
McQueen's 12 Years A Slave
and Asante's Belle.

While we will try our very best to avoid voyeuristic titillation, please come prepared to watch material, and talk about it which contains graphic images of violence against Black people. One of the main goals of the seminar will be, precisely, to ask which function does any representation of anti-black violence serve; which, and whose interests benefit, and what happens to different constitutions in the course of studying it? Which effect, on the contrary, does the avoidance of such representation have on viewers, and how does this evasion work?

Please read as prerequisite:
1. Hall, Stuart. "The Work of Representation." in Representation: Cultural Representations and Signifying Practices. ed. Stuart Hall. London: Sage, 1997. 1-74.
2. Kenneth Morgan, Transatlantic Slavery. Padstow,: T. J. International, 2016 ( a one-volume 180 pages concise history of slavery)

Further secondary material will be brought into class in the context of our debates.

Prof. Dr. Sabine Bröck
10-76-3-D1/WD1-12 Key Topics in Literature: Anatomy and Power in Jonathan Swift's Gulliver's Travels (in englischer Sprache)

Seminar

Termine:
wöchentlich Di 14:15 - 15:45 SuUB 4330 (Studio I Medienraum ) (2 SWS) Seminar

Most of us are familiar with the voyages of Lemuel Gulliver who heads out to the South Sea and is washed up on Lilliput, an island inhabited by tiny people who capture him. Gulliver eventually becomes friends with the Emperor of the Lilliputians whose customs he learns and wars he participates in. After a series of threats he escapes and returns to England. Only few know, that Gulliver is not only a surgeon, but travels to more islands including Broddingnag and its giants; Laputa, a floating island full of people only interested in mathematics and music; Glubbdubdrib and Luggnagg, islands of sorcerers and immortals; and finally the island of the beastly Yahoos and the horse-friendly Houyhnhnms.

Swift’s masterpiece is a well-known satire and mocks both human nature as well as travel literature – a highly popular genre in eighteenth-century Britain. Gulliver’s Travels is concerned with man’s intellectual pride and pretensions to reason while also addressing particularly scientific discoveries and developments. What this seminar focusses on are observations of the human body in Swift’s prose satire. Scholars agree on the blatant misogyny present in his text which manifests especially in Gulliver’s disgusted descriptions of female bodies or parts of it he comes across ranging from a nurse’s huge breast and nipple to a sexual encounter he has with one of the beast-like Yahoos.

The aim of this course is to shed light on discourses of gender and the female body apparent in eighteenth-century literature in order to examine if and how representations of anatomy are linked with patriarchal power structures.

Keywords: Body Studies, Gender Studies, Satire, History of Science, Medical Humanities, Adaptation Studies, Eighteenth-Century

Requirements:
• registration on Stud.IP
• in-depth knowledge of the reading material (i.e. read the novel[s] in advance!)*
• regular attendance and oral participation
• oral presentation and handout
• term paper (optional)

*NOTE: YOUR FAMILIARITY WITH THE PRIMARY TEXT(S) IS MANDATORY AND WILL BE EXAMINED IN ONE OF THE FIRST SESSIONS***

Text:
Swift, Jonathan [1726]. Gulliver’s Travels (Norton Critical Edition). New York: Norton, 2002.*

*NOTE: Please pay attention to the EXACT publication dates when purchasing the book(s) so we can all work with the same editions.

Dr. phil. Jennifer Henke
10-76-3-D1/WD1-13 Key Topics in Literature: Narratives of Illness (in englischer Sprache)

Seminar

Termine:
wöchentlich Fr 14:15 - 15:45 SFG 1060 Dezernetenbesprechnungsraum (2 SWS) Seminar

The purpose of this seminar is to introduce students to the flourishing genre of illness narratives. In recent decades, more and more literary and non-literary texts depict the experience of illness and its effects on people's lives. This course will use fictional writings (e.g. poems, short stories, and excerpts from novels) as well as autobiographical accounts by actual patients, family members, or healthcare professionals to explore the physical, psychological, and emotional aspects of a patient's, doctor's, or relative's experience of such conditions as Alzheimer's, cancer, or AIDS.

In addition to an in-depth analysis and interpretation of the selected texts, we will look at illness narratives in the context of the history of medicine, medical humanities, narrative medicine, literary history, body studies, life writing, and gender theory.

Requirements:
- regular attendance and active participation
- in-depth knowledge of the reading material
- presentation (and handout) and/or final paper

A detailed syllabus will be handed out in the first session.

Texts:

Please make sure that you purchase exactly the copies given below, so that we can all work with the same edition.

Edson, Margaret. Wit. New York: Faber and Faber, 1999. ISBN: 978-0-571-19877-1.
Kalanithi, Paul. When Breath Becomes Air. London: The Bodley Head, 2016. ISBN: 978-1-847-92367-7.

Additional primary texts and secondary materials will be made available on Stud.IP.

Please note that prior enrolment via Stud.IP is mandatory.

Christine Müller, M.A.
10-M83-2-P1-3 Key Topics in Literature: Travel Writing: Texts, Contexts, Criticism (in englischer Sprache)

Seminar

Termine:
wöchentlich Di 16:15 - 17:45 GW2 B3010 (Kleiner Studierraum) (2 SWS)

Travel writing is an increasingly popular genre in terms of text production and commercial success, encompassing a fascinating diversity of literary forms, modes and itineraries which negate a forthright definition of the genre. As a repository for factual and fictional accounts of mobility and cross-cultural exchange, however, it has long been underestimated for its potential to contribute to a broad range of cultural, political and historical debates that seek to reassess the role of travel writing as a "vehicle for geographic, ethnographic and sociological knowledge." (Thompson 4). This course is designed to introduce students to the comprehensive history of this dynamic and complex genre within the socio-cultural framework of the English-speaking world. We will trace recurrent literary conventions, themes, motifs, functions and concerns in historical and contemporary travel narratives in English by various key contributors and engage with textual and contextual approaches. Since some of the participants are required to submit a research paper, we will use parts of our seminar discussions to the development of topics, the formulation of a thesis statement, as well as considerations about the methodological approaches of writing such a paper.

For Non-E-SC students and academic exchange students: Please contact your lecturer if you require more than 3 credit points.

Additional secondary sources can be accessed in the "Semesterapparat", a reference only section on the third floor of the library building. A reader with selected secondary text materials will be made available for download on Stud. IP. You may wish to check the learning compact for further details such as requirements, weekly schedule, select bibliography and modes of assessment ("Allgemeiner Dateiordner" on Stud. IP).

Please note that prior enrolment via Stud.IP is mandatory. Deadline: 15 September 2016.

Assessment:

regular attendance, informed participation in class discussion,
in-depth knowledge of the selected reading material,
homework assignments,
presentation of research paper or group project,
term paper.

The requirements as formulated above may vary depending on your overall degree program. E-SC students - Please check the departmental website for guidelines on modules and exams: http://www.fb10.uni-bremen.de/anglistik/ba2/profil/studienplan.aspx
MA TnL module: http://www.master-transnationale-literaturwissenschaft.uni-bremen.de/studium/modulbeschreibungen/

Required reading before the first session (you need a copy for class):

Thompson, Carl. Travel Writing (Italics). London: Routledge, 2011. Print.

Copies can be purchased at the bookstore on our campus (Universitätsbuchhandlung Bremen: www.unibuch-bremen.de)

Dr. Jana Nittel
10-M83-2-P3-1 Key Topics in Cultural History: Shakespeare on Screen (in englischer Sprache)
(also Key Topics in Literature)

Seminar

Termine:
wöchentlich Di 14:15 - 15:45 GW2 B3010 (Kleiner Studierraum) (2 SWS)

In 2016, the year marking the 400th anniversary of Shakespeare’s death, Shakespeare’s plays are as enticing to filmmakers and visual artists as they were in 1899 when the first Shakespeare film was screened. Since then the number of filmic contributions has increased steadily. Divided into three projects depending on the choice of play (Hamlet, Macbeth and Othello) and drawing equally on traditional as well as contemporary ideas, that have emerged in the fields of cultural studies, transnational film, world cinema as well as filmic and television storytelling, we will explore how three plays by William Shakespeare are re-imagined in different linguistic and cultural contexts in selected late 20th Century and post-2000 productions. Focusing on traditional as well as contemporary stories/modern updates course participants will be encouraged to investigate these films’ engagement with sexuality and gender, race and ethnicity and questions of power. In addition, the course is designed to introduce its participants to key terms and functional principles of filmic storytelling: Film editing and its functions, mise en scène (modification of space), cinematography (light and colour), camera usage as well as plot, character, and filmic space; the nature of narrative in film and its dramatic composition (composition, narration and focalisation). We may also engage with the following questions: What specific, distinguishable filmic distinctions guide viewers’ constructions of reading hypotheses? How do filmic cues guide the perception of the audience?
Since some of the participants are required to submit a research-based term paper, we will use parts of our seminar discussions to the development of topics, the formulation of a thesis statement, as well as considerations about the methodological approaches of writing such a paper.

Electronic resources for independent study:

Jahn, Manfred. 2003. A Guide to Narratological Film Analysis. Poems, Plays, and Prose: A Guide to the Theory of Literary Genres. English Department, University of Cologne. http://www.uni-koeln.de/~ame02/pppf.htm

Jahn, Manfred. 2003. A Guide to the Theory of Drama. Part II of Poems, Plays, and Prose: A Guide to the Theory of Literary Genres. English Department, University of Cologne. http://www.uni-koeln.de/~ame02/pppd.htm
Lexikon der Filmbegriffe: http://filmlexikon.uni-kiel.de/index.php?action=lexikon

For Non-E-SC students and academic exchange students: Please contact your lecturer if you require more than 3 credit points.

Additional secondary sources can be accessed in the "Semesterapparat", a reference only section on the third floor of the library building. A number of DVDs will be available in the “Semesterapparat” in the “Mediathek”, located on the fourth floor of the library building: http://www.suub.uni-bremen.de/standorte/zentrale/mediathek/.

Please note that prior enrolment via Stud.IP is mandatory. Deadline: 15 September 2016.

Assessment:

regular attendance, informed participation in class discussion,

in-depth knowledge of the selected reading material,

homework assignments,

presentation of research paper or group project,

term paper.

The requirements as formulated above may vary depending on your overall degree program.

E-SC students - Please check the departmental website for guidelines on modules and exams: http://www.fb10.uni-bremen.de/anglistik/ba2/profil/studienplan.aspx

MA TnL module: http://www.master-transnationale-literaturwissenschaft.uni-bremen.de/studium/modulbeschreibungen/

Please be familiar with the following materials:

Filmography:

Hamlet. (Italics)(UK, US 1996) Dir. Kenneth Branagh

Hamlet. (Italics) (US, 2000) Dir. Michael Almereyda

Haider. (Italics) (India, 2014) Dir. Vishal Bhardwaj

Macbeth. (Italics) (US, 1948) Dir. Orson Welles (optional)

Throne of Blood. (Italics) (Japan, 1957). Dir. Akira Kurosawa

Maqbool. (Italics) (India, 2004) Dir. Vishal Bhardwaj

Macbeth. (Italics) (UK, 2015) Dir. Justin Kurzel

Othello. (Italics) (UK, US 1995) Dir. Oliver Parker

Othello. (Italics) (UK, 2001) Dir. Geoffrey Sax

Omkara. (Italics) (India, 2006) Dir. Vishal Bhardwaj

Dr. Jana Nittel

D-1b: Aufbaumodul (nur für das Wintersemester)

Literatur- und Kulturgeschichte (3 CP + 3 CP) (1PL = Term paper/Hausarbeit)

Es gilt zu beachten: Laut SK-Beschluss (E-SC) vom 21.11.2012 ist die Pruefungsleistung im Bereich "Key Topics in Cultural History" zu erbringen = Schriftliche Hausarbeit/Term paper.

Modulbeauftragte/r: Prof. Dr. Sabine Broeck, broeck@uni-bremen.de
VAK Titel der Veranstaltung DozentIn
10-76-3-D1/WD1-01 Key Topics in Cultural History: Documenting the US: Themes, Concepts and Skills (in englischer Sprache)

Seminar

Einzeltermine:
Mi 09.11.16 17:00 - 18:00 GW2 A3570 (FB 10 Besprechungsraum)
Fr 18.11.16 12:00 - 18:00 GW2 A4020
Sa 19.11.16 11:00 - 17:00 MZH 1470
Fr 02.12.16 12:00 - 18:00 SFG 2060
Sa 03.12.16 11:00 - 17:00 MZH 1470

In this course we will study various documentary sources such as films, web pages, photographs in order to learn more about significant events in the USA both contemporary and historical. Yet at the same time we will question the reliability and viability of the respective resources in order to strengthen our awareness of the limits inherent in the various documentary formats.
Essential readings will be available for download on Stud-IP. You should also consult the 'Semesterapparat' (SuUB) for further readings.
Requirements:
• regular attendance and oral participation
• in-depth knowledge of the reading material
• oral presentation and handout
• term paper (possible)
Please note that prior enrollment via Stud.IP is mandatory.

Dr. Karin Esders-Angermund
10-76-3-D1/WD1-02 Key Topics in Cultural History: Analyzing Hollywood Cinema (in englischer Sprache)

Seminar

Termine:
wöchentlich Do 14:15 - 15:45 GW2 B1632 (2 SWS)

This course is designed to introduce students to critical scholarship on US-American film history and culture. Basic introductions to the analytical categories of race, class, gender, and sexuality will help students to analyze how films construct and limit representations of African-Americans, Native Americans, women and femininity, men and masculinity, sexuality, class struggle and class difference.
The participation in the course “Viewing film critically” Tuesdays 18:00 (sharp) – 20:00 (General Studies / Schlüsselqualifikation / Global Education) is highly recommended because it offers full-length screenings of the films we will discuss in class. Otherwise you must watch the films individually; they will be made available at the beginning of the semester on a reserve shelf in the SuuB-Mediathek.
Our major textbook will be Benshoff and Griffin: America on film: Representing race, class, gender, and sexuality at the movies. (Purchase is is suggested.)
Essential readings will be available for download on Stud-IP. You should also consult the 'Semesterapparat' (SuUB) for further readings.
Requirements:
• regular attendance and oral participation
• in-depth knowledge of the reading material
• oral presentation and handout
Please note that prior enrollment via Stud.IP is mandatory.

Dr. Karin Esders-Angermund
10-76-3-D1/WD1-03 Key Topics in Cultural History: Black (and white) in the Union Jack (in englischer Sprache)

Seminar
ECTS: 3

Termine:
wöchentlich Di 16:15 - 17:45 SFG 1020 GW2 B1700 (2 SWS)

Taking its cue from Paul Gilroy’s famous observation, 'There ain’t no Black in the Union Jack‘, this seminar is going to explore the impact migration and diasporic communities have on the notion of British national identity. We shall view a range of recent films projecting images of English and/or British identities in order to investigate how British national identity gets (re)conceptualised in the days of globalisation and multiculturalism. Course discussions will focus on the interrelations between individual and political identities, and will analyse how these films narrate and negotiate the multiply intertwined transitions from being black in Britain to being a Black Briton. -
Students are required to invest much time and dedication into week-to-week preparations that include not just the attentive viewing of films but also a high amount of reading. A list of films will be agreed upon in the first session, and will be put on restricted loan for you in the Mediathek.

Reading material will be made available on Stud.IP.

Requirements:
# regular attendance and active participation
# in-depth knowledge of the viewing and reading material
# portfolio of worksheets (graded in WD-1b)
# for a grade in D-1b: an additional long term paper of 8-10 pp.

Prior enrolment via Stud.IP is mandatory.

Irmgard Maassen
10-76-3-D1/WD1-04 Key Topics in Cultural History: British History and National Heritage (in englischer Sprache)

Seminar
ECTS: 3

Termine:
wöchentlich Mi 12:15 - 13:45 GW2 A4020 (2 SWS)

This course has a twofold aim: It is first of all designed to introduce students to select issues in British history, to major historical events, figures, developments and topics that have shaped the face of contemporary Britain and remain points of reference in today's political and cultural debates. But the main focus will lie on the way in which 'history' is being conceptualized, reproduced, exhibited, commercialized, and ideologically exploited not just in current politics (viz. the Brexit campaign) but also by the 'heritage industry'. In a series of case studies across a range of media, we will discuss and analyze the manner, meanings, and implicit messages of current representations of historical epochs and events: political speeches, museums, heritage sites, architecture, films, literature, royal weddings, war monuments…. After the Brexit referendum, investigating the uses that invocations of ‘British/English history’ are being put to seems particularly urgent.

Reading material will be made available for download in Stud.IP. A list of suggested research topics and case studies will be negotiated in the first session.

Requirements:
# regular attendance and active participation
# in-depth knowledge of the reading material
# a self-researched case study presented to the class (group presentation)
# two brief written assignments (graded in WD-1b)
# alternatively, for a grade in D-1b: a term paper of 8-10 pp.

Prior enrolment via StudIP is mandatory.

Irmgard Maassen
10-76-3-D1/WD1-06 Key Topics in Cultural History: The Postcolonial World in Literature and Film: Canada (in englischer Sprache)

Seminar

Termine:
wöchentlich Do 10:15 - 11:45 SFG 1020 (2 SWS) Seminar

This class will introduce students to Canada, its colonial history, postcolonial cultures, and contemporary issues with a focus on Canada’s Indigenous and immigrant populations. We will learn about Canada through reading non-fiction texts, poetry, and two novels and watching four feature films.

All texts except the novels will be provided electronically. Class requirements are regular attendance, in-depth knowledge of reading and viewing material, and active class discussion. Reading the texts and watching the films is mandatory. The films will be shown on four Tuesday evenings from 6-8 pm, in all probability 1 Nov., 20 Dec., 10 Jan., 31 Jan. On 15 December 2016 we will organize a Canada-Study-Day in cooperation with BIKQS with a reading by the Canadian author George Elliott Clarke as a highlight in the evening. Students are expected to participate in all events of the Canada Day.
Students are required to purchase and read Aritha van Herk’s The Tent Peg (by the beginning of November) and Eden Robinson’s Monkey Beach (by the middle of January). Ten copies of each are available at the university bookstore for ca. 8 € (van Herk) and 17 € (Robinson) a few weeks before the start of the semester. You can also order them cheaper via amazon marketplace; allow for a 3 weeks international delivery time.
Please note that prior enrollment via Stud.IP is mandatory except for ERASMUS students.

Prof. Dr. Kerstin Knopf
10-76-3-D1/WD1-08 Key Topics in Literature: Transmedial and Transmedia Storytelling: The Case of Sherlock Holmes and Dr Watson (in englischer Sprache)

Seminar

Termine:
wöchentlich Do 12:15 - 13:45 GW2 B3010 (Kleiner Studierraum) (2 SWS) Seminar

Sir Arthur Conan Doyle (1859-1930) as highly prolific and technologically minded author, produced an impressive body of work including plays, romances, poetry, non-fiction, science fiction stories and historical novels, in addition to his collections of detective fiction stories featuring the most memorable and certainly best known of the epistemological detectives, Sherlock Holmes. Since his first public appearance in the A Study in Scarlet (1887), a global audience continues to enjoy the adventures and living habits of the eccentric persona of the detective. This immense popularity was not only further spurned by the corpus of non-canonical Sherlock Holmes works and several fictional biographies, chronologies of Holmes’s life and the London of Sherlock Holmes, but most prominently by the character’s effortless shift from page to stage, to radio and to screen, in other words, the process of storytelling, canonical or non-canonical, across various media and genres, such as film, animated film, TV series, radio plays, audio books, graphic novels, cartoons, and video games, constituting the transmedial world of Sherlock Holmes. Every subsequent media shift (written to audio-visual) or retelling of the Sherlock Holmes prose narratives as filmic narratives offered its makers and producers multifarious ways of manipulating and shaping what Stephen Knight termed “the traditional image of Sherlock Holmes”: “[the]deerstalker hat, a checked Inverness cape, large curved pipe and a magnifying glass” (368).

Divided into four areas of critical inquiry (novel, feature film, TV series and graphic novel), and drawing equally on traditional as well as contemporary ideas, that have emerged in the fields of crime fiction, (post) classical and transmedial narratology, filmic and television storytelling, Transmedia Fandom and Comics studies, we will trace the transformation of our cherished key figures, discuss the effects of audience participation and explore the nature of narrative, in general, and that of the analytical detective fiction narrative, in particular (plot, character and space) in differing media and genre formats.

Since some of the participants are required to submit a research-based term paper, we will use parts of our seminar discussions to the development of topics, the formulation of a thesis statement, as well as considerations about the methodological approaches of writing such a paper.

For Non-E-SC students and academic exchange students: Please contact your lecturer if you require more than 3 credit points.

Additional secondary sources can be accessed in the "Semesterapparat", a reference only section on the third floor of the library building. A number of DVDs will be available in the “Semesterapparat” in the “Mediathek”, located on the fourth floor of the library building: http://www.suub.uni-bremen.de/standorte/zentrale/mediathek/.
For the availability of primary sources, please check the “Information” section on Stud.IP. A reader with selected secondary text materials will be made available for download on Stud. IP. You may wish to check the learning compact for further details such as requirements, weekly schedule, select bibliography and modes of assessment ("Allgemeiner Dateiordner" on Stud. IP).

Please note that prior enrolment via Stud.IP is mandatory. Deadline: 15 September 2016.
Assessment:

• regular attendance, informed participation in class discussion,
• in-depth knowledge of the selected reading material,
• homework assignments,
• presentation of research paper or group project,
• term paper.

The requirements as formulated above may vary depending on your overall degree program.

E-SC students - Please check the departmental website for guidelines on modules and exams: http://www.fb10.uni-bremen.de/anglistik/ba2/profil/studienplan.aspx

Please be familiar with the following materials:

Novel/Short Story

Doyle, Arthur C. "A Study in Scarlet”. Sherlock Holmes: The Complete Illustrated Novels. (Italics) London: Chancellor Press, 1987. 1-108. Print.

---."A Scandal in Bohemia”. Sherlock Holmes: The Complete Illustrated Short Stories. (Italics) London: Chancellor Press, 1985. 9-28. Print.

Feature Film

Sherlock Holmes (Italics) (USA, D 2009). Director: Guy Ritchie. Warner 2010. DVD.

TV Series

Elementary (Italics) – Season 1. (US, CBS 2012). Created by Robert Doherty. DVD.

Sherlock (Italics) – Season 1. (UK, BBC 2010). "A Study in Pink”, “The Blind Banker“, “The Great Game”. Created by Mark Gatiss and Steven Moffat. DVD.

Graphic Novel

Doyle, Arthur C. A Study in Scarlet. A Sherlock Holmes Graphic Novel. (Italics) Illustrated by I.N.J. Culbard. Text adapted by Ian Edington. New York City: Sterling (Reprint Edition), 2010. Print.

Dr. Jana Nittel
10-76-3-D1/WD1-10 Key Topics in Literature: New American Classics (in englischer Sprache)

Seminar

Termine:
wöchentlich Do 14:15 - 15:45 GRA2 0080 (2 SWS) Seminar

Einzeltermine:
Mo 16.01.17 16:00 - 20:30 GW1 B0100

This seminar will be an excursion into close reading, and lots of it. We will read and study a series of post-2000 US American novels which have been nominees or winners in prestigious literary contests, such as the Pulitzer Price - thus, new "classics". Reading all the texts, preferably before semester beginning, will be a prerequisite; we will study them together in class, based on group or individual student presentations of each one. Which, and whose AMERICA do these novels represent? Which paradigmatic conflicts do they commit to cultural memory with their writing? Which contemporary or historical features of US American life and society do they draw readers' attention to? Can we discern shared aesthetic features of these texts?
The texts are, in no particular order:
Marilynne Robinson, Lila
Jesmyn Ward, Salvage the Bones
Chimamanda Adichie, Americanah
Richard Ford, Let Me Be Frank With You
Margaret Verble, Maud's Line
Maceo Montoya, The Deportation of Wopper Barraza: A Novel
David Anthony Durham, Walk Through Darkness

Prof. Dr. Sabine Bröck
10-76-3-D1/WD1-11 Key Topics in Literature: The Fabric of Slavery (in englischer Sprache)

Seminar

Termine:
wöchentlich Di 14:15 - 15:45 GW1 B1070 GW2 A3570 (FB 10 Besprechungsraum) (2 SWS) Seminar

Einzeltermine:
Mo 30.01.17 17:00 - 20:00 GW2 B1216

This is part one of a two semester class; each class may be taken separately, however. This winter semester we will, based on a general introduction to the history of New World enslavement, as well as on an introduction into the theory of representation (see Stuart Hall) watch and study three recent, very different films about modern enslavement:

Tarantino's Django Unchained
McQueen's 12 Years A Slave
and Asante's Belle.

While we will try our very best to avoid voyeuristic titillation, please come prepared to watch material, and talk about it which contains graphic images of violence against Black people. One of the main goals of the seminar will be, precisely, to ask which function does any representation of anti-black violence serve; which, and whose interests benefit, and what happens to different constitutions in the course of studying it? Which effect, on the contrary, does the avoidance of such representation have on viewers, and how does this evasion work?

Please read as prerequisite:
1. Hall, Stuart. "The Work of Representation." in Representation: Cultural Representations and Signifying Practices. ed. Stuart Hall. London: Sage, 1997. 1-74.
2. Kenneth Morgan, Transatlantic Slavery. Padstow,: T. J. International, 2016 ( a one-volume 180 pages concise history of slavery)

Further secondary material will be brought into class in the context of our debates.

Prof. Dr. Sabine Bröck
10-76-3-D1/WD1-12 Key Topics in Literature: Anatomy and Power in Jonathan Swift's Gulliver's Travels (in englischer Sprache)

Seminar

Termine:
wöchentlich Di 14:15 - 15:45 SuUB 4330 (Studio I Medienraum ) (2 SWS) Seminar

Most of us are familiar with the voyages of Lemuel Gulliver who heads out to the South Sea and is washed up on Lilliput, an island inhabited by tiny people who capture him. Gulliver eventually becomes friends with the Emperor of the Lilliputians whose customs he learns and wars he participates in. After a series of threats he escapes and returns to England. Only few know, that Gulliver is not only a surgeon, but travels to more islands including Broddingnag and its giants; Laputa, a floating island full of people only interested in mathematics and music; Glubbdubdrib and Luggnagg, islands of sorcerers and immortals; and finally the island of the beastly Yahoos and the horse-friendly Houyhnhnms.

Swift’s masterpiece is a well-known satire and mocks both human nature as well as travel literature – a highly popular genre in eighteenth-century Britain. Gulliver’s Travels is concerned with man’s intellectual pride and pretensions to reason while also addressing particularly scientific discoveries and developments. What this seminar focusses on are observations of the human body in Swift’s prose satire. Scholars agree on the blatant misogyny present in his text which manifests especially in Gulliver’s disgusted descriptions of female bodies or parts of it he comes across ranging from a nurse’s huge breast and nipple to a sexual encounter he has with one of the beast-like Yahoos.

The aim of this course is to shed light on discourses of gender and the female body apparent in eighteenth-century literature in order to examine if and how representations of anatomy are linked with patriarchal power structures.

Keywords: Body Studies, Gender Studies, Satire, History of Science, Medical Humanities, Adaptation Studies, Eighteenth-Century

Requirements:
• registration on Stud.IP
• in-depth knowledge of the reading material (i.e. read the novel[s] in advance!)*
• regular attendance and oral participation
• oral presentation and handout
• term paper (optional)

*NOTE: YOUR FAMILIARITY WITH THE PRIMARY TEXT(S) IS MANDATORY AND WILL BE EXAMINED IN ONE OF THE FIRST SESSIONS***

Text:
Swift, Jonathan [1726]. Gulliver’s Travels (Norton Critical Edition). New York: Norton, 2002.*

*NOTE: Please pay attention to the EXACT publication dates when purchasing the book(s) so we can all work with the same editions.

Dr. phil. Jennifer Henke
10-76-3-D1/WD1-13 Key Topics in Literature: Narratives of Illness (in englischer Sprache)

Seminar

Termine:
wöchentlich Fr 14:15 - 15:45 SFG 1060 Dezernetenbesprechnungsraum (2 SWS) Seminar

The purpose of this seminar is to introduce students to the flourishing genre of illness narratives. In recent decades, more and more literary and non-literary texts depict the experience of illness and its effects on people's lives. This course will use fictional writings (e.g. poems, short stories, and excerpts from novels) as well as autobiographical accounts by actual patients, family members, or healthcare professionals to explore the physical, psychological, and emotional aspects of a patient's, doctor's, or relative's experience of such conditions as Alzheimer's, cancer, or AIDS.

In addition to an in-depth analysis and interpretation of the selected texts, we will look at illness narratives in the context of the history of medicine, medical humanities, narrative medicine, literary history, body studies, life writing, and gender theory.

Requirements:
- regular attendance and active participation
- in-depth knowledge of the reading material
- presentation (and handout) and/or final paper

A detailed syllabus will be handed out in the first session.

Texts:

Please make sure that you purchase exactly the copies given below, so that we can all work with the same edition.

Edson, Margaret. Wit. New York: Faber and Faber, 1999. ISBN: 978-0-571-19877-1.
Kalanithi, Paul. When Breath Becomes Air. London: The Bodley Head, 2016. ISBN: 978-1-847-92367-7.

Additional primary texts and secondary materials will be made available on Stud.IP.

Please note that prior enrolment via Stud.IP is mandatory.

Christine Müller, M.A.
10-M83-2-P1-2 Key Topics in Cultural History: The Postcolonial World in Literature and Film: Africa (in englischer Sprache)

Seminar

Termine:
wöchentlich Do 12:15 - 13:45 SFG 2040 (2 SWS)

This course is a comparative survey of the aesthetics and nature of African film and literature. We shall examine the development of these two genres in the last and current centuries. With regard to films, we are not just talking about cinematic productions but also on what has been produced on TV, videos and DVDs.
Images matter; some of the most enduring images of Africa and Africans come from Hollywood representations; from Tarzan (1918) to Tsotsi (2005). Other films such as the African Queen (1951) use Africa as a mere backdrop in their glorification of the west, with many portraying Europeans and Americans as saviours of Africa. Work of literature by westerners such as Joseph Conrad’s Heart of Darkness (1901) have also made a lasting impression on generations of westerners. As a result of these depictions, many members of the first generation of modern African writers, film and television producers produced works that negated these stereotypes by portraying their societies from an African perspective. After colonial rule, many of these men and women focused not just replying back to the West but mainly on portraying the many changes and challenges their countries are undergoing. The past two decades have also witnessed a rapid rise of film industries spearheaded by Nigeria’s Nollywood. These platforms allow African producers to address fellow Africans directly. It is arguably, Africa speaking back to itself. Writers have also turned their attention to the online medium producing short stories and poems that are mainly targeted at a burgeoning online African communities. During the course of a semester, we shall analyse these developments through a study of relevant texts and films. Our analysis of literature will not be complete without discussing oral literature as well as work published online.

Please note that this course is designed to be critically engaged. Class sessions will consist of discussions of the assigned readings and collaborative analysis of selected works. Students are expected to do the readings and to fully contribute to discussions in the classroom.

Week 1: Detailed study of the map of Africa introduction to notable authors and film producers.
Assignment: Students should study a map of Africa and bring this to the first session. Each student is expected to do a five-minute presentation on an African country of their choice.

Week 2: Africa in the West imagination
Reading: Chapter 1 to 3 of Joseph Conrad’s Heart of Darkness

Week 3: The development of African films
We watch Ousmane Sembene’s Borom Sarret (1963)
Reading:
1. Cassis Kilian’s Glimmering Utopia: 50 Years of African Film (2011). This is available for free download at http://www.jstor.org/stable/41336270

2.David Murphy’s Africans filming Africa: questioning theories of an authentic African cinema. This is available for download at http://www.jstor.org/stable/pdf/1771833.pdf?_=1470602958262

Week 4 & 5: First generation of modern African canon
Readings:
Naguib Mahfouz’s A Voice from the Other World (translated from the Arabic by Raymond Stock). This is available for free download at http://www.jstor.org/stable/4338211
Ousmane Sembene’s Tribal Scars and Other Stories. This is available at http://mrchrisattlc.weebly.com/uploads/2/3/4/8/23481786/tribal_scars_and_other_stories_-_sembene_ousmane.pdf
Read at least a chapter from The Cambridge History of African and Caribbean Literature, Volume 1 and Volume 2, edited by F. Abiola Irele and Simon Gikandi.

Week 6 & 7: Written texts in the 20th Century – Language, Colonialism and the response to colonialism
Readings:
Ngugi wa Thiong’o’s Weep Not Child. You can either borrow a copy from the library or buy one from Amazon
L. Adele Jinadu’s Language and Politics: On the Cultural Basis of Colonialism. This is available for download at http://www.jstor.org/stable/pdf/4391483.pdf

Week 8: The Negritude Movement and its influences
Reading:
Poems from the Negritude movement
Christopher L. Miller’s The (Revised) Birth of Negritude: Communist Revolution and "the Immanent Negro" in 1935. This is available for download at http://www.jstor.org/stable/pdf/25704473.pdf

Week 9: Foreign films and their impacts: On censorship and culture War
Reading: James R. Brennan’s Democratising Cinema and Censorship in Tanzania: 1920 – 1980. This is available for download at - http://www.jstor.org/stable/40033967

Week 10: The introduction of films and the evolution of traditional drama
Reading: Students are expected to have read prior to this session, Karin Barber’s “Orality, the Media, and New Popular Cultures in Africa.” Kimani Njoku (ed.) Media and Identity in Africa. (2009: 3-18). The book is available at the University Library and this particular article can also be read on Google Scholar at this web-link

https://books.google.co.uk/books?id=OjWlBgAAQBAJ&pg=PA3&lpg=PA3&dq=%22ORALITY,+THE+MEDIA+AND+NEW+POPULAR+CULTURES+IN+AFRICA&source=bl&ots=EiT8-oF0Yv&sig=CAm4aEbkA1kqQ5ZyoCM5AX-Epx0&hl=en&sa=X&ved=0ahUKEwiG_53ewrTOAhXDCcAKHRYrAoUQ6AEIJjAC#v=onepage&q=%22ORALITY%2C%20THE%20MEDIA%20AND%20NEW%20POPULAR%20CULTURES%20IN%20AFRICA&f=false

Week 12: The rise and rise of Nollywood: How the Nigerian film industry rose to become the second largest in the world. Discussions of some of the key players and seminal works.
Reading:
Jonathan Haynes and Onookome Okome’s Evolving Popular Media Nigerian Video Films. It is available for download at http://www.jstor.org/stable/3820623

Week 13: From YouTube to Netflix: Nollywood in a Digital Age
Reading:
Noah Tsika’s From Yorùbá to YouTube: Studying Nollywood's Star System. This can be downloaded at http://www.jstor.org/stable/10.2979/blackcamera.5.2.95

Week 14: New Media and African literature: New media literary genres; critical discussion of creative works in digital media.
Readings: Students to select texts from Saraba online magazine, www.thenewblackmagazine.com, Brittle Paper etc.

Learning Outcomes: You are expected to write an essay at the end of the semester based on the materials used on this course. You are also expected to produce a detailed journal of external materials you may have read or seen relating to our discussions. In your essay and journal, you are expected to demonstrate you have grappled with most of the issues raised during our discussions.

Olorunshola Adenekan
10-M83-2-P1-3 Key Topics in Literature: Travel Writing: Texts, Contexts, Criticism (in englischer Sprache)

Seminar

Termine:
wöchentlich Di 16:15 - 17:45 GW2 B3010 (Kleiner Studierraum) (2 SWS)

Travel writing is an increasingly popular genre in terms of text production and commercial success, encompassing a fascinating diversity of literary forms, modes and itineraries which negate a forthright definition of the genre. As a repository for factual and fictional accounts of mobility and cross-cultural exchange, however, it has long been underestimated for its potential to contribute to a broad range of cultural, political and historical debates that seek to reassess the role of travel writing as a "vehicle for geographic, ethnographic and sociological knowledge." (Thompson 4). This course is designed to introduce students to the comprehensive history of this dynamic and complex genre within the socio-cultural framework of the English-speaking world. We will trace recurrent literary conventions, themes, motifs, functions and concerns in historical and contemporary travel narratives in English by various key contributors and engage with textual and contextual approaches. Since some of the participants are required to submit a research paper, we will use parts of our seminar discussions to the development of topics, the formulation of a thesis statement, as well as considerations about the methodological approaches of writing such a paper.

For Non-E-SC students and academic exchange students: Please contact your lecturer if you require more than 3 credit points.

Additional secondary sources can be accessed in the "Semesterapparat", a reference only section on the third floor of the library building. A reader with selected secondary text materials will be made available for download on Stud. IP. You may wish to check the learning compact for further details such as requirements, weekly schedule, select bibliography and modes of assessment ("Allgemeiner Dateiordner" on Stud. IP).

Please note that prior enrolment via Stud.IP is mandatory. Deadline: 15 September 2016.

Assessment:

regular attendance, informed participation in class discussion,
in-depth knowledge of the selected reading material,
homework assignments,
presentation of research paper or group project,
term paper.

The requirements as formulated above may vary depending on your overall degree program. E-SC students - Please check the departmental website for guidelines on modules and exams: http://www.fb10.uni-bremen.de/anglistik/ba2/profil/studienplan.aspx
MA TnL module: http://www.master-transnationale-literaturwissenschaft.uni-bremen.de/studium/modulbeschreibungen/

Required reading before the first session (you need a copy for class):

Thompson, Carl. Travel Writing (Italics). London: Routledge, 2011. Print.

Copies can be purchased at the bookstore on our campus (Universitätsbuchhandlung Bremen: www.unibuch-bremen.de)

Dr. Jana Nittel
10-M83-2-P3-1 Key Topics in Cultural History: Shakespeare on Screen (in englischer Sprache)
(also Key Topics in Literature)

Seminar

Termine:
wöchentlich Di 14:15 - 15:45 GW2 B3010 (Kleiner Studierraum) (2 SWS)

In 2016, the year marking the 400th anniversary of Shakespeare’s death, Shakespeare’s plays are as enticing to filmmakers and visual artists as they were in 1899 when the first Shakespeare film was screened. Since then the number of filmic contributions has increased steadily. Divided into three projects depending on the choice of play (Hamlet, Macbeth and Othello) and drawing equally on traditional as well as contemporary ideas, that have emerged in the fields of cultural studies, transnational film, world cinema as well as filmic and television storytelling, we will explore how three plays by William Shakespeare are re-imagined in different linguistic and cultural contexts in selected late 20th Century and post-2000 productions. Focusing on traditional as well as contemporary stories/modern updates course participants will be encouraged to investigate these films’ engagement with sexuality and gender, race and ethnicity and questions of power. In addition, the course is designed to introduce its participants to key terms and functional principles of filmic storytelling: Film editing and its functions, mise en scène (modification of space), cinematography (light and colour), camera usage as well as plot, character, and filmic space; the nature of narrative in film and its dramatic composition (composition, narration and focalisation). We may also engage with the following questions: What specific, distinguishable filmic distinctions guide viewers’ constructions of reading hypotheses? How do filmic cues guide the perception of the audience?
Since some of the participants are required to submit a research-based term paper, we will use parts of our seminar discussions to the development of topics, the formulation of a thesis statement, as well as considerations about the methodological approaches of writing such a paper.

Electronic resources for independent study:

Jahn, Manfred. 2003. A Guide to Narratological Film Analysis. Poems, Plays, and Prose: A Guide to the Theory of Literary Genres. English Department, University of Cologne. http://www.uni-koeln.de/~ame02/pppf.htm

Jahn, Manfred. 2003. A Guide to the Theory of Drama. Part II of Poems, Plays, and Prose: A Guide to the Theory of Literary Genres. English Department, University of Cologne. http://www.uni-koeln.de/~ame02/pppd.htm
Lexikon der Filmbegriffe: http://filmlexikon.uni-kiel.de/index.php?action=lexikon

For Non-E-SC students and academic exchange students: Please contact your lecturer if you require more than 3 credit points.

Additional secondary sources can be accessed in the "Semesterapparat", a reference only section on the third floor of the library building. A number of DVDs will be available in the “Semesterapparat” in the “Mediathek”, located on the fourth floor of the library building: http://www.suub.uni-bremen.de/standorte/zentrale/mediathek/.

Please note that prior enrolment via Stud.IP is mandatory. Deadline: 15 September 2016.

Assessment:

regular attendance, informed participation in class discussion,

in-depth knowledge of the selected reading material,

homework assignments,

presentation of research paper or group project,

term paper.

The requirements as formulated above may vary depending on your overall degree program.

E-SC students - Please check the departmental website for guidelines on modules and exams: http://www.fb10.uni-bremen.de/anglistik/ba2/profil/studienplan.aspx

MA TnL module: http://www.master-transnationale-literaturwissenschaft.uni-bremen.de/studium/modulbeschreibungen/

Please be familiar with the following materials:

Filmography:

Hamlet. (Italics)(UK, US 1996) Dir. Kenneth Branagh

Hamlet. (Italics) (US, 2000) Dir. Michael Almereyda

Haider. (Italics) (India, 2014) Dir. Vishal Bhardwaj

Macbeth. (Italics) (US, 1948) Dir. Orson Welles (optional)

Throne of Blood. (Italics) (Japan, 1957). Dir. Akira Kurosawa

Maqbool. (Italics) (India, 2004) Dir. Vishal Bhardwaj

Macbeth. (Italics) (UK, 2015) Dir. Justin Kurzel

Othello. (Italics) (UK, US 1995) Dir. Oliver Parker

Othello. (Italics) (UK, 2001) Dir. Geoffrey Sax

Omkara. (Italics) (India, 2006) Dir. Vishal Bhardwaj

Dr. Jana Nittel
10-M83-3-V-2 Key Topics in Cultural History: Gender - Culture - Feminism (in englischer Sprache)

Seminar

Termine:
wöchentlich Mi 16:15 - 17:45 GW2 B2890 (2 SWS)

Ziel der Ringvorlesung ist es, über gender-bezogene Themen und Forschungsansätze fachübergreifend ins Gespräch zu kommen und eine größere Sichtbarkeit für die vielfältigen diesbezüglichen wissenschaftlichen Aktivitäten im FB 10 herzustellen. Das erscheint uns in Zeiten, da es in der breiteren Öffentlichkeit vermehrt zu anti-feministischen, gender-studies-feindlichen und homophoben Polemiken kommt, aber gleichzeitig eine junge Generation von Aktivist*innen die Relevanz feministischer und queerer Analysen für sich neu entdeckt, besonders angebracht. Den Studierenden an unserem Fachbereich kann eine solche Reihe zugleich Ideengeber und Motivation für die eigene Spezialisierung sein. Die Vorträge finden im zweiwöchigen Rhythmus statt und sind in ein reguläres Seminar eingebettet, das von Dr Karin Esders geleitet wird.

This course is a mixture between a lecture course and a regular seminar. Scholars and teachers both from FB 10 and TU Berlin will deliver lectures on various aspects of our general topic initiating a transdisciplinary discourse on "Gender - Culture - Feminism". In the sessions between the lectures we will discuss corresponding texts and resources to prepare the diverse subjects of the presentations and to critically reflect on their respective ideas and arguments.

Please note that some of the lectures will be in German. You are welcome to attend lectures only without participating in the full seminar.
Essential readings will be available for download on Stud-IP. You should also consult the 'Semesterapparat' (SuUB) for further readings.
Requirements depend on the number of CPs you wish to achieve and will be announced at the beginning of the course.
Please note that prior enrollment via Stud.IP is mandatory for full seminar participation.

Dr. Karin Esders-Angermund

D-1c: Aufbaumodul (nur für das Wintersemester)

Sprachwissenschaft und Kulturgeschichte (3 CP + 3 CP) (1PL = Term paper/Hausarbeit)

Es gilt zu beachten: Laut SK-Beschluss (E-SC) vom 21.11.2012 ist die Pruefungsleistung im Bereich "Key Topics in Linguistics" zu erbringen = Schriftliche Hausarbeit/Term paper.

Modulbeauftragte/r: Prof. Dr. Sabine Broeck, broeck@uni-bremen.de
VAK Titel der Veranstaltung DozentIn
10-76-3-D1-01 Key Topics in Linguistics: Comparing British and American English (in englischer Sprache)

Seminar

Termine:
wöchentlich Di 10:15 - 11:45 GW2 A3390 (CIP-Labor FB 10) (2 SWS)

“England and America are two nations divided by a common language.” (George Bernard Shaw)

This seminar explores the linguistic differences between the two main reference varieties of English, British English (BrE) and American English (AmE). We will examine these differences on various levels of language use, e.g. phonology, spelling, vocabulary, phraseology, grammar, and pragmatics. We will also look at the assumed widespread influence of AmE in terms of an “Americanization” of orther varieites of English. In addition, we will investigate patterns of language change in the two varieties under study. In the course of the seminar students will carry out small-scale empricial research projects based on computer corpora to examine differences between BrE and AmE in a data-driven, empirical way.

READING
The course will not be based on one single textbook, but key readings will be made available on an electronic bookshelf on the university’s e-learning platform Stud.IP.
Preparatory reading before the first meeting (available as PDF on Stud.IP after registration): chapter 8 in Svartvik, Jan & Geoffrey Leech (2006), English. One Tongue, Many Voices. Basingstoke: Palgrave Macmillan.

ASSESSMENT
  • regular attendance and active participation in in-class data analysis and discussion
  • careful reading and preparation of assigned readings for each session, reading assignments
  • oral presentation and/or term paper

Prof. Dr. Marcus Callies
10-76-3-D1-03 Key Topics in Linguistics: Pragmatics (in englischer Sprache)

Seminar

Termine:
wöchentlich Fr 10:15 - 11:45 GW2 A3340 GW1 C1070 (2 SWS)

For communication to be successful, it is not enough to know the meaning of words. We also need to understand what a speaker or writer meant to say with these words. This only works if we share assumptions and expectations with the speaker or writer. As Yule (2006) puts it, "Pragmatics is the study of 'invisible' meaning, or how we recognize what is meant even when it isn't actually said or written". In this class, we will take a look at speech acts (Austin 1962), the cooperative principle (Grice 1975), positive and negative face, implicature, presupposition, reference and information structure. After getting familiar with the concepts, we will conduct our own small-scale studies. At the end of the semester, you will know how the magic works: Not only how to do things with words, better still, how to do things without words.

Requirements
Regular attendance, active participation in class, weekly reading assignments and exercises.
BA ESC D 1a Presentation (unbenotete Studienleistung)
BA ESC D 1c Term paper (benotete Prüfungsleistung)

Recommended Literature (no need to buy any)
Archer, Dawn & Karin Aijmer & Anne Wichmann. 2012. Pragmatics: An Advanced Resource Book for Students. London: Routledge.
Cutting, Joan. 2015. Pragmatics: A Resource Book for Students. 3rd ed. Routledge.
Horn, Laurence & Gregory Ward (eds.). 2004. The Handbook of Pragmatics. Oxford; Malden MA: Blackwell.
O’Keeffe, Anne & Brian Clancy & Svenja Adolphs. 2011. Introducing Pragmatics in Use. Routledge.

Dr. Anke Schulz
10-76-3-D1-04 Key Topics in Linguistics: Language and Gender (in englischer Sprache)

Seminar

Termine:
wöchentlich Mo 12:15 - 13:45 GW2 B3010 (Kleiner Studierraum) (2 SWS)

This course will deal with the principles underlying language use, with a specific focus on differences and the construction of gender and sexual orientation. We will learn that gender is seen as a dichotomy in some research such as sociolinguistics and that other research claims that gender interactional patterns are not a reflection of the individual’s nature but rather of some performance that the individual is accomplishing. According to this view, "gender is doing, not being." But also there is more to know about the different research methodologies of language, sex and gender categories. These include Sociolinguistics, Conversation analysis, Corpus linguistics, Critical discourse analysis, Discursive Psychology, Feminist Post-Structuralist Discourse Analysis and Queer Theory. Subsequently, students will be required to develop a project of their own, analysing the language used by people of different gender, sex or sexual orientation in a particular communication situation of their own choice.

Dr. Inke Du Bois
10-76-3-D1-05 Key Topics in Linguistics: Applied Linguistics (in englischer Sprache)

Seminar

Termine:
wöchentlich Mi 08:30 - 10:00 GW2 B2890 (2 SWS)

Applied linguistics involves „the theoretical and empirical investigation of real-world problems in which language is a central issue“ (Brumfit 1995:27).
Even though language teaching and learning is often seen as the core area of applied linguistics, in this class we want to focus on some of the other branches. One area where language may create, or solve, problems is its use in forming and maintaining public opinion. The UK’s newspapers’ contribution to the outcome of the Brexit vote is certainly an impressive example. Another area is the use of language by criminals, in police investigations and in court; this is the area of forensic linguistics.
In this class, you get to know the basic theoretical concepts of applied linguistics. You will learn to choose the appropriate method for answering different research questions, e.g. questionnaires, interviews or corpus studies. Finally, you will practice your skills as researchers by conducting a study of your own favourite real-world language problem.

Requirements
Regular attendance, active participation in class, weekly reading assignments, possibly some exercises.
BA ESC D 1a Portfolio (unbenotete Studienleistung)
BA ESC D 1c Term paper (benotete Prüfungsleistung)

Recommended literature (no need to buy any)
Coffin, Caroline & Theresa Lillis & Kieran O’Halloran. 2010. Applied Linguistics Methods: A Reader. London; New York: Routledge.
Cook, Guy & Sarah North. 2010. Applied Linguistics in Action: A Reader. London; New York: Routledge.
Hunston, Susan & David Oakey. 2010. Introducing Applied Linguistics: Concepts and Skills. London; New York: Routledge.
Loewen, Shawn & Luke Plonsky. 2016. An A-Z of Applied Linguistics Research Methods. London; New York: Palgrave Macmillan.
Olsson, John. 2004. Forensic Linguistics: An Introduction to Language, Crime and the Law. London; New York: Continuum.

Dr. Anke Schulz
10-76-3-D1-06 Key Topics in Linguistics: Grammar-based methods for textual analysis and critical reading (in englischer Sprache)

Seminar

Termine:
wöchentlich Mo 14:15 - 15:45 GW2 B3009 (Großer Studierraum) GW2 B3010 (Kleiner Studierraum) (2 SWS)
Prof. John Arnold Bateman, Ph.D.
10-76-3-D1/WD1-01 Key Topics in Cultural History: Documenting the US: Themes, Concepts and Skills (in englischer Sprache)

Seminar

Einzeltermine:
Mi 09.11.16 17:00 - 18:00 GW2 A3570 (FB 10 Besprechungsraum)
Fr 18.11.16 12:00 - 18:00 GW2 A4020
Sa 19.11.16 11:00 - 17:00 MZH 1470
Fr 02.12.16 12:00 - 18:00 SFG 2060
Sa 03.12.16 11:00 - 17:00 MZH 1470

In this course we will study various documentary sources such as films, web pages, photographs in order to learn more about significant events in the USA both contemporary and historical. Yet at the same time we will question the reliability and viability of the respective resources in order to strengthen our awareness of the limits inherent in the various documentary formats.
Essential readings will be available for download on Stud-IP. You should also consult the 'Semesterapparat' (SuUB) for further readings.
Requirements:
• regular attendance and oral participation
• in-depth knowledge of the reading material
• oral presentation and handout
• term paper (possible)
Please note that prior enrollment via Stud.IP is mandatory.

Dr. Karin Esders-Angermund
10-76-3-D1/WD1-02 Key Topics in Cultural History: Analyzing Hollywood Cinema (in englischer Sprache)

Seminar

Termine:
wöchentlich Do 14:15 - 15:45 GW2 B1632 (2 SWS)

This course is designed to introduce students to critical scholarship on US-American film history and culture. Basic introductions to the analytical categories of race, class, gender, and sexuality will help students to analyze how films construct and limit representations of African-Americans, Native Americans, women and femininity, men and masculinity, sexuality, class struggle and class difference.
The participation in the course “Viewing film critically” Tuesdays 18:00 (sharp) – 20:00 (General Studies / Schlüsselqualifikation / Global Education) is highly recommended because it offers full-length screenings of the films we will discuss in class. Otherwise you must watch the films individually; they will be made available at the beginning of the semester on a reserve shelf in the SuuB-Mediathek.
Our major textbook will be Benshoff and Griffin: America on film: Representing race, class, gender, and sexuality at the movies. (Purchase is is suggested.)
Essential readings will be available for download on Stud-IP. You should also consult the 'Semesterapparat' (SuUB) for further readings.
Requirements:
• regular attendance and oral participation
• in-depth knowledge of the reading material
• oral presentation and handout
Please note that prior enrollment via Stud.IP is mandatory.

Dr. Karin Esders-Angermund
10-76-3-D1/WD1-03 Key Topics in Cultural History: Black (and white) in the Union Jack (in englischer Sprache)

Seminar
ECTS: 3

Termine:
wöchentlich Di 16:15 - 17:45 SFG 1020 GW2 B1700 (2 SWS)

Taking its cue from Paul Gilroy’s famous observation, 'There ain’t no Black in the Union Jack‘, this seminar is going to explore the impact migration and diasporic communities have on the notion of British national identity. We shall view a range of recent films projecting images of English and/or British identities in order to investigate how British national identity gets (re)conceptualised in the days of globalisation and multiculturalism. Course discussions will focus on the interrelations between individual and political identities, and will analyse how these films narrate and negotiate the multiply intertwined transitions from being black in Britain to being a Black Briton. -
Students are required to invest much time and dedication into week-to-week preparations that include not just the attentive viewing of films but also a high amount of reading. A list of films will be agreed upon in the first session, and will be put on restricted loan for you in the Mediathek.

Reading material will be made available on Stud.IP.

Requirements:
# regular attendance and active participation
# in-depth knowledge of the viewing and reading material
# portfolio of worksheets (graded in WD-1b)
# for a grade in D-1b: an additional long term paper of 8-10 pp.

Prior enrolment via Stud.IP is mandatory.

Irmgard Maassen
10-76-3-D1/WD1-04 Key Topics in Cultural History: British History and National Heritage (in englischer Sprache)

Seminar
ECTS: 3

Termine:
wöchentlich Mi 12:15 - 13:45 GW2 A4020 (2 SWS)

This course has a twofold aim: It is first of all designed to introduce students to select issues in British history, to major historical events, figures, developments and topics that have shaped the face of contemporary Britain and remain points of reference in today's political and cultural debates. But the main focus will lie on the way in which 'history' is being conceptualized, reproduced, exhibited, commercialized, and ideologically exploited not just in current politics (viz. the Brexit campaign) but also by the 'heritage industry'. In a series of case studies across a range of media, we will discuss and analyze the manner, meanings, and implicit messages of current representations of historical epochs and events: political speeches, museums, heritage sites, architecture, films, literature, royal weddings, war monuments…. After the Brexit referendum, investigating the uses that invocations of ‘British/English history’ are being put to seems particularly urgent.

Reading material will be made available for download in Stud.IP. A list of suggested research topics and case studies will be negotiated in the first session.

Requirements:
# regular attendance and active participation
# in-depth knowledge of the reading material
# a self-researched case study presented to the class (group presentation)
# two brief written assignments (graded in WD-1b)
# alternatively, for a grade in D-1b: a term paper of 8-10 pp.

Prior enrolment via StudIP is mandatory.

Irmgard Maassen
10-76-3-D1/WD1-06 Key Topics in Cultural History: The Postcolonial World in Literature and Film: Canada (in englischer Sprache)

Seminar

Termine:
wöchentlich Do 10:15 - 11:45 SFG 1020 (2 SWS) Seminar

This class will introduce students to Canada, its colonial history, postcolonial cultures, and contemporary issues with a focus on Canada’s Indigenous and immigrant populations. We will learn about Canada through reading non-fiction texts, poetry, and two novels and watching four feature films.

All texts except the novels will be provided electronically. Class requirements are regular attendance, in-depth knowledge of reading and viewing material, and active class discussion. Reading the texts and watching the films is mandatory. The films will be shown on four Tuesday evenings from 6-8 pm, in all probability 1 Nov., 20 Dec., 10 Jan., 31 Jan. On 15 December 2016 we will organize a Canada-Study-Day in cooperation with BIKQS with a reading by the Canadian author George Elliott Clarke as a highlight in the evening. Students are expected to participate in all events of the Canada Day.
Students are required to purchase and read Aritha van Herk’s The Tent Peg (by the beginning of November) and Eden Robinson’s Monkey Beach (by the middle of January). Ten copies of each are available at the university bookstore for ca. 8 € (van Herk) and 17 € (Robinson) a few weeks before the start of the semester. You can also order them cheaper via amazon marketplace; allow for a 3 weeks international delivery time.
Please note that prior enrollment via Stud.IP is mandatory except for ERASMUS students.

Prof. Dr. Kerstin Knopf
10-M83-2-P1-2 Key Topics in Cultural History: The Postcolonial World in Literature and Film: Africa (in englischer Sprache)

Seminar

Termine:
wöchentlich Do 12:15 - 13:45 SFG 2040 (2 SWS)

This course is a comparative survey of the aesthetics and nature of African film and literature. We shall examine the development of these two genres in the last and current centuries. With regard to films, we are not just talking about cinematic productions but also on what has been produced on TV, videos and DVDs.
Images matter; some of the most enduring images of Africa and Africans come from Hollywood representations; from Tarzan (1918) to Tsotsi (2005). Other films such as the African Queen (1951) use Africa as a mere backdrop in their glorification of the west, with many portraying Europeans and Americans as saviours of Africa. Work of literature by westerners such as Joseph Conrad’s Heart of Darkness (1901) have also made a lasting impression on generations of westerners. As a result of these depictions, many members of the first generation of modern African writers, film and television producers produced works that negated these stereotypes by portraying their societies from an African perspective. After colonial rule, many of these men and women focused not just replying back to the West but mainly on portraying the many changes and challenges their countries are undergoing. The past two decades have also witnessed a rapid rise of film industries spearheaded by Nigeria’s Nollywood. These platforms allow African producers to address fellow Africans directly. It is arguably, Africa speaking back to itself. Writers have also turned their attention to the online medium producing short stories and poems that are mainly targeted at a burgeoning online African communities. During the course of a semester, we shall analyse these developments through a study of relevant texts and films. Our analysis of literature will not be complete without discussing oral literature as well as work published online.

Please note that this course is designed to be critically engaged. Class sessions will consist of discussions of the assigned readings and collaborative analysis of selected works. Students are expected to do the readings and to fully contribute to discussions in the classroom.

Week 1: Detailed study of the map of Africa introduction to notable authors and film producers.
Assignment: Students should study a map of Africa and bring this to the first session. Each student is expected to do a five-minute presentation on an African country of their choice.

Week 2: Africa in the West imagination
Reading: Chapter 1 to 3 of Joseph Conrad’s Heart of Darkness

Week 3: The development of African films
We watch Ousmane Sembene’s Borom Sarret (1963)
Reading:
1. Cassis Kilian’s Glimmering Utopia: 50 Years of African Film (2011). This is available for free download at http://www.jstor.org/stable/41336270

2.David Murphy’s Africans filming Africa: questioning theories of an authentic African cinema. This is available for download at http://www.jstor.org/stable/pdf/1771833.pdf?_=1470602958262

Week 4 & 5: First generation of modern African canon
Readings:
Naguib Mahfouz’s A Voice from the Other World (translated from the Arabic by Raymond Stock). This is available for free download at http://www.jstor.org/stable/4338211
Ousmane Sembene’s Tribal Scars and Other Stories. This is available at http://mrchrisattlc.weebly.com/uploads/2/3/4/8/23481786/tribal_scars_and_other_stories_-_sembene_ousmane.pdf
Read at least a chapter from The Cambridge History of African and Caribbean Literature, Volume 1 and Volume 2, edited by F. Abiola Irele and Simon Gikandi.

Week 6 & 7: Written texts in the 20th Century – Language, Colonialism and the response to colonialism
Readings:
Ngugi wa Thiong’o’s Weep Not Child. You can either borrow a copy from the library or buy one from Amazon
L. Adele Jinadu’s Language and Politics: On the Cultural Basis of Colonialism. This is available for download at http://www.jstor.org/stable/pdf/4391483.pdf

Week 8: The Negritude Movement and its influences
Reading:
Poems from the Negritude movement
Christopher L. Miller’s The (Revised) Birth of Negritude: Communist Revolution and "the Immanent Negro" in 1935. This is available for download at http://www.jstor.org/stable/pdf/25704473.pdf

Week 9: Foreign films and their impacts: On censorship and culture War
Reading: James R. Brennan’s Democratising Cinema and Censorship in Tanzania: 1920 – 1980. This is available for download at - http://www.jstor.org/stable/40033967

Week 10: The introduction of films and the evolution of traditional drama
Reading: Students are expected to have read prior to this session, Karin Barber’s “Orality, the Media, and New Popular Cultures in Africa.” Kimani Njoku (ed.) Media and Identity in Africa. (2009: 3-18). The book is available at the University Library and this particular article can also be read on Google Scholar at this web-link

https://books.google.co.uk/books?id=OjWlBgAAQBAJ&pg=PA3&lpg=PA3&dq=%22ORALITY,+THE+MEDIA+AND+NEW+POPULAR+CULTURES+IN+AFRICA&source=bl&ots=EiT8-oF0Yv&sig=CAm4aEbkA1kqQ5ZyoCM5AX-Epx0&hl=en&sa=X&ved=0ahUKEwiG_53ewrTOAhXDCcAKHRYrAoUQ6AEIJjAC#v=onepage&q=%22ORALITY%2C%20THE%20MEDIA%20AND%20NEW%20POPULAR%20CULTURES%20IN%20AFRICA&f=false

Week 12: The rise and rise of Nollywood: How the Nigerian film industry rose to become the second largest in the world. Discussions of some of the key players and seminal works.
Reading:
Jonathan Haynes and Onookome Okome’s Evolving Popular Media Nigerian Video Films. It is available for download at http://www.jstor.org/stable/3820623

Week 13: From YouTube to Netflix: Nollywood in a Digital Age
Reading:
Noah Tsika’s From Yorùbá to YouTube: Studying Nollywood's Star System. This can be downloaded at http://www.jstor.org/stable/10.2979/blackcamera.5.2.95

Week 14: New Media and African literature: New media literary genres; critical discussion of creative works in digital media.
Readings: Students to select texts from Saraba online magazine, www.thenewblackmagazine.com, Brittle Paper etc.

Learning Outcomes: You are expected to write an essay at the end of the semester based on the materials used on this course. You are also expected to produce a detailed journal of external materials you may have read or seen relating to our discussions. In your essay and journal, you are expected to demonstrate you have grappled with most of the issues raised during our discussions.

Olorunshola Adenekan
10-M83-2-P3-1 Key Topics in Cultural History: Shakespeare on Screen (in englischer Sprache)
(also Key Topics in Literature)

Seminar

Termine:
wöchentlich Di 14:15 - 15:45 GW2 B3010 (Kleiner Studierraum) (2 SWS)

In 2016, the year marking the 400th anniversary of Shakespeare’s death, Shakespeare’s plays are as enticing to filmmakers and visual artists as they were in 1899 when the first Shakespeare film was screened. Since then the number of filmic contributions has increased steadily. Divided into three projects depending on the choice of play (Hamlet, Macbeth and Othello) and drawing equally on traditional as well as contemporary ideas, that have emerged in the fields of cultural studies, transnational film, world cinema as well as filmic and television storytelling, we will explore how three plays by William Shakespeare are re-imagined in different linguistic and cultural contexts in selected late 20th Century and post-2000 productions. Focusing on traditional as well as contemporary stories/modern updates course participants will be encouraged to investigate these films’ engagement with sexuality and gender, race and ethnicity and questions of power. In addition, the course is designed to introduce its participants to key terms and functional principles of filmic storytelling: Film editing and its functions, mise en scène (modification of space), cinematography (light and colour), camera usage as well as plot, character, and filmic space; the nature of narrative in film and its dramatic composition (composition, narration and focalisation). We may also engage with the following questions: What specific, distinguishable filmic distinctions guide viewers’ constructions of reading hypotheses? How do filmic cues guide the perception of the audience?
Since some of the participants are required to submit a research-based term paper, we will use parts of our seminar discussions to the development of topics, the formulation of a thesis statement, as well as considerations about the methodological approaches of writing such a paper.

Electronic resources for independent study:

Jahn, Manfred. 2003. A Guide to Narratological Film Analysis. Poems, Plays, and Prose: A Guide to the Theory of Literary Genres. English Department, University of Cologne. http://www.uni-koeln.de/~ame02/pppf.htm

Jahn, Manfred. 2003. A Guide to the Theory of Drama. Part II of Poems, Plays, and Prose: A Guide to the Theory of Literary Genres. English Department, University of Cologne. http://www.uni-koeln.de/~ame02/pppd.htm
Lexikon der Filmbegriffe: http://filmlexikon.uni-kiel.de/index.php?action=lexikon

For Non-E-SC students and academic exchange students: Please contact your lecturer if you require more than 3 credit points.

Additional secondary sources can be accessed in the "Semesterapparat", a reference only section on the third floor of the library building. A number of DVDs will be available in the “Semesterapparat” in the “Mediathek”, located on the fourth floor of the library building: http://www.suub.uni-bremen.de/standorte/zentrale/mediathek/.

Please note that prior enrolment via Stud.IP is mandatory. Deadline: 15 September 2016.

Assessment:

regular attendance, informed participation in class discussion,

in-depth knowledge of the selected reading material,

homework assignments,

presentation of research paper or group project,

term paper.

The requirements as formulated above may vary depending on your overall degree program.

E-SC students - Please check the departmental website for guidelines on modules and exams: http://www.fb10.uni-bremen.de/anglistik/ba2/profil/studienplan.aspx

MA TnL module: http://www.master-transnationale-literaturwissenschaft.uni-bremen.de/studium/modulbeschreibungen/

Please be familiar with the following materials:

Filmography:

Hamlet. (Italics)(UK, US 1996) Dir. Kenneth Branagh

Hamlet. (Italics) (US, 2000) Dir. Michael Almereyda

Haider. (Italics) (India, 2014) Dir. Vishal Bhardwaj

Macbeth. (Italics) (US, 1948) Dir. Orson Welles (optional)

Throne of Blood. (Italics) (Japan, 1957). Dir. Akira Kurosawa

Maqbool. (Italics) (India, 2004) Dir. Vishal Bhardwaj

Macbeth. (Italics) (UK, 2015) Dir. Justin Kurzel

Othello. (Italics) (UK, US 1995) Dir. Oliver Parker

Othello. (Italics) (UK, 2001) Dir. Geoffrey Sax

Omkara. (Italics) (India, 2006) Dir. Vishal Bhardwaj

Dr. Jana Nittel
10-M83-3-V-2 Key Topics in Cultural History: Gender - Culture - Feminism (in englischer Sprache)

Seminar

Termine:
wöchentlich Mi 16:15 - 17:45 GW2 B2890 (2 SWS)

Ziel der Ringvorlesung ist es, über gender-bezogene Themen und Forschungsansätze fachübergreifend ins Gespräch zu kommen und eine größere Sichtbarkeit für die vielfältigen diesbezüglichen wissenschaftlichen Aktivitäten im FB 10 herzustellen. Das erscheint uns in Zeiten, da es in der breiteren Öffentlichkeit vermehrt zu anti-feministischen, gender-studies-feindlichen und homophoben Polemiken kommt, aber gleichzeitig eine junge Generation von Aktivist*innen die Relevanz feministischer und queerer Analysen für sich neu entdeckt, besonders angebracht. Den Studierenden an unserem Fachbereich kann eine solche Reihe zugleich Ideengeber und Motivation für die eigene Spezialisierung sein. Die Vorträge finden im zweiwöchigen Rhythmus statt und sind in ein reguläres Seminar eingebettet, das von Dr Karin Esders geleitet wird.

This course is a mixture between a lecture course and a regular seminar. Scholars and teachers both from FB 10 and TU Berlin will deliver lectures on various aspects of our general topic initiating a transdisciplinary discourse on "Gender - Culture - Feminism". In the sessions between the lectures we will discuss corresponding texts and resources to prepare the diverse subjects of the presentations and to critically reflect on their respective ideas and arguments.

Please note that some of the lectures will be in German. You are welcome to attend lectures only without participating in the full seminar.
Essential readings will be available for download on Stud-IP. You should also consult the 'Semesterapparat' (SuUB) for further readings.
Requirements depend on the number of CPs you wish to achieve and will be announced at the beginning of the course.
Please note that prior enrollment via Stud.IP is mandatory for full seminar participation.

Dr. Karin Esders-Angermund

SP-2 Aufbaumodul: Sprachpraxis/ Practical-Language Proficiency Module (Part 1) (nur für das Wintersemester)

Modulbeauftragte/r: Michael Claridge, claridge@uni-bremen.de
VAK Titel der Veranstaltung DozentIn
10-76-3-SP2-01 Content-Based Integrated Skills a (in englischer Sprache)

Übung

Termine:
wöchentlich Di 08:15 - 09:45 GW2 A4330 (2 SWS)

Content-based integrated skills (CBIS)…. You need a translation!? In the spirit of “one for all, all for one,” CBIS entails implementing all four of your core language skills (listening, speaking, reading, and writing) and rolling up your sleeves to Go MAD (!) aka Go Make a Difference by turning a theoretical challenge into a practical success!

Rather than engaging in a role-playing simulating as is done in some CBIS classes, this particular group will establish and put their own unique ideas into practice. Thus, you will have the opportunity to learn through playing a key role in a scaled-down real-life situation. This will require (allow) you to independently make decisions, solve problems, and present the fruits of your labours.

The Game Plan:
The class will entail four distinct phases: a pre-simulation phase in which your teams will be formed; a preparatory phase during which the core of your work will be accomplished independently as teams; the presentation phase during which your ideas will be put into practice; and finally, the debriefing phase during which we will reflect on the overall process as a class.
Literature: Required hand out material will be made available via StudIP.

For further detail, please consult the course description hand out.

Dr. Penelope A. Murdock
10-76-3-SP2-02 Content-Based Integrated Skills b (in englischer Sprache)

Übung

Termine:
wöchentlich Mo 12:15 - 13:45 GW2 A4020 (2 SWS)

Content-based integrated skills (CBIS)…. You need a translation!? In the spirit of “one for all, all for one,” CBIS entails implementing all four of your core language skills (listening, speaking, reading, and writing) and rolling up your sleeves to Go MAD (!) aka Go Make a Difference by turning a theoretical challenge into a practical success!

Rather than engaging in a role-playing simulating as is done in some CBIS classes, this particular group will establish and put their own unique ideas into practice. Thus, you will have the opportunity to learn through playing a key role in a scaled-down real-life situation. This will require (allow) you to independently make decisions, solve problems, and present the fruits of your labours.

The Game Plan:
The class will entail four distinct phases: a pre-simulation phase in which your teams will be formed; a preparatory phase during which the core of your work will be accomplished independently as teams; the presentation phase during which your ideas will be put into practice; and finally, the debriefing phase during which we will reflect on the overall process as a class.

Literature: Required hand out material will be made available via StudIP.

For further detail, please consult the course description hand out.

Dr. Penelope A. Murdock
10-76-3-SP2-03 Content-Based Integrated Skills c (in englischer Sprache)

Übung

Termine:
wöchentlich Di 14:15 - 15:45 GW2 B1632 (2 SWS)

Content-based integrated skills (CBIS)…. You need a translation!? In the spirit of “one for all, all for one,” CBIS entails implementing all four of your core language skills (listening, speaking, reading, and writing) and rolling up your sleeves to Go MAD (!) aka Go Make a Difference by turning a theoretical challenge into a practical success!

Rather than engaging in a role-playing simulating as is done in some CBIS classes, this particular group will establish and put their own unique ideas into practice. Thus, you will have the opportunity to learn through playing a key role in a scaled-down real-life situation. This will require (allow) you to independently make decisions, solve problems, and present the fruits of your labours.

The Game Plan:
The class will entail four distinct phases: a pre-simulation phase in which your teams will be formed; a preparatory phase during which the core of your work will be accomplished independently as teams; the presentation phase during which your ideas will be put into practice; and finally, the debriefing phase during which we will reflect on the overall process as a class.

Literature: Required hand out material will be made available via StudIP.

For further detail, please consult the course description hand out.

Dr. Penelope A. Murdock
10-76-3-SP2-04 Content-Based Integrated Skills d (in englischer Sprache)

Übung
ECTS: 3

Termine:
wöchentlich Do 14:15 - 15:45 SuUB 4320 (Studio II Medienraum ) (2 SWS)

SUMMARY
We will be using a simulation on a politically and/or culturally relevant topic in which you are representatives (e.g. of a country, an NGO, an interest group) to a task force set up to examine aspects of the topic and negotiate a mutually acceptable solution with the other groups. The work will require you to work together with other groups and their members (as well as your own!), argue your case, persuade them, and reach consensus.
This framework will enable you to develop all four language skills (speaking & listening, writing & reading); to further your ability to use the correct register (formal<->informal, spoken<->written) when communicating in English; to expand your soft skills (e.g. time management; teamwork; taking responsibility for your own work and that of your team); and - of course - to develop your understanding of the issue at stake, as well as what a given formulation actually involves (and means) - in short, audience focus...
There will be some formal collaborative writing as members of your group, and all participants will be writing at least an initial piece to focus your thoughts on the topic, a summary in mid-simulation, and a reflective essay on what they have learnt and what skills they have acquired in the course of the semester's work.

Registration via Stud.IP
Advance registration deadlines on Stud.IP:
For courses offered in the winter term: September, 15th
For courses offered for first semester students: last Friday before the start of the lecture period

This course is not open to Erasmus students below a B2 English level.

Katja Müller, M.A.
10-76-3-SP2-05 Content-Based Integrated Skills e (in englischer Sprache)

Übung
ECTS: 3

Termine:
wöchentlich Fr 14:15 - 15:45 SFG 1030 (2 SWS)

SUMMARY
We will be using a simulation on a politically and/or culturally relevant topic in which you are representatives (e.g. of a country, an NGO, an interest group) to a task force set up to examine aspects of the topic and negotiate a mutually acceptable solution with the other groups. The work will require you to work together with other groups and their members (as well as your own!), argue your case, persuade them, and reach consensus.
This framework will enable you to develop all four language skills (speaking & listening, writing & reading); to further your ability to use the correct register (formal<->informal, spoken<->written) when communicating in English; to expand your soft skills (e.g. time management; teamwork; taking responsibility for your own work and that of your team); and - of course - to develop your understanding of the issue at stake, as well as what a given formulation actually involves (and means) - in short, audience focus...
There will be some formal collaborative writing as members of your group, and all participants will be writing at least an initial piece to focus your thoughts on the topic, a summary in mid-simulation, and a reflective essay on what they have learnt and what skills they have acquired in the course of the semester's work.

Registration via Stud.IP
Advance registration deadlines on Stud.IP:
For courses offered in the winter term: September, 15th
For courses offered for first semester students: last Friday before the start of the lecture period

This course is not open to Erasmus students below a B2 English level.

Katja Müller, M.A.
10-76-3-SP2-06 Content-Based Integrated Skills f: 'Language for Negotiation' (in englischer Sprache)

Übung
ECTS: 3

Termine:
wöchentlich Mi 16:15 - 17:45 GW2 B1632 (2 SWS)

Einzeltermine:
Fr 09.12.16 16:00 - 20:00 GW2 B2880
Fr 13.01.17 16:00 - 20:00 GW2 B2880

We will be using a simulation on a politically and/or culturally relevant topic in which you are representatives (e.g. of a country, an NGO, an interest group) to a fictitious task force set up to examine aspects of the topic and negotiate a mutually acceptable solution with the other groups. The work will require you to work together with other groups and their members (as well as your own!), argue your case, persuade them, and reach consensus.
This framework will enable you to develop all four language skills (speaking & listening, writing & reading); to further your ability to use the correct register (formal<->informal, spoken<->written) when communicating in English; to expand your soft skills (e.g. time management; teamwork; taking responsibility for your own work and that of your team); and - of course - to develop your understanding of the issue at stake, as well as what a given formulation actually involves (and means) - in short, audience focus...
There will be some formal collaborative writing as members of your group, and all participants will be writing at least an initial piece to focus your thoughts on the topic, a summary in mid-simulation, and a reflective essay on what they have learnt and what skills they have acquired in the course of the semester's work.
Registration for this CBIS class: There will initially be 18 places open for this class. Register in Stud.IP for the class by 12 noon on Thursday, 15th September. Once the registration process ends on that day, I will notify you (via Stud.IP) whether you have a seat in the class. Should you not receive a seat in the class, please proceed by first consulting StudIP to determine where seats remain available. (By simply clicking on the link to each respective parallel class and scrolling down to the "Number of Participants" section, one can see how many seats remain open.) Then contact the relevant CBIS class teacher.
If you believe you are in a situation of exceptional hardship and can truly only take part in my CBIS class despite the other parallel sections, contact me well in advance of 15th September to plead your case (i.e. provide proof of the conflict you have). I will consider your request and examine whether I can accommodate you.

Michael Claridge, M.A., Dip.Ed.
10-76-3-SP2-07 Content-Based Integrated Skills g (in englischer Sprache)

Übung
ECTS: 3

Termine:
wöchentlich Do 12:15 - 13:45 GW1 B0080 (2 SWS)

We will be using a simulation on a politically and/or culturally relevant topic in which you are representatives (e.g. of a country, an NGO, an interest group) to a task force set up to examine aspects of the topic and negotiate a mutually acceptable solution with the other groups. The work will require you to work together with other groups and their members (as well as your own!), argue your case, persuade them, and reach consensus.
This framework will enable you to develop all four language skills (speaking & listening, writing & reading); to further your ability to use the correct register (formal<->informal, spoken<->written) when communicating in English; to expand your soft skills (e.g. time management; teamwork; taking responsibility for your own work and that of your team); and - of course - to develop your understanding of the issue at stake, as well as what a given formulation actually involves (and means) - in short, audience focus...
There will be some formal collaborative writing as members of your group
Registration to be completed via StudIP by the 15th September 2016

Lisa Nehls
10-76-3-SP2-08 Content-Based Integrated Skills h (in englischer Sprache)

Übung
ECTS: 3

Termine:
wöchentlich Fr 14:15 - 15:45 GW2 B3010 (Kleiner Studierraum) (2 SWS)

We will be using a simulation on a politically and/or culturally relevant topic in which you are representatives (e.g. of a country, an NGO, an interest group) to a task force set up to examine aspects of the topic and negotiate a mutually acceptable solution with the other groups. The work will require you to work together with other groups and their members (as well as your own!), argue your case, persuade them, and reach consensus.
This framework will enable you to develop all four language skills (speaking & listening, writing & reading); to further your ability to use the correct register (formal<->informal, spoken<->written) when communicating in English; to expand your soft skills (e.g. time management; teamwork; taking responsibility for your own work and that of your team); and - of course - to develop your understanding of the issue at stake, as well as what a given formulation actually involves (and means) - in short, audience focus...
There will be some formal collaborative writing as members of your group
Registration to be completed via StudIP by the 15th September 2016

Lisa Nehls
10-76-3-SP2-09 Content-Based Integrated Skills i (in englischer Sprache)

Übung
ECTS: 3

Termine:
wöchentlich Fr 16:15 - 17:45 GW2 B3010 (Kleiner Studierraum) (2 SWS)

We will be using a simulation on a politically and/or culturally relevant topic in which you are representatives (e.g. of a country, an NGO, an interest group) to a task force set up to examine aspects of the topic and negotiate a mutually acceptable solution with the other groups. The work will require you to work together with other groups and their members (as well as your own!), argue your case, persuade them, and reach consensus.
This framework will enable you to develop all four language skills (speaking & listening, writing & reading); to further your ability to use the correct register (formal<->informal, spoken<->written) when communicating in English; to expand your soft skills (e.g. time management; teamwork; taking responsibility for your own work and that of your team); and - of course - to develop your understanding of the issue at stake, as well as what a given formulation actually involves (and means) - in short, audience focus...
There will be some formal collaborative writing as members of your group
Registration to be completed via StudIP by the 15th September 2016

Lisa Nehls
10-76-3-SP2-10 Content-Based Integrated Skills j (in englischer Sprache)

Übung

Termine:
wöchentlich Do 08:00 - 10:00 GW2 B3770 (2 SWS)
Anne Kirkham, M.A.
10-76-3-SP2-11 Content-Based Integrated Skills k (in englischer Sprache)

Übung

Termine:
wöchentlich Mi 08:15 - 09:45 SFG 1030 (2 SWS)
Anne Kirkham, M.A.

WD-1a: Aufbaumodul: Literatur- und Sprachwissenschaft (Wahlpflichtmodul 6 CP) (nur für das Wintersemester)

(3 CP + 3 CP)

Es gilt zu beachten: Laut SK-Beschluss (E-SC) vom 21.11.2012 ist die Pruefungsleistung im Bereich "Key Topics in Literature" zu erbringen = Klausur/Written test oder benotete Präsentationsleistung/presentation.

Modulbeauftragte/r: Dr. Jana Nittel, jnittel@uni-bremen.de
VAK Titel der Veranstaltung DozentIn
10-76-3-D1/WD1-08 Key Topics in Literature: Transmedial and Transmedia Storytelling: The Case of Sherlock Holmes and Dr Watson (in englischer Sprache)

Seminar

Termine:
wöchentlich Do 12:15 - 13:45 GW2 B3010 (Kleiner Studierraum) (2 SWS) Seminar

Sir Arthur Conan Doyle (1859-1930) as highly prolific and technologically minded author, produced an impressive body of work including plays, romances, poetry, non-fiction, science fiction stories and historical novels, in addition to his collections of detective fiction stories featuring the most memorable and certainly best known of the epistemological detectives, Sherlock Holmes. Since his first public appearance in the A Study in Scarlet (1887), a global audience continues to enjoy the adventures and living habits of the eccentric persona of the detective. This immense popularity was not only further spurned by the corpus of non-canonical Sherlock Holmes works and several fictional biographies, chronologies of Holmes’s life and the London of Sherlock Holmes, but most prominently by the character’s effortless shift from page to stage, to radio and to screen, in other words, the process of storytelling, canonical or non-canonical, across various media and genres, such as film, animated film, TV series, radio plays, audio books, graphic novels, cartoons, and video games, constituting the transmedial world of Sherlock Holmes. Every subsequent media shift (written to audio-visual) or retelling of the Sherlock Holmes prose narratives as filmic narratives offered its makers and producers multifarious ways of manipulating and shaping what Stephen Knight termed “the traditional image of Sherlock Holmes”: “[the]deerstalker hat, a checked Inverness cape, large curved pipe and a magnifying glass” (368).

Divided into four areas of critical inquiry (novel, feature film, TV series and graphic novel), and drawing equally on traditional as well as contemporary ideas, that have emerged in the fields of crime fiction, (post) classical and transmedial narratology, filmic and television storytelling, Transmedia Fandom and Comics studies, we will trace the transformation of our cherished key figures, discuss the effects of audience participation and explore the nature of narrative, in general, and that of the analytical detective fiction narrative, in particular (plot, character and space) in differing media and genre formats.

Since some of the participants are required to submit a research-based term paper, we will use parts of our seminar discussions to the development of topics, the formulation of a thesis statement, as well as considerations about the methodological approaches of writing such a paper.

For Non-E-SC students and academic exchange students: Please contact your lecturer if you require more than 3 credit points.

Additional secondary sources can be accessed in the "Semesterapparat", a reference only section on the third floor of the library building. A number of DVDs will be available in the “Semesterapparat” in the “Mediathek”, located on the fourth floor of the library building: http://www.suub.uni-bremen.de/standorte/zentrale/mediathek/.
For the availability of primary sources, please check the “Information” section on Stud.IP. A reader with selected secondary text materials will be made available for download on Stud. IP. You may wish to check the learning compact for further details such as requirements, weekly schedule, select bibliography and modes of assessment ("Allgemeiner Dateiordner" on Stud. IP).

Please note that prior enrolment via Stud.IP is mandatory. Deadline: 15 September 2016.
Assessment:

• regular attendance, informed participation in class discussion,
• in-depth knowledge of the selected reading material,
• homework assignments,
• presentation of research paper or group project,
• term paper.

The requirements as formulated above may vary depending on your overall degree program.

E-SC students - Please check the departmental website for guidelines on modules and exams: http://www.fb10.uni-bremen.de/anglistik/ba2/profil/studienplan.aspx

Please be familiar with the following materials:

Novel/Short Story

Doyle, Arthur C. "A Study in Scarlet”. Sherlock Holmes: The Complete Illustrated Novels. (Italics) London: Chancellor Press, 1987. 1-108. Print.

---."A Scandal in Bohemia”. Sherlock Holmes: The Complete Illustrated Short Stories. (Italics) London: Chancellor Press, 1985. 9-28. Print.

Feature Film

Sherlock Holmes (Italics) (USA, D 2009). Director: Guy Ritchie. Warner 2010. DVD.

TV Series

Elementary (Italics) – Season 1. (US, CBS 2012). Created by Robert Doherty. DVD.

Sherlock (Italics) – Season 1. (UK, BBC 2010). "A Study in Pink”, “The Blind Banker“, “The Great Game”. Created by Mark Gatiss and Steven Moffat. DVD.

Graphic Novel

Doyle, Arthur C. A Study in Scarlet. A Sherlock Holmes Graphic Novel. (Italics) Illustrated by I.N.J. Culbard. Text adapted by Ian Edington. New York City: Sterling (Reprint Edition), 2010. Print.

Dr. Jana Nittel
10-76-3-D1/WD1-10 Key Topics in Literature: New American Classics (in englischer Sprache)

Seminar

Termine:
wöchentlich Do 14:15 - 15:45 GRA2 0080 (2 SWS) Seminar

Einzeltermine:
Mo 16.01.17 16:00 - 20:30 GW1 B0100

This seminar will be an excursion into close reading, and lots of it. We will read and study a series of post-2000 US American novels which have been nominees or winners in prestigious literary contests, such as the Pulitzer Price - thus, new "classics". Reading all the texts, preferably before semester beginning, will be a prerequisite; we will study them together in class, based on group or individual student presentations of each one. Which, and whose AMERICA do these novels represent? Which paradigmatic conflicts do they commit to cultural memory with their writing? Which contemporary or historical features of US American life and society do they draw readers' attention to? Can we discern shared aesthetic features of these texts?
The texts are, in no particular order:
Marilynne Robinson, Lila
Jesmyn Ward, Salvage the Bones
Chimamanda Adichie, Americanah
Richard Ford, Let Me Be Frank With You
Margaret Verble, Maud's Line
Maceo Montoya, The Deportation of Wopper Barraza: A Novel
David Anthony Durham, Walk Through Darkness

Prof. Dr. Sabine Bröck
10-76-3-D1/WD1-11 Key Topics in Literature: The Fabric of Slavery (in englischer Sprache)

Seminar

Termine:
wöchentlich Di 14:15 - 15:45 GW1 B1070 GW2 A3570 (FB 10 Besprechungsraum) (2 SWS) Seminar

Einzeltermine:
Mo 30.01.17 17:00 - 20:00 GW2 B1216

This is part one of a two semester class; each class may be taken separately, however. This winter semester we will, based on a general introduction to the history of New World enslavement, as well as on an introduction into the theory of representation (see Stuart Hall) watch and study three recent, very different films about modern enslavement:

Tarantino's Django Unchained
McQueen's 12 Years A Slave
and Asante's Belle.

While we will try our very best to avoid voyeuristic titillation, please come prepared to watch material, and talk about it which contains graphic images of violence against Black people. One of the main goals of the seminar will be, precisely, to ask which function does any representation of anti-black violence serve; which, and whose interests benefit, and what happens to different constitutions in the course of studying it? Which effect, on the contrary, does the avoidance of such representation have on viewers, and how does this evasion work?

Please read as prerequisite:
1. Hall, Stuart. "The Work of Representation." in Representation: Cultural Representations and Signifying Practices. ed. Stuart Hall. London: Sage, 1997. 1-74.
2. Kenneth Morgan, Transatlantic Slavery. Padstow,: T. J. International, 2016 ( a one-volume 180 pages concise history of slavery)

Further secondary material will be brought into class in the context of our debates.

Prof. Dr. Sabine Bröck
10-76-3-D1/WD1-12 Key Topics in Literature: Anatomy and Power in Jonathan Swift's Gulliver's Travels (in englischer Sprache)

Seminar

Termine:
wöchentlich Di 14:15 - 15:45 SuUB 4330 (Studio I Medienraum ) (2 SWS) Seminar

Most of us are familiar with the voyages of Lemuel Gulliver who heads out to the South Sea and is washed up on Lilliput, an island inhabited by tiny people who capture him. Gulliver eventually becomes friends with the Emperor of the Lilliputians whose customs he learns and wars he participates in. After a series of threats he escapes and returns to England. Only few know, that Gulliver is not only a surgeon, but travels to more islands including Broddingnag and its giants; Laputa, a floating island full of people only interested in mathematics and music; Glubbdubdrib and Luggnagg, islands of sorcerers and immortals; and finally the island of the beastly Yahoos and the horse-friendly Houyhnhnms.

Swift’s masterpiece is a well-known satire and mocks both human nature as well as travel literature – a highly popular genre in eighteenth-century Britain. Gulliver’s Travels is concerned with man’s intellectual pride and pretensions to reason while also addressing particularly scientific discoveries and developments. What this seminar focusses on are observations of the human body in Swift’s prose satire. Scholars agree on the blatant misogyny present in his text which manifests especially in Gulliver’s disgusted descriptions of female bodies or parts of it he comes across ranging from a nurse’s huge breast and nipple to a sexual encounter he has with one of the beast-like Yahoos.

The aim of this course is to shed light on discourses of gender and the female body apparent in eighteenth-century literature in order to examine if and how representations of anatomy are linked with patriarchal power structures.

Keywords: Body Studies, Gender Studies, Satire, History of Science, Medical Humanities, Adaptation Studies, Eighteenth-Century

Requirements:
• registration on Stud.IP
• in-depth knowledge of the reading material (i.e. read the novel[s] in advance!)*
• regular attendance and oral participation
• oral presentation and handout
• term paper (optional)

*NOTE: YOUR FAMILIARITY WITH THE PRIMARY TEXT(S) IS MANDATORY AND WILL BE EXAMINED IN ONE OF THE FIRST SESSIONS***

Text:
Swift, Jonathan [1726]. Gulliver’s Travels (Norton Critical Edition). New York: Norton, 2002.*

*NOTE: Please pay attention to the EXACT publication dates when purchasing the book(s) so we can all work with the same editions.

Dr. phil. Jennifer Henke
10-76-3-D1/WD1-13 Key Topics in Literature: Narratives of Illness (in englischer Sprache)

Seminar

Termine:
wöchentlich Fr 14:15 - 15:45 SFG 1060 Dezernetenbesprechnungsraum (2 SWS) Seminar

The purpose of this seminar is to introduce students to the flourishing genre of illness narratives. In recent decades, more and more literary and non-literary texts depict the experience of illness and its effects on people's lives. This course will use fictional writings (e.g. poems, short stories, and excerpts from novels) as well as autobiographical accounts by actual patients, family members, or healthcare professionals to explore the physical, psychological, and emotional aspects of a patient's, doctor's, or relative's experience of such conditions as Alzheimer's, cancer, or AIDS.

In addition to an in-depth analysis and interpretation of the selected texts, we will look at illness narratives in the context of the history of medicine, medical humanities, narrative medicine, literary history, body studies, life writing, and gender theory.

Requirements:
- regular attendance and active participation
- in-depth knowledge of the reading material
- presentation (and handout) and/or final paper

A detailed syllabus will be handed out in the first session.

Texts:

Please make sure that you purchase exactly the copies given below, so that we can all work with the same edition.

Edson, Margaret. Wit. New York: Faber and Faber, 1999. ISBN: 978-0-571-19877-1.
Kalanithi, Paul. When Breath Becomes Air. London: The Bodley Head, 2016. ISBN: 978-1-847-92367-7.

Additional primary texts and secondary materials will be made available on Stud.IP.

Please note that prior enrolment via Stud.IP is mandatory.

Christine Müller, M.A.
10-76-3-WD1-01 Key Topics in Linguistics: English-based Pidgins and Creoles (in englischer Sprache)

Seminar

Termine:
wöchentlich Di 14:15 - 15:45 GW2 A4020 (2 SWS)

Pidgins and creoles are contact languages that emerged from intense contact among two or more previously existing languages.
They usually serve as a lingua franca for speakers of different language backgrounds
and are therefore highly influenced by the speakers’ need for communication.
In this seminar, we will explore the linguistic features of English-based pidgins and creoles around the globe, such as Naija Pidgin or Jamaican Patois.
We will not only learn about the different linguistic properties of particular
pidgins/creoles and the processes that are at play in language contact and language change,
but also discuss the historical and sociolinguistic factors that had an impact on the emergence and
development of pidgins and creoles from their colonial context up until now.

Tonia Anni Sperling
10-76-3-WD1-02 Key Topics in Linguistics: Analysing Emotion in Multimodal Texts (in englischer Sprache)

Seminar

Termine:
wöchentlich Fr 12:15 - 13:45 GW2 B3010 (Kleiner Studierraum) (2 SWS)

Humans have the unique capacity to experience complex emotions and to communicate those experiences to one another with verbal and non-verbal mediums. To date, many studies have investigated how our emotional experiences get translated into language and different kinds of multimodal artifacts such as literature, printed artworks or moving images. These studies are important for domains ranging from discourse analysis to cross cultural communication. However, what has not been sufficiently studied is that language as well as non-verbal modes might not just translate feelings and human values into words, but could also help shape the nature of those emotions in a complex way with different affordances in different modes and media. This is precisely the perspective we will explore throughout this course. We will review the various methods that have investigated relationships between verbal/visual/audio texts and emotion and examine how the nature of the relationship between emotion and potentials of different modes such as verbal, visual and audio modes can be systematically analyzed.

Requirement:
3 CPs: participation, Referat
6 CPs: participation, Referat and final project

Selected readings:
Kress & van Leeuwen, (2006) Reading Images: the grammar of visual design
*Chapter 4, Representation and Interaction
*Chapter 5, Modality

*Feng and O’Halloran (2012) Representing emotive meaning in visual images: A social semiotic approach. Journal of Pragmatics, Vol 44: 2067 -- 2084

*Williams (2008) Image, Text and Story: comics and graphic novels in classroom. Art Education, 61:6, 13-19

*Smith (1994) Altered States: Character and Emotional Response in the Cinema.
Cinema Journal, Vol. 33, No. 4 (Summer, 1994), pp. 34-56

*Tseng (2017) Analysing characters’ developments in film and comics pages. Discourse, Context & Media

Dr. Chiaoi Tseng
10-76-3-WD1-03 Key Topics in Linguistics: Multimodal Text & Discourse Analysis (in englischer Sprache)

Seminar

Termine:
wöchentlich Di 16:15 - 17:45 GW2 B2900 (2 SWS)

It’s still a relatively new, but very exciting way within the context of linguistics to understand films and TV series as texts and to analyse comics with linguistic methods. The focus of these analyses lies no longer on language as the central semiotic resource, but includes the analysis of all possible modalities in an artefact, such as images, colours, layout and music, for example.
For this, multimodal text and discourse analysis has developed several methods and tools which make it possible to ask for the process of meaning construction in multimodal and multimedia texts and to analyze their coherence and structure. Central questions are, for example: How do we understand these texts at all (if there is no language involved, for instance)? How do we construct meaning and communicate with them and what kind of knowledge do we need to communicate effectively?
The seminar focuses on these questions, the mentioned tools and their theoretical background in the area of multimodal linguistics to demonstrate that these multimodal artefacts work similarly to verbal texts and that it is possible to use methods for verbal discourse to analyse and discuss them. Besides films and comics, we will also look at posters, Internet memes and other social media phenomena and strengthen our ability to analyze them.

Literature to start with:

Kress, Gunther/van Leeuwen, Theo (2001): Multimodal Discourse. The Modes and Media of Contemporary Communication. London: Arnold.

Kress, Gunther (2010): Multimodality. A Social Semiotic Approach to Contemporary Communication. London, New York: Routledge.

Jewitt, Carey (ed.) (2014): The Routledge Handbook of Multimodal Analysis. Second Edition. London, New York: Routledge.

Dr. Janina Wildfeuer
10-76-3-WD1-04 Key Topics in Linguistics: Language and Media (in englischer Sprache)

Seminar

Termine:
wöchentlich Mi 12:15 - 13:45 GW2 A3390 (CIP-Labor FB 10) (2 SWS)

In this seminar we will investigate the role of language in different types of media, e.g. printed (newspapers, magazines), spoken (radio, TV, film) and digital media (websites, social media like Facebook or Twitter). What role does language play? How can we tell if language is used to influence readers / listeners in a certain way? You will learn methods of corpus linguistics and critical discourse analysis that help to identify the different features, structures and functions of the language used in media.

Requirements
Homework assignments (reading 10-30 pages each week; possibly some exercises).
Active participation in all class work, working through texts / exercises / discussions.

BA ESC ( 2011) WD 1 a: An analysis + written report (not graded, 3 CP)
BA ESC ( 2011) WD 1 c: An analysis + poster presentation (graded, 3 CP)
BA Linguistik (2011) SIK 4: An analysis + poster + term paper (graded, 6 CP)
Others: talk to lecturer for an arrangement

Recommended literature (no need to buy any)
Aitchison, Jean & Diana M. Lewis (eds.) 2003. New Media Language. Routledge.
Durant, Alan & Marina Lambrou. 2009. Language and Media: A Resource Book for Students. London; New York: Routledge.
McEnery, Tony & Richard Xiao & Yukio Tono. 2006. Corpus-based Language Studies: An Advanced Resource Book. London; New York: Routledge.
Silverblatt, Art. 2008. Media Literacy. 3rd ed. Westport, Ct: Praeger.

For students of the development certificate study: Only English-Speaking Cultures students are allowed to attend this seminar.

Dr. Anke Schulz
10-M83-2-P1-1 Key Topics in Literature: Fictions of Migration (in englischer Sprache)

Seminar

Termine:
wöchentlich Mo 12:15 - 13:45 SuUB 4320 (Studio II Medienraum ) (2 SWS)

In this seminar we will read works of fiction, and critical essays and articles, by and about “migrant” authors and their works – those who come from one geographical location and write in/about another. We will explore the changing natures of migration, and the effects that the movements of people and cultures continue to have on such concepts as “home,” “nation” and “identity.” This course is designed to build on students’ existing familiarity with literary and cultural theory, and develop their application of critical reading skills. It is available in both the ‘English-Speaking Cultures,’ and the ‘Transnational Literatures’ degree programmes.

Dr. Janelle Rodriques
10-M83-2-P1-3 Key Topics in Literature: Travel Writing: Texts, Contexts, Criticism (in englischer Sprache)

Seminar

Termine:
wöchentlich Di 16:15 - 17:45 GW2 B3010 (Kleiner Studierraum) (2 SWS)

Travel writing is an increasingly popular genre in terms of text production and commercial success, encompassing a fascinating diversity of literary forms, modes and itineraries which negate a forthright definition of the genre. As a repository for factual and fictional accounts of mobility and cross-cultural exchange, however, it has long been underestimated for its potential to contribute to a broad range of cultural, political and historical debates that seek to reassess the role of travel writing as a "vehicle for geographic, ethnographic and sociological knowledge." (Thompson 4). This course is designed to introduce students to the comprehensive history of this dynamic and complex genre within the socio-cultural framework of the English-speaking world. We will trace recurrent literary conventions, themes, motifs, functions and concerns in historical and contemporary travel narratives in English by various key contributors and engage with textual and contextual approaches. Since some of the participants are required to submit a research paper, we will use parts of our seminar discussions to the development of topics, the formulation of a thesis statement, as well as considerations about the methodological approaches of writing such a paper.

For Non-E-SC students and academic exchange students: Please contact your lecturer if you require more than 3 credit points.

Additional secondary sources can be accessed in the "Semesterapparat", a reference only section on the third floor of the library building. A reader with selected secondary text materials will be made available for download on Stud. IP. You may wish to check the learning compact for further details such as requirements, weekly schedule, select bibliography and modes of assessment ("Allgemeiner Dateiordner" on Stud. IP).

Please note that prior enrolment via Stud.IP is mandatory. Deadline: 15 September 2016.

Assessment:

regular attendance, informed participation in class discussion,
in-depth knowledge of the selected reading material,
homework assignments,
presentation of research paper or group project,
term paper.

The requirements as formulated above may vary depending on your overall degree program. E-SC students - Please check the departmental website for guidelines on modules and exams: http://www.fb10.uni-bremen.de/anglistik/ba2/profil/studienplan.aspx
MA TnL module: http://www.master-transnationale-literaturwissenschaft.uni-bremen.de/studium/modulbeschreibungen/

Required reading before the first session (you need a copy for class):

Thompson, Carl. Travel Writing (Italics). London: Routledge, 2011. Print.

Copies can be purchased at the bookstore on our campus (Universitätsbuchhandlung Bremen: www.unibuch-bremen.de)

Dr. Jana Nittel
10-M83-2-P3-1 Key Topics in Cultural History: Shakespeare on Screen (in englischer Sprache)
(also Key Topics in Literature)

Seminar

Termine:
wöchentlich Di 14:15 - 15:45 GW2 B3010 (Kleiner Studierraum) (2 SWS)

In 2016, the year marking the 400th anniversary of Shakespeare’s death, Shakespeare’s plays are as enticing to filmmakers and visual artists as they were in 1899 when the first Shakespeare film was screened. Since then the number of filmic contributions has increased steadily. Divided into three projects depending on the choice of play (Hamlet, Macbeth and Othello) and drawing equally on traditional as well as contemporary ideas, that have emerged in the fields of cultural studies, transnational film, world cinema as well as filmic and television storytelling, we will explore how three plays by William Shakespeare are re-imagined in different linguistic and cultural contexts in selected late 20th Century and post-2000 productions. Focusing on traditional as well as contemporary stories/modern updates course participants will be encouraged to investigate these films’ engagement with sexuality and gender, race and ethnicity and questions of power. In addition, the course is designed to introduce its participants to key terms and functional principles of filmic storytelling: Film editing and its functions, mise en scène (modification of space), cinematography (light and colour), camera usage as well as plot, character, and filmic space; the nature of narrative in film and its dramatic composition (composition, narration and focalisation). We may also engage with the following questions: What specific, distinguishable filmic distinctions guide viewers’ constructions of reading hypotheses? How do filmic cues guide the perception of the audience?
Since some of the participants are required to submit a research-based term paper, we will use parts of our seminar discussions to the development of topics, the formulation of a thesis statement, as well as considerations about the methodological approaches of writing such a paper.

Electronic resources for independent study:

Jahn, Manfred. 2003. A Guide to Narratological Film Analysis. Poems, Plays, and Prose: A Guide to the Theory of Literary Genres. English Department, University of Cologne. http://www.uni-koeln.de/~ame02/pppf.htm

Jahn, Manfred. 2003. A Guide to the Theory of Drama. Part II of Poems, Plays, and Prose: A Guide to the Theory of Literary Genres. English Department, University of Cologne. http://www.uni-koeln.de/~ame02/pppd.htm
Lexikon der Filmbegriffe: http://filmlexikon.uni-kiel.de/index.php?action=lexikon

For Non-E-SC students and academic exchange students: Please contact your lecturer if you require more than 3 credit points.

Additional secondary sources can be accessed in the "Semesterapparat", a reference only section on the third floor of the library building. A number of DVDs will be available in the “Semesterapparat” in the “Mediathek”, located on the fourth floor of the library building: http://www.suub.uni-bremen.de/standorte/zentrale/mediathek/.

Please note that prior enrolment via Stud.IP is mandatory. Deadline: 15 September 2016.

Assessment:

regular attendance, informed participation in class discussion,

in-depth knowledge of the selected reading material,

homework assignments,

presentation of research paper or group project,

term paper.

The requirements as formulated above may vary depending on your overall degree program.

E-SC students - Please check the departmental website for guidelines on modules and exams: http://www.fb10.uni-bremen.de/anglistik/ba2/profil/studienplan.aspx

MA TnL module: http://www.master-transnationale-literaturwissenschaft.uni-bremen.de/studium/modulbeschreibungen/

Please be familiar with the following materials:

Filmography:

Hamlet. (Italics)(UK, US 1996) Dir. Kenneth Branagh

Hamlet. (Italics) (US, 2000) Dir. Michael Almereyda

Haider. (Italics) (India, 2014) Dir. Vishal Bhardwaj

Macbeth. (Italics) (US, 1948) Dir. Orson Welles (optional)

Throne of Blood. (Italics) (Japan, 1957). Dir. Akira Kurosawa

Maqbool. (Italics) (India, 2004) Dir. Vishal Bhardwaj

Macbeth. (Italics) (UK, 2015) Dir. Justin Kurzel

Othello. (Italics) (UK, US 1995) Dir. Oliver Parker

Othello. (Italics) (UK, 2001) Dir. Geoffrey Sax

Omkara. (Italics) (India, 2006) Dir. Vishal Bhardwaj

Dr. Jana Nittel

WD-1b Aufbaumodul: Literaturwissenschaft und Kulturgeschichte (Wahlpflichtmodul 6 CP) - (nur für das Wintersemester)

(3 CP + 3 CP)

Es gilt zu beachten: Laut SK-Beschluss (E-SC) vom 21.11.2012 ist die Pruefungsleistung im Bereich "Key Topics in Cultural History" zu erbringen = Klausur/Written test oder benotete Präsentationsleistung/presentation.

Modulbeauftragte/r: Dr. Jana Nittel, jnittel@uni-bremen.de
VAK Titel der Veranstaltung DozentIn
10-76-3-D1/WD1-01 Key Topics in Cultural History: Documenting the US: Themes, Concepts and Skills (in englischer Sprache)

Seminar

Einzeltermine:
Mi 09.11.16 17:00 - 18:00 GW2 A3570 (FB 10 Besprechungsraum)
Fr 18.11.16 12:00 - 18:00 GW2 A4020
Sa 19.11.16 11:00 - 17:00 MZH 1470
Fr 02.12.16 12:00 - 18:00 SFG 2060
Sa 03.12.16 11:00 - 17:00 MZH 1470

In this course we will study various documentary sources such as films, web pages, photographs in order to learn more about significant events in the USA both contemporary and historical. Yet at the same time we will question the reliability and viability of the respective resources in order to strengthen our awareness of the limits inherent in the various documentary formats.
Essential readings will be available for download on Stud-IP. You should also consult the 'Semesterapparat' (SuUB) for further readings.
Requirements:
• regular attendance and oral participation
• in-depth knowledge of the reading material
• oral presentation and handout
• term paper (possible)
Please note that prior enrollment via Stud.IP is mandatory.

Dr. Karin Esders-Angermund
10-76-3-D1/WD1-02 Key Topics in Cultural History: Analyzing Hollywood Cinema (in englischer Sprache)

Seminar

Termine:
wöchentlich Do 14:15 - 15:45 GW2 B1632 (2 SWS)

This course is designed to introduce students to critical scholarship on US-American film history and culture. Basic introductions to the analytical categories of race, class, gender, and sexuality will help students to analyze how films construct and limit representations of African-Americans, Native Americans, women and femininity, men and masculinity, sexuality, class struggle and class difference.
The participation in the course “Viewing film critically” Tuesdays 18:00 (sharp) – 20:00 (General Studies / Schlüsselqualifikation / Global Education) is highly recommended because it offers full-length screenings of the films we will discuss in class. Otherwise you must watch the films individually; they will be made available at the beginning of the semester on a reserve shelf in the SuuB-Mediathek.
Our major textbook will be Benshoff and Griffin: America on film: Representing race, class, gender, and sexuality at the movies. (Purchase is is suggested.)
Essential readings will be available for download on Stud-IP. You should also consult the 'Semesterapparat' (SuUB) for further readings.
Requirements:
• regular attendance and oral participation
• in-depth knowledge of the reading material
• oral presentation and handout
Please note that prior enrollment via Stud.IP is mandatory.

Dr. Karin Esders-Angermund
10-76-3-D1/WD1-03 Key Topics in Cultural History: Black (and white) in the Union Jack (in englischer Sprache)

Seminar
ECTS: 3

Termine:
wöchentlich Di 16:15 - 17:45 SFG 1020 GW2 B1700 (2 SWS)

Taking its cue from Paul Gilroy’s famous observation, 'There ain’t no Black in the Union Jack‘, this seminar is going to explore the impact migration and diasporic communities have on the notion of British national identity. We shall view a range of recent films projecting images of English and/or British identities in order to investigate how British national identity gets (re)conceptualised in the days of globalisation and multiculturalism. Course discussions will focus on the interrelations between individual and political identities, and will analyse how these films narrate and negotiate the multiply intertwined transitions from being black in Britain to being a Black Briton. -
Students are required to invest much time and dedication into week-to-week preparations that include not just the attentive viewing of films but also a high amount of reading. A list of films will be agreed upon in the first session, and will be put on restricted loan for you in the Mediathek.

Reading material will be made available on Stud.IP.

Requirements:
# regular attendance and active participation
# in-depth knowledge of the viewing and reading material
# portfolio of worksheets (graded in WD-1b)
# for a grade in D-1b: an additional long term paper of 8-10 pp.

Prior enrolment via Stud.IP is mandatory.

Irmgard Maassen
10-76-3-D1/WD1-04 Key Topics in Cultural History: British History and National Heritage (in englischer Sprache)

Seminar
ECTS: 3

Termine:
wöchentlich Mi 12:15 - 13:45 GW2 A4020 (2 SWS)

This course has a twofold aim: It is first of all designed to introduce students to select issues in British history, to major historical events, figures, developments and topics that have shaped the face of contemporary Britain and remain points of reference in today's political and cultural debates. But the main focus will lie on the way in which 'history' is being conceptualized, reproduced, exhibited, commercialized, and ideologically exploited not just in current politics (viz. the Brexit campaign) but also by the 'heritage industry'. In a series of case studies across a range of media, we will discuss and analyze the manner, meanings, and implicit messages of current representations of historical epochs and events: political speeches, museums, heritage sites, architecture, films, literature, royal weddings, war monuments…. After the Brexit referendum, investigating the uses that invocations of ‘British/English history’ are being put to seems particularly urgent.

Reading material will be made available for download in Stud.IP. A list of suggested research topics and case studies will be negotiated in the first session.

Requirements:
# regular attendance and active participation
# in-depth knowledge of the reading material
# a self-researched case study presented to the class (group presentation)
# two brief written assignments (graded in WD-1b)
# alternatively, for a grade in D-1b: a term paper of 8-10 pp.

Prior enrolment via StudIP is mandatory.

Irmgard Maassen
10-76-3-D1/WD1-08 Key Topics in Literature: Transmedial and Transmedia Storytelling: The Case of Sherlock Holmes and Dr Watson (in englischer Sprache)

Seminar

Termine:
wöchentlich Do 12:15 - 13:45 GW2 B3010 (Kleiner Studierraum) (2 SWS) Seminar

Sir Arthur Conan Doyle (1859-1930) as highly prolific and technologically minded author, produced an impressive body of work including plays, romances, poetry, non-fiction, science fiction stories and historical novels, in addition to his collections of detective fiction stories featuring the most memorable and certainly best known of the epistemological detectives, Sherlock Holmes. Since his first public appearance in the A Study in Scarlet (1887), a global audience continues to enjoy the adventures and living habits of the eccentric persona of the detective. This immense popularity was not only further spurned by the corpus of non-canonical Sherlock Holmes works and several fictional biographies, chronologies of Holmes’s life and the London of Sherlock Holmes, but most prominently by the character’s effortless shift from page to stage, to radio and to screen, in other words, the process of storytelling, canonical or non-canonical, across various media and genres, such as film, animated film, TV series, radio plays, audio books, graphic novels, cartoons, and video games, constituting the transmedial world of Sherlock Holmes. Every subsequent media shift (written to audio-visual) or retelling of the Sherlock Holmes prose narratives as filmic narratives offered its makers and producers multifarious ways of manipulating and shaping what Stephen Knight termed “the traditional image of Sherlock Holmes”: “[the]deerstalker hat, a checked Inverness cape, large curved pipe and a magnifying glass” (368).

Divided into four areas of critical inquiry (novel, feature film, TV series and graphic novel), and drawing equally on traditional as well as contemporary ideas, that have emerged in the fields of crime fiction, (post) classical and transmedial narratology, filmic and television storytelling, Transmedia Fandom and Comics studies, we will trace the transformation of our cherished key figures, discuss the effects of audience participation and explore the nature of narrative, in general, and that of the analytical detective fiction narrative, in particular (plot, character and space) in differing media and genre formats.

Since some of the participants are required to submit a research-based term paper, we will use parts of our seminar discussions to the development of topics, the formulation of a thesis statement, as well as considerations about the methodological approaches of writing such a paper.

For Non-E-SC students and academic exchange students: Please contact your lecturer if you require more than 3 credit points.

Additional secondary sources can be accessed in the "Semesterapparat", a reference only section on the third floor of the library building. A number of DVDs will be available in the “Semesterapparat” in the “Mediathek”, located on the fourth floor of the library building: http://www.suub.uni-bremen.de/standorte/zentrale/mediathek/.
For the availability of primary sources, please check the “Information” section on Stud.IP. A reader with selected secondary text materials will be made available for download on Stud. IP. You may wish to check the learning compact for further details such as requirements, weekly schedule, select bibliography and modes of assessment ("Allgemeiner Dateiordner" on Stud. IP).

Please note that prior enrolment via Stud.IP is mandatory. Deadline: 15 September 2016.
Assessment:

• regular attendance, informed participation in class discussion,
• in-depth knowledge of the selected reading material,
• homework assignments,
• presentation of research paper or group project,
• term paper.

The requirements as formulated above may vary depending on your overall degree program.

E-SC students - Please check the departmental website for guidelines on modules and exams: http://www.fb10.uni-bremen.de/anglistik/ba2/profil/studienplan.aspx

Please be familiar with the following materials:

Novel/Short Story

Doyle, Arthur C. "A Study in Scarlet”. Sherlock Holmes: The Complete Illustrated Novels. (Italics) London: Chancellor Press, 1987. 1-108. Print.

---."A Scandal in Bohemia”. Sherlock Holmes: The Complete Illustrated Short Stories. (Italics) London: Chancellor Press, 1985. 9-28. Print.

Feature Film

Sherlock Holmes (Italics) (USA, D 2009). Director: Guy Ritchie. Warner 2010. DVD.

TV Series

Elementary (Italics) – Season 1. (US, CBS 2012). Created by Robert Doherty. DVD.

Sherlock (Italics) – Season 1. (UK, BBC 2010). "A Study in Pink”, “The Blind Banker“, “The Great Game”. Created by Mark Gatiss and Steven Moffat. DVD.

Graphic Novel

Doyle, Arthur C. A Study in Scarlet. A Sherlock Holmes Graphic Novel. (Italics) Illustrated by I.N.J. Culbard. Text adapted by Ian Edington. New York City: Sterling (Reprint Edition), 2010. Print.

Dr. Jana Nittel
10-76-3-D1/WD1-10 Key Topics in Literature: New American Classics (in englischer Sprache)

Seminar

Termine:
wöchentlich Do 14:15 - 15:45 GRA2 0080 (2 SWS) Seminar

Einzeltermine:
Mo 16.01.17 16:00 - 20:30 GW1 B0100

This seminar will be an excursion into close reading, and lots of it. We will read and study a series of post-2000 US American novels which have been nominees or winners in prestigious literary contests, such as the Pulitzer Price - thus, new "classics". Reading all the texts, preferably before semester beginning, will be a prerequisite; we will study them together in class, based on group or individual student presentations of each one. Which, and whose AMERICA do these novels represent? Which paradigmatic conflicts do they commit to cultural memory with their writing? Which contemporary or historical features of US American life and society do they draw readers' attention to? Can we discern shared aesthetic features of these texts?
The texts are, in no particular order:
Marilynne Robinson, Lila
Jesmyn Ward, Salvage the Bones
Chimamanda Adichie, Americanah
Richard Ford, Let Me Be Frank With You
Margaret Verble, Maud's Line
Maceo Montoya, The Deportation of Wopper Barraza: A Novel
David Anthony Durham, Walk Through Darkness

Prof. Dr. Sabine Bröck
10-76-3-D1/WD1-11 Key Topics in Literature: The Fabric of Slavery (in englischer Sprache)

Seminar

Termine:
wöchentlich Di 14:15 - 15:45 GW1 B1070 GW2 A3570 (FB 10 Besprechungsraum) (2 SWS) Seminar

Einzeltermine:
Mo 30.01.17 17:00 - 20:00 GW2 B1216

This is part one of a two semester class; each class may be taken separately, however. This winter semester we will, based on a general introduction to the history of New World enslavement, as well as on an introduction into the theory of representation (see Stuart Hall) watch and study three recent, very different films about modern enslavement:

Tarantino's Django Unchained
McQueen's 12 Years A Slave
and Asante's Belle.

While we will try our very best to avoid voyeuristic titillation, please come prepared to watch material, and talk about it which contains graphic images of violence against Black people. One of the main goals of the seminar will be, precisely, to ask which function does any representation of anti-black violence serve; which, and whose interests benefit, and what happens to different constitutions in the course of studying it? Which effect, on the contrary, does the avoidance of such representation have on viewers, and how does this evasion work?

Please read as prerequisite:
1. Hall, Stuart. "The Work of Representation." in Representation: Cultural Representations and Signifying Practices. ed. Stuart Hall. London: Sage, 1997. 1-74.
2. Kenneth Morgan, Transatlantic Slavery. Padstow,: T. J. International, 2016 ( a one-volume 180 pages concise history of slavery)

Further secondary material will be brought into class in the context of our debates.

Prof. Dr. Sabine Bröck
10-76-3-D1/WD1-12 Key Topics in Literature: Anatomy and Power in Jonathan Swift's Gulliver's Travels (in englischer Sprache)

Seminar

Termine:
wöchentlich Di 14:15 - 15:45 SuUB 4330 (Studio I Medienraum ) (2 SWS) Seminar

Most of us are familiar with the voyages of Lemuel Gulliver who heads out to the South Sea and is washed up on Lilliput, an island inhabited by tiny people who capture him. Gulliver eventually becomes friends with the Emperor of the Lilliputians whose customs he learns and wars he participates in. After a series of threats he escapes and returns to England. Only few know, that Gulliver is not only a surgeon, but travels to more islands including Broddingnag and its giants; Laputa, a floating island full of people only interested in mathematics and music; Glubbdubdrib and Luggnagg, islands of sorcerers and immortals; and finally the island of the beastly Yahoos and the horse-friendly Houyhnhnms.

Swift’s masterpiece is a well-known satire and mocks both human nature as well as travel literature – a highly popular genre in eighteenth-century Britain. Gulliver’s Travels is concerned with man’s intellectual pride and pretensions to reason while also addressing particularly scientific discoveries and developments. What this seminar focusses on are observations of the human body in Swift’s prose satire. Scholars agree on the blatant misogyny present in his text which manifests especially in Gulliver’s disgusted descriptions of female bodies or parts of it he comes across ranging from a nurse’s huge breast and nipple to a sexual encounter he has with one of the beast-like Yahoos.

The aim of this course is to shed light on discourses of gender and the female body apparent in eighteenth-century literature in order to examine if and how representations of anatomy are linked with patriarchal power structures.

Keywords: Body Studies, Gender Studies, Satire, History of Science, Medical Humanities, Adaptation Studies, Eighteenth-Century

Requirements:
• registration on Stud.IP
• in-depth knowledge of the reading material (i.e. read the novel[s] in advance!)*
• regular attendance and oral participation
• oral presentation and handout
• term paper (optional)

*NOTE: YOUR FAMILIARITY WITH THE PRIMARY TEXT(S) IS MANDATORY AND WILL BE EXAMINED IN ONE OF THE FIRST SESSIONS***

Text:
Swift, Jonathan [1726]. Gulliver’s Travels (Norton Critical Edition). New York: Norton, 2002.*

*NOTE: Please pay attention to the EXACT publication dates when purchasing the book(s) so we can all work with the same editions.

Dr. phil. Jennifer Henke
10-76-3-D1/WD1-13 Key Topics in Literature: Narratives of Illness (in englischer Sprache)

Seminar

Termine:
wöchentlich Fr 14:15 - 15:45 SFG 1060 Dezernetenbesprechnungsraum (2 SWS) Seminar

The purpose of this seminar is to introduce students to the flourishing genre of illness narratives. In recent decades, more and more literary and non-literary texts depict the experience of illness and its effects on people's lives. This course will use fictional writings (e.g. poems, short stories, and excerpts from novels) as well as autobiographical accounts by actual patients, family members, or healthcare professionals to explore the physical, psychological, and emotional aspects of a patient's, doctor's, or relative's experience of such conditions as Alzheimer's, cancer, or AIDS.

In addition to an in-depth analysis and interpretation of the selected texts, we will look at illness narratives in the context of the history of medicine, medical humanities, narrative medicine, literary history, body studies, life writing, and gender theory.

Requirements:
- regular attendance and active participation
- in-depth knowledge of the reading material
- presentation (and handout) and/or final paper

A detailed syllabus will be handed out in the first session.

Texts:

Please make sure that you purchase exactly the copies given below, so that we can all work with the same edition.

Edson, Margaret. Wit. New York: Faber and Faber, 1999. ISBN: 978-0-571-19877-1.
Kalanithi, Paul. When Breath Becomes Air. London: The Bodley Head, 2016. ISBN: 978-1-847-92367-7.

Additional primary texts and secondary materials will be made available on Stud.IP.

Please note that prior enrolment via Stud.IP is mandatory.

Christine Müller, M.A.
10-M83-2-P1-1 Key Topics in Literature: Fictions of Migration (in englischer Sprache)

Seminar

Termine:
wöchentlich Mo 12:15 - 13:45 SuUB 4320 (Studio II Medienraum ) (2 SWS)

In this seminar we will read works of fiction, and critical essays and articles, by and about “migrant” authors and their works – those who come from one geographical location and write in/about another. We will explore the changing natures of migration, and the effects that the movements of people and cultures continue to have on such concepts as “home,” “nation” and “identity.” This course is designed to build on students’ existing familiarity with literary and cultural theory, and develop their application of critical reading skills. It is available in both the ‘English-Speaking Cultures,’ and the ‘Transnational Literatures’ degree programmes.

Dr. Janelle Rodriques
10-M83-2-P1-3 Key Topics in Literature: Travel Writing: Texts, Contexts, Criticism (in englischer Sprache)

Seminar

Termine:
wöchentlich Di 16:15 - 17:45 GW2 B3010 (Kleiner Studierraum) (2 SWS)

Travel writing is an increasingly popular genre in terms of text production and commercial success, encompassing a fascinating diversity of literary forms, modes and itineraries which negate a forthright definition of the genre. As a repository for factual and fictional accounts of mobility and cross-cultural exchange, however, it has long been underestimated for its potential to contribute to a broad range of cultural, political and historical debates that seek to reassess the role of travel writing as a "vehicle for geographic, ethnographic and sociological knowledge." (Thompson 4). This course is designed to introduce students to the comprehensive history of this dynamic and complex genre within the socio-cultural framework of the English-speaking world. We will trace recurrent literary conventions, themes, motifs, functions and concerns in historical and contemporary travel narratives in English by various key contributors and engage with textual and contextual approaches. Since some of the participants are required to submit a research paper, we will use parts of our seminar discussions to the development of topics, the formulation of a thesis statement, as well as considerations about the methodological approaches of writing such a paper.

For Non-E-SC students and academic exchange students: Please contact your lecturer if you require more than 3 credit points.

Additional secondary sources can be accessed in the "Semesterapparat", a reference only section on the third floor of the library building. A reader with selected secondary text materials will be made available for download on Stud. IP. You may wish to check the learning compact for further details such as requirements, weekly schedule, select bibliography and modes of assessment ("Allgemeiner Dateiordner" on Stud. IP).

Please note that prior enrolment via Stud.IP is mandatory. Deadline: 15 September 2016.

Assessment:

regular attendance, informed participation in class discussion,
in-depth knowledge of the selected reading material,
homework assignments,
presentation of research paper or group project,
term paper.

The requirements as formulated above may vary depending on your overall degree program. E-SC students - Please check the departmental website for guidelines on modules and exams: http://www.fb10.uni-bremen.de/anglistik/ba2/profil/studienplan.aspx
MA TnL module: http://www.master-transnationale-literaturwissenschaft.uni-bremen.de/studium/modulbeschreibungen/

Required reading before the first session (you need a copy for class):

Thompson, Carl. Travel Writing (Italics). London: Routledge, 2011. Print.

Copies can be purchased at the bookstore on our campus (Universitätsbuchhandlung Bremen: www.unibuch-bremen.de)

Dr. Jana Nittel
10-M83-2-P3-1 Key Topics in Cultural History: Shakespeare on Screen (in englischer Sprache)
(also Key Topics in Literature)

Seminar

Termine:
wöchentlich Di 14:15 - 15:45 GW2 B3010 (Kleiner Studierraum) (2 SWS)

In 2016, the year marking the 400th anniversary of Shakespeare’s death, Shakespeare’s plays are as enticing to filmmakers and visual artists as they were in 1899 when the first Shakespeare film was screened. Since then the number of filmic contributions has increased steadily. Divided into three projects depending on the choice of play (Hamlet, Macbeth and Othello) and drawing equally on traditional as well as contemporary ideas, that have emerged in the fields of cultural studies, transnational film, world cinema as well as filmic and television storytelling, we will explore how three plays by William Shakespeare are re-imagined in different linguistic and cultural contexts in selected late 20th Century and post-2000 productions. Focusing on traditional as well as contemporary stories/modern updates course participants will be encouraged to investigate these films’ engagement with sexuality and gender, race and ethnicity and questions of power. In addition, the course is designed to introduce its participants to key terms and functional principles of filmic storytelling: Film editing and its functions, mise en scène (modification of space), cinematography (light and colour), camera usage as well as plot, character, and filmic space; the nature of narrative in film and its dramatic composition (composition, narration and focalisation). We may also engage with the following questions: What specific, distinguishable filmic distinctions guide viewers’ constructions of reading hypotheses? How do filmic cues guide the perception of the audience?
Since some of the participants are required to submit a research-based term paper, we will use parts of our seminar discussions to the development of topics, the formulation of a thesis statement, as well as considerations about the methodological approaches of writing such a paper.

Electronic resources for independent study:

Jahn, Manfred. 2003. A Guide to Narratological Film Analysis. Poems, Plays, and Prose: A Guide to the Theory of Literary Genres. English Department, University of Cologne. http://www.uni-koeln.de/~ame02/pppf.htm

Jahn, Manfred. 2003. A Guide to the Theory of Drama. Part II of Poems, Plays, and Prose: A Guide to the Theory of Literary Genres. English Department, University of Cologne. http://www.uni-koeln.de/~ame02/pppd.htm
Lexikon der Filmbegriffe: http://filmlexikon.uni-kiel.de/index.php?action=lexikon

For Non-E-SC students and academic exchange students: Please contact your lecturer if you require more than 3 credit points.

Additional secondary sources can be accessed in the "Semesterapparat", a reference only section on the third floor of the library building. A number of DVDs will be available in the “Semesterapparat” in the “Mediathek”, located on the fourth floor of the library building: http://www.suub.uni-bremen.de/standorte/zentrale/mediathek/.

Please note that prior enrolment via Stud.IP is mandatory. Deadline: 15 September 2016.

Assessment:

regular attendance, informed participation in class discussion,

in-depth knowledge of the selected reading material,

homework assignments,

presentation of research paper or group project,

term paper.

The requirements as formulated above may vary depending on your overall degree program.

E-SC students - Please check the departmental website for guidelines on modules and exams: http://www.fb10.uni-bremen.de/anglistik/ba2/profil/studienplan.aspx

MA TnL module: http://www.master-transnationale-literaturwissenschaft.uni-bremen.de/studium/modulbeschreibungen/

Please be familiar with the following materials:

Filmography:

Hamlet. (Italics)(UK, US 1996) Dir. Kenneth Branagh

Hamlet. (Italics) (US, 2000) Dir. Michael Almereyda

Haider. (Italics) (India, 2014) Dir. Vishal Bhardwaj

Macbeth. (Italics) (US, 1948) Dir. Orson Welles (optional)

Throne of Blood. (Italics) (Japan, 1957). Dir. Akira Kurosawa

Maqbool. (Italics) (India, 2004) Dir. Vishal Bhardwaj

Macbeth. (Italics) (UK, 2015) Dir. Justin Kurzel

Othello. (Italics) (UK, US 1995) Dir. Oliver Parker

Othello. (Italics) (UK, 2001) Dir. Geoffrey Sax

Omkara. (Italics) (India, 2006) Dir. Vishal Bhardwaj

Dr. Jana Nittel
10-M83-3-V-2 Key Topics in Cultural History: Gender - Culture - Feminism (in englischer Sprache)

Seminar

Termine:
wöchentlich Mi 16:15 - 17:45 GW2 B2890 (2 SWS)

Ziel der Ringvorlesung ist es, über gender-bezogene Themen und Forschungsansätze fachübergreifend ins Gespräch zu kommen und eine größere Sichtbarkeit für die vielfältigen diesbezüglichen wissenschaftlichen Aktivitäten im FB 10 herzustellen. Das erscheint uns in Zeiten, da es in der breiteren Öffentlichkeit vermehrt zu anti-feministischen, gender-studies-feindlichen und homophoben Polemiken kommt, aber gleichzeitig eine junge Generation von Aktivist*innen die Relevanz feministischer und queerer Analysen für sich neu entdeckt, besonders angebracht. Den Studierenden an unserem Fachbereich kann eine solche Reihe zugleich Ideengeber und Motivation für die eigene Spezialisierung sein. Die Vorträge finden im zweiwöchigen Rhythmus statt und sind in ein reguläres Seminar eingebettet, das von Dr Karin Esders geleitet wird.

This course is a mixture between a lecture course and a regular seminar. Scholars and teachers both from FB 10 and TU Berlin will deliver lectures on various aspects of our general topic initiating a transdisciplinary discourse on "Gender - Culture - Feminism". In the sessions between the lectures we will discuss corresponding texts and resources to prepare the diverse subjects of the presentations and to critically reflect on their respective ideas and arguments.

Please note that some of the lectures will be in German. You are welcome to attend lectures only without participating in the full seminar.
Essential readings will be available for download on Stud-IP. You should also consult the 'Semesterapparat' (SuUB) for further readings.
Requirements depend on the number of CPs you wish to achieve and will be announced at the beginning of the course.
Please note that prior enrollment via Stud.IP is mandatory for full seminar participation.

Dr. Karin Esders-Angermund

WD-1c: Aufbaumodul: Sprachwissenschaft und Kulturgeschichte (Wahlpflichtmodul 6 CP) - (nur für das Wintersemester)

(3 CP + 3 CP)

Es gilt zu beachten: Laut SK-Beschluss (E-SC) vom 21.11.2012 ist die Pruefungsleistung im Bereich "Key Topics in Linguistics" zu erbringen = Klausur/Written test oder benotete Praesentationsleistung/Presentation.

Modulbeauftragte/r: Dr. Jana Nittel, jnittel@uni-bremen.de
VAK Titel der Veranstaltung DozentIn
10-76-3-D1/WD1-01 Key Topics in Cultural History: Documenting the US: Themes, Concepts and Skills (in englischer Sprache)

Seminar

Einzeltermine:
Mi 09.11.16 17:00 - 18:00 GW2 A3570 (FB 10 Besprechungsraum)
Fr 18.11.16 12:00 - 18:00 GW2 A4020
Sa 19.11.16 11:00 - 17:00 MZH 1470
Fr 02.12.16 12:00 - 18:00 SFG 2060
Sa 03.12.16 11:00 - 17:00 MZH 1470

In this course we will study various documentary sources such as films, web pages, photographs in order to learn more about significant events in the USA both contemporary and historical. Yet at the same time we will question the reliability and viability of the respective resources in order to strengthen our awareness of the limits inherent in the various documentary formats.
Essential readings will be available for download on Stud-IP. You should also consult the 'Semesterapparat' (SuUB) for further readings.
Requirements:
• regular attendance and oral participation
• in-depth knowledge of the reading material
• oral presentation and handout
• term paper (possible)
Please note that prior enrollment via Stud.IP is mandatory.

Dr. Karin Esders-Angermund
10-76-3-D1/WD1-02 Key Topics in Cultural History: Analyzing Hollywood Cinema (in englischer Sprache)

Seminar

Termine:
wöchentlich Do 14:15 - 15:45 GW2 B1632 (2 SWS)

This course is designed to introduce students to critical scholarship on US-American film history and culture. Basic introductions to the analytical categories of race, class, gender, and sexuality will help students to analyze how films construct and limit representations of African-Americans, Native Americans, women and femininity, men and masculinity, sexuality, class struggle and class difference.
The participation in the course “Viewing film critically” Tuesdays 18:00 (sharp) – 20:00 (General Studies / Schlüsselqualifikation / Global Education) is highly recommended because it offers full-length screenings of the films we will discuss in class. Otherwise you must watch the films individually; they will be made available at the beginning of the semester on a reserve shelf in the SuuB-Mediathek.
Our major textbook will be Benshoff and Griffin: America on film: Representing race, class, gender, and sexuality at the movies. (Purchase is is suggested.)
Essential readings will be available for download on Stud-IP. You should also consult the 'Semesterapparat' (SuUB) for further readings.
Requirements:
• regular attendance and oral participation
• in-depth knowledge of the reading material
• oral presentation and handout
Please note that prior enrollment via Stud.IP is mandatory.

Dr. Karin Esders-Angermund
10-76-3-D1/WD1-03 Key Topics in Cultural History: Black (and white) in the Union Jack (in englischer Sprache)

Seminar
ECTS: 3

Termine:
wöchentlich Di 16:15 - 17:45 SFG 1020 GW2 B1700 (2 SWS)

Taking its cue from Paul Gilroy’s famous observation, 'There ain’t no Black in the Union Jack‘, this seminar is going to explore the impact migration and diasporic communities have on the notion of British national identity. We shall view a range of recent films projecting images of English and/or British identities in order to investigate how British national identity gets (re)conceptualised in the days of globalisation and multiculturalism. Course discussions will focus on the interrelations between individual and political identities, and will analyse how these films narrate and negotiate the multiply intertwined transitions from being black in Britain to being a Black Briton. -
Students are required to invest much time and dedication into week-to-week preparations that include not just the attentive viewing of films but also a high amount of reading. A list of films will be agreed upon in the first session, and will be put on restricted loan for you in the Mediathek.

Reading material will be made available on Stud.IP.

Requirements:
# regular attendance and active participation
# in-depth knowledge of the viewing and reading material
# portfolio of worksheets (graded in WD-1b)
# for a grade in D-1b: an additional long term paper of 8-10 pp.

Prior enrolment via Stud.IP is mandatory.

Irmgard Maassen
10-76-3-D1/WD1-04 Key Topics in Cultural History: British History and National Heritage (in englischer Sprache)

Seminar
ECTS: 3

Termine:
wöchentlich Mi 12:15 - 13:45 GW2 A4020 (2 SWS)

This course has a twofold aim: It is first of all designed to introduce students to select issues in British history, to major historical events, figures, developments and topics that have shaped the face of contemporary Britain and remain points of reference in today's political and cultural debates. But the main focus will lie on the way in which 'history' is being conceptualized, reproduced, exhibited, commercialized, and ideologically exploited not just in current politics (viz. the Brexit campaign) but also by the 'heritage industry'. In a series of case studies across a range of media, we will discuss and analyze the manner, meanings, and implicit messages of current representations of historical epochs and events: political speeches, museums, heritage sites, architecture, films, literature, royal weddings, war monuments…. After the Brexit referendum, investigating the uses that invocations of ‘British/English history’ are being put to seems particularly urgent.

Reading material will be made available for download in Stud.IP. A list of suggested research topics and case studies will be negotiated in the first session.

Requirements:
# regular attendance and active participation
# in-depth knowledge of the reading material
# a self-researched case study presented to the class (group presentation)
# two brief written assignments (graded in WD-1b)
# alternatively, for a grade in D-1b: a term paper of 8-10 pp.

Prior enrolment via StudIP is mandatory.

Irmgard Maassen
10-76-3-WD1-01 Key Topics in Linguistics: English-based Pidgins and Creoles (in englischer Sprache)

Seminar

Termine:
wöchentlich Di 14:15 - 15:45 GW2 A4020 (2 SWS)

Pidgins and creoles are contact languages that emerged from intense contact among two or more previously existing languages.
They usually serve as a lingua franca for speakers of different language backgrounds
and are therefore highly influenced by the speakers’ need for communication.
In this seminar, we will explore the linguistic features of English-based pidgins and creoles around the globe, such as Naija Pidgin or Jamaican Patois.
We will not only learn about the different linguistic properties of particular
pidgins/creoles and the processes that are at play in language contact and language change,
but also discuss the historical and sociolinguistic factors that had an impact on the emergence and
development of pidgins and creoles from their colonial context up until now.

Tonia Anni Sperling
10-76-3-WD1-02 Key Topics in Linguistics: Analysing Emotion in Multimodal Texts (in englischer Sprache)

Seminar

Termine:
wöchentlich Fr 12:15 - 13:45 GW2 B3010 (Kleiner Studierraum) (2 SWS)

Humans have the unique capacity to experience complex emotions and to communicate those experiences to one another with verbal and non-verbal mediums. To date, many studies have investigated how our emotional experiences get translated into language and different kinds of multimodal artifacts such as literature, printed artworks or moving images. These studies are important for domains ranging from discourse analysis to cross cultural communication. However, what has not been sufficiently studied is that language as well as non-verbal modes might not just translate feelings and human values into words, but could also help shape the nature of those emotions in a complex way with different affordances in different modes and media. This is precisely the perspective we will explore throughout this course. We will review the various methods that have investigated relationships between verbal/visual/audio texts and emotion and examine how the nature of the relationship between emotion and potentials of different modes such as verbal, visual and audio modes can be systematically analyzed.

Requirement:
3 CPs: participation, Referat
6 CPs: participation, Referat and final project

Selected readings:
Kress & van Leeuwen, (2006) Reading Images: the grammar of visual design
*Chapter 4, Representation and Interaction
*Chapter 5, Modality

*Feng and O’Halloran (2012) Representing emotive meaning in visual images: A social semiotic approach. Journal of Pragmatics, Vol 44: 2067 -- 2084

*Williams (2008) Image, Text and Story: comics and graphic novels in classroom. Art Education, 61:6, 13-19

*Smith (1994) Altered States: Character and Emotional Response in the Cinema.
Cinema Journal, Vol. 33, No. 4 (Summer, 1994), pp. 34-56

*Tseng (2017) Analysing characters’ developments in film and comics pages. Discourse, Context & Media

Dr. Chiaoi Tseng
10-76-3-WD1-03 Key Topics in Linguistics: Multimodal Text & Discourse Analysis (in englischer Sprache)

Seminar

Termine:
wöchentlich Di 16:15 - 17:45 GW2 B2900 (2 SWS)

It’s still a relatively new, but very exciting way within the context of linguistics to understand films and TV series as texts and to analyse comics with linguistic methods. The focus of these analyses lies no longer on language as the central semiotic resource, but includes the analysis of all possible modalities in an artefact, such as images, colours, layout and music, for example.
For this, multimodal text and discourse analysis has developed several methods and tools which make it possible to ask for the process of meaning construction in multimodal and multimedia texts and to analyze their coherence and structure. Central questions are, for example: How do we understand these texts at all (if there is no language involved, for instance)? How do we construct meaning and communicate with them and what kind of knowledge do we need to communicate effectively?
The seminar focuses on these questions, the mentioned tools and their theoretical background in the area of multimodal linguistics to demonstrate that these multimodal artefacts work similarly to verbal texts and that it is possible to use methods for verbal discourse to analyse and discuss them. Besides films and comics, we will also look at posters, Internet memes and other social media phenomena and strengthen our ability to analyze them.

Literature to start with:

Kress, Gunther/van Leeuwen, Theo (2001): Multimodal Discourse. The Modes and Media of Contemporary Communication. London: Arnold.

Kress, Gunther (2010): Multimodality. A Social Semiotic Approach to Contemporary Communication. London, New York: Routledge.

Jewitt, Carey (ed.) (2014): The Routledge Handbook of Multimodal Analysis. Second Edition. London, New York: Routledge.

Dr. Janina Wildfeuer
10-76-3-WD1-04 Key Topics in Linguistics: Language and Media (in englischer Sprache)

Seminar

Termine:
wöchentlich Mi 12:15 - 13:45 GW2 A3390 (CIP-Labor FB 10) (2 SWS)

In this seminar we will investigate the role of language in different types of media, e.g. printed (newspapers, magazines), spoken (radio, TV, film) and digital media (websites, social media like Facebook or Twitter). What role does language play? How can we tell if language is used to influence readers / listeners in a certain way? You will learn methods of corpus linguistics and critical discourse analysis that help to identify the different features, structures and functions of the language used in media.

Requirements
Homework assignments (reading 10-30 pages each week; possibly some exercises).
Active participation in all class work, working through texts / exercises / discussions.

BA ESC ( 2011) WD 1 a: An analysis + written report (not graded, 3 CP)
BA ESC ( 2011) WD 1 c: An analysis + poster presentation (graded, 3 CP)
BA Linguistik (2011) SIK 4: An analysis + poster + term paper (graded, 6 CP)
Others: talk to lecturer for an arrangement

Recommended literature (no need to buy any)
Aitchison, Jean & Diana M. Lewis (eds.) 2003. New Media Language. Routledge.
Durant, Alan & Marina Lambrou. 2009. Language and Media: A Resource Book for Students. London; New York: Routledge.
McEnery, Tony & Richard Xiao & Yukio Tono. 2006. Corpus-based Language Studies: An Advanced Resource Book. London; New York: Routledge.
Silverblatt, Art. 2008. Media Literacy. 3rd ed. Westport, Ct: Praeger.

For students of the development certificate study: Only English-Speaking Cultures students are allowed to attend this seminar.

Dr. Anke Schulz
10-M83-2-P3-1 Key Topics in Cultural History: Shakespeare on Screen (in englischer Sprache)
(also Key Topics in Literature)

Seminar

Termine:
wöchentlich Di 14:15 - 15:45 GW2 B3010 (Kleiner Studierraum) (2 SWS)

In 2016, the year marking the 400th anniversary of Shakespeare’s death, Shakespeare’s plays are as enticing to filmmakers and visual artists as they were in 1899 when the first Shakespeare film was screened. Since then the number of filmic contributions has increased steadily. Divided into three projects depending on the choice of play (Hamlet, Macbeth and Othello) and drawing equally on traditional as well as contemporary ideas, that have emerged in the fields of cultural studies, transnational film, world cinema as well as filmic and television storytelling, we will explore how three plays by William Shakespeare are re-imagined in different linguistic and cultural contexts in selected late 20th Century and post-2000 productions. Focusing on traditional as well as contemporary stories/modern updates course participants will be encouraged to investigate these films’ engagement with sexuality and gender, race and ethnicity and questions of power. In addition, the course is designed to introduce its participants to key terms and functional principles of filmic storytelling: Film editing and its functions, mise en scène (modification of space), cinematography (light and colour), camera usage as well as plot, character, and filmic space; the nature of narrative in film and its dramatic composition (composition, narration and focalisation). We may also engage with the following questions: What specific, distinguishable filmic distinctions guide viewers’ constructions of reading hypotheses? How do filmic cues guide the perception of the audience?
Since some of the participants are required to submit a research-based term paper, we will use parts of our seminar discussions to the development of topics, the formulation of a thesis statement, as well as considerations about the methodological approaches of writing such a paper.

Electronic resources for independent study:

Jahn, Manfred. 2003. A Guide to Narratological Film Analysis. Poems, Plays, and Prose: A Guide to the Theory of Literary Genres. English Department, University of Cologne. http://www.uni-koeln.de/~ame02/pppf.htm

Jahn, Manfred. 2003. A Guide to the Theory of Drama. Part II of Poems, Plays, and Prose: A Guide to the Theory of Literary Genres. English Department, University of Cologne. http://www.uni-koeln.de/~ame02/pppd.htm
Lexikon der Filmbegriffe: http://filmlexikon.uni-kiel.de/index.php?action=lexikon

For Non-E-SC students and academic exchange students: Please contact your lecturer if you require more than 3 credit points.

Additional secondary sources can be accessed in the "Semesterapparat", a reference only section on the third floor of the library building. A number of DVDs will be available in the “Semesterapparat” in the “Mediathek”, located on the fourth floor of the library building: http://www.suub.uni-bremen.de/standorte/zentrale/mediathek/.

Please note that prior enrolment via Stud.IP is mandatory. Deadline: 15 September 2016.

Assessment:

regular attendance, informed participation in class discussion,

in-depth knowledge of the selected reading material,

homework assignments,

presentation of research paper or group project,

term paper.

The requirements as formulated above may vary depending on your overall degree program.

E-SC students - Please check the departmental website for guidelines on modules and exams: http://www.fb10.uni-bremen.de/anglistik/ba2/profil/studienplan.aspx

MA TnL module: http://www.master-transnationale-literaturwissenschaft.uni-bremen.de/studium/modulbeschreibungen/

Please be familiar with the following materials:

Filmography:

Hamlet. (Italics)(UK, US 1996) Dir. Kenneth Branagh

Hamlet. (Italics) (US, 2000) Dir. Michael Almereyda

Haider. (Italics) (India, 2014) Dir. Vishal Bhardwaj

Macbeth. (Italics) (US, 1948) Dir. Orson Welles (optional)

Throne of Blood. (Italics) (Japan, 1957). Dir. Akira Kurosawa

Maqbool. (Italics) (India, 2004) Dir. Vishal Bhardwaj

Macbeth. (Italics) (UK, 2015) Dir. Justin Kurzel

Othello. (Italics) (UK, US 1995) Dir. Oliver Parker

Othello. (Italics) (UK, 2001) Dir. Geoffrey Sax

Omkara. (Italics) (India, 2006) Dir. Vishal Bhardwaj

Dr. Jana Nittel
10-M83-3-V-2 Key Topics in Cultural History: Gender - Culture - Feminism (in englischer Sprache)

Seminar

Termine:
wöchentlich Mi 16:15 - 17:45 GW2 B2890 (2 SWS)

Ziel der Ringvorlesung ist es, über gender-bezogene Themen und Forschungsansätze fachübergreifend ins Gespräch zu kommen und eine größere Sichtbarkeit für die vielfältigen diesbezüglichen wissenschaftlichen Aktivitäten im FB 10 herzustellen. Das erscheint uns in Zeiten, da es in der breiteren Öffentlichkeit vermehrt zu anti-feministischen, gender-studies-feindlichen und homophoben Polemiken kommt, aber gleichzeitig eine junge Generation von Aktivist*innen die Relevanz feministischer und queerer Analysen für sich neu entdeckt, besonders angebracht. Den Studierenden an unserem Fachbereich kann eine solche Reihe zugleich Ideengeber und Motivation für die eigene Spezialisierung sein. Die Vorträge finden im zweiwöchigen Rhythmus statt und sind in ein reguläres Seminar eingebettet, das von Dr Karin Esders geleitet wird.

This course is a mixture between a lecture course and a regular seminar. Scholars and teachers both from FB 10 and TU Berlin will deliver lectures on various aspects of our general topic initiating a transdisciplinary discourse on "Gender - Culture - Feminism". In the sessions between the lectures we will discuss corresponding texts and resources to prepare the diverse subjects of the presentations and to critically reflect on their respective ideas and arguments.

Please note that some of the lectures will be in German. You are welcome to attend lectures only without participating in the full seminar.
Essential readings will be available for download on Stud-IP. You should also consult the 'Semesterapparat' (SuUB) for further readings.
Requirements depend on the number of CPs you wish to achieve and will be announced at the beginning of the course.
Please note that prior enrollment via Stud.IP is mandatory for full seminar participation.

Dr. Karin Esders-Angermund

FD 1 - Basismodul Fachdidaktik 10-76-3-204 (nur für das Wintersemester)

Pflichtmodul: Gy, BIPEB
ECTS: 6

Modulbeauftragte/r: Tim Giesler, giesler@uni-bremen.de
VAK Titel der Veranstaltung DozentIn
10-76-3-FD1-01 Introduction to English Language Education (BiPEB) (in englischer Sprache)

Seminar

Termine:
wöchentlich Do 10:15 - 11:45 (2 SWS)

This introductory course will provide an insight into important aspects and theoretical foundations of English Language Teaching (ELT) which is an indispensable part of every teacher's knowledge base. Participants will get an overview of theoretical as well as practical issues. Starting from a look at the history of ELT we will then move on to Foreign Language Politics in Germany and Europe before we begin to discuss more practical concerns, for example:
  • In how far do the different varieties of English in the world take an effect on ELT?
  • How can teachers foster the development of the students' language skills?
Apart from that, we will be looking at special forms of ELT, for example English in Primary Schools and Content and Language Integrated Learning (CLIL), and also the role of course books and literature in the classroom will be investigated. It is most important that participants actively engage with these topics, as it is crucial for teacher trainees to form an opinion about their future way of teaching.

There will be a special emphasis on English in Primary Schools in this course.

Tim Giesler
10-76-3-FD1-02 Introduction to English Language Education (Gy) (in englischer Sprache)

Seminar

Termine:
wöchentlich Di 14:15 - 15:45 SFG 1030 (2 SWS)

This introductory course will provide an insight into important aspects and theoretical foundations of English Language Teaching (ELT) which is an indispensable part of every teacher's knowledge base. Participants will get an overview of theoretical as well as practical issues. Starting from a look at the history of ELT we will then move on to Foreign Language Politics in Germany and Europe before we begin to discuss more practical concerns, for example:

  • In how far do the different varieties of English in the world take an effect on ELT?
  • How can teachers foster the development of the students' language skills?

Apart from that, we will be looking at special forms of ELT, for example English in Primary Schools and Content and Language Integrated Learning (CLIL), and also the role of course books and literature in the classroom will be investigated. It is most important that participants actively engage with these topics, as it is crucial for teacher trainees to form an opinion about their future way of teaching.

Elisabeth Bigge
10-76-3-FD1-03 Introduction to English Language Education (Gy) (in englischer Sprache)

Seminar

Termine:
wöchentlich Do 12:15 - 13:45 MZH 1460 GW2 B1820 (2 SWS)

This introductory course will provide an insight into important aspects and theoretical foundations of English Language Teaching (ELT) which is an indispensable part of every teacher's knowledge base. Participants will get an overview of theoretical as well as practical issues. Starting from a look at the history of ELT we will then move on to Foreign Language Politics in Germany and Europe before we begin to discuss more practical concerns, for example:

  • In how far do the different varieties of English in the world take an effect on ELT?
  • How can teachers foster the development of the students' language skills?

Apart from that, we will be looking at special forms of ELT, for example English in Primary Schools and Content and Language Integrated Learning (CLIL), and also the role of course books and literature in the classroom will be investigated. It is most important that participants actively engage with these topics, as it is crucial for teacher trainees to form an opinion about their future way of teaching.

Fatou Julia Wolter
10-76-3-FD1-04 Introduction to English Language Teaching Practice (BiPEB) (in englischer Sprache)

Seminar

Einzeltermine:
Sa 28.01.17 09:00 - 15:00
Sa 18.02.17 09:00 - 15:00
Sa 04.03.17 09:00 - 15:00

Begleitveranstaltung zu den Praxisorientierten Elementen für (POE) BiPEB-Studierende (großes und kleines Fach) im Frühjahr 2015.

Bitte melden Sie sich parallel
a) beim ZfL für die POE und
b) unter stud.IP für diesen Kurs an.

Tim Giesler
10-76-3-FD1-05 Introduction to English Language Teaching Practice (Gy) (in englischer Sprache)

Seminar

Einzeltermine:
Sa 14.01.17 09:00 - 15:00 GW2 B3850
Sa 11.02.17 09:00 - 15:00 GW2 B1410
Sa 11.03.17 09:00 - 15:00 GW2 B1410
Heather Haase
10-76-3-FD1-06 Introduction to English Language Teaching Practice (Gy) (in englischer Sprache)

Seminar

Einzeltermine:
Sa 04.02.17 09:00 - 15:00 LIS, T.20
Sa 25.02.17 09:00 - 15:00 LIS, T.40
Sa 18.03.17 09:00 - 15:00 LIST, T.20
Tobias Peter Carus
10-76-3-FD1-07 Introduction to English Language Teaching Practice (Gy) (in englischer Sprache)

Seminar

Einzeltermine:
Fr 17.02.17 15:00 - 18:00 GW2 B3770
Fr 24.02.17 15:00 - 19:00 GW2 B1700
Sa 25.02.17 10:00 - 15:00 GW2 B1700
Fr 03.03.17 15:00 - 19:00 GW2 B1700
Fr 10.03.17 15:00 - 19:00 GW2 B3770
Fr 17.03.17 15:00 - 19:00 MZH 1090
Fr 24.03.17 15:00 - 19:00 MZH 1090
Angela Hamilton
10-76-3-FD1-08 Introduction to English Language Teaching Practice (Gy) (in englischer Sprache)

Seminar

Einzeltermine:
Sa 21.01.17 09:00 - 15:00 GW2 B1700
Sa 11.02.17 09:00 - 15:00 GW2 B2900
Sa 04.03.17 09:00 - 15:00 GW2 B2900
Yvonne Schindler
10-76-3-FD1-09 Introduction to English Language Teaching Practice (Gy) (in englischer Sprache)

Seminar

Einzeltermine:
Sa 21.01.17 09:00 - 15:00 GW2 B2900
Sa 18.02.17 09:00 - 15:00 GW2 B2900
Sa 18.03.17 09:00 - 15:00 GW2 B2900
Heather Haase

Zusatzqualifikation Bilinguales Lehren und Lernen

Interessenten an der Zusatzqualifikation belegen im Wintersemester die unten stehende Einführungsveranstaltung.
Nähere Informationen erhalten Sie unter giesler@uni-bremen.de
VAK Titel der Veranstaltung DozentIn
10-76-3-Zbil-01 Grundbegriffe der Didaktik des bilingualen Sachfachunterrichts

Seminar

Termine:
wöchentlich Fr 10:15 - 11:45 GW2 B3230 (2 SWS)

Einführungsveranstaltung für die Zusatzqualifikation "Bilinguales Lernen und Lehren". Mehr Infos dazu finden Sie hier: http://www.fb10.uni-bremen.de/anglistik/fd/studieninfos.aspx

Das Angebot richtet sich an Lehramtsstudierende des Studiengangs English-Speaking Cultures, die ein Sachfach als Zeitfach studieren.

Bei ausreichend freien Plätzen können auch weitere interessierte Studierende aufgenommen werden.

Tim Giesler

LEHRVERANSTALTUNGEN DES 3. JAHRES:

P Abschlussmodul Profilfach "Sprachwissenschaft" oder "Literaturwissenschaft" oder "Kulturgeschichte"

Modulbeauftragte/r: Prof. Dr. John Bateman, bateman@uni-bremen.de

Laut PO des BA ESC von 2011 (§6;1 werden die 3 CP des Begleitseminars (im Profilfach obligatorisch) im Bereich General Studies angerechnet; die Studierenden, die bestanden haben, sind daher Irmgard Maassen (maassen@uni-bremen.de), der Modulbeauftragten für General Studies, zu melden.
VAK Titel der Veranstaltung DozentIn
10-76-6-AP-01 Begleitveranstaltung Sprachwissenschaft (in englischer Sprache)

Colloquium

Termine:
wöchentlich Do 14:15 - 15:45 GW2 A3340 (2 SWS)

This colloquium is for all students who plan to write their BA thesis in Linguistics in the winter term. Together we will find a topic for you and go through all the steps towards your final thesis: search for literature in the library catalogue and linguistic databases, find or collect the data for the analysis, choose an appropriate methodology, and do the actual research. You will learn how to plan your time realistically (and stick to the plan), how to structure your BA thesis, and you will write your thesis in less than one semester.
Recommended literature:
Cottrell, Stella. 2008/2013. The Study Skills Handbook. Palgrave Macmillan. 3rd or 4th ed.
Frank, Andrea & Stefanie Haacke & Swantje Lahm. 2013. Schl?sselkompetenzen: Schreiben in Studium und Beruf. 2. Auflage. Stuttgart: Metzler.
Rothstein, Bj?rn. 2011. Wissenschaftliches Arbeiten f?r Linguisten. T?bingen: Narr.

Dr. Anke Schulz
10-76-6-AP-02 Begleitveranstaltung Kulturgeschichte - Colloquium Research and Writing (in englischer Sprache)

Übung

Termine:
wöchentlich Di 16:15 - 17:45 SuUB 4320 (Studio II Medienraum ) (2 SWS)

Diese Veranstaltung richtet sich besonders an Studierende, die in diesem Semester Hausarbeiten oder Abschlussarbeiten schreiben wollen. Die Studierenden werden in die Grundlagen des wissenschaftlichen Arbeitens eingeführt. Wir werden eine Bibliotheksschulung für fortgeschrittene Studierende bekommen und selbständig für eigene größere und kleinere Arbeiten bibliographieren, Thesen und Fragestellungen entwickeln, strukturierte Gliederungen entwerfen etc. Gemeinsam werden wir die Projekte diskutieren und voranbringen.

Dr. Karin Esders-Angermund

GENERAL STUDIES - siehe auch die Veranstaltungen von General Studies - Sprach- und Literaturwissenschaften

Modulbeauftragte/r: Irmgard Maassen, maassen@uni-bremen.de
VAK Titel der Veranstaltung DozentIn
10-76-6-AP-02 Begleitveranstaltung Kulturgeschichte - Colloquium Research and Writing (in englischer Sprache)

Übung

Termine:
wöchentlich Di 16:15 - 17:45 SuUB 4320 (Studio II Medienraum ) (2 SWS)

Diese Veranstaltung richtet sich besonders an Studierende, die in diesem Semester Hausarbeiten oder Abschlussarbeiten schreiben wollen. Die Studierenden werden in die Grundlagen des wissenschaftlichen Arbeitens eingeführt. Wir werden eine Bibliotheksschulung für fortgeschrittene Studierende bekommen und selbständig für eigene größere und kleinere Arbeiten bibliographieren, Thesen und Fragestellungen entwickeln, strukturierte Gliederungen entwerfen etc. Gemeinsam werden wir die Projekte diskutieren und voranbringen.

Dr. Karin Esders-Angermund
10-76-6-GS-01 Forschungskolloquium für Promovierende und fortgeschrittene Studierende (in englischer Sprache)

Colloquium

Termine:
wöchentlich Do 09:30 - 11:00 GW2 A3340 (2 SWS)

Dies ist ein Kolloquium für Doktoranden und Studierende, die an Dissertationen und Abschlussarbeiten im Bereich der (angewandten) englischen Sprachwissenschaft und (Lerner-) Korpuslinguistik arbeiten. Teilnahme nur auf Einladung.

Prof. Dr. Marcus Callies
10-76-6-GS-02 Viewing Film Critically (in englischer Sprache)

Übung

Termine:
wöchentlich Di 18:00 - 21:00 SuUB 4330 (Studio I Medienraum ) (2 SWS)

Films are usually appreciated as mere entertainment. However, they always convey ideas about self and society, right and wrong, good and bad. Moreover, they offer specific conceptions of race, class and gender. In watching a selection of classical and post-classical Hollywood films we will prepare ourselves for the discussions in the course “Key Topics in Cultural History: Analyzing Hollywood Film”.
Requirements:
• regular attendance
• oral presentation and handout
Please note that prior enrollment via Stud.IP is mandatory.

Dr. Karin Esders-Angermund
10-76-6-GS-03 Forschungskolloquium für Promovierende und fortgeschrittene Studierende (in englischer Sprache)

Colloquium

Termine:
wöchentlich Mi 18:00 - 20:00 GW2 B3010 (Kleiner Studierraum) (2 SWS)
Prof. Dr. Sabine Bröck
10-76-6-GS-04 Übung zum Seminar "Introduction to English Literatures (Part I)" (in englischer Sprache)

Seminar

Termine:
wöchentlich Fr 08:15 - 09:45 GW2 B1400 NUR Mi. - So. (2 SWS)

These tutorials are offered in combination with the foundation module course "Introduction to English Literature Part I". In our weekly sessions we will explore some of the issues discussed during the seminar sessions in greater detail. In addition, we will further examine a number of text samples (poetry, drama, prose) and focus our attention on an adequate preparation for the written exam, scheduled for February 2017. Students who are currently taking the foundation module A "Introduction to English Literatures" are strongly encouraged to attend these tutorials and may gain credits in the process.

Dr. Jana Nittel
10-76-6-GS-05 Übung zum Seminar "Key Moments in the Cultural History of the English-Speaking World 10-76-1-BC-01 (in englischer Sprache)

Übung
ECTS: ///

Termine:
wöchentlich Di 18:00 - 19:30 GW2 B1700
wöchentlich Do 18:00 - 19:30 GW2 B2890

This tutorial is designed to assist students of the Basismodul 'Key Moments in Cultural History' in accomplishing the course requirements. Besides offering a forum for the discussion of those questions you were afraid to ask during the seminar sessions, the course will provide advice on the basic skills of academic study and research - tackling complex texts, writing a paper, citation rules, oral presentations, using the library and other research tools. Attendance is not obligatory but highly recommended. -
The tutorial will run in several parallel groups. Particulars will be explained in the first session of the 'Key Moments' course.

Dr. Karin Esders-Angermund
Irmgard Maassen
10-76-6-GS-06 Digitales Lehrangebot: Key Developments in Literary Histor(ies) and Literary Criticism in English (in englischer Sprache)
Mobile Lectures - Keine Präsenzlehrveranstaltung

Seminar

The lecture series is an additional offer for all students registered in the course programme English-Speaking Cultures and is attached to the General Studies Option, which means it is open to all interested parties within and outside of the faculty. Participants will have access to 10 videos upon registration. Please explored whether your study programme includes the General studies option before signing up. Please arrange for an appointment during my office hours and submit a completed “General Studies Certificate” (copies are available for download in the “General Document Folder” on Stud.IP by December 23rd, 2016.

Please explore the “Information” button for programme details, abstracts and biographical details of the individual speaker as well as requirements for gaining credit points.

Please click on “Mobile Lectures” to view the recorded sessions.

Dr. Jana Nittel
10-GS-9-02 Linguistische Werkstatt
Forschendes Studieren und Lernen mit linguistischen Daten

Seminar
ECTS: 1

Einzeltermine:
Mo 31.10.16 10:00 - 11:30 GW2 A3340
Mo 07.11.16 10:15 - 11:45 GW2 A3340
Mo 21.11.16 10:15 - 11:45 GW2 A3340
Mo 28.11.16 10:15 - 11:45
Mo 05.12.16 10:15 - 11:45 GW2 A3340
Mo 19.12.16 10:15 - 11:45 GW2 A3340
Mo 09.01.17 10:15 - 11:45 GW2 A3340
Mo 16.01.17 10:15 - 11:45 GW2 A3340
Mo 30.01.17 10:15 - 11:45 GW2 A3340
Mo 13.02.17 10:15 - 11:45 GW2 A3340
Mo 27.02.17 10:15 - 11:45 GW2 A3340
Mo 06.03.17 10:15 - 11:45 GW2 A3340
Mo 13.03.17 10:15 - 11:45 GW2 A3340
Mo 20.03.17 10:15 - 11:45 GW2 A3340

Die Linguistische Werkstatt steht allen Studierenden des FB 10 offen, die mit sprachlichen Daten arbeiten, etwa im Rahmen von sprachwissenschaftlichen Haus- und Abschlussarbeiten oder Referaten. Sie bekommen hier z.B. Unterstützung bei der Nutzung von Korpora und der Software AntConc, der Erstellung von Fragebögen, der Durchführung und Transkription von Sprachaufnahmen oder der Erstellung von Linguistic Landscape Fotodokumentationen.
Die Veranstaltung kann auch nur an einzelnen Terminen besucht werden, eine kontinuierliche Teilnahme ist nicht erforderlich.
Ein Erwerb von Credit Points im Bereich General Studies ist nach Absprache möglich.

Weitere Informationen finden Sie im Blog der Linguistischen Werkstatt:
https://blogs.uni-bremen.de/lingwerk/

Cordula Voigts
10-M83-1-PRAI-S-2 Practical Translation (in englischer Sprache)

Übung

Termine:
wöchentlich Mo 16:15 - 17:45 SFG 2080 (2 SWS)

NOTE: This class is not open to ERASMUS students, unless their language skills in both English and German are demonstrably at least at C1 level.
The goal of this course is to develop your ability to translate correctly and efficiently and to identify the differences and similarities between German and English – especially those caused by interference. Beyond this, we will approach translation as the transferring of ideas and concepts from one language to another. The course has three linked elements:
• short texts (German into English only) to emphasize the importance of looking at the text 'as a whole' and to explore how this affects syntax and word choice.
• individual sentence translation (German into English only) to focus attention on possible syntactic and lexical traps resulting from language interference and/or intercultural differences;
• work on ‘false friends’ to foster awareness that what may seem the obvious word choice is not necessarily the best one.
Registration for this class: There will initially be 20 places open for this class. Register in Stud.IP for the class by 12 noon on Thursday, 15th September. Once the registration process ends on that day, I will notify you (via Stud.IP) whether you have a seat in the class. Once I have formally admitted you to the class, download the Practical Translation interference-exercises pack and the course programme, to be found under Practical Translation in Stud.IP, then print the interference-exercises pack out and bring it to class each week. Material for the work on ‘false friends’ will be provided. You are expected to have and be familiar with a good, comprehensive German-English dictionary (e.g. the Großwörterbuch published by Collins/Langenscheidt (Schulwörterbücher are not adequate at this level of language!) and either the Longman-Langenscheidt Dictionary of Contemporary English or the Oxford Advanced Learner's Dictionary.
If you believe you are in a situation of exceptional hardship and can truly only take part in my CBIS class despite the other parallel sections, contact me well in advance of 15th September to plead your case (i.e. provide proof of the conflict you have). I will consider your request and examine whether I can accommodate you. ERASMUS and other exchange students are requested to contact me in advance: some places will be reserved for you!

Michael Claridge, M.A., Dip.Ed.
10-M83-1-PRAI-S-3 Archetypes in Cinema

Seminar

Termine:
wöchentlich Di 10:15 - 11:45 GW2 B1630 (2 SWS)
Nancy Schrauf, M.A.
10-M83-1-PRAI-T-1 English Theatre Workshop (in englischer Sprache)

Übung

Termine:
wöchentlich Mo 18:00 - 21:00 GW2 B3009 (Großer Studierraum) (3 SWS)
wöchentlich Do 18:00 - 21:00 GW2 B3009 (Großer Studierraum)

Einzeltermine:
Mi 09.11.16 18:00 - 21:00

What is involved in staging a play? How do words on a page metamorphose into performance? What considerations must director and actor bear in mind to create a convincing visual and aural product? Indeed, what must a playwright consider when attempting to write a play? What aspects concerning the actors and what concerning the audience are essential? To what extent can the circumstances in which the play is to be performed play a role, whether this be the physical location (e.g. the space in which the play is staged) or the occasion? In a nutshell, what must be borne in mind if a play – a text – is to successfully make the transition ‘from page to stage’? This is what the winter-semester theatre workshop will be considering, giving you the opportunity to actively investigate these and other questions. The work will not end in any public performance, although you will be performing for each other within the context of the workshop: ‘no-fear theatre’, one might say.
We will meet on Mondays and Wednesdays from 6.15-9.30 p.m.; there will also be a full-day workshop on two weekends during the semester. I also hope to arrange a visit to one or possibly two theatre performances as an integral element in the workshop. There will be a minimum of 6 Credit Points for active, regular participation in the workshop; more CPs are possible if you make suitable arrangements with me in the first three weeks of the semester. We will discuss in the first class session what the basis for assessment will be, and when the two one-day workshops will take place. Note that this is a practical-language “Übung”: thus, you will be required to actively participate in at least 80% of class sessions (including the one-day workshops). If you have to miss 20% or more of class sessions, make arrangements with me WELL in advance as to how to compensate for your absence.
Initial registration for the class will be in Stud.IP, and should be done by 15th September 2016. I will inform you after that date as to which play – and which edition – to obtain. If more than 20 people have signed up by that date, priority will be given to Master TnL students, since the workshop is anchored in the TnL ‘Praxismodul’. There will be an absolute maximum of 29 participants. Your English-language skills must be at least at a GOOD B2 level.

What will we be looking at?
  • a playscript: a Shakespeare play, since these are among the richest and most interesting works of drama available, and offering the most possibilities for exploration and experimentation. We will ‘mine’ the script for potential meaning, see the clues it contains about acting, examine what the script reveals about the characters and their interrelationships, and weigh up various interpretations of language, character and plot on the basis of the script. We will see how such aspects as prose vs. verse and blank verse vs. rhyming verse provide important signals to the actor
  • characterisation: what defines a character? How can one convey a character to an audience (verbal and non-verbal communication)? How are the relationships between characters made visible onstage? How does one develop and ultimately become – or ‘inhabit’ – a character? How important are costume and props for this process? You will be assigned a character from our Shakespeare play, and will work on this character during the semester, becoming intimately familiar with her/him and her/his scenes, putting ‘flesh’ on the ‘bones’ of the script. You will learn some of the character’s scenes and will work on staging those scenes with the other characters, experiencing what is involved in rehearsing. You will ultimately perform the scenes for the other members of the workshop.
  • the acting relationship: what is involved when two or more actors perform a scene? What ‘offers’ do they make to each other in the acting process: what brings the scene alive? What must they clearly have in mind if the scene is to function? Status: its central significance for every scene.
  • the actor-audience relationship: what ‘promises’ does the actor make to the audience? How has the role and function of the audience changed over the past 450 years? What are the consequences for this relationship of performing in different types of space?
  • subject-matter: “a fun night out”, didactic tool, something in between?
  • the role of the critic
among other things: a full semester!

The summer-semester theatre workshop will involve a full-scale production by The Parlement of Foules, with public performances. Auditions will take place in the second half of the winter semester – contact me in early December 2016 for further information.

Michael Claridge, M.A., Dip.Ed.
10-M83-2/3-PRAII-S-1 Function & Form in Grammar (in englischer Sprache)

Übung

Termine:
wöchentlich Mi 14:15 - 15:45 GW2 A4020 (2 SWS)

This class is primarily for BA “English-Speaking Cultures”, MA “Transnational Literature” and MEd English students. It is not open to ERASMUS students, unless their language skills in both English and German are demonstrably at at least C1 level.
The class has developed out of a growing sense that “ESC” students frequently have good to excellent vocabulary but demonstrate a worrying weakness in their grasp of certain basic aspects of grammar – and accordingly have problems explaining that grammar. This is perhaps the result of an over-emphasis on the so-called ‘communicative’ approach at school level, teachers urging pupils to say and/or write anything, with linguistic accuracy playing a much less important role.
We will take a hands-on approach to certain areas of what many would regard as basic syntax – also known as ‘the usual suspects’! – such as tense selection and sequencing, use of the articles and reference, word order, and punctuation, examining how mis-selection can result in misunderstanding. Consideration of contrasting examples and work at the text level will underpin our analysis, which will also focus on the question of German interference. Students will be expected to give reasons for their syntactic choices. Thus, the class goes far beyond a merely ‘remedial’ level: if you can explain a grammatical point, you understand it, and can apply it correctly!
The core of the class consists of two things. First of all, some materials will be made available in Stud.IP; you will be expected to bring these either in print form or electronically on a laptop/notebook to class. Secondly, we will be working from what I believe is the best teaching/learning grammar of English currently available for foreign students of English at your advanced level, namely Foley, Mark & Diane Hall, Longman Advanced Learners' Grammar. A self-study reference & practice book with answers. Longman (Pearson Education Limited), 2003. ISBN 058240383-9. The book currently costs something like €25.99 from Amazon. It includes a comprehensive set of very helpful self-use diagnostic tests (with key) at the front, to enable you to identify your syntactic strengths and weaknesses. Each unit consists of explanations with examples, then of practice exercises; the key is at the back. You will be required to do work on your own using this book in preparation for each class: ensure that you have easy, regular access to it, either by buying your own copy or by sharing a copy with a friend.
Registration for this class: There will initially be 20 places open for this class. Register in Stud.IP for the class by 12 noon on Thursday, 15th September. Once the registration process ends on that day, I will notify you (via Stud.IP) whether you have a seat in the class. Download the class pack, once I have formally admitted you to the class.
If you believe you are in a situation of exceptional hardship and can truly only take part in my CBIS class despite the other parallel sections, contact me well in advance of 15th September to plead your case (i.e. provide proof of the conflict you have). I will consider your request and examine whether I can accommodate you. ERASMUS and other exchange students are requested to contact me in advance: some places will be reserved for you!

Michael Claridge, M.A., Dip.Ed.
10-M83-3-V-2 Key Topics in Cultural History: Gender - Culture - Feminism (in englischer Sprache)

Seminar

Termine:
wöchentlich Mi 16:15 - 17:45 GW2 B2890 (2 SWS)

Ziel der Ringvorlesung ist es, über gender-bezogene Themen und Forschungsansätze fachübergreifend ins Gespräch zu kommen und eine größere Sichtbarkeit für die vielfältigen diesbezüglichen wissenschaftlichen Aktivitäten im FB 10 herzustellen. Das erscheint uns in Zeiten, da es in der breiteren Öffentlichkeit vermehrt zu anti-feministischen, gender-studies-feindlichen und homophoben Polemiken kommt, aber gleichzeitig eine junge Generation von Aktivist*innen die Relevanz feministischer und queerer Analysen für sich neu entdeckt, besonders angebracht. Den Studierenden an unserem Fachbereich kann eine solche Reihe zugleich Ideengeber und Motivation für die eigene Spezialisierung sein. Die Vorträge finden im zweiwöchigen Rhythmus statt und sind in ein reguläres Seminar eingebettet, das von Dr Karin Esders geleitet wird.

This course is a mixture between a lecture course and a regular seminar. Scholars and teachers both from FB 10 and TU Berlin will deliver lectures on various aspects of our general topic initiating a transdisciplinary discourse on "Gender - Culture - Feminism". In the sessions between the lectures we will discuss corresponding texts and resources to prepare the diverse subjects of the presentations and to critically reflect on their respective ideas and arguments.

Please note that some of the lectures will be in German. You are welcome to attend lectures only without participating in the full seminar.
Essential readings will be available for download on Stud-IP. You should also consult the 'Semesterapparat' (SuUB) for further readings.
Requirements depend on the number of CPs you wish to achieve and will be announced at the beginning of the course.
Please note that prior enrollment via Stud.IP is mandatory for full seminar participation.

Dr. Karin Esders-Angermund

Ansprechpartner für die Inhalte des Veranstaltungsverzeichnisses

Alte Vorlesungsverzeichnisse (bis Sommersemester 2012)