Lehrveranstaltungen SoSe 2017

English-Speaking Cultures / Englisch, B.A.

Veranstaltungen anzeigen: alle | in englischer Sprache | für ältere Erwachsene

Very important information for advance registration, please read

(Profilfach / Komplementärfach / Lehramtsoption) und Bachelor Bildungswissenschaften des Primar- und Elementarbereichs (English-Speaking Cultures/Englisch)
Please be aware that advance registration for all courses offered on Stud. IP. is mandatory.
All Students enrolled in the study programme English-Speaking Cultures (BA E-SC) are required to register for courses in advance and in a timely fashion! (Students enrolled in their first term need to register until the last Friday before the start of the lecture period)
Please register on Stud.IP:
You select a course of your choice and apply for participation. Your lecturer will either accept or reject your application, depending on the number of students permitted to take one class. The registration process is complete, when you receive a confirmation email. Courses offered in the winter term are available in our online course programme from July 30th onwards. Courses offered in the summer term are available from December 30th.
Registration deadlines on Stud.IP:
For courses offered in the summer term: March, 15th
For courses offered in the winter term: September, 15th
For courses offered for first semester students: last Friday before the start of the lecture period
Comment:
This registration process supports students and faculty members alike. For health and safety reasons the number of students who may register for one course is in some cases limited due to room size. Early registration therefore allows students to make alternative arrangements, i.e. to select another course of their choice before the start of the lecture period.
Registration for Academic Exchange students (Erasmus, Free Mover, international students):
We would like to advice academic exchange students to register for courses via Email. Please identify the relevant faculty member or lecturer and send your email registration request directly to the faculty member offering the course you wish to join. Please follow the link for a detailed list of all contact details: http://www.fb10.uni-bremen.de/anglistik/personal.aspx
VAK Titel der Veranstaltung DozentIn
XXX (Profilfach / Komplementärfach / Lehramtsoption) und Bachelor Bildungswissenschaften des Primar- und Elementarbereichs (English-Speaking Cultures/Englisch)

Vorlesung
N. N.

LEHRVERANSTALTUNGEN DES 1. JAHRES (PO 2011)

Basismodul A: Englische Literaturwissenschaft (6 CP)

Modulbeauftragte/r: Dr. Jana Nittel, jnittel@uni-bremen.de
VAK Titel der Veranstaltung DozentIn
10-76-2-A-01 Introduction to English Literatures Part II (in englischer Sprache)

Seminar

Termine:
wöchentlich Mo 14:15 - 15:45 GW2 B1400 NUR Mo. + Di. UNICOM 3; 0. Ebene; Seminarraum 3 (2 SWS) Gruppe A (Jana Nittel)
wöchentlich Di 10:15 - 11:45 GW2 B1400 NUR Mo. + Di. GW2 B1700 (2 SWS) Gruppe B (Jana Nittel)
wöchentlich Mi 16:15 - 17:45 GW2 B2880 (2 SWS) Gruppe C (Jana Nittel)
wöchentlich Do 10:15 - 11:45 GW2 B2900 (2 SWS) Gruppe D (Paula von Gleich, MA)

This introductory course will attempt to offer students access to literary studies at university level and try to balance scholarly considerations with aesthetic enjoyment. As this is a continuation of the foundation module course “Introduction to English Literatures, Part I”, students will be asked to review the methodology of poetry, drama and narrative analysis. Having gathered historical and textual skills in dealing with various genres, this course will explore theoretical key concepts in literary and cultural studies.

The course will run as four groups. All course participants are required to register on Stud.IP for one of these four groups A, B, C or D by selecting the option “Participants/TeilnehmerInnen” on Stud.IP, followed by “Functions/Groups”. Please select only one group and be aware that the number of students who are permitted to sign up for each group is limited (room size) and that your registration is mandatory (March, 15th 2017).

Monday 02:15 p. m. - 03:45 p. m. Lecturer: Dr Jana Nittel
Tuesday 10:15 a. m. - 11:45 a. m. Lecturer: Dr Jana Nittel
Wednesday 04:15 p. m. - 05:45 p. m. Lecturer: Dr Jana Nittel
Thursday 10:15 a. m. - 11:45 a. m. Lecturer: N.N.

In addition, we would like you to register for:
1) Digitales Lehrangebot: "Key Developments in Literary Histor(ies) and Literary Criticism in English” VAK: 10-76-6-GS-04 [General Studies: 3 CPs] Keine Präsenzveranstaltung,
2) for the tutorials “Übung zum Seminar Introduction to English Literatures Part II”, VAK: 10-76-6-GS-05 [General Studies: 1 CP] on Fridays 08:15 a. m. – 9:45 a. m.

Please explore the sections “Information” and “Schedule” on Stud. IP. for further details such as requirements, weekly schedule, select bibliography, reference only section in the library, modes of assessment and the exam schedule.

Required reading materials (you will need a copy of these books for class):

Berensmeyer, Ingo. Literary Theory: An Introduction to Approaches, Methods and Terms. (Italics) Stuttgart: Klett, 2009. Print.
Pope, Rob. Studying English Literature and Language: An Introduction and Companion. (Italics) 3rd Edition. Abingdon: Routledge, 2012. Print.

Availability: Copies of the texts can be purchased at the bookstore on our campus (Universitätsbuchhandlung Bremen: www.unibuch-bremen.de). In addition, you will find copies in the reference-only section on the third floor of the library building.

Assessment:
- regular attendance, informed participation in class discussions,
- in-depth knowledge of the selected reading material,
- homework assignments, i.e. study group presentation in the tutorial sessions on Fridays.

Students will take a final written exam.

Dr. Jana Nittel
Paula von Gleich, M.A.

Basismodul B: Englische Sprachwissenschaft

Modulbeauftragte/r: Prof. Dr. John Bateman, bateman@uni-bremen.de
VAK Titel der Veranstaltung DozentIn
10-76-2-B-01 Introduction to English Linguistics 2 - Research methods (in englischer Sprache)

Seminar

Termine:
wöchentlich Mo 10:15 - 11:45 GW2 B2900 (2 SWS)

This course continues the general introduction to English Linguistics from last semester, focusing on how to do empirical work in linguistics. Students will be introduced to the different ways, methods and tools to obtain, process and analyze linguistic data. The following topics will be covered: research methodology and design, types of data collection, experiments, corpus linguistics, online dictionaries, transcription, and quantitative approaches to data analysis.

Coursework and assessment

You are expected to read and prepare selected texts for each session. The coursework will focus on real-life linguistic data and exercises which are designed to help you apply selected methods and tools and critically discuss their usefulness. You are required to submit a portfolio comprising different data-based tasks ("worksheets") and other assignments that will be worked on in the course of the semester.


Basic introductory textbooks

Sealey, A. (2010), Researching English Language. A resource book for students. London: Routledge.
Wray, A. & A. Bloomer (2012), Projects in Linguistics and Language Studies. 3rd edition. London: Hodder Education.
E-book at http://lib.myilibrary.com/Open.aspx?id=368803

Prof. Dr. Marcus Callies
10-76-2-B-02 Introduction to English Linguistics 2 - Research methods (in englischer Sprache)

Seminar

Termine:
wöchentlich Mo 14:15 - 15:45 GW2 B2900 IW3 0330 (2 SWS)

This course continues the general introduction to English Linguistics from last semester, focusing on how to do empirical work in linguistics. Students will be introduced to the different ways, methods and tools to obtain, process and analyze linguistic data. The following topics will be covered: research methodology and design, types of data collection, experiments, corpus linguistics, online dictionaries, transcription, and quantitative approaches to data analysis.

Coursework and assessment

You are expected to read and prepare selected texts for each session. The coursework will focus on real-life linguistic data and exercises which are designed to help you apply selected methods and tools and critically discuss their usefulness. You are required to submit a portfolio comprising different data-based tasks ("worksheets") and other assignments that will be worked on in the course of the semester.


Basic introductory textbooks

Sealey, A. (2010), Researching English Language. A resource book for students. London: Routledge.
Wray, A. & A. Bloomer (2012), Projects in Linguistics and Language Studies. 3rd edition. London: Hodder Education.
E-book at http://lib.myilibrary.com/Open.aspx?id=368803

Prof. Dr. Marcus Callies
10-76-2-B-03 Introduction to English Linguistics 2 - Research methods (in englischer Sprache)

Seminar

Termine:
wöchentlich Mi 12:00 - 14:00 SFG 2040 (2 SWS)

This course continues the general introduction to English Linguistics from last semester, focusing on how to do empirical work in linguistics. Students will be introduced to the different ways, methods and tools to obtain, process and analyze linguistic data. The following topics will be covered: research methodology and design, types of data collection, experiments, corpus linguistics, online dictionaries, transcription, and quantitative approaches to data analysis.

Coursework and assessment

You are expected to read and prepare selected texts for each session. The coursework will focus on real-life linguistic data and exercises which are designed to help you apply selected methods and tools and critically discuss their usefulness. You are required to submit a portfolio comprising different data-based tasks ("worksheets") and other assignments that will be worked on in the course of the semester.


Basic introductory textbooks

Sealey, A. (2010), Researching English Language. A resource book for students. London: Routledge.
Wray, A. & A. Bloomer (2012), Projects in Linguistics and Language Studies. 3rd edition. London: Hodder Education.
E-book at http://lib.myilibrary.com/Open.aspx?id=368803

Alexandra Kinne
10-76-2-B-04 Introduction to English Linguistics 2 - Research methods

Seminar

Termine:
wöchentlich Fr 08:15 - 09:45 SH D1020 (2 SWS)

This course continues the general introduction to English Linguistics from last semester, focusing on how to do empirical work in linguistics. Students will be introduced to the different ways, methods and tools to obtain, process and analyze linguistic data. The following topics will be covered: research methodology and design, types of data collection, experiments, corpus linguistics, online dictionaries, transcription, and quantitative approaches to data analysis.

Coursework and assessment

You are expected to read and prepare selected texts for each session. The coursework will focus on real-life linguistic data and exercises which are designed to help you apply selected methods and tools and critically discuss their usefulness. You are required to submit a portfolio comprising different data-based tasks ("worksheets") and other assignments that will be worked on in the course of the semester.


Basic introductory textbooks

Sealey, A. (2010), Researching English Language. A resource book for students. London: Routledge.
Wray, A. & A. Bloomer (2012), Projects in Linguistics and Language Studies. 3rd edition. London: Hodder Education.
E-book at http://lib.myilibrary.com/Open.aspx?id=368803

Nina Aleksandra Reshöft, M.A.

Basismodul C: Kultur- und Sprachgeschichte der englischsprachigen Welt

Modulbeauftragte/r: Dr. Karin Esders, esders@uni-bremen.de und Dr. Inke Du Bois, dubois@uni-bremen.de
VAK Titel der Veranstaltung DozentIn
10-76-2-C-01 Key Moments in the Linguistic History of the English-Speaking World (in englischer Sprache)

Seminar

Termine:
wöchentlich Fr 12:15 - 13:45 SFG 2020 (2 SWS)

In this seminar, students get an introduction to the history of English, i.e. Old English, Middle English and Early Modern English. In the second half of the seminar, we study the major varieties of British and North American English as well as other world varieties with a focus on their structural and phonological features. We will follow the debates about English as a cause of language death, and talk about the place of English in language policies and language planning.

Final assessment: Written exam (E-Klausur)

Recommended literature:
Bloomer, Aileen & Patrick Griffiths & Andrew John Merrison. 2005. Introducing Language in Use: A Coursebook. London; New York: Routledge.
Gramley, Stephan. 2012. The History of English: An Introduction. London; New York: Routledge.
Jenkins, Jennifer. 2009. World Englishes. A resource book for students. London: Routledge.
McIntyre, Dan. 2009. History of English : A resource book for students. London: Routledge.

Dr. Anke Schulz
10-76-2-C-02 Key Moments in the Linguistic History of the English-Speaking World (in englischer Sprache)

Seminar

Termine:
wöchentlich Fr 10:15 - 11:45 GW2 B2900 (2 SWS)

In this seminar, students get an introduction to the history of English, i.e. Old English, Middle English and Early Modern English. In the second half of the seminar, we study the major varieties of British and North American English as well as other world varieties with a focus on their structural and phonological features. We will follow the debates about English as a cause of language death, and talk about the place of English in language policies and language planning.

Final assessment: Written exam (E-Klausur)

Recommended literature:
Bloomer, Aileen & Patrick Griffiths & Andrew John Merrison. 2005. Introducing Language in Use: A Coursebook. London; New York: Routledge.
Gramley, Stephan. 2012. The History of English: An Introduction. London; New York: Routledge.
Jenkins, Jennifer. 2009. World Englishes. A resource book for students. London: Routledge.
McIntyre, Dan. 2009. History of English : A resource book for students. London: Routledge.

Dr. Anke Schulz
10-76-2-C-03 Key Moments in the Linguistic History of the English-Speaking World (in englischer Sprache)

Seminar

Termine:
wöchentlich Mo 12:15 - 13:45 GW2 B1400 NUR Mo. + Di. (2 SWS)

In this seminar, students get an introduction to the history of English, i.e. Old English, Middle English and Early Modern English. In the second half of the seminar, we study the major varieties of British and North American English as well as other world varieties with a focus on their structural and phonological features. We will follow the debates about English as a cause of language death, and talk about the place of English in language policies and language planning.

Final assessment: Written exam (E-Klausur)

Recommended literature:
Bloomer, Aileen & Patrick Griffiths & Andrew John Merrison. 2005. Introducing Language in Use: A Coursebook. London; New York: Routledge.
Gramley, Stephan. 2012. The History of English: An Introduction. London; New York: Routledge.
Jenkins, Jennifer. 2009. World Englishes. A resource book for students. London: Routledge.
McIntyre, Dan. 2009. History of English : A resource book for students. London: Routledge.

Dr. Inke Du Bois
10-76-2-C-04 Key Moments in the Linguistic History of the English-Speaking World (in englischer Sprache)

Seminar

Termine:
wöchentlich Mo 14:15 - 15:45 GW2 B2880 (2 SWS)

In this seminar, students get an introduction to the history of English, i.e. Old English, Middle English and Early Modern English. In the second half of the seminar, we study the major varieties of British and North American English as well as other world varieties with a focus on their structural and phonological features. We will follow the debates about English as a cause of language death, and talk about the place of English in language policies and language planning.

Final assessment: Written exam (E-Klausur)

Recommended literature:

Jenkins, Jennifer. 2009. World Englishes. A resource book for students. London: Routledge.
McIntyre, Dan. 2009. History of English : A resource book for students. London: Routledge.

Dr. Inke Du Bois

SP-1 Basismodul: Sprachpraxis/Practical Language Foundation Module (Part 2) (nur für das Sommersemester)

Modulbeauftragte/: Anne Kirkham, kirkham@uni-bremen.de

Core ULS2 language classes for BA „E-SC“ - 1st year, Semester 2 („Basismodul Sprachpraxis“ SP-1 BAPO 2011, Part 2)
N.B. This class has TWO parts; you MUST attend BOTH the a AND the b part of the SAME class (i.e. 2-1a + 2-1b OR 2-2a + 2-2b OR 2-3a + 2-3b etc.)
VAK Titel der Veranstaltung DozentIn
10-76-2-SP1-01 University Language Skills 2 (1a) (in englischer Sprache)

Übung
ECTS: 6 (ULS 2 1a + 1b)

Termine:
wöchentlich Di 10:15 - 11:45 GW1 B2130 - gesperrt (2 SWS)

IMPORTANT NOTES:

1. Those students in situations of exceptional hardship (who can truly only take part in a specific group despite the other parallel sections) are asked to contact the lecturer for your class of choice directly. It is imperative that you please do so BEFORE the end of the registration procedure (i.e. before March 15, 2017). In such situations, you will be given the opportunity to plead your case (provide proof of the conflict you have) and an effort will be made to accommodate your request where applicable.

2. Once the registration process ends at 18:00 on March 15, 2017, you will automatically be notified (via Stud.IP) whether you have a seat in your group of choice.

3. In the event that your preferred classes (e.g. ULS 2 1a and 1b) are full, the fact that you are (potentially) on an electronic waiting list does not imply that you will eventually get a seat in the class. Thus, in such instances, you are herewith strongly advised to act on your contingency plan.

Dr. Penelope A. Murdock
10-76-2-SP1-02 University Language Skills 2 (1b) (in englischer Sprache)

Übung
ECTS: 6 (ULS 2 1a + 1b)

Termine:
wöchentlich Di 12:15 - 13:45 GW2 B1632 (2 SWS)

Please note: Registration for this class is only possible via the ULS 2 1a group.

Dr. Penelope A. Murdock
10-76-2-SP1-03 University Language Skills 2 (2a) (in englischer Sprache)

Übung
ECTS: 3 ULS 2 (2a) + 3 ULS 2 (2b)

Termine:
wöchentlich Mi 14:15 - 15:45 GW1 B0100 GW2 A3390 (CIP-Labor FB 10) (2 SWS)

ULS 2 is the second part of the 'SP1 Basismodul Sprachpraxis'

PLEASE NOTE: ULS 2 is a FOUR hour class (4 SWS; 6 CP for ULs 2 2a AND 2b) with TWO time slots each week. Consequently, you are required to attend both the “a” and “b” class of a respective group.
For ULS 2 -2 this means that you are required to participate in BOTH sections 2a AND 2b.
Please be advised: It is not permissible to take part in group 2a and combine it with any group OTHER than 2b, for example.

Participation
The class is not recommended for transfer students, students who for whatever reason have not yet attended ULS 1 or ERASMUS students with a level below C1 (GER, CEFR).
ERASMUS students on a level below C1 but above B2 wishing to attend ULS 2 need to contact Katja Müller before joining a class. (kamueller(at)uni-bremen.de)

Coursework
Having practiced the planning and structuring of academic essays in “ULS 1” last semester, you will now be moving on to explore different key writing strategies. Starting with the yet familiar descriptive writing, you will then familiarize yourself with other strategies, for example exemplification, cause & effect, comparison & contrast and argumentation. Analysing a wide variety of texts will improve your reading skills, while applying the key strategies to your own texts will help you practice and develop your own academic style in writing.
Additionally, mini-group peer review will give you (and your readers) the opportunity to evaluate and improve your reading and listening skills in terms of audience-focus and reader-friendliness.
Continued work with McCarthy, Michael & Felicity O’Dell English Collocations in Use, Intermediate edition. Self-study edition with key. Cambridge University Press/Klett, Cornell, Alan & Geoff Parkes What’s the Difference? Englang Books and a third book McCarthy, Michael & Felicity O’Dell English Phrasal Verbs in Use, Intermediate edition (which should be available via the University Bookshop) will systematically expand and refine your lexical (vocabulary) and "lexico-grammatical" resources (e.g. collocations, phrasal verbs, prepositional verbs).
For further language work please bring the latest edition of either the Langenscheidt/Longman Dictionary of Contemporary English or the Cornelsen/Oxford University Press Advanced Learner’s Dictionary, including the electronic version (CD or DVD as appropriate).

Course requirements:
  • regular (80%) and active participation in class
  • thorough preparation of each class session
  • a portfolio comprised of several written assignments (all in all ca. 2000 words)
  • short presentation in class

Katja Müller, M.A.
10-76-2-SP1-04 University Language Skills 2 (2b) (in englischer Sprache)

Übung
ECTS: 3 ULS 2 (2a) + 3 ULS 2 (2b)

Termine:
wöchentlich Mi 16:15 - 17:45 SuUB 4330 (Studio I Medienraum ) GW2 A3390 (CIP-Labor FB 10) (2 SWS)

ULS 2 is the second part of the 'SP1 Basismodul Sprachpraxis'

PLEASE NOTE: ULS 2 is a FOUR hour class (4 SWS; 6 CP for ULs 2 2a AND 2b) with TWO time slots each week. Consequently, you are required to attend both the “a” and “b” class of a respective group.
For ULS 2 -2 this means that you are required to participate in BOTH sections 2a AND 2b.
Please be advised: It is not permissible to take part in group 2a and combine it with any group OTHER than 2b, for example.

Participation
The class is not recommended for transfer students, students who for whatever reason have not yet attended ULS 1 or ERASMUS students with a level below C1 (GER, CEFR).
ERASMUS students on a level below C1 but above B2 wishing to attend ULS 2 need to contact Katja Müller before joining a class. (kamueller(at)uni-bremen.de)

Coursework
Having practiced the planning and structuring of academic essays in “ULS 1” last semester, you will now be moving on to explore different key writing strategies. Starting with the yet familiar descriptive writing, you will then familiarize yourself with other strategies, for example exemplification, cause & effect, comparison & contrast and argumentation. Analysing a wide variety of texts will improve your reading skills, while applying the key strategies to your own texts will help you practice and develop your own academic style in writing.
Additionally, mini-group peer review will give you (and your readers) the opportunity to evaluate and improve your reading and listening skills in terms of audience-focus and reader-friendliness.
Continued work with McCarthy, Michael & Felicity O’Dell English Collocations in Use, Intermediate edition. Self-study edition with key. Cambridge University Press/Klett, Cornell, Alan & Geoff Parkes What’s the Difference? Englang Books and a third book McCarthy, Michael & Felicity O’Dell English Phrasal Verbs in Use, Intermediate edition (which should be available via the University Bookshop) will systematically expand and refine your lexical (vocabulary) and "lexico-grammatical" resources (e.g. collocations, phrasal verbs, prepositional verbs).
For further language work please bring the latest edition of either the Langenscheidt/Longman Dictionary of Contemporary English or the Cornelsen/Oxford University Press Advanced Learner’s Dictionary, including the electronic version (CD or DVD as appropriate).

Course requirements:
  • regular (80%) and active participation in class
  • thorough preparation of each class session
  • a portfolio comprised of several written assignments (all in all ca. 2000 words)
  • short presentation in class

Katja Müller, M.A.
10-76-2-SP1-05 University Language Skills 2 (3a) (in englischer Sprache)

Übung
ECTS: 3

Termine:
wöchentlich Mi 14:15 - 15:45 GW1 B0080 (2 SWS)

University Language Skills 2 is the second part of the SP1 module. Our class will meet once a week for a total of 6CPs. It is a four-hour class with two time slots, both of which MUST be attended.
Course description
The following seminar will build on skills already acquired in ULS1. We will review and further develop writing skills with regard to the significance of the different phases in writing, essay structure and good writing style. In addition, we will examine and expand on different writing strategies only touched on in ULS 1 (exemplification, cause and effect, comparison and contrast, argumentation).
Emphasis will be placed on the ability to recognize individual errors, self-correct and work on personally challenging aspects. You will therefore continue to work on functional grammar at an individual, needs-based level and will be given self-study material on which to work independently according to your requirements outside of the classroom. This is essential in developing an autonomous learning style enabling you to critically assess your own work. Central to our work will be lexical competence building strategies with regard to context and usage, phrasal verbs, confusables and collocations.
Reader focus and readability will be of central importance when writing and planning your writing. Extensive work will be done on both sentence construction and cohesion and coherence in order to develop a deeper understanding of how writing can be made more comprehensible to the reader, resulting in a better sense of flow and a reduction in L1 interference.
Assessment requirements
Students will be required to hand in 2 assignments of 1000 words each based on two of the writing strategies dealt with. Detailed feedback will provide a basis upon which to identify and improve on individual areas of difficulty. In addition, tests and quizzes based on the language work done outside of class will need to be completed.

Lisa Nehls
10-76-2-SP1-06 University Language Skills 2 (3b) (in englischer Sprache)

Übung
ECTS: 3

Termine:
wöchentlich Mi 16:15 - 17:45 GW1 B0080 (2 SWS)

See University Language Skills 3a for details

Lisa Nehls
10-76-2-SP1-07 University Language Skills 2 (4a) (in englischer Sprache)

Übung
ECTS: 3 (+ 3 for ULS2 4b)

Termine:
wöchentlich Mo 14:15 - 15:45 GW2 A4330 (2 SWS)

IMPORTANT: you MUST take the a & b section of the SAME ULS2 class, i.e. either 1a + 1b, or 5a + 5b etc. You MAY NOT take e.g. 1a + 4b!!!
Building on the writing foundations laid in “ULS” 1 last semester, this class enables you to develop your writing skills in the context of particular writing strategies, starting with a refresher of descriptive writing and then proceeding via classification and definition to exemplification, before advancing to cause & effect and comparison & contrast. We will observe how you can use some or all of these writing strategies in persuasive or argumentative essays.
Parallel to this, we will exploit mini-group peer review to explore methods of helping others improve their own writing and, in so doing, gaining useful ideas for your own work.
Work at home and in class on a wide variety of texts and text types will not only continue the development of your reading- and listening-comprehension skills but also help you to expand your vocabulary, further refine your feeling for appropriate register (spoken↔written, formal↔informal), and provide opportunity for refreshing your understanding and application of grammar to improve the clarity of your ‘message’. This will be aided by continued work on material from What’s the Difference?, English Collocations in Use and – this semester’s addition to your practical-language library – English Phrasal Verbs in Use; the latter book should be available in the University Bookshop. You will also be expected to have the latest edition of either the Langenscheidt/Longman Dictionary of Contemporary English or the Cornelsen/Oxford University Press Advanced Learner’s Dictionary, including online access to the electronic version. Finally, a working familiarity with the terminology from the ULS1 “Grammar Terminology” pack. is required.
Since this is an Übung (and you cannot “übe” if you are not present…!), you will be REQUIRED to 1. actively attend class regularly (80% of class meetings) and 2. be appropriately and fully prepared for each class session; being absent the previous week is no satisfactory excuse for coming to class without the necessary preparation. Insufficient preparation with no convincing reason (teacher’s definition!) means you have not completed the preparation aspect of the module requirements, and so will result in your failing the class.
REGISTRATION: Initial provisional registration for this class via Stud.IP will officially close at 4 p.m. on Wednesday, 15th March, 2017 (Studienkommission E-SC ruling). I will check the list on Tuesday, 21st March and admit a maximum of 25 people to the class that day. If MORE than 25 people have signed up for it by the deadline, I will inform the ‘lucky’ 25 that are definitely IN the class who they are, and ask them to confirm they are definitely participating by a set deadline a few days later. Anyone else who has registered will be put on the waiting list. Any places that are still open will be filled at the Practical-Language ‘Börse’ at 2 p.m. on the afternoon of Friday, 31st March, when I assume I will have some information to give you about spaces in most – hopefully all – ULS2 classes; I will add the room for the ‘Börse’ here on Stud.IP when this has been arranged. NOTE: If you are a genuine ‘hardship case’ and can only attend THIS ULS2 class, send me an email or see me in an office hour WELL IN ADVANCE OF 15th March with clear evidence why you should be given preferential treatment regarding admission to this class, and why none of the other ULS2 classes are remotely possible for you. Warning: I have heard MANY stories down the years, and require very good proof!

Michael Claridge, M.A., Dip.Ed.
10-76-2-SP1-08 University Language Skills 2 (4b) (in englischer Sprache)

Übung
ECTS: 3 (+ 3 for ULS 2 4a)

Termine:
wöchentlich Mi 16:15 - 17:45 GW2 A4020 (2 SWS)

Please see ULS2 4a for description. It is impossible to take ULS2 4b without also taking ULS2 4a!

Michael Claridge, M.A., Dip.Ed.
10-76-2-SP1-09 University Language Skills 2 (5a) (in englischer Sprache)

Übung
ECTS: 3 (plus 3 for ULS2 5b)

Termine:
wöchentlich Mo 16:15 - 17:45 GW2 A4020 (2 SWS)

IMPORTANT: you MUST take the a & b section of the SAME ULS2 class, i.e. either 1a + 1b, or 5a + 5b etc. You MAY NOT take e.g. 1a + 4b!!!
Building on the writing foundations laid in “ULS” 1 last semester, this class enables you to develop your writing skills in the context of particular writing strategies, starting with a refresher of descriptive writing and then proceeding via classification and definition to exemplification, before advancing to cause & effect and comparison & contrast. We will observe how you can use some or all of these writing strategies in persuasive or argumentative essays.
Parallel to this, we will exploit mini-group peer review to explore methods of helping others improve their own writing and, in so doing, gaining useful ideas for your own work.
Work at home and in class on a wide variety of texts and text types will not only continue the development of your reading- and listening-comprehension skills but also help you to expand your vocabulary, further refine your feeling for appropriate register (spoken↔written, formal↔informal), and provide opportunity for refreshing your understanding and application of grammar to improve the clarity of your ‘message’. This will be aided by continued work on material from What’s the Difference?, English Collocations in Use and – this semester’s addition to your practical-language library – English Phrasal Verbs in Use; the latter book should be available in the University Bookshop. You will also be expected to have the latest edition of either the Langenscheidt/Longman Dictionary of Contemporary English or the Cornelsen/Oxford University Press Advanced Learner’s Dictionary, including online access to the electronic version. Finally, a working familiarity with the terminology from the ULS1 “Grammar Terminology” pack. is required.
Since this is an Übung (and you cannot “übe” if you are not present…!), you will be REQUIRED to 1. actively attend class regularly (80% of class meetings) and 2. be appropriately and fully prepared for each class session; being absent the previous week is no satisfactory excuse for coming to class without the necessary preparation. Insufficient preparation with no convincing reason (teacher’s definition!) means you have not completed the preparation aspect of the module requirements, and so will result in your failing the class.
REGISTRATION: Initial provisional registration for this class via Stud.IP will officially close at 4 p.m. on Wednesday, 15th March, 2017 (Studienkommission E-SC ruling). I will check the list on Tuesday, 21st March and admit a maximum of 25 people to the class that day. If MORE than 25 people have signed up for it by the deadline, I will inform the ‘lucky’ 25 that are definitely IN the class who they are, and ask them to confirm they are definitely participating by a set deadline a few days later. Anyone else who has registered will be put on the waiting list. Any places that are still open will be filled at the Practical-Language ‘Börse’ at 2 p.m. on the afternoon of Friday, 31st March, when I assume I will have some information to give you about spaces in most – hopefully all – ULS2 classes; I will add the room for the ‘Börse’ here on Stud.IP when this has been arranged. NOTE: If you are a genuine ‘hardship case’ and can only attend THIS ULS2 class, send me an email or see me in an office hour WELL IN ADVANCE OF 15th March with clear evidence why you should be given preferential treatment regarding admission to this class, and why none of the other ULS2 classes are remotely possible for you. Warning: I have heard MANY stories down the years, and require very good proof!

Michael Claridge, M.A., Dip.Ed.
10-76-2-SP1-10 University Language Skills 2 (5b) (in englischer Sprache)

Übung
ECTS: 3 (plus 2 for ULS2 5a)

Termine:
wöchentlich Fr 12:15 - 13:45 GW2 B2890 SFG 1040 (2 SWS)

Please see ULS2 5a for description. It is impossible to take ULS2 5b without taking ULS2 5b!

Michael Claridge, M.A., Dip.Ed.
10-76-2-SP1-11 University Language Skills 2 (6a) (in englischer Sprache)

Übung

Termine:
wöchentlich Mo 08:15 - 09:45 GW2 B2890 (2 SWS)

University Language Skills 2 is the second part of the SP 1 Module, meeting twice a week for a total of 6 CPs. In this course, we will be dealing intensively with a variety of academic essay types, practicing various ways of constructing a written academic argument in English. Types of essays we will be working on are: Argumentation, Cause/Effect, Compare/Contrast, and Exemplification. Students will continue to develop the proficiency in English and academic writing in English they gained in ULS1, focusing in depth on the three-stage process of writing academic essays, practicing gathering, selecting, and organizing information logically, using sentence and paragraph structures to establish relationships between ideas and to communicate effectively, and further developing their strengths in writing in English, while (also verbally) addressing specific problems with accuracy, style/expression, content, and typical “lexico-grammatical” pitfalls associated with non-native speakers writing in English. Intensive, focused peer feedback, both written and oral, is also central to this course.
Active engaged participation and handing in assignments punctually are mandatory.
Grades for this half of the module will be based on two academic essays of 1000 words each.

Anne Kirkham, M.A.
10-76-2-SP1-12 University Language Skills 2 (6b) (in englischer Sprache)

Übung

Termine:
wöchentlich Mi 08:15 - 09:45 GW2 B3010 (Kleiner Studierraum) (2 SWS)
Anne Kirkham, M.A.
10-76-2-SP1-13 University Language Skills 2 (7a) (in englischer Sprache)

Übung

Termine:
wöchentlich Mo 10:15 - 11:45 GW2 A4020 (2 SWS)

University Language Skills 2 is the second part of the SP 1 Module, meeting twice a week for a total of 6 CPs. In this course, we will be dealing intensively with a variety of academic essay types, practicing various ways of constructing a written academic argument in English. Types of essays we will be working on are: Argumentation, Cause/Effect, Compare/Contrast, and Exemplification. Students will continue to develop the proficiency in English and academic writing in English they gained in ULS1, focusing in depth on the three-stage process of writing academic essays, practicing gathering, selecting, and organizing information logically, using sentence and paragraph structures to establish relationships between ideas and to communicate effectively, and further developing their strengths in writing in English, while (also verbally) addressing specific problems with accuracy, style/expression, content, and typical “lexico-grammatical” pitfalls associated with non-native speakers writing in English. Intensive, focused peer feedback, both written and oral, is also central to this course.
Active engaged participation and handing in assignments punctually are mandatory.
Grades for this half of the module will be based on two academic essays of 1000 words each.

Anne Kirkham, M.A.
10-76-2-SP1-14 University Language Skills 2 (7b) (in englischer Sprache)

Übung

Termine:
wöchentlich Mi 12:15 - 13:45 SFG 1030 (2 SWS)
Anne Kirkham, M.A.
10-76-2-SP1-15 University Language Skills 2 (8a) (in englischer Sprache)

Übung
ECTS: 3

Termine:
wöchentlich Fr 10:15 - 11:45 SFG 2020 (2 SWS)

University Language Skills 2 is the second part of the SP1 module. Our class will meet once a week for a total of 6CPs. It is a four-hour class with two time slots, both of which MUST be attended.
Course description
The following seminar will build on skills already acquired in ULS1. We will review and further develop writing skills with regard to the significance of the different phases in writing, essay structure and good writing style. In addition, we will examine and expand on different writing strategies only touched on in ULS 1 (exemplification, cause and effect, comparison and contrast, argumentation).
Emphasis will be placed on the ability to recognize individual errors, self-correct and work on personally challenging aspects. You will therefore continue to work on functional grammar at an individual, needs-based level and will be given self-study material on which to work independently according to your requirements outside of the classroom. This is essential in developing an autonomous learning style enabling you to critically assess your own work. Central to our work will be lexical competence building strategies with regard to context and usage, phrasal verbs, confusables and collocations.
Reader focus and readability will be of central importance when writing and planning your writing. Extensive work will be done on both sentence construction and cohesion and coherence in order to develop a deeper understanding of how writing can be made more comprehensible to the reader, resulting in a better sense of flow and a reduction in L1 interference.
Assessment requirements
Students will be required to hand in 2 assignments of 1000 words each based on two of the writing strategies dealt with. Detailed feedback will provide a basis upon which to identify and improve on individual areas of difficulty. In addition, tests and quizzes based on the language work done outside of class will need to be completed.

Lisa Nehls
10-76-2-SP1-16 University Language Skills 2 (8b) (in englischer Sprache)

Übung
ECTS: 3

Termine:
wöchentlich Fr 12:15 - 13:45 SFG 1010 (2 SWS)

Please see University Language Skills 8a for details

Lisa Nehls

LEHRVERANSTALTUNGEN DES 2. JAHRES (PO 2011)

D2-a Aufbaumodul: Kulturgeschichte (nur für das Sommersemester)

6 CP (3 CP + 3 CP)

1 PL = Term paper/Hausarbeit

Modulbeautragte/r: Dr. Jana Nittel, jnittel@uni-bremen.de
VAK Titel der Veranstaltung DozentIn
10-76-4-D2/WD2-01 Key Topics in Cultural History: Critical Concepts of Race, Class, Gender, Sexuality (in englischer Sprache)

Seminar

Termine:
wöchentlich Di 12:15 - 13:45 MZH 1460 (2 SWS)

This seminar will focus on class, gender and race/ethnicity as historically specific, structured relations of privilege and domination. We will examine the interconnections of these categories and explore some of the main theories which have been developed to account for them.
NB: This seminar is part of a collaborative focus on Black Lives Matter and the Critique of White Supremacy.
Essential readings will be available for download on Stud-IP. You should also consult the ‘Semesterapparat’ (SuUB) for further readings.

Dr. Karin Esders-Angermund
10-76-4-D2/WD2-02 Key Topics in Cultural History: Hollywood Orientalism (in englischer Sprache)

Seminar

Termine:
wöchentlich Do 10:15 - 11:45 SuUB 4330 (Studio I Medienraum ) (2 SWS)

This course aims to provide students with a critical perspective on Hollywood films that deal with and at the same time construct an imaginary "orient". We will deal with basic features of orientalism and postcolonial theory, film theory and film analysis. Using a number of examples we will engage in a a discussion of Hollywood's orientalism: How is the "east" visualized, how are femininity, masculinity, and sexuality presented, how is interracial romance portrayed and restricted? What kind of fears and anxieties, desires and wishes are hidden behind the narrative and visual schemes of the films?

The participation in the course "Exemplary Screenings-Screening Examples" (General Studies / Schlüsselqualifikation / Global Education) is highly recommended.

The course includes weekly reading assignments and requires active participation in discussions based on a thorough preparation of the required reading and film viewing. In addition, you must always bring at least one question or comment about the required reading with you to class (in hard copy). Students will give an oral presentation including a handout and may write a term paper.

A reader with course material will be made available at the beginning of the class. You will also find a choice of books on reserve shelf in the SUuB, 3rd floor.

Please note that prior enrollment via Stud.IP is mandatory

Dr. Karin Esders-Angermund
10-76-4-D2/WD2-03 Key Topics in Cultural History: The Cultural Politics of Sugar (in englischer Sprache)

Seminar

Termine:
wöchentlich Mi 12:15 - 13:45 GW2 A4330 (2 SWS)

This course examines the sociohistorical and political legacy of sugar. Interdisciplinary course readings introduce the history of sugar production and consumption with its thorough dependency on slavery and slave labor. We will also look into more recent developments and investigate how contemporary artists like Kara Walker in her work "A Subtlety. Or the Marvelous Sugar Baby" deals with sugar as a cultural, historical and social artifact.

Dr. Karin Esders-Angermund
10-76-4-D2/WD2-04 Key Topics in Cultural History: Cultural Representations of Empire (in englischer Sprache)

Seminar
ECTS: 3

Termine:
wöchentlich Mi 14:15 - 15:45 GW1 C1070 SFG 1030 GW2 B2900 (2 SWS)

This seminar aims to explore the ways in which the British Empire was (and is) imagined, represented and fictionalized, predominantly for the British public. A brief historical survey will be complemented by the analysis of cultural representations of colonial rule in a range of different media, covering Victorian visual culture both high and popular, older and more recent films about the ‘Raj’ in India, and fictional narratives from the heydays of imperialism such as Kipling’s ambivalent depictions of the Anglo-Indian experience, or Rider Haggard’s African adventure tales for boys. We will investigate issues such as orientalist stereotyping, the native ‘other’, and white masculine self-constructions, discuss both the romance and the anxiety of imperial conquest, and consider the representational strategies employed to defend, critique or undermine the imperial project.

Requirements:
# regular attendance and active participation
# in-depth knowledge of the reading and viewing material
# portfolio of worksheets (graded in WD-2b)
# for a grade in D-2a: an additional long term paper of 8-10 pp.

Texts to be purchased:
- Rudyard Kipling, Plain Tales from the Hills (Oxford UP 2001 or any other, also on the net)
- H. Rider Haggard, King Solomon's Mines (Oxford UP 1998 or Penguin 1994)

Prior enrolment via StudIP is mandatory.

Irmgard Maassen
10-76-4-D2/WD2-05 Key Topics in Cultural History: From Gentleman to Essex Lad - British Masculinities (in englischer Sprache)

Seminar
ECTS: 3

Termine:
wöchentlich Di 14:15 - 15:45 GW2 B3770 (2 SWS)

While gender difference is one of the basic binary opposites by which we construct cultural meaning, the hierarchisation of this difference, the subordination of women to men, is at the core of patriarchal ideology. This course aims to reverse the more usual direction of inquiry by looking at what patriarchal ideology assumes as the norm, and therefore tends to keep from critical view - at masculinity. We shall take a broad historical approach, surveying a wide range of conceptualisations of manhood, covering the Petrarchist lover and the transmutations of the gentleman ideal, the decline of working-class masculinity, Dandies and boy-scouts, the homosociality of the military, and the dissolution of gender stereotypes in consumer cultures and queer cultures. Examples will mainly be taken from British literary and visual culture, both high and popular, and may include Henry VIII, James Bond and David Beckham, but analysis will be supported by theories of gender from, among others, Aristotle, Laqueur, Freud, Kimmel, and R.W.Connell.
"It's a tough job but someone's gotta do it!"

Reading material will be made available on Stud.IP.

Requirements:
# regular attendance and active participation
# in-depth knowledge of the viewing and reading material
# oral presentation and portfolio of short papers (graded in WD-2b)
# for a grade in D-2a: an additional long term paper of 8-10 pp.
Prior enrolment via Stud.IP is mandatory.

Irmgard Maassen
10-76-4-D2/WD2-07 Key Topics in Cultural History: Gender and Power in 20/21st Century U.S. Culture and Media (in englischer Sprache)

Seminar

Einzeltermine:
Fr 12.05.17 14:00 - 16:00 SFG 2030
Fr 30.06.17 15:00 - 19:00 GW2 B3770
Sa 01.07.17 - So 02.07.17 (So, Sa) 10:00 - 19:00 GW2 B2880
Anne Marie Scholz
10-76-4-D2/WD2-08 Key Topics in Cultural History: Postcolonial (Literary) Theory (in englischer Sprache)

Seminar

Termine:
wöchentlich Di 10:15 - 11:45 SuUB 4320 (Studio II Medienraum ) (2 SWS)

Einzeltermine:
Mi 19.04.17 12:15 - 13:45 GW2 B1216
Mo 12.06.17 10:15 - 11:45 GW2 A4330
Di 27.06.17 12:00 - 13:15 SuUB 4330 (Studio I Medienraum )

In this course we will read and discuss contemporary postcolonial theory, with occasional reference to "postcolonial" literary texts. Students will be encouraged to contribute to class discussions on the intersections of class, gender, race, sexuality and space, and how these affect our current understanding of what it means to be "postcolonial" in our contemporary world.

Dr. Janelle Rodriques
10-76-4-D2/WD2-14 Key Topics in Cultural History: Media History and Media Aesthetics (in englischer Sprache)

Seminar

Termine:
wöchentlich Do 10:15 - 11:45 GW2 A4330 (2 SWS)

We are thoroughly surrounded by media on a daily basis, living, so to speak, in a “mediatized” society (Voigts-Virchow, 2005: 5), where the majority of information and knowledge is not perceived through a first-hand experience, i.e. somatically, but information that came to us via a medium, in other words, symbolically (Ott and Mack, 2010: 1). According to a number of critical textbooks in Media studies in English, a course on media aesthetics can supply the basis for media literacy by examining the meaning of visual images for use in film and electronic media.
Delineating from a quintessential understanding of media aesthetics as a study in sensory perception, as a study in value, and a study in the stylistic and formal properties of artistic products, the course will maintain a more philosophically minded orientation in the first half of the course by providing students with an extensive overview of the field of old, new and hybrid forms of media (print, painting, and photography, broadcast, radio play, TV, film, hypertext, simulation systems, videogames and digital art). The sessions on film analysis (narratological and dramatic composition) will however incorporate some aspects of applied media aesthetics by exploring major aesthetic image elements including light, colour and sound in greater detail. Since some of the participants are required to submit a research paper, we will use parts of our seminar discussions to the development of topics, the formulation of a thesis statement, as well as considerations about the methodological approaches of writing such a paper.
Additional secondary sources can be accessed in the “Semesterapparat”, a reference only section on the third floor of the library building. A reader with selected secondary text materials will be made available for download on Stud. IP. Please be aware that your registration on Stud. IP. is mandatory (deadline March 15th, 2017). You may wish to check the sections "Information" and "Schedule" further details such as requirements, weekly schedule, select bibliography and modes of assessment.
For Non-E-SC students and academic exchange students: Please contact me if you require more than 3 credit points.

Assessment (Available for modules D2-a and WD2-b/c)

regular attendance, informed participation in class discussion,
in-depth knowledge of the selected reading material,
homework assignments,
presentation of research paper or group project,
term paper.

The requirements as formulated above may vary depending on your overall degree program. Please check the departmental website for guidelines on modules and exams: http://www.fb10.uni-bremen.de/anglistik/ba2/profil/studienplan.aspx

Please submit your completed data sheet indicating your module choice in week 2 (available on Stud.IP “Allgemeiner Dateiordner”)

Dr. Jana Nittel
10-76-4-D2/WD2-21 Key Topics in Cultural History: Screening America at War: Filmic Representations of Armed Conflict in US Culture (in englischer Sprache)

Seminar

Termine:
wöchentlich Do 16:00 - 18:00 SuUB 4330 (Studio I Medienraum ) (2 SWS)

War is one of the most fundamental topics of US cinema. Since most American conflicts are fought overseas, movies provide images of events that few Americans experience for themselves, thus creating a kind of surrogate war experience. At the same time, combat films are highly artificial constructs that employ a set of cinematic conventions to affect the audience’s emotions through spectacle. As a result, war movies are never objective; their scope ranges from patriotic propaganda pieces to scathing critiques of war’s inhumanity.

This course will explore film as a central cultural arena wherein discourses on armed conflict are negotiated. The seminar’s main focus will lie on the field of representation: What filmic devices are used to portray America’s wars on screen? How do war films influence each other through intertextual referencing? How do these films perpetuate or challenge concepts of gender? How do they portray enemies, and in contrast, what does this portrayal tell us about America’s self-image? How do combat movies affect collective memories of past wars? And finally, what does the representation of a certain conflict on film tell us about the socio-cultural background of its time?

Requirements:
• Regular attendance and active participation
• In-depth knowledge of the reading materials
• Oral presentation and/or term paper

Please note that prior enrollment via Stud. IP is mandatory.

Katalina Kopka
Prof. Dr. Norbert Schaffeld (Mentor)

D2-b Aufbaumodul: Sprachwissenschaft (nur für das Sommersemester)

6 CP (3 CP + 3 CP)

1 PL = Term paper/Hausarbeit

Modulbeautragte/r: Dr. Jana Nittel, jnittel@uni-bremen.de
VAK Titel der Veranstaltung DozentIn
10-76-4-D2b-1 Key Topics in Linguistics: The sounds of English around the world (in englischer Sprache)

Seminar

Termine:
wöchentlich Do 12:15 - 13:45 GW2 A3390 (CIP-Labor FB 10) (2 SWS)

English is spoken as a first language by about 350 million people and as second or foreign language by over 600 million speakers, worldwide. Given this multitude of speakers, with varying (i.e. linguistic) backgrounds, we are very likely to encounter many different forms of spoken English in our lives. These may differ on several levels; however, often most noticeably in form of phonological and phonetic features leading to utterances which “sound different” (see e.g. “Mi cyaan believe it” Michael Smith). But what does this really mean and how can we describe these differences or innovations appropriately?
This class will introduce students to a number of varieties of spoken English from around the globe and theoretical concepts central to language change and contact (e.g. models of World Englishes, standard /national/first language, etc.). We will examine spoken data and will take a look at variety-specific phonological processes and features, but also similarities. The main focus of this course will be on the sounds of Postcolonial Englishes (e.g. Indian English) and contact languages such as English-based pidgins and creoles (e.g. Jamaican Creole, Nigerian Pidgin English).

Requirements:
BA E-SC D2b:
• Active participation: obligatory readings, some homework, some in-class (group) tasks, short presentation
• Oral presentation (20min, Studienleistung); term paper (10-12 pages, Prüfungsleistung)

SIK5:
• Active participation: obligatory readings, some homework, some in-class (group) tasks , short presentation
• Oral presentation (20min) + term paper (10-12 pages)

Antorlina Mandal
10-76-4-D2b-2 Key Topics in Linguistics: Intercultural pragmatics (in englischer Sprache)

Seminar

Einzeltermine:
Fr 12.05.17 12:00 - 14:00 SFG 1030
Fr 12.05.17 14:00 - 18:00 SFG 1010
Sa 13.05.17 10:00 - 18:00 SFG 1010
Fr 23.06.17 12:00 - 18:00 GW2 B3009 (Großer Studierraum)
Sa 24.06.17 10:00 - 18:00 GW2 B3009 (Großer Studierraum)

Language in context has traditionally been studied within the context of one culture such as British or US-American English. Speech Act Theory, Politeness Theory, Conversation Analysis principles meanwhile have been applied to global speech communities and a previously ethnocentric perspective has made way for research that demonstrates different communicative strategies in different cultures. On this background, we will move on to multimodal interaction and take non-verbal discourse strategies into account. Hence, we expand the traditional concepts and analyze how they are realized multimodally. First, students will learn the major analytical frameworks that are applied in pragmatics. Second, we will look at the state of art in multimodal research in intercultural communication.
The texts will be uploaded.

Course Requirements:
A presentation on the second week-end and two 500 word response papers to selected from the class will be required.

Dr. Inke Du Bois
10-76-4-D2b-3 Key Topics in Linguistics: The language of academic writing (in englischer Sprache)
A linguistic perspective on the features of academic texts

Seminar

Termine:
zweiwöchentlich (Startwoche: 2) Mo 12:15 - 15:45 GW2 A3390 (CIP-Labor FB 10) (2 SWS)

Note: This is not an academic writing course, but a linguistics class that looks at academic writing from a research perspective.

As most students will have experienced in the course of their studies, academic texts differ from other genres such as newspapers in many ways. Often, learners of academic writing - both in their mother tongue and in a foreign language such as English - struggle to figure out the conventions of this written genre, which differ across disciplines and text types and are rarely taught explicitly at German universities. The critical assessment and use of sources and the command of adequate academic language often form the basis for measuring learners' competence in academic writing, which makes it crucial to their academic success. But what exactly are the features of academic writing? Which vocabulary is considered appropriate and why? How are academic papers structured? What is appropriate source use and what is plagiarism?

In this seminar, we will take a linguistic perspective on academic writing. By referring to current research and our own analyses of authentic data, we will explore defining characteristics of academic writing such as academic language, the structure of research papers, and intertextuality, i.e. the reference to previous literature. We will study the linguistic strategies of expert writers as well as the problems encountered by novices. Course participants will reflect on their own strategies and issues and explore the processes and products of academic writing using a range of linguistic research methods.

The aim of this course is to gain an in-depth understanding of the lexical, structural, and rhetorical properties as well as the intertextual aspects of academic writing.

Recommended preparatory reading:

Macgilchrist, Felicitas (2014): Academic Writing. Paderborn: Schöningh.
*This book will provide you with a general overview of the features of academic writing, which will provide a useful starting point for our seminar and some practical advice for your own writing. It is available from the University Book Shop on the Boulevard.*

Charles, Maggie & Pecorari, Diane (2016): Introducing English for Academic Purposes. New York: Routledge.
*This book takes a more linguistic approach to English in academic settings. Its target audience are teachers of academic writing classes, but it is also helpful for students who are interested in the characteristics of academic English.*

Leonie Wiemeyer
10-76-4-D2b-5 Key Topics in Linguistics: English-German contrasts (in englischer Sprache)

Seminar

Termine:
wöchentlich Mi 12:15 - 13:45 SH D1020 SuUB 4330 (Studio I Medienraum ) (2 SWS)

Why is English English, and what makes German German? How are, for example, case and gender realized in these languages? What is special about their morphology? How is the word order different? In this class, we will investigate the commonalities and differences in the English and German language system and their use. We will start with a look at the theoretical description of the two language systems, at the notion of ‘equivalence’ in translations, and at translation universals. In the second half of the seminar, you will investigate the Bremen Translation Corpus (BTC) with the help of computer-assisted manual annotations. For this, you will learn how to use the UAM corpus tool. Finally, you will present the results of your study as a poster or term paper.
Recommended literature:
Koenig, Ekkehard & Volker Gast. 2007. Understanding English-German Contrasts. 1st ed. Berlin: Erich Schmidt Verlag. (Buy 2nd ed from 2012 if any at all)
Rothstein, Bjoern. 2011. Wissenschaftliches Arbeiten fuer Linguisten. Tuebingen: Narr.

Dr. Anke Schulz
10-82-2-LS1-1 Key topics in Linguistics: The linguistics of text and discourse
Achtung! Seminar beginnt erst in der 2. Woche, also ab 10.04.17

Seminar
ECTS: 6

Termine:
wöchentlich Mo 14:15 - 15:45 GW2 B2890 SH D1020 (2 SWS)

In the last decades, linguistics has ‘jumped the border’ of the sentence and moved towards larger units of description such as text and discourse. In this seminar we will cover the principal linguistic approaches to text, addressing frameworks such as cohesion, rhetorical structure theory and introductory segmented discourse representation theory. Class work will consist of overviews of the theoretical approaches (supported by readings) followed by group-based analysis and discussion of example texts. Final credit for the module can be obtained by carrying out a more detailed analysis of a collection of short texts (possibly in groups) and motivating the decisions made. Considerations of corpus linguistic approaches to discourse structure and organisation will also be addressed and some particular tools for supporting such analyses introduced. Successful participation in the course should enable the analysis and critical discussion of texts in general, as well as raising awareness of current open topics and issues in linguistic discourse research.

Prof. John Arnold Bateman, Ph.D.

D2-c Aufbaumodul: Literaturwissenschaft (nur für das Sommersemester)

6 CP (3 CP + 3 CP)

1 PL = Term paper/Hausarbeit

Modulbeautragte/r: Dr. Jana Nittel, jnittel@uni-bremen.de
VAK Titel der Veranstaltung DozentIn
10-76-4-D2/WD2-09 Key Topics in Literature: Samuel Richardson and the Epistolary Novel (in englischer Sprache)

Seminar

Termine:
wöchentlich Di 14:15 - 15:45 GW2 B1630 (2 SWS)

Samuel Richardson’s sentimental novel Pamela (1740) is about the eponymous heroine who narrates her story through letters and diary entries. The book starts with the fifteen year old servant Pamela who works in the aristocratic household of Mrs. B. After the lady’s death her son, Mr. B., is entrusted with Pamela’s care, but instead he kidnaps the girl and repeatedly tries to seduce her. Pamela, however, is able to defend her virtue, i.e. her virginity, eventually falls in love with Mr. B. and is finally rewarded with marriage and motherhood.

The novel caused extreme reactions which resulted in the so called “Pamela controversy”. While some praised Pamela as a role model for young women, especially for those of the lower class, others, mainly aristocratic readers, criticized the negative portrayal of Mr. B. and his attempted rapes. Moreover, they doubted Pamela’s virtue altogether and accused the girl of using her sexuality to manipulate the aristocrat.

What can be said for sure is that the eighteenth century was obsessed with the female body, women’s sexuality, virginity, maternity and the general “meaning” of femininity. Richardson’s works can be regarded as one of the literary battlefields for changes in science, medicine, sex, gender, and social order. The aim of this seminar is to critically reflect these historical and cultural developments through an in-depth analysis of this classic novel. In addition, we will turn to Henry Fielding’s bawdy parody Shamela (1741), a farcical burlesque of Pamela’s narrative. In this subversive reading the satirist Fielding reverses the roles and turns the heroine into the predator of the tame and malleable Squire Booby who is finally lured into marriage by Shamela.


Keywords: eighteenth century, body studies, gender, virginity, birth, medicine, power, satire

Requirements:
• registration on Stud.IP
• in-depth knowledge of the reading material (i.e. read the text[s] in advance!)
• regular attendance and oral participation
• oral presentation and handout
• term paper (optional)

Primary text:
Richardson, Samuel [1740]. Pamela; or, Virtue Rewarded. Ed. Thomas Keymer and Alice Wakely. OUP: 2008.*
Fielding, Joseph [1741]. Shamela. Ed. Douglas Brooks-Davies. OUP: 2008.* (p. 305-345)

*NOTE: Please pay attention to the EXACT publication dates when purchasing/copying the book(s) so we can all work with the same editions.

Dr. phil. Jennifer Henke
10-76-4-D2/WD2-10 Key Topics in Literature: The Science Play (in englischer Sprache)

Seminar

Termine:
wöchentlich Fr 14:15 - 15:45 GW2 B3010 (Kleiner Studierraum) (2 SWS)

Einzeltermine:
Fr 16.06.17 14:15 - 15:45 GW2 B1700

The purpose of this seminar is to introduce students to the booming genre of science plays. In recent decades, playwrights show an increasing interest in portraying science and scientists on the theatrical stage. While the interaction between science and theater is not a new phenomenon, as examples such as Christopher Marlowe's Doctor Faustus or Ben Jonson's The Alchemist prove, scholars attest a veritable boom of science playwriting in recent decades (cf. e.g.: Shepherd-Barr 2006, Zehelein 2009).

In this course we will discuss selected science plays from different English-speaking countries and periods that embrace a variety of scientific fields, ideas, (historic) persona, and moments in the history of science in order to gain an impression of this interdisciplinary genre, its different manifestations, its historical development, and the conditions of its production and reception. In addition to an in-depth analysis and interpretation of the selected texts, we will look at science plays in the context of the history of science, gender theory, literary history, the "two-culture-debate", ethics in science, as well as science communication and popularization.

Requirements:
- regular attendance and active participation
- in-depth knowledge of the reading material
- presentation (and handout) and/or final paper

A detailed syllabus will be handed out in the first session.

Texts:
The texts will be announced soon.

Please note that prior enrolment via Stud.IP is mandatory.

Christine Müller, M.A.
10-76-4-D2/WD2-11 Key Topics in Literature: The Fabric of Slavery II (in englischer Sprache)

Seminar

Termine:
wöchentlich Di 14:15 - 15:45 GW2 B1700 UNICOM 3; 0. Ebene; Seminarraum 4 (2 SWS)

dear prospective participants,
this seminar is part of a semester focus across a range of ESC seminars on:
BLACK LIVES MATTER AND THE CRITIQUE OF WHITE SUPREMACY

it is part of the 2 part module The Fabric Slavery; however, it may well be taken separately, so EVERYBODY IS WELCOME!
after a few sessions of basic but intensive instruction about the history of euro/american modern regimes of transatlantic enslavement, we will focus on a close reading of Toni Morrison|s by now classic novel BELOVED. additional secondary reading requirements will be announced on stud ip in due time.
sabine broeck

Prof. Dr. Sabine Bröck
10-76-4-D2/WD2-12 Key Topics in Literature: Science and the Supernatural in post-2000 Crime Series (in englischer Sprache)

Seminar

Termine:
wöchentlich Di 14:15 - 15:45 GW1 B1070 (2 SWS)
Dr. Jana Nittel
10-76-4-D2/WD2-15 Key Topics in Literature: Negotiating "Normalcy": Literature and Disability (in englischer Sprache)

Seminar

Einzeltermine:
Fr 28.04.17 12:00 - 19:00 SFG 1040
Sa 29.04.17 10:00 - 15:30 SFG 1030
Fr 19.05.17 12:00 - 19:00 SuUB 4330 (Studio I Medienraum )
Sa 20.05.17 10:00 - 15:30 SH D1020

Disability demands a narrative: its "very unknowability [...] consolidates the need to tell a story about it" (Snyder/Mitchell) or, as Couser argues, "the scar, the limp, the missing limb, or the obvious prosthesis calls for a story". What is this story, though, and who gets to tell it? This seminar serves as a text-based introduction to literary disability studies. Highlighting key aspects and questions of the disability rights movement and their representation in literature and art, we will focus on canonical texts as well as some more recent and innovative negotiations of disability. Key texts include The Sound and the Fury (William Faulkner), Of Mice and Men (John Steinbeck), and The Heart Is a Lonely Hunter (Carson McCullers); we will also investigate less canonical examples such as the autobiographies The Shaking Woman (Siri Hustvedt) and My Body Politic (Simi Linton), the films Million Dollar Baby and Murderball, Anne Finger’s short story collection “Call Me Ahab”, examples of the works of crip poets Cheryl Marie Wade and Jim Ferris, as well as the Young Adult novels Strong Deaf (Lynn McElfresh) and Roses Are Blue (Sally Murphy).

Marion Rana
10-76-4-D2/WD2-16 Key Topics in Literature: The Empire Writes Back: Colonial and Postcolonial Subjects in Black British Literature (in englischer Sprache)

Seminar

Termine:
wöchentlich Di 14:15 - 15:45 GW2 B1410 GW1-HS H1000 (2 SWS)

Einzeltermine:
Di 23.05.17 16:00 - 18:00 GW2 B3009 (Großer Studierraum)
Do 01.06.17 16:00 - 18:00 GW2 B1400 NUR Mi. - So.

Tutor: Dr Shola Adenekan

Course Description:
People of African descent have been part of European history for many centuries. Recent studies suggest Black people have been living in Britain since the time of the Roman Empire. During the centuries of the trans-Atlantic slave trade, people of African descent, most of whom were ex-slaves settled in Britain. There was migration to and from Britain by people of African origin during colonial era, most notably after the Second World War, when many from the Caribbean came to Britain to help in the post-war effort. It is important to stress that a few others also came to Britain to study, and that the flow of migration was not just one way, but that many Britons emigrated to countries around the globe.

Fictional narratives robustly captured these movements, and on this course, we will be studying the literature of colonial and postcolonial migration so as to show the way in which Black British literature is integral to our understanding of British, European, African and Caribbean history, as well as current developments across different societies.

The main focus of this course is on the stories of people of African descent, as well as those of their children and grandchildren who see Britain as home, many of whom also see themselves as British.

We will examine the notions of belonging and alienation, and we will analyse the discourses surrounding these notions.



Course Objectives:
By the end of this course, students are expected to have
A robust understanding of the nature of Black British literature.
An understanding of the importance of Black British literature to the interpretation of global history.
An understanding of the connection of Black British literature to the issues of migration, race, class and gender. And the way in which these issues often intersect.
.
Reading Materials:
Olaudah Equiano’s The Interesting Narrative of the Life of Olaudah Equiano, Or Gustavus Vassa, The African.

Andrea Levy’s Small Island.

Buchi Emecheta’s Second Class Citizen.

Zadie Smith’s White Teeth

Course Requirements:
Students are expected to attend every class and to contribute to discussions in every seminar.
Students are expected to either develop a portfolio or write a term paper, depending on the credit points they want to have in this class.
Please note that any materials submitted must be your own work and you must ensure that sources that you have consulted are appropriately referenced. This in accordance to the University of Bremen’s rules on plagiarism and academic honesty.

Olorunshola Adenekan
10-76-4-D2/WD2-17 Key Topics in Literature: Literary London (in englischer Sprache)

Seminar

Termine:
wöchentlich Do 12:15 - 13:45 GW2 B3010 (Kleiner Studierraum) (2 SWS)

This course seeks to familiarise students with a number of selected authors, poets and writers, in general, who have held lifelong connections with London, may it be historic or contemporary. We will aim to discuss their continued engagement with the city by exploring a selections of excerpts from Alexander Pope, Olaudah Equiano, Daniel Defoe, Alfred Lord Tennyson, Charles Dickens, Thomas Hardy, Elizabeth Bowen, Sir Arthur Conan Doyle, and George Eliot, just to name a few. By tracing forgotten as well as prominent landmarks of the urban centre, we seek to connect the literary representations of the city with historical and cultural developments, present and past.

Since some of the participants are required to submit a research paper, we will use parts of our seminar discussions to the development of topics, the formulation of a thesis statement, as well as considerations about the methodological approaches of writing such a paper.

Additional secondary sources can be accessed in the “Semesterapparat”, a reference only section on the third floor of the library building. A reader with selected secondary text materials will be made available for download on Stud. IP. Please be aware that your registration on Stud. IP. is mandatory (deadline March 15th, 2017). You may wish to check the sections "Information" and "Schedule" further details such as requirements, weekly schedule, select bibliography and modes of assessment.

For Non-E-SC students and academic exchange students: Please contact me if you require more than 3 credit points.

Assessment (Available for modules D2-c and WD2-a/b)

regular attendance, informed participation in class discussion,
in-depth knowledge of the selected reading material,
homework assignments,
presentation of research paper or group project,
term paper.

The requirements as formulated above may vary depending on your overall degree program. Please check the departmental website for guidelines on modules and exams: http://www.fb10.uni-bremen.de/anglistik/ba2/profil/studienplan.aspx

Please submit your completed data sheet indicating your module choice in week 2 (available on Stud.IP “Allgemeiner Dateiordner”)

Required reading materials (you may wish to purchase a copy of these publications for class):

Bowen, Elizabeth. The Heat of the Day. (Italics) 1948. New York: Anchor Books, 2002. Print.
Conrad, Joseph. Heart of Darkness. (Italics) 1902. CreateSpace Independent Publishing Platform, 2014. Print.
Defoe, Daniel. Roxana: The Fortunate Mistress. (Italics) 1724. Oxford: OUP, 2008. Print.
Dickens, Charles. David Copperfield: The Personal History of David Copperfield. (Italics) 1849-50. London: Penguin Classics, 2004. Print.
Doyle, Sir Arthur Conan. The Memoirs of Sherlock Holmes. (Italics) 1894. London: Penguin, 2011. Print.
Eliot, George. Daniel Deronda. (Italics) 1876. London: Penguin Classics, 1995. Print.
Equiano, Olaudah. The Interesting Narrative of the Life of Olaudah Equiano, or Gustavus Vassa, the African. Written by Himself. 1789. (Italics) Print.

Copies of the texts can be purchased at the bookstore on our campus (Universitätsbuchhandlung Bremen: www.unibuch-bremen.de)

Dr. Jana Nittel
10-76-4-D2/WD2-18 Key Topics in Literature: Black Women Writers in the US (in englischer Sprache)

Seminar

Termine:
wöchentlich Mo 14:15 - 15:45 SuUB 4320 (Studio II Medienraum ) (2 SWS)

Einzeltermine:
Fr 09.06.17 15:15 - 19:45 GW2 B3770
Dr. Selamawit Terrefe
10-76-4-D2/WD2-19 Key Topics in Literature: From Black Power to BLM-Black Political and Protest Literature in the US (in englischer Sprache)

Seminar

Einzeltermine:
Fr 02.06.17 10:00 - 18:00 GW2 B1820
Sa 03.06.17 - So 04.06.17 (So, Sa) 10:00 - 18:00 GW2 B2900
Dr. Selamawit Terrefe
10-76-4-D2/WD2-20 Key Topics in Literature: African American Autobiography (in englischer Sprache)

Seminar

Termine:
wöchentlich Di 12:15 - 13:45 GW2 B1405 NUR Mo. + Di. SFG 2080 (2 SWS)

Einzeltermine:
Di 30.05.17 18:00 - 22:00 GW2 B1410
Di 04.07.17 18:00 - 22:00 GW2 B1410

Autobiography is often said to be the preeminent narrative tradition of black America. This seminar will provide an overview of this tradition by exploring a range of autobiographical representations across time in their various forms and functions.In the first half of the seminar we will focus on slave narratives such as Harriet Jacob’s 'Incidents in the Life of a Slave Girl' (1861) or Frederick Douglass’s 'My Bondage and My Freedom' (1855) and analyze the terms on which the black subject could speak for herself/himself in the framework of abolitionism. Furthermore, we will take a look at autobiographical narratives that speak to black experiences in the aftermath of the Civil War as well as texts that emerged out of the Harlem Renaissance.The second half of the seminar will introduce students to a number of life narratives from the Civil Rights era to the turn of the twenty-first century. From 'The Autobiography of Malcolm X' (1965) and Audre Lorde’s ''Zami: A New Spelling of My Name'' (1982) to contemporary documentary, we will zoom in on the ways in which the genre has addressed black experiences in intersection with concerns of gender, religion, class and sexuality. We will conclude our seminar with Barack Obama’s 'Dreams from My Father' (1995/2004) as one of the most recent bestsellers of African American Autobiography.

Cedric-Akpeje Essi
10-M83-2-P1-5 Key Topics in Literature: West African Female Writers (in englischer Sprache)

Seminar

Termine:
wöchentlich Do 12:15 - 13:45 GW2 B1410 (2 SWS)

West African Female Writers

Course Tutor: Dr Shola Adenekan

Course Description:

Discussions around contemporary literature from the continent of Africa often focus on male writers. But there are female writers from across the over 50 African countries who produce aesthetically-pleasing creative writings that deserve our critical attention. The complex story of each African country cannot be grasped without a thorough examination of writing by women because they provide powerful insight into various discourses affecting our world.

Since we want to avoid what Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie (July 2009) refers to as “the danger of a single story” - Africa is a continent of about a billion people living in 55 countries and where hundreds of languages are spoken – our focus will be on selected female writers from two West African countries - Nigeria and Ghana.

We shall examine some of the issues raised in their fictional narratives and poetry, such as gender, sexuality, class and politics, and how these discourses intersect one another.

This course is specifically aimed at MA students and advanced BA students.

Reading Materials:

1. Flora Nwapa’s Efuru
2. Ama Ata Aidoo’s Changes
3. Chika Unigwe’s On Black Sister Street
4. Taiye Selasi’s Ghana Must Go

Olorunshola Adenekan

SP-2 Aufbaumodul: Sprachpraxis/ Practical-Language Proficiency Module (Part 2) (nur für das Sommersemester)

Modulbeauftragte/r: Michael Claridge, claridge@uni-bremen.de

Core language classes for BA „E-SC“ - 2nd year, Semester 4 („Aufbaumodul“ SP-2 BAPO 2011, Part 2)
VAK Titel der Veranstaltung DozentIn
10-76-4-SP2-01 Culture and Communication a (in englischer Sprache)
"'No (wo)man is an island'?"

Übung
ECTS: 3

Termine:
wöchentlich Mi 14:15 - 15:45 GW1-HS H1000 GW2 B1400 NUR Mi. - So. (2 SWS)

The name for this new class is adapted from John Donne, a poet and theologian, a contemporary of William Shakespeare: “No man is an Island, entire of it self.” Donne comments how one person’s actions and fate can affect each of us, as fellow-members of “Mankind” – a key idea when we consider how the world, political blocs, and countries are – or should be – governed, and our role in this as citizens and voters: a central issue as Germany and France prepare to elect their national governments, the UK Parliament readies itself to vote on the whole Brexit process, the intentions of the recently elected US President for his country and the globe at large become clearer, and the media proclaim the arrival of a ‘post-truth’ world.
Recent behaviour by electorates in the western world has underlined how many people are increasingly questioning the extent to which the political system of their country is in fact democratic and representative. Does it guarantee democratic elections (and what does this actually mean)? Does it genuinely reflect the will of ‘the people’ (and which ‘people’ – are majorities and minorities equally fairly represented)? In those cases where the country belongs to a political bloc, are political decisions affecting the bloc taken in a representative and truly effective manner? Is it “government of the people, by the people, and for the people” (Abraham Lincoln, 1863)? Or does ‘The Establishment’ run everything in an inscrutable, unaccountable manner, with meaningless elections held every now and then to appease the voters? CAN we – the voters, individually and collectively – actually affect anything and bring about meaningful change (e.g. through referendums)? In a nutshell, are we forced to choose between true democracy and effective, efficient government?
Using mini-presentations, a collection of key readings, and our own critical faculties, we will examine different forms of government and governance during the first half of the semester to assess in each case what are the good aspects, at least in theory; what is potentially dangerous or dysfunctional about each form; and what problems could arise (perhaps have arisen) in reality. This will enable us to conclude whether the form of government can actually function, under what conditions and with what consequences for a country and its people. (For example, what is the difference between ‘representative democracy’ and ‘direct democracy’, and can a system that makes considerable use of referendums truly function?) Finally, we will attempt to answer the question why a given system appears to function in one country and not in another.
In the second part of the semester, everyone will give a further mini-presentation, this time on a topic of your own choosing; I will provide you with some suggestions emerging from the ideas discussed in the first half, but personal preferences and wishes can also be discussed and agreed upon! This will in effect be a ‘dress rehearsal’ for your SP2 module exam presentation, i.e. you can ‘road-test’ what you are planning to do and receive feedback from the class and me, as you work up the actual exam presentation. And a reflective essay will draw together everything you have learnt about good, effective academic writing, as well as pointing to what areas you should work on in your semester abroad before writing your BA dissertation in your final BA semester.
You will thus be furthering your English-language speaking, listening, reading and writing skills, building on lessons learnt in the previous three semesters to help you help yourself in the Aufbaumodul exam, during your study semester abroad, and when working on your BA dissertation (no matter in what language!). In particular, we will look closely at what elements make for a GOOD, PROFESSIONAL presentation. Thus, the communicative and also soft skills you acquire will be invaluable in ‘life after completing BA studies’ as well: much of the work we will be doing on recipient-orientated structure and communication strategies will be equally valid in any communication situation, no matter in what language or country: a well-structured essay, presentation or simply ‘message’ is well-structured, no matter whether in English, Spanish, Swahili or Klingon!!!
Please note that since this is an Übung (and you cannot “übe” if you are not present…!), you will be required to actively attend class regularly (80% of class meetings). Insufficient preparation with no convincing reason (teacher’s definition!) means you have not completed the preparation aspect of the module requirements, and so will result in your failing the class.
REGISTRATION: Initial provisional registration for this class via Stud.IP will close at 4 p.m. on Wednesday, 15th March, 2017 (Studienkommission E-SC ruling). If MORE than 23 people have signed up for it by the deadline, I will inform the ‘lucky’ 23 that are definitely IN the class who they are, and ask them to confirm they are definitely participating by a set deadline a few days later. Anyone else who has registered will be put on the waiting list. Any places that are still open will be filled at the Practical-Language ‘Börse’ at 3 p.m. on the afternoon of Friday, 31st March, when I assume I will have some information to give you about spaces in most – hopefully all – C&C classes; I will add the room for the ‘Börse’ here on Stud.IP when this has been arranged. NOTE: If you are a genuine ‘hardship case’ and can only attend THIS C&C class, send me an email or see me in an office hour WELL IN ADVANCE OF 15th March with clear evidence why you should be given preferential treatment regarding admission to this class, and why none of the other ULS2 classes are remotely possible for you. Warning: I have heard MANY stories down the years, and require very good proof!

Michael Claridge, M.A., Dip.Ed.
10-76-4-SP2-02 Culture and Communication b: Can films broaden and build our virtues and character strengths? (in englischer Sprache)

Übung
ECTS: 3

Termine:
wöchentlich Do 12:15 - 13:45 GW2 B2880 GW2 A4330 (2 SWS)

This culture and communication seminar will offer students an opportunity to critically examine aspects of English-speaking North American culture through film. Our research-based approach to viewing and analysing “positive psychology” films will emphasise learning to identify and then consciously look for character and signature strengths and/or other positive phenomena being modelled therein. This approach will introduce participants to practical ways of discovering and fostering one’s own strengths. The seminar is very experiential in nature. As such, participants can anticipate regular classroom discussion and activities to augment the assignments and supplementary background literature provided. A major objective of this seminar is to allow you opportunity to critically analyse, discuss, and present your perceptions of the themes introduced.

Specific Focus:
This fourth semester practical language seminar will emphasise rhetoric and oral presentation techniques.

Important notes:

1. Those students in situations of exceptional hardship (who can truly only take part in a specific group despite the other parallel sections) are asked to contact the lecturer for your class of choice directly. It is imperative that you please do so BEFORE the end of the registration period (i.e. before March 15, 2017). In such situations, you will be given the opportunity to plead your case (provide proof of the conflict you have) and an effort will be made to accommodate your request where applicable.

2. Once the registration process ends at 18:00 on March 15, 2017, you will automatically be notified (via Stud.IP) whether you have a seat in this seminar.

Dr. Penelope A. Murdock
10-76-4-SP2-03 Culture and Communication c: Black Lives Matter (in englischer Sprache)

Übung
ECTS: 3

Termine:
wöchentlich Do 10:15 - 11:45 GW2 A4020 (2 SWS)

This culture and communication seminar will offer students an opportunity to critically examine aspects of the Black Lives Matter movement through film, literature, and music. To provide an adequate framework for this seminar, our primarily research-based approach to the theme shall commence by examining racial identity development. Thus, we shall first grapple with understanding whiteness in a white context, blackness in a white context, and identity development in people of colour who share similar patterns of racial, ethnic, or cultural oppression. The remaining syllabus is a partial adoption of the course: “Black Lives Matter” designed by Frank Leon Roberts (frankroberts@nyu.edu) at BlackLivesMatterSyllabus.com.

Specific Focus:
While this fourth semester practical language seminar will touch on rhetoric and oral presentation techniques, regular reading assignments and oral communication skills shall be our focus. Moreover, a willingness to engage in meaningful, productive dialogue to raise consciousness about “race, resistance, and populist protest” will be of paramount significance.

NB: This seminar is part of a collaborative focus on Black Lives Matter and the Critique of White Supremacy.


Additional notes:

1. Those students in situations of exceptional hardship (who can truly only take part in a specific group despite the other parallel sections) are asked to contact the lecturer for your class of choice directly. It is imperative that you please do so BEFORE the end of the registration period (i.e. before March 15, 2017). In such situations, you will be given the opportunity to plead your case (provide proof of the conflict you have) and an effort will be made to accommodate your request where applicable.

2. Once the registration process ends at 18:00 on March 15, 2017, you will automatically be notified (via Stud.IP) whether you have a seat in this seminar.

Dr. Penelope A. Murdock
10-76-4-SP2-04 Culture and Communication d: Introduction to Positive Education (in englischer Sprache)

Übung
ECTS: 3

Termine:
wöchentlich Di 08:15 - 09:45 GW2 B3010 (Kleiner Studierraum) SH D1020 (2 SWS)

Can one cultivate skills, which increase motivation, resilience, and positive emotions when it comes to the learning processes? Indeed, Positive Education aims to impart exactly these skills and more. This culture and communication seminar will offer students an opportunity to experience and better understand this approach to fostering one’s individual development throughout the learning process. The science of positive psychology is the foundation of this evidence-based framework which can be applied in educational learning contexts to actively promote students’ psychological well-being and the development of personal resources essential for flourishing.

While the seminar will offer participants an opportunity to identify and further develop their own skills and strengths, a further clear goal is to critically analyse and discuss how the class material could be adopted and applied in other educational contexts with children and youth in particular. A selection of themes we shall discuss include identifying and building character and signature strengths as well as fostering mindfulness, strong social relationships, and self-determined forms of motivation to engage.

Specific Focus:
While this fourth semester practical language seminar will touch on rhetoric and oral presentation techniques, the primary focus of this seminar is on actively engaging in, reflecting on, and discussing the practical assignments given.


Important notes:

1. Those students in situations of exceptional hardship (who can truly only take part in a specific group despite the other parallel sections) are asked to contact the lecturer for your class of choice directly. It is imperative that you please do so BEFORE the end of the registration period (i.e. before March 15, 2017). In such situations, you will be given the opportunity to plead your case (provide proof of the conflict you have) and an effort will be made to accommodate your request where applicable.

2. Once the registration process ends at 18:00 on March 15, 2017, you will automatically be notified (via Stud.IP) whether you have a seat in this seminar.

Dr. Penelope A. Murdock
10-76-4-SP2-05 Culture and Communication e (in englischer Sprache)

Übung

Termine:
wöchentlich Do 10:15 - 11:45 SuUB 4320 (Studio II Medienraum ) (2 SWS)
Katja Müller, M.A.
10-76-4-SP2-06 Culture and Communication f (in englischer Sprache)
The Immigrant, the Other (This seminar is part of a collaborative focus on Black Lives Matter and the Critique of White Supremacy)"

Übung

Termine:
wöchentlich Do 10:15 - 11:45 GW1 B2070 - gesperrt (2 SWS)

In this course, we will examine the academic concept of otherizing, specifically but not limited to the treatment of refugees, immigrants, and other perceived “others” in modern European and North American society (and elsewhere). Issues as diverse as racism, racial profiling, discrimination against (perceived) minorities, hate crimes and hate speech, fundamentalism “fake news”, homo- and trans-phobia, sexism, multiculturalism and how it is perceived will be examined, among others.
Students will be required to complete the required readings, participate in discussions, and give a presentation based on one of the topics covered during the class.
The grade will be based on performance in the presentation; this presentation (and feedback given on it) will prepare students for their final oral presentation.

Anne Kirkham, M.A.
10-76-4-SP2-07 Culture and Communication g (in englischer Sprache)
"'No (wo)man is an island'?"

Übung
ECTS: 3

Termine:
wöchentlich Fr 10:15 - 11:45 SuUB 4320 (Studio II Medienraum ) GW2 B1580 (2 SWS)

The name for this new class is adapted from John Donne, a poet and theologian, a contemporary of William Shakespeare: “No man is an Island, entire of it self.” Donne comments how one person’s actions and fate can affect each of us, as fellow-members of “Mankind” – a key idea when we consider how the world, political blocs, and countries are – or should be – governed, and our role in this as citizens and voters: a central issue as Germany and France prepare to elect their national governments, the UK Parliament readies itself to vote on the whole Brexit process, the intentions of the recently elected US President for his country and the globe at large become clearer, and the media proclaim the arrival of a ‘post-truth’ world.
Recent behaviour by electorates in the western world has underlined how many people are increasingly questioning the extent to which the political system of their country is in fact democratic and representative. Does it guarantee democratic elections (and what does this actually mean)? Does it genuinely reflect the will of ‘the people’ (and which ‘people’ – are majorities and minorities equally fairly represented)? In those cases where the country belongs to a political bloc, are political decisions affecting the bloc taken in a representative and truly effective manner? Is it “government of the people, by the people, and for the people” (Abraham Lincoln, 1863)? Or does ‘The Establishment’ run everything in an inscrutable, unaccountable manner, with meaningless elections held every now and then to appease the voters? CAN we – the voters, individually and collectively – actually affect anything and bring about meaningful change (e.g. through referendums)? In a nutshell, are we forced to choose between true democracy and effective, efficient government?
Using mini-presentations, a collection of key readings, and our own critical faculties, we will examine different forms of government and governance during the first half of the semester to assess in each case what are the good aspects, at least in theory; what is potentially dangerous or dysfunctional about each form; and what problems could arise (perhaps have arisen) in reality. This will enable us to conclude whether the form of government can actually function, under what conditions and with what consequences for a country and its people. (For example, what is the difference between ‘representative democracy’ and ‘direct democracy’, and can a system that makes considerable use of referendums truly function?) Finally, we will attempt to answer the question why a given system appears to function in one country and not in another.
In the second part of the semester, everyone will give a further mini-presentation, this time on a topic of your own choosing; I will provide you with some suggestions emerging from the ideas discussed in the first half, but personal preferences and wishes can also be discussed and agreed upon! This will in effect be a ‘dress rehearsal’ for your SP2 module exam presentation, i.e. you can ‘road-test’ what you are planning to do and receive feedback from the class and me, as you work up the actual exam presentation. And a reflective essay will draw together everything you have learnt about good, effective academic writing, as well as pointing to what areas you should work on in your semester abroad before writing your BA dissertation in your final BA semester.
You will thus be furthering your English-language speaking, listening, reading and writing skills, building on lessons learnt in the previous three semesters to help you help yourself in the Aufbaumodul exam, during your study semester abroad, and when working on your BA dissertation (no matter in what language!). In particular, we will look closely at what elements make for a GOOD, PROFESSIONAL presentation. Thus, the communicative and also soft skills you acquire will be invaluable in ‘life after completing BA studies’ as well: much of the work we will be doing on recipient-orientated structure and communication strategies will be equally valid in any communication situation, no matter in what language or country: a well-structured essay, presentation or simply ‘message’ is well-structured, no matter whether in English, Spanish, Swahili or Klingon!!!
Please note that since this is an Übung (and you cannot “übe” if you are not present…!), you will be required to actively attend class regularly (80% of class meetings). Insufficient preparation with no convincing reason (teacher’s definition!) means you have not completed the preparation aspect of the module requirements, and so will result in your failing the class.
REGISTRATION: Initial provisional registration for this class via Stud.IP will close at 4 p.m. on Wednesday, 15th March, 2017 (Studienkommission E-SC ruling). If MORE than 23 people have signed up for it by the deadline, I will inform the ‘lucky’ 23 that are definitely IN the class who they are, and ask them to confirm they are definitely participating by a set deadline a few days later. Anyone else who has registered will be put on the waiting list. Any places that are still open will be filled at the Practical-Language ‘Börse’ at 3 p.m. on the afternoon of Friday, 31st March, when I assume I will have some information to give you about spaces in most – hopefully all – C&C classes; I will add the room for the ‘Börse’ here on Stud.IP when this has been arranged. NOTE: If you are a genuine ‘hardship case’ and can only attend THIS C&C class, send me an email or see me in an office hour WELL IN ADVANCE OF 15th March with clear evidence why you should be given preferential treatment regarding admission to this class, and why none of the other ULS2 classes are remotely possible for you. Warning: I have heard MANY stories down the years, and require very good proof!

Michael Claridge, M.A., Dip.Ed.
10-76-4-SP2-08 Culture and Communication h
Great speakers and what we can learn from them.

Übung
ECTS: 3

Termine:
wöchentlich Mo 14:15 - 15:45 GW2 B3850 (2 SWS)

Speakers of our time and what we can learn from them.

The aim of this Culture and Communication language-practice course is to prepare you for the SP2 module oral exam to be taken after successful completion of this class. During the course, we will look at a range of presentations skills and will discuss the importance of audience focus. You will be required to hold a 10 minute presentation and lead a 5 minute discussion in order to pass the class. The feedback you receive from this mock exam is excellent preparation for the subsequent SP2 module exam and will familiarize you with the requirements and format with which you will be later faced.
As a basis for our work, we will take a critical analytical look at speakers and speeches of our time with regard to context, content and delivery. The central question will be: What can we learn from this example and how can we apply these skills to our presentation task? As you can see, it is a hands-on and communicative course in which you will be expected to participate actively and with enthusiasm

Lisa Nehls

FD-2 Aufbaumodul Fachdidaktik 10-76-4-204 (nur für das Sommersemester)

Pflichtmodul: Gy, BIPEB

6 CP

Modulbeauftragte/r: Tim Giesler, Link-extern giesler@uni-bremen.de
VAK Titel der Veranstaltung DozentIn
10-76-4-FD2-01 Historical and Theoretical Foundations of Second Language Acquisition (BiPEB)

Seminar

Termine:
wöchentlich Do 10:15 - 11:45 GW1 A0160 (2 SWS)

This course has a closer look at how first and second languages are learned in order for future English Language Teachers to evaluate the effectiveness of their own language teaching. We will deal with the following questions:
• In which way has English Language Teaching developed in history?
• How do children acquire a first language?
• To what extent can theories of first language acquisition be applied to second language learning?
• Can individual learner characteristics affect success in second language learning?
• How do learners learn a foreign language at school - and what are the consequences for teaching them?
• There will be a special emphasis on primary education in some sessions in this class.

Tim Giesler
10-76-4-FD2-02 Historical and Theoretical Foundations of Second Language Acquisition (Gy) (in englischer Sprache)

Seminar

Termine:
wöchentlich Fr 14:15 - 15:45 GW2 B2890 SFG 1040 (2 SWS)

This course has a closer look at how first and second languages are learned in order for future English Language Teachers to evaluate the effectiveness of their own language teaching. We will deal with the following questions:
• In which way has English Language Teaching developed in history?
• How do children acquire a first language?
• To what extent can theories of first language acquisition be applied to second language learning?
• Can individual learner characteristics affect success in second language learning?
• How do learners learn a foreign language at school - and what are the consequences for teaching them?

Tim Giesler
10-76-4-FD2-03 Historical and Theoretical Foundations of Second Language Acquisition (Gy) (in englischer Sprache)

Seminar

Termine:
wöchentlich Fr 14:15 - 15:45 GW2 B2900 (2 SWS)

This course has a closer look at how first and second languages are learned in order for future English Language Teachers to evaluate the effectiveness of their own language teaching. We will deal with the following questions:

  • In which way has English Language Teaching developed in history?
  • How do children acquire a first language?
  • To what extent can theories of first language acquisition be applied to second language learning?
  • Can individual learner characteristics affect success in second language learning?
  • How do learners learn a foreign language at school - and what are the consequences for teaching them?

Heather Haase
10-76-4-FD2-04 ELT: Primary Activities, Resources and Materials (BiPEB) (in englischer Sprache)

Seminar

Termine:
zweiwöchentlich (Startwoche: 1) Di 14:15 - 15:45 SH D1020 (2 SWS)

Einzeltermine:
Sa 22.04.17 09:00 - 15:00 GW2 B2900
Sa 01.07.17 09:00 - 15:00 GW2 B2900

Teachers often feel that their own teaching practice and theoretical insights about teaching are only loosely connected. In this course, we are striving to bridge the gap between those two dimensions by looking at activities, resources, and materials and reflecting on ways of doing research in these areas. We are also going to look at recent studies and research methodologies which might be used as starting points for students' own action research projects. All this is designed to help students become reflective practitioners.

The course's Studienleistung will be doing small-scale research projects in the field of English Language Education and presenting the results on research posters. This is part of the university's ForstA-scheme.

Please note that there are two mandatory additional sessions on Saturdays (22 April and 1 July) from 09:00 to 15:00.

Christine Ringwald
10-76-4-FD2-05 ELT: CLIL Activities, Resources and Materials (Gy) (in englischer Sprache)

Seminar

Termine:
zweiwöchentlich (Startwoche: 1) Fr 10:15 - 11:45 GW2 B3770 (2 SWS) GW2 A3750

Einzeltermine:
Sa 22.04.17 09:00 - 15:00 GW2 B2900
Sa 01.07.17 09:00 - 15:00 GW2 B2900

Teachers often feel that their own teaching practice and theoretical insights about teaching are only loosely connected. In this course, we are striving to bridge the gap between those two dimensions by looking at activities, resources, and materials and reflecting on ways of doing research in these areas. We are also going to look at recent studies and research methodologies which might be used as starting points for students' own action research projects. All this is designed to help students become reflective practitioners.

The course's Studienleistung will be doing small-scale research projects in the field of English Language Education and presenting the results on research posters. This is part of the university's ForstA-scheme.

Please note that there are two mandatory additional sessions on Saturdays (22 April and 1 July) from 09:00 to 15:00.

Tim Giesler
10-76-4-FD2-06 ELT: Activities, Resources and Materials (Gy) (in englischer Sprache)

Seminar

Termine:
zweiwöchentlich (Startwoche: 2) Fr 10:15 - 11:45 GW2 B1216 GW2 B3770

Einzeltermine:
Sa 22.04.17 09:00 - 15:00 GW2 B2900
Sa 01.07.17 09:00 - 15:00 GW2 B2900

Teachers often feel that their own teaching practice and theoretical insights about teaching are only loosely connected. In this course, we are striving to bridge the gap between those two dimensions by looking at activities, resources, and materials and reflecting on ways of doing research in these areas. We are also going to look at recent studies and research methodologies which might be used as starting points for students' own action research projects. All this is designed to help students become reflective practitioners.

The course's Studienleistung will be doing small-scale research projects in the field of English Language Education and presenting the results on research posters. This is part of the university's ForstA-scheme.

Please note that there are two mandatory additional sessions on Saturdays (22 April and 1 July) from 09:00 to 15:00.

Elisabeth Bigge
10-76-4-FD2-07 ELT: Activities, Resources and Materials (Gy) (in englischer Sprache)

Seminar

Termine:
zweiwöchentlich (Startwoche: 2) Di 14:15 - 15:45 GW2 A4330 (2 SWS)

Einzeltermine:
Sa 22.04.17 09:00 - 15:00 GW2 B2900
Sa 01.07.17 09:00 - 15:00 GW2 B2900

Teachers often feel that their own teaching practice and theoretical insights about teaching are only loosely connected. In this course, we are striving to bridge the gap between those two dimensions by looking at activities, resources, and materials and reflecting on ways of doing research in these areas. We are also going to look at recent studies and research methodologies which might be used as starting points for students' own action research projects. All this is designed to help students become reflective practitioners.

The course's Studienleistung will be doing small-scale research projects in the field of English Language Education and presenting the results on research posters. This is part of the university's ForstA-scheme.

Please note that there are two mandatory additional sessions on Saturdays (22 April and 1 July) from 09:00 to 15:00

Heather Haase

WD-2a Aufbaumodul: Literatur- und Sprachwissenschaft (Wahlpflichtmodul) (nur für das Sommersemester)

(6 CP = 3 CP und 3 CP)

Es gilt zu beachten: Laut SK-Beschluss (E-SC) vom 21.12.2012 ist die Prüfungsleistung im Bereich "Key Topics in Literature" zu erbringen =
Klausur/Written Test oder benotete Präsentationsleistung/Presentation

Modulbeauftragte/r: Dr. Inke du Bois, dubois@uni-bremen.de und Prof. Dr. Marcus Callies, callies@uni-bremen.de
VAK Titel der Veranstaltung DozentIn
10-76-4-D2/WD2-09 Key Topics in Literature: Samuel Richardson and the Epistolary Novel (in englischer Sprache)

Seminar

Termine:
wöchentlich Di 14:15 - 15:45 GW2 B1630 (2 SWS)

Samuel Richardson’s sentimental novel Pamela (1740) is about the eponymous heroine who narrates her story through letters and diary entries. The book starts with the fifteen year old servant Pamela who works in the aristocratic household of Mrs. B. After the lady’s death her son, Mr. B., is entrusted with Pamela’s care, but instead he kidnaps the girl and repeatedly tries to seduce her. Pamela, however, is able to defend her virtue, i.e. her virginity, eventually falls in love with Mr. B. and is finally rewarded with marriage and motherhood.

The novel caused extreme reactions which resulted in the so called “Pamela controversy”. While some praised Pamela as a role model for young women, especially for those of the lower class, others, mainly aristocratic readers, criticized the negative portrayal of Mr. B. and his attempted rapes. Moreover, they doubted Pamela’s virtue altogether and accused the girl of using her sexuality to manipulate the aristocrat.

What can be said for sure is that the eighteenth century was obsessed with the female body, women’s sexuality, virginity, maternity and the general “meaning” of femininity. Richardson’s works can be regarded as one of the literary battlefields for changes in science, medicine, sex, gender, and social order. The aim of this seminar is to critically reflect these historical and cultural developments through an in-depth analysis of this classic novel. In addition, we will turn to Henry Fielding’s bawdy parody Shamela (1741), a farcical burlesque of Pamela’s narrative. In this subversive reading the satirist Fielding reverses the roles and turns the heroine into the predator of the tame and malleable Squire Booby who is finally lured into marriage by Shamela.


Keywords: eighteenth century, body studies, gender, virginity, birth, medicine, power, satire

Requirements:
• registration on Stud.IP
• in-depth knowledge of the reading material (i.e. read the text[s] in advance!)
• regular attendance and oral participation
• oral presentation and handout
• term paper (optional)

Primary text:
Richardson, Samuel [1740]. Pamela; or, Virtue Rewarded. Ed. Thomas Keymer and Alice Wakely. OUP: 2008.*
Fielding, Joseph [1741]. Shamela. Ed. Douglas Brooks-Davies. OUP: 2008.* (p. 305-345)

*NOTE: Please pay attention to the EXACT publication dates when purchasing/copying the book(s) so we can all work with the same editions.

Dr. phil. Jennifer Henke
10-76-4-D2/WD2-10 Key Topics in Literature: The Science Play (in englischer Sprache)

Seminar

Termine:
wöchentlich Fr 14:15 - 15:45 GW2 B3010 (Kleiner Studierraum) (2 SWS)

Einzeltermine:
Fr 16.06.17 14:15 - 15:45 GW2 B1700

The purpose of this seminar is to introduce students to the booming genre of science plays. In recent decades, playwrights show an increasing interest in portraying science and scientists on the theatrical stage. While the interaction between science and theater is not a new phenomenon, as examples such as Christopher Marlowe's Doctor Faustus or Ben Jonson's The Alchemist prove, scholars attest a veritable boom of science playwriting in recent decades (cf. e.g.: Shepherd-Barr 2006, Zehelein 2009).

In this course we will discuss selected science plays from different English-speaking countries and periods that embrace a variety of scientific fields, ideas, (historic) persona, and moments in the history of science in order to gain an impression of this interdisciplinary genre, its different manifestations, its historical development, and the conditions of its production and reception. In addition to an in-depth analysis and interpretation of the selected texts, we will look at science plays in the context of the history of science, gender theory, literary history, the "two-culture-debate", ethics in science, as well as science communication and popularization.

Requirements:
- regular attendance and active participation
- in-depth knowledge of the reading material
- presentation (and handout) and/or final paper

A detailed syllabus will be handed out in the first session.

Texts:
The texts will be announced soon.

Please note that prior enrolment via Stud.IP is mandatory.

Christine Müller, M.A.
10-76-4-D2/WD2-11 Key Topics in Literature: The Fabric of Slavery II (in englischer Sprache)

Seminar

Termine:
wöchentlich Di 14:15 - 15:45 GW2 B1700 UNICOM 3; 0. Ebene; Seminarraum 4 (2 SWS)

dear prospective participants,
this seminar is part of a semester focus across a range of ESC seminars on:
BLACK LIVES MATTER AND THE CRITIQUE OF WHITE SUPREMACY

it is part of the 2 part module The Fabric Slavery; however, it may well be taken separately, so EVERYBODY IS WELCOME!
after a few sessions of basic but intensive instruction about the history of euro/american modern regimes of transatlantic enslavement, we will focus on a close reading of Toni Morrison|s by now classic novel BELOVED. additional secondary reading requirements will be announced on stud ip in due time.
sabine broeck

Prof. Dr. Sabine Bröck
10-76-4-D2/WD2-12 Key Topics in Literature: Science and the Supernatural in post-2000 Crime Series (in englischer Sprache)

Seminar

Termine:
wöchentlich Di 14:15 - 15:45 GW1 B1070 (2 SWS)
Dr. Jana Nittel
10-76-4-D2/WD2-15 Key Topics in Literature: Negotiating "Normalcy": Literature and Disability (in englischer Sprache)

Seminar

Einzeltermine:
Fr 28.04.17 12:00 - 19:00 SFG 1040
Sa 29.04.17 10:00 - 15:30 SFG 1030
Fr 19.05.17 12:00 - 19:00 SuUB 4330 (Studio I Medienraum )
Sa 20.05.17 10:00 - 15:30 SH D1020

Disability demands a narrative: its "very unknowability [...] consolidates the need to tell a story about it" (Snyder/Mitchell) or, as Couser argues, "the scar, the limp, the missing limb, or the obvious prosthesis calls for a story". What is this story, though, and who gets to tell it? This seminar serves as a text-based introduction to literary disability studies. Highlighting key aspects and questions of the disability rights movement and their representation in literature and art, we will focus on canonical texts as well as some more recent and innovative negotiations of disability. Key texts include The Sound and the Fury (William Faulkner), Of Mice and Men (John Steinbeck), and The Heart Is a Lonely Hunter (Carson McCullers); we will also investigate less canonical examples such as the autobiographies The Shaking Woman (Siri Hustvedt) and My Body Politic (Simi Linton), the films Million Dollar Baby and Murderball, Anne Finger’s short story collection “Call Me Ahab”, examples of the works of crip poets Cheryl Marie Wade and Jim Ferris, as well as the Young Adult novels Strong Deaf (Lynn McElfresh) and Roses Are Blue (Sally Murphy).

Marion Rana
10-76-4-D2/WD2-16 Key Topics in Literature: The Empire Writes Back: Colonial and Postcolonial Subjects in Black British Literature (in englischer Sprache)

Seminar

Termine:
wöchentlich Di 14:15 - 15:45 GW2 B1410 GW1-HS H1000 (2 SWS)

Einzeltermine:
Di 23.05.17 16:00 - 18:00 GW2 B3009 (Großer Studierraum)
Do 01.06.17 16:00 - 18:00 GW2 B1400 NUR Mi. - So.

Tutor: Dr Shola Adenekan

Course Description:
People of African descent have been part of European history for many centuries. Recent studies suggest Black people have been living in Britain since the time of the Roman Empire. During the centuries of the trans-Atlantic slave trade, people of African descent, most of whom were ex-slaves settled in Britain. There was migration to and from Britain by people of African origin during colonial era, most notably after the Second World War, when many from the Caribbean came to Britain to help in the post-war effort. It is important to stress that a few others also came to Britain to study, and that the flow of migration was not just one way, but that many Britons emigrated to countries around the globe.

Fictional narratives robustly captured these movements, and on this course, we will be studying the literature of colonial and postcolonial migration so as to show the way in which Black British literature is integral to our understanding of British, European, African and Caribbean history, as well as current developments across different societies.

The main focus of this course is on the stories of people of African descent, as well as those of their children and grandchildren who see Britain as home, many of whom also see themselves as British.

We will examine the notions of belonging and alienation, and we will analyse the discourses surrounding these notions.



Course Objectives:
By the end of this course, students are expected to have
A robust understanding of the nature of Black British literature.
An understanding of the importance of Black British literature to the interpretation of global history.
An understanding of the connection of Black British literature to the issues of migration, race, class and gender. And the way in which these issues often intersect.
.
Reading Materials:
Olaudah Equiano’s The Interesting Narrative of the Life of Olaudah Equiano, Or Gustavus Vassa, The African.

Andrea Levy’s Small Island.

Buchi Emecheta’s Second Class Citizen.

Zadie Smith’s White Teeth

Course Requirements:
Students are expected to attend every class and to contribute to discussions in every seminar.
Students are expected to either develop a portfolio or write a term paper, depending on the credit points they want to have in this class.
Please note that any materials submitted must be your own work and you must ensure that sources that you have consulted are appropriately referenced. This in accordance to the University of Bremen’s rules on plagiarism and academic honesty.

Olorunshola Adenekan
10-76-4-D2/WD2-17 Key Topics in Literature: Literary London (in englischer Sprache)

Seminar

Termine:
wöchentlich Do 12:15 - 13:45 GW2 B3010 (Kleiner Studierraum) (2 SWS)

This course seeks to familiarise students with a number of selected authors, poets and writers, in general, who have held lifelong connections with London, may it be historic or contemporary. We will aim to discuss their continued engagement with the city by exploring a selections of excerpts from Alexander Pope, Olaudah Equiano, Daniel Defoe, Alfred Lord Tennyson, Charles Dickens, Thomas Hardy, Elizabeth Bowen, Sir Arthur Conan Doyle, and George Eliot, just to name a few. By tracing forgotten as well as prominent landmarks of the urban centre, we seek to connect the literary representations of the city with historical and cultural developments, present and past.

Since some of the participants are required to submit a research paper, we will use parts of our seminar discussions to the development of topics, the formulation of a thesis statement, as well as considerations about the methodological approaches of writing such a paper.

Additional secondary sources can be accessed in the “Semesterapparat”, a reference only section on the third floor of the library building. A reader with selected secondary text materials will be made available for download on Stud. IP. Please be aware that your registration on Stud. IP. is mandatory (deadline March 15th, 2017). You may wish to check the sections "Information" and "Schedule" further details such as requirements, weekly schedule, select bibliography and modes of assessment.

For Non-E-SC students and academic exchange students: Please contact me if you require more than 3 credit points.

Assessment (Available for modules D2-c and WD2-a/b)

regular attendance, informed participation in class discussion,
in-depth knowledge of the selected reading material,
homework assignments,
presentation of research paper or group project,
term paper.

The requirements as formulated above may vary depending on your overall degree program. Please check the departmental website for guidelines on modules and exams: http://www.fb10.uni-bremen.de/anglistik/ba2/profil/studienplan.aspx

Please submit your completed data sheet indicating your module choice in week 2 (available on Stud.IP “Allgemeiner Dateiordner”)

Required reading materials (you may wish to purchase a copy of these publications for class):

Bowen, Elizabeth. The Heat of the Day. (Italics) 1948. New York: Anchor Books, 2002. Print.
Conrad, Joseph. Heart of Darkness. (Italics) 1902. CreateSpace Independent Publishing Platform, 2014. Print.
Defoe, Daniel. Roxana: The Fortunate Mistress. (Italics) 1724. Oxford: OUP, 2008. Print.
Dickens, Charles. David Copperfield: The Personal History of David Copperfield. (Italics) 1849-50. London: Penguin Classics, 2004. Print.
Doyle, Sir Arthur Conan. The Memoirs of Sherlock Holmes. (Italics) 1894. London: Penguin, 2011. Print.
Eliot, George. Daniel Deronda. (Italics) 1876. London: Penguin Classics, 1995. Print.
Equiano, Olaudah. The Interesting Narrative of the Life of Olaudah Equiano, or Gustavus Vassa, the African. Written by Himself. 1789. (Italics) Print.

Copies of the texts can be purchased at the bookstore on our campus (Universitätsbuchhandlung Bremen: www.unibuch-bremen.de)

Dr. Jana Nittel
10-76-4-D2/WD2-18 Key Topics in Literature: Black Women Writers in the US (in englischer Sprache)

Seminar

Termine:
wöchentlich Mo 14:15 - 15:45 SuUB 4320 (Studio II Medienraum ) (2 SWS)

Einzeltermine:
Fr 09.06.17 15:15 - 19:45 GW2 B3770
Dr. Selamawit Terrefe
10-76-4-D2/WD2-19 Key Topics in Literature: From Black Power to BLM-Black Political and Protest Literature in the US (in englischer Sprache)

Seminar

Einzeltermine:
Fr 02.06.17 10:00 - 18:00 GW2 B1820
Sa 03.06.17 - So 04.06.17 (So, Sa) 10:00 - 18:00 GW2 B2900
Dr. Selamawit Terrefe
10-76-4-D2/WD2-20 Key Topics in Literature: African American Autobiography (in englischer Sprache)

Seminar

Termine:
wöchentlich Di 12:15 - 13:45 GW2 B1405 NUR Mo. + Di. SFG 2080 (2 SWS)

Einzeltermine:
Di 30.05.17 18:00 - 22:00 GW2 B1410
Di 04.07.17 18:00 - 22:00 GW2 B1410

Autobiography is often said to be the preeminent narrative tradition of black America. This seminar will provide an overview of this tradition by exploring a range of autobiographical representations across time in their various forms and functions.In the first half of the seminar we will focus on slave narratives such as Harriet Jacob’s 'Incidents in the Life of a Slave Girl' (1861) or Frederick Douglass’s 'My Bondage and My Freedom' (1855) and analyze the terms on which the black subject could speak for herself/himself in the framework of abolitionism. Furthermore, we will take a look at autobiographical narratives that speak to black experiences in the aftermath of the Civil War as well as texts that emerged out of the Harlem Renaissance.The second half of the seminar will introduce students to a number of life narratives from the Civil Rights era to the turn of the twenty-first century. From 'The Autobiography of Malcolm X' (1965) and Audre Lorde’s ''Zami: A New Spelling of My Name'' (1982) to contemporary documentary, we will zoom in on the ways in which the genre has addressed black experiences in intersection with concerns of gender, religion, class and sexuality. We will conclude our seminar with Barack Obama’s 'Dreams from My Father' (1995/2004) as one of the most recent bestsellers of African American Autobiography.

Cedric-Akpeje Essi
10-76-4-WD2-1 Key Topics in Linguistics: Linguistic variation in English (in englischer Sprache)

Seminar

Termine:
wöchentlich Di 12:00 - 14:00 GW1 B1070 (2 SWS)

This seminar will explore the notion of linguistic variation in English. Linguistic variation refers to differences in the ways a particular language is used. Variation is inherent in human language. It occurs between speakers of a particular language but also within the language of a single speaker and is possible on all structural levels: phonology, morphology, lexis and syntax.

This seminar will look at linguistic variation in English from three different perspectives. It will address (1) regional variation, i.e. how language varies regionally, (2) social variation, i.e. how language varies according to social factors such as the speakers’ social class, ethnicity, gender and age, and (3) functional variation, i.e. how language varies according to the characteristics of a communicative situation such as the level of formality, mode, or text type/genre. It will also address how linguistic variation is connected with language change.


Recommended preparatory reading
Kortmann, Bernd (2005), English Linguistics: Essentials. Berlin: Cornelsen, chapter 8

Alexandra Kinne
10-76-4-WD2-2 Key Topics in Linguistics: Human-Machine: the process of meaning-making in digital texts (in englischer Sprache)

Seminar

Termine:
wöchentlich Fr 10:15 - 11:45 SFG 2040 (2 SWS)

Seminar

Termine:
wöchentlich Fr 10:15 - 11:45, SFG 2040

In this seminar, we will focus on the way meaning is originated while reading shapeshifting, multimodal and responsive texts comprised of code, verbal language, images, icons, audio or video files.
The relationship between human and machine has been depicted in various ways by different forms of text, and continues to develop with huge diversity. Even though human and machine have often been considered as members of a dichotomic pair, there seems to be rather a strong affinity, and even symbiotic link, between both. From the nineteenth century luddite attacks on factories, to the almost inevitable dependency on computers and other digital devices, the “human-machine” theme has been intensely explored by writers, film-makers, and scholars. During this seminar, debates concerning human identity, as well as the place of print book in a digital age, might emerge. We will begin by focusing our attention on how the “machine” has been described throughout the history of humankind. In a second part of our seminar, we will discuss some examples of the impact of digital media on the use of verbal language among social media users and gamers. Finally, the reception of digital texts, namely, of electronic literature (a literary form read and created on a computer), will be analysed by focusing on human-machine interaction. The materials selected for this course will range from science fiction’s cautionary tales (along with filmic reinterpretations), and news articles about human-machine co-existence/binarism, to literary digital works which offer multiple reading experiences, often turning the reader into a player or a viewer.

Essential bibliography (excerpts will be provided):
Hayles, N. Katherine (2011). How We Think: Digital Media and Contemporary Technogenesis. Chicago: The University Chicago Press.

Dr. Daniela Cortes Maduro
10-76-4-WD2-3 Key Topics in Linguistics: Linguistic analysis of literary texts (in englischer Sprache)

Seminar

Termine:
wöchentlich Do 10:15 - 11:45 GW2 A3390 (CIP-Labor FB 10) (2 SWS)

In this seminar, we want to apply linguist theories and methods to investigate different kinds of literary texts, e.g. novels, plays and poems. This is a branch of applied linguistics often called ‘stylistics’. The Systemic Functional Grammar provides us with the theoretical background to investigate, for example, transitivity and theme in texts. In addition, we will use corpus linguistic methods, e.g. word frequencies, keywords and collocations, to describe the style of a literary text. You will learn how to do automatic analyses with the AntConc software, and do some computer-assisted manual annotations with the UAM corpus tool software.
Each student will do analyses of different linguistic aspects of a text of their choice. In the end, you will be able to find, analyse and present aspects of literary texts that exceed what can be described with methods from literature studies alone.

Requirements
Regular attendance and active participation in class, working through texts / exercises / discussions.
Homework assignments (reading 10-30 pages each week; doing the exercises and analyses).

BA ESC ( 2011) WD 2 a: An analysis + poster presentation (not graded, 3 CP)
BA ESC ( 2011) WD 2 c: An analysis + portfolio (graded, 3 CP)
Erasmus 3 CP An analysis and poster presentation (graded), 6 CP An analysis, poster presentation and portfolio (graded)

Literature
Goatly, Andrew. 2008. Explorations in Stylistics. Equinox. Available as e-book from the library.
McEnery, Tony & Richard Xiao & Yukio Tono. 2006. Corpus-based Language Studies: An Advanced Resource Book. Routledge.
Toolan, Michael. 2009. Narrative Progression in the Short Story: A Corpus Stylistic Approach. John Benjamins. Available as e-book from the library.

Dr. Anke Schulz
10-82-4-TM II-2 Computer-mediated Communication | Mo 18-20 (in englischer Sprache)

Seminar

Termine:
wöchentlich Mo 18:00 - 20:00 SFG 1010 (2 SWS)

The advent of the Internet has changed human communication drastically. Along with and dependent on technical development, new communicative patterns have emerged such as emailing, chatting, blogging and vlogging. Although some of these practices still show quite a number of parallels to offline communication - emails resemble letters and a blog may remind us of a diary, they are distinctively new with regards to a number of other features. Computer-mediated communication is a very exciting research object for text and discourse linguistics. Established descriptive tools such as multimodal genre analysis, theoretical approaches to politeness, audience design, or word-formation patterns serve to "ride the rough waves of genre research" on the web. They deliver fascinating insights into those communicative practices all of us engage in on a daily basis: on Facebook, on Twitter, on WhatsApp - and by signing up for this class ;).

Jana Pflaeging
10-M82-1-4-ME-2 Introduction to Multimodal Text Analysis | Mo 10-12
Modultyp B/C im Studiengang Language Sciences, M.A.

Seminar

Termine:
wöchentlich Mo 10:00 - 12:00 UNICOM 3; 0. Ebene; Seminarraum 1

Einzeltermine:
Do 29.06.17 10:00 - 12:00

This seminar daws our attention to something researchers describe as "the discovery of the obvious": every instance of communication is (and has been) multimodal. Although verbal language might seem the most obvious means of communication, there are other semiotic resources people additonally draw on when, for instance, composing a newspaper article, shooting a film, designing advertisements or IKEA furniture, giving firm handshakes or soft air-kisses. In this introductory class we will scrutinize multimodality from both a theoretical and an empirical perspective. By discussing key research papers in multimodality studies, we shall lay the foundations for many empirical investigations of static, dynamic, spatial, temporal, and/or interactive examples of multimodal texts that we'll find in- and outside the classroom.

Jana Pflaeging
10-M83-2-P1-5 Key Topics in Literature: West African Female Writers (in englischer Sprache)

Seminar

Termine:
wöchentlich Do 12:15 - 13:45 GW2 B1410 (2 SWS)

West African Female Writers

Course Tutor: Dr Shola Adenekan

Course Description:

Discussions around contemporary literature from the continent of Africa often focus on male writers. But there are female writers from across the over 50 African countries who produce aesthetically-pleasing creative writings that deserve our critical attention. The complex story of each African country cannot be grasped without a thorough examination of writing by women because they provide powerful insight into various discourses affecting our world.

Since we want to avoid what Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie (July 2009) refers to as “the danger of a single story” - Africa is a continent of about a billion people living in 55 countries and where hundreds of languages are spoken – our focus will be on selected female writers from two West African countries - Nigeria and Ghana.

We shall examine some of the issues raised in their fictional narratives and poetry, such as gender, sexuality, class and politics, and how these discourses intersect one another.

This course is specifically aimed at MA students and advanced BA students.

Reading Materials:

1. Flora Nwapa’s Efuru
2. Ama Ata Aidoo’s Changes
3. Chika Unigwe’s On Black Sister Street
4. Taiye Selasi’s Ghana Must Go

Olorunshola Adenekan

WD-2b Aufbaumodul: Literaturwissenschaft und Kulturgeschichte (Wahlpflichtmodul) - (nur für das Sommersemester)

(6 CP = 3 CP und 3 CP)

Es gilt zu beachten: Laut SK-Beschluss (E-SC) vom 21.12.2012 ist die Prüfungsleistung im Bereich "Key Topics in Cultural History" zu erbringen =
Klausur/Written Test oder benotete Praesentationsleistung/Presentation

Modulbeauftragte/r: Dr. Inke du Bois, dubois@uni-bremen.de und Prof. Dr. Marcus Callies, callies@uni-bremen.de
VAK Titel der Veranstaltung DozentIn
10-76-4-D2/WD2-01 Key Topics in Cultural History: Critical Concepts of Race, Class, Gender, Sexuality (in englischer Sprache)

Seminar

Termine:
wöchentlich Di 12:15 - 13:45 MZH 1460 (2 SWS)

This seminar will focus on class, gender and race/ethnicity as historically specific, structured relations of privilege and domination. We will examine the interconnections of these categories and explore some of the main theories which have been developed to account for them.
NB: This seminar is part of a collaborative focus on Black Lives Matter and the Critique of White Supremacy.
Essential readings will be available for download on Stud-IP. You should also consult the ‘Semesterapparat’ (SuUB) for further readings.

Dr. Karin Esders-Angermund
10-76-4-D2/WD2-02 Key Topics in Cultural History: Hollywood Orientalism (in englischer Sprache)

Seminar

Termine:
wöchentlich Do 10:15 - 11:45 SuUB 4330 (Studio I Medienraum ) (2 SWS)

This course aims to provide students with a critical perspective on Hollywood films that deal with and at the same time construct an imaginary "orient". We will deal with basic features of orientalism and postcolonial theory, film theory and film analysis. Using a number of examples we will engage in a a discussion of Hollywood's orientalism: How is the "east" visualized, how are femininity, masculinity, and sexuality presented, how is interracial romance portrayed and restricted? What kind of fears and anxieties, desires and wishes are hidden behind the narrative and visual schemes of the films?

The participation in the course "Exemplary Screenings-Screening Examples" (General Studies / Schlüsselqualifikation / Global Education) is highly recommended.

The course includes weekly reading assignments and requires active participation in discussions based on a thorough preparation of the required reading and film viewing. In addition, you must always bring at least one question or comment about the required reading with you to class (in hard copy). Students will give an oral presentation including a handout and may write a term paper.

A reader with course material will be made available at the beginning of the class. You will also find a choice of books on reserve shelf in the SUuB, 3rd floor.

Please note that prior enrollment via Stud.IP is mandatory

Dr. Karin Esders-Angermund
10-76-4-D2/WD2-03 Key Topics in Cultural History: The Cultural Politics of Sugar (in englischer Sprache)

Seminar

Termine:
wöchentlich Mi 12:15 - 13:45 GW2 A4330 (2 SWS)

This course examines the sociohistorical and political legacy of sugar. Interdisciplinary course readings introduce the history of sugar production and consumption with its thorough dependency on slavery and slave labor. We will also look into more recent developments and investigate how contemporary artists like Kara Walker in her work "A Subtlety. Or the Marvelous Sugar Baby" deals with sugar as a cultural, historical and social artifact.

Dr. Karin Esders-Angermund
10-76-4-D2/WD2-04 Key Topics in Cultural History: Cultural Representations of Empire (in englischer Sprache)

Seminar
ECTS: 3

Termine:
wöchentlich Mi 14:15 - 15:45 GW1 C1070 SFG 1030 GW2 B2900 (2 SWS)

This seminar aims to explore the ways in which the British Empire was (and is) imagined, represented and fictionalized, predominantly for the British public. A brief historical survey will be complemented by the analysis of cultural representations of colonial rule in a range of different media, covering Victorian visual culture both high and popular, older and more recent films about the ‘Raj’ in India, and fictional narratives from the heydays of imperialism such as Kipling’s ambivalent depictions of the Anglo-Indian experience, or Rider Haggard’s African adventure tales for boys. We will investigate issues such as orientalist stereotyping, the native ‘other’, and white masculine self-constructions, discuss both the romance and the anxiety of imperial conquest, and consider the representational strategies employed to defend, critique or undermine the imperial project.

Requirements:
# regular attendance and active participation
# in-depth knowledge of the reading and viewing material
# portfolio of worksheets (graded in WD-2b)
# for a grade in D-2a: an additional long term paper of 8-10 pp.

Texts to be purchased:
- Rudyard Kipling, Plain Tales from the Hills (Oxford UP 2001 or any other, also on the net)
- H. Rider Haggard, King Solomon's Mines (Oxford UP 1998 or Penguin 1994)

Prior enrolment via StudIP is mandatory.

Irmgard Maassen
10-76-4-D2/WD2-05 Key Topics in Cultural History: From Gentleman to Essex Lad - British Masculinities (in englischer Sprache)

Seminar
ECTS: 3

Termine:
wöchentlich Di 14:15 - 15:45 GW2 B3770 (2 SWS)

While gender difference is one of the basic binary opposites by which we construct cultural meaning, the hierarchisation of this difference, the subordination of women to men, is at the core of patriarchal ideology. This course aims to reverse the more usual direction of inquiry by looking at what patriarchal ideology assumes as the norm, and therefore tends to keep from critical view - at masculinity. We shall take a broad historical approach, surveying a wide range of conceptualisations of manhood, covering the Petrarchist lover and the transmutations of the gentleman ideal, the decline of working-class masculinity, Dandies and boy-scouts, the homosociality of the military, and the dissolution of gender stereotypes in consumer cultures and queer cultures. Examples will mainly be taken from British literary and visual culture, both high and popular, and may include Henry VIII, James Bond and David Beckham, but analysis will be supported by theories of gender from, among others, Aristotle, Laqueur, Freud, Kimmel, and R.W.Connell.
"It's a tough job but someone's gotta do it!"

Reading material will be made available on Stud.IP.

Requirements:
# regular attendance and active participation
# in-depth knowledge of the viewing and reading material
# oral presentation and portfolio of short papers (graded in WD-2b)
# for a grade in D-2a: an additional long term paper of 8-10 pp.
Prior enrolment via Stud.IP is mandatory.

Irmgard Maassen
10-76-4-D2/WD2-07 Key Topics in Cultural History: Gender and Power in 20/21st Century U.S. Culture and Media (in englischer Sprache)

Seminar

Einzeltermine:
Fr 12.05.17 14:00 - 16:00 SFG 2030
Fr 30.06.17 15:00 - 19:00 GW2 B3770
Sa 01.07.17 - So 02.07.17 (So, Sa) 10:00 - 19:00 GW2 B2880
Anne Marie Scholz
10-76-4-D2/WD2-08 Key Topics in Cultural History: Postcolonial (Literary) Theory (in englischer Sprache)

Seminar

Termine:
wöchentlich Di 10:15 - 11:45 SuUB 4320 (Studio II Medienraum ) (2 SWS)

Einzeltermine:
Mi 19.04.17 12:15 - 13:45 GW2 B1216
Mo 12.06.17 10:15 - 11:45 GW2 A4330
Di 27.06.17 12:00 - 13:15 SuUB 4330 (Studio I Medienraum )

In this course we will read and discuss contemporary postcolonial theory, with occasional reference to "postcolonial" literary texts. Students will be encouraged to contribute to class discussions on the intersections of class, gender, race, sexuality and space, and how these affect our current understanding of what it means to be "postcolonial" in our contemporary world.

Dr. Janelle Rodriques
10-76-4-D2/WD2-09 Key Topics in Literature: Samuel Richardson and the Epistolary Novel (in englischer Sprache)

Seminar

Termine:
wöchentlich Di 14:15 - 15:45 GW2 B1630 (2 SWS)

Samuel Richardson’s sentimental novel Pamela (1740) is about the eponymous heroine who narrates her story through letters and diary entries. The book starts with the fifteen year old servant Pamela who works in the aristocratic household of Mrs. B. After the lady’s death her son, Mr. B., is entrusted with Pamela’s care, but instead he kidnaps the girl and repeatedly tries to seduce her. Pamela, however, is able to defend her virtue, i.e. her virginity, eventually falls in love with Mr. B. and is finally rewarded with marriage and motherhood.

The novel caused extreme reactions which resulted in the so called “Pamela controversy”. While some praised Pamela as a role model for young women, especially for those of the lower class, others, mainly aristocratic readers, criticized the negative portrayal of Mr. B. and his attempted rapes. Moreover, they doubted Pamela’s virtue altogether and accused the girl of using her sexuality to manipulate the aristocrat.

What can be said for sure is that the eighteenth century was obsessed with the female body, women’s sexuality, virginity, maternity and the general “meaning” of femininity. Richardson’s works can be regarded as one of the literary battlefields for changes in science, medicine, sex, gender, and social order. The aim of this seminar is to critically reflect these historical and cultural developments through an in-depth analysis of this classic novel. In addition, we will turn to Henry Fielding’s bawdy parody Shamela (1741), a farcical burlesque of Pamela’s narrative. In this subversive reading the satirist Fielding reverses the roles and turns the heroine into the predator of the tame and malleable Squire Booby who is finally lured into marriage by Shamela.


Keywords: eighteenth century, body studies, gender, virginity, birth, medicine, power, satire

Requirements:
• registration on Stud.IP
• in-depth knowledge of the reading material (i.e. read the text[s] in advance!)
• regular attendance and oral participation
• oral presentation and handout
• term paper (optional)

Primary text:
Richardson, Samuel [1740]. Pamela; or, Virtue Rewarded. Ed. Thomas Keymer and Alice Wakely. OUP: 2008.*
Fielding, Joseph [1741]. Shamela. Ed. Douglas Brooks-Davies. OUP: 2008.* (p. 305-345)

*NOTE: Please pay attention to the EXACT publication dates when purchasing/copying the book(s) so we can all work with the same editions.

Dr. phil. Jennifer Henke
10-76-4-D2/WD2-10 Key Topics in Literature: The Science Play (in englischer Sprache)

Seminar

Termine:
wöchentlich Fr 14:15 - 15:45 GW2 B3010 (Kleiner Studierraum) (2 SWS)

Einzeltermine:
Fr 16.06.17 14:15 - 15:45 GW2 B1700

The purpose of this seminar is to introduce students to the booming genre of science plays. In recent decades, playwrights show an increasing interest in portraying science and scientists on the theatrical stage. While the interaction between science and theater is not a new phenomenon, as examples such as Christopher Marlowe's Doctor Faustus or Ben Jonson's The Alchemist prove, scholars attest a veritable boom of science playwriting in recent decades (cf. e.g.: Shepherd-Barr 2006, Zehelein 2009).

In this course we will discuss selected science plays from different English-speaking countries and periods that embrace a variety of scientific fields, ideas, (historic) persona, and moments in the history of science in order to gain an impression of this interdisciplinary genre, its different manifestations, its historical development, and the conditions of its production and reception. In addition to an in-depth analysis and interpretation of the selected texts, we will look at science plays in the context of the history of science, gender theory, literary history, the "two-culture-debate", ethics in science, as well as science communication and popularization.

Requirements:
- regular attendance and active participation
- in-depth knowledge of the reading material
- presentation (and handout) and/or final paper

A detailed syllabus will be handed out in the first session.

Texts:
The texts will be announced soon.

Please note that prior enrolment via Stud.IP is mandatory.

Christine Müller, M.A.
10-76-4-D2/WD2-11 Key Topics in Literature: The Fabric of Slavery II (in englischer Sprache)

Seminar

Termine:
wöchentlich Di 14:15 - 15:45 GW2 B1700 UNICOM 3; 0. Ebene; Seminarraum 4 (2 SWS)

dear prospective participants,
this seminar is part of a semester focus across a range of ESC seminars on:
BLACK LIVES MATTER AND THE CRITIQUE OF WHITE SUPREMACY

it is part of the 2 part module The Fabric Slavery; however, it may well be taken separately, so EVERYBODY IS WELCOME!
after a few sessions of basic but intensive instruction about the history of euro/american modern regimes of transatlantic enslavement, we will focus on a close reading of Toni Morrison|s by now classic novel BELOVED. additional secondary reading requirements will be announced on stud ip in due time.
sabine broeck

Prof. Dr. Sabine Bröck
10-76-4-D2/WD2-12 Key Topics in Literature: Science and the Supernatural in post-2000 Crime Series (in englischer Sprache)

Seminar

Termine:
wöchentlich Di 14:15 - 15:45 GW1 B1070 (2 SWS)
Dr. Jana Nittel
10-76-4-D2/WD2-14 Key Topics in Cultural History: Media History and Media Aesthetics (in englischer Sprache)

Seminar

Termine:
wöchentlich Do 10:15 - 11:45 GW2 A4330 (2 SWS)

We are thoroughly surrounded by media on a daily basis, living, so to speak, in a “mediatized” society (Voigts-Virchow, 2005: 5), where the majority of information and knowledge is not perceived through a first-hand experience, i.e. somatically, but information that came to us via a medium, in other words, symbolically (Ott and Mack, 2010: 1). According to a number of critical textbooks in Media studies in English, a course on media aesthetics can supply the basis for media literacy by examining the meaning of visual images for use in film and electronic media.
Delineating from a quintessential understanding of media aesthetics as a study in sensory perception, as a study in value, and a study in the stylistic and formal properties of artistic products, the course will maintain a more philosophically minded orientation in the first half of the course by providing students with an extensive overview of the field of old, new and hybrid forms of media (print, painting, and photography, broadcast, radio play, TV, film, hypertext, simulation systems, videogames and digital art). The sessions on film analysis (narratological and dramatic composition) will however incorporate some aspects of applied media aesthetics by exploring major aesthetic image elements including light, colour and sound in greater detail. Since some of the participants are required to submit a research paper, we will use parts of our seminar discussions to the development of topics, the formulation of a thesis statement, as well as considerations about the methodological approaches of writing such a paper.
Additional secondary sources can be accessed in the “Semesterapparat”, a reference only section on the third floor of the library building. A reader with selected secondary text materials will be made available for download on Stud. IP. Please be aware that your registration on Stud. IP. is mandatory (deadline March 15th, 2017). You may wish to check the sections "Information" and "Schedule" further details such as requirements, weekly schedule, select bibliography and modes of assessment.
For Non-E-SC students and academic exchange students: Please contact me if you require more than 3 credit points.

Assessment (Available for modules D2-a and WD2-b/c)

regular attendance, informed participation in class discussion,
in-depth knowledge of the selected reading material,
homework assignments,
presentation of research paper or group project,
term paper.

The requirements as formulated above may vary depending on your overall degree program. Please check the departmental website for guidelines on modules and exams: http://www.fb10.uni-bremen.de/anglistik/ba2/profil/studienplan.aspx

Please submit your completed data sheet indicating your module choice in week 2 (available on Stud.IP “Allgemeiner Dateiordner”)

Dr. Jana Nittel
10-76-4-D2/WD2-15 Key Topics in Literature: Negotiating "Normalcy": Literature and Disability (in englischer Sprache)

Seminar

Einzeltermine:
Fr 28.04.17 12:00 - 19:00 SFG 1040
Sa 29.04.17 10:00 - 15:30 SFG 1030
Fr 19.05.17 12:00 - 19:00 SuUB 4330 (Studio I Medienraum )
Sa 20.05.17 10:00 - 15:30 SH D1020

Disability demands a narrative: its "very unknowability [...] consolidates the need to tell a story about it" (Snyder/Mitchell) or, as Couser argues, "the scar, the limp, the missing limb, or the obvious prosthesis calls for a story". What is this story, though, and who gets to tell it? This seminar serves as a text-based introduction to literary disability studies. Highlighting key aspects and questions of the disability rights movement and their representation in literature and art, we will focus on canonical texts as well as some more recent and innovative negotiations of disability. Key texts include The Sound and the Fury (William Faulkner), Of Mice and Men (John Steinbeck), and The Heart Is a Lonely Hunter (Carson McCullers); we will also investigate less canonical examples such as the autobiographies The Shaking Woman (Siri Hustvedt) and My Body Politic (Simi Linton), the films Million Dollar Baby and Murderball, Anne Finger’s short story collection “Call Me Ahab”, examples of the works of crip poets Cheryl Marie Wade and Jim Ferris, as well as the Young Adult novels Strong Deaf (Lynn McElfresh) and Roses Are Blue (Sally Murphy).

Marion Rana
10-76-4-D2/WD2-16 Key Topics in Literature: The Empire Writes Back: Colonial and Postcolonial Subjects in Black British Literature (in englischer Sprache)

Seminar

Termine:
wöchentlich Di 14:15 - 15:45 GW2 B1410 GW1-HS H1000 (2 SWS)

Einzeltermine:
Di 23.05.17 16:00 - 18:00 GW2 B3009 (Großer Studierraum)
Do 01.06.17 16:00 - 18:00 GW2 B1400 NUR Mi. - So.

Tutor: Dr Shola Adenekan

Course Description:
People of African descent have been part of European history for many centuries. Recent studies suggest Black people have been living in Britain since the time of the Roman Empire. During the centuries of the trans-Atlantic slave trade, people of African descent, most of whom were ex-slaves settled in Britain. There was migration to and from Britain by people of African origin during colonial era, most notably after the Second World War, when many from the Caribbean came to Britain to help in the post-war effort. It is important to stress that a few others also came to Britain to study, and that the flow of migration was not just one way, but that many Britons emigrated to countries around the globe.

Fictional narratives robustly captured these movements, and on this course, we will be studying the literature of colonial and postcolonial migration so as to show the way in which Black British literature is integral to our understanding of British, European, African and Caribbean history, as well as current developments across different societies.

The main focus of this course is on the stories of people of African descent, as well as those of their children and grandchildren who see Britain as home, many of whom also see themselves as British.

We will examine the notions of belonging and alienation, and we will analyse the discourses surrounding these notions.



Course Objectives:
By the end of this course, students are expected to have
A robust understanding of the nature of Black British literature.
An understanding of the importance of Black British literature to the interpretation of global history.
An understanding of the connection of Black British literature to the issues of migration, race, class and gender. And the way in which these issues often intersect.
.
Reading Materials:
Olaudah Equiano’s The Interesting Narrative of the Life of Olaudah Equiano, Or Gustavus Vassa, The African.

Andrea Levy’s Small Island.

Buchi Emecheta’s Second Class Citizen.

Zadie Smith’s White Teeth

Course Requirements:
Students are expected to attend every class and to contribute to discussions in every seminar.
Students are expected to either develop a portfolio or write a term paper, depending on the credit points they want to have in this class.
Please note that any materials submitted must be your own work and you must ensure that sources that you have consulted are appropriately referenced. This in accordance to the University of Bremen’s rules on plagiarism and academic honesty.

Olorunshola Adenekan
10-76-4-D2/WD2-17 Key Topics in Literature: Literary London (in englischer Sprache)

Seminar

Termine:
wöchentlich Do 12:15 - 13:45 GW2 B3010 (Kleiner Studierraum) (2 SWS)

This course seeks to familiarise students with a number of selected authors, poets and writers, in general, who have held lifelong connections with London, may it be historic or contemporary. We will aim to discuss their continued engagement with the city by exploring a selections of excerpts from Alexander Pope, Olaudah Equiano, Daniel Defoe, Alfred Lord Tennyson, Charles Dickens, Thomas Hardy, Elizabeth Bowen, Sir Arthur Conan Doyle, and George Eliot, just to name a few. By tracing forgotten as well as prominent landmarks of the urban centre, we seek to connect the literary representations of the city with historical and cultural developments, present and past.

Since some of the participants are required to submit a research paper, we will use parts of our seminar discussions to the development of topics, the formulation of a thesis statement, as well as considerations about the methodological approaches of writing such a paper.

Additional secondary sources can be accessed in the “Semesterapparat”, a reference only section on the third floor of the library building. A reader with selected secondary text materials will be made available for download on Stud. IP. Please be aware that your registration on Stud. IP. is mandatory (deadline March 15th, 2017). You may wish to check the sections "Information" and "Schedule" further details such as requirements, weekly schedule, select bibliography and modes of assessment.

For Non-E-SC students and academic exchange students: Please contact me if you require more than 3 credit points.

Assessment (Available for modules D2-c and WD2-a/b)

regular attendance, informed participation in class discussion,
in-depth knowledge of the selected reading material,
homework assignments,
presentation of research paper or group project,
term paper.

The requirements as formulated above may vary depending on your overall degree program. Please check the departmental website for guidelines on modules and exams: http://www.fb10.uni-bremen.de/anglistik/ba2/profil/studienplan.aspx

Please submit your completed data sheet indicating your module choice in week 2 (available on Stud.IP “Allgemeiner Dateiordner”)

Required reading materials (you may wish to purchase a copy of these publications for class):

Bowen, Elizabeth. The Heat of the Day. (Italics) 1948. New York: Anchor Books, 2002. Print.
Conrad, Joseph. Heart of Darkness. (Italics) 1902. CreateSpace Independent Publishing Platform, 2014. Print.
Defoe, Daniel. Roxana: The Fortunate Mistress. (Italics) 1724. Oxford: OUP, 2008. Print.
Dickens, Charles. David Copperfield: The Personal History of David Copperfield. (Italics) 1849-50. London: Penguin Classics, 2004. Print.
Doyle, Sir Arthur Conan. The Memoirs of Sherlock Holmes. (Italics) 1894. London: Penguin, 2011. Print.
Eliot, George. Daniel Deronda. (Italics) 1876. London: Penguin Classics, 1995. Print.
Equiano, Olaudah. The Interesting Narrative of the Life of Olaudah Equiano, or Gustavus Vassa, the African. Written by Himself. 1789. (Italics) Print.

Copies of the texts can be purchased at the bookstore on our campus (Universitätsbuchhandlung Bremen: www.unibuch-bremen.de)

Dr. Jana Nittel
10-76-4-D2/WD2-18 Key Topics in Literature: Black Women Writers in the US (in englischer Sprache)

Seminar

Termine:
wöchentlich Mo 14:15 - 15:45 SuUB 4320 (Studio II Medienraum ) (2 SWS)

Einzeltermine:
Fr 09.06.17 15:15 - 19:45 GW2 B3770
Dr. Selamawit Terrefe
10-76-4-D2/WD2-19 Key Topics in Literature: From Black Power to BLM-Black Political and Protest Literature in the US (in englischer Sprache)

Seminar

Einzeltermine:
Fr 02.06.17 10:00 - 18:00 GW2 B1820
Sa 03.06.17 - So 04.06.17 (So, Sa) 10:00 - 18:00 GW2 B2900
Dr. Selamawit Terrefe
10-76-4-D2/WD2-20 Key Topics in Literature: African American Autobiography (in englischer Sprache)

Seminar

Termine:
wöchentlich Di 12:15 - 13:45 GW2 B1405 NUR Mo. + Di. SFG 2080 (2 SWS)

Einzeltermine:
Di 30.05.17 18:00 - 22:00 GW2 B1410
Di 04.07.17 18:00 - 22:00 GW2 B1410

Autobiography is often said to be the preeminent narrative tradition of black America. This seminar will provide an overview of this tradition by exploring a range of autobiographical representations across time in their various forms and functions.In the first half of the seminar we will focus on slave narratives such as Harriet Jacob’s 'Incidents in the Life of a Slave Girl' (1861) or Frederick Douglass’s 'My Bondage and My Freedom' (1855) and analyze the terms on which the black subject could speak for herself/himself in the framework of abolitionism. Furthermore, we will take a look at autobiographical narratives that speak to black experiences in the aftermath of the Civil War as well as texts that emerged out of the Harlem Renaissance.The second half of the seminar will introduce students to a number of life narratives from the Civil Rights era to the turn of the twenty-first century. From 'The Autobiography of Malcolm X' (1965) and Audre Lorde’s ''Zami: A New Spelling of My Name'' (1982) to contemporary documentary, we will zoom in on the ways in which the genre has addressed black experiences in intersection with concerns of gender, religion, class and sexuality. We will conclude our seminar with Barack Obama’s 'Dreams from My Father' (1995/2004) as one of the most recent bestsellers of African American Autobiography.

Cedric-Akpeje Essi
10-76-4-D2/WD2-21 Key Topics in Cultural History: Screening America at War: Filmic Representations of Armed Conflict in US Culture (in englischer Sprache)

Seminar

Termine:
wöchentlich Do 16:00 - 18:00 SuUB 4330 (Studio I Medienraum ) (2 SWS)

War is one of the most fundamental topics of US cinema. Since most American conflicts are fought overseas, movies provide images of events that few Americans experience for themselves, thus creating a kind of surrogate war experience. At the same time, combat films are highly artificial constructs that employ a set of cinematic conventions to affect the audience’s emotions through spectacle. As a result, war movies are never objective; their scope ranges from patriotic propaganda pieces to scathing critiques of war’s inhumanity.

This course will explore film as a central cultural arena wherein discourses on armed conflict are negotiated. The seminar’s main focus will lie on the field of representation: What filmic devices are used to portray America’s wars on screen? How do war films influence each other through intertextual referencing? How do these films perpetuate or challenge concepts of gender? How do they portray enemies, and in contrast, what does this portrayal tell us about America’s self-image? How do combat movies affect collective memories of past wars? And finally, what does the representation of a certain conflict on film tell us about the socio-cultural background of its time?

Requirements:
• Regular attendance and active participation
• In-depth knowledge of the reading materials
• Oral presentation and/or term paper

Please note that prior enrollment via Stud. IP is mandatory.

Katalina Kopka
Prof. Dr. Norbert Schaffeld (Mentor)
10-M83-2-P1-5 Key Topics in Literature: West African Female Writers (in englischer Sprache)

Seminar

Termine:
wöchentlich Do 12:15 - 13:45 GW2 B1410 (2 SWS)

West African Female Writers

Course Tutor: Dr Shola Adenekan

Course Description:

Discussions around contemporary literature from the continent of Africa often focus on male writers. But there are female writers from across the over 50 African countries who produce aesthetically-pleasing creative writings that deserve our critical attention. The complex story of each African country cannot be grasped without a thorough examination of writing by women because they provide powerful insight into various discourses affecting our world.

Since we want to avoid what Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie (July 2009) refers to as “the danger of a single story” - Africa is a continent of about a billion people living in 55 countries and where hundreds of languages are spoken – our focus will be on selected female writers from two West African countries - Nigeria and Ghana.

We shall examine some of the issues raised in their fictional narratives and poetry, such as gender, sexuality, class and politics, and how these discourses intersect one another.

This course is specifically aimed at MA students and advanced BA students.

Reading Materials:

1. Flora Nwapa’s Efuru
2. Ama Ata Aidoo’s Changes
3. Chika Unigwe’s On Black Sister Street
4. Taiye Selasi’s Ghana Must Go

Olorunshola Adenekan

WD-2c Aufbaumodul: Sprachwissenschaft und Kulturgeschichte (Wahlpflichtmodul) - (nur für das Sommersemester)

(6 CP = 3 CP und 3 CP)

Es gilt zu beachten: Laut SK-Beschluss (E-SC) vom 21.12.2012 ist die Prüfungsleistung im Bereich "Key Topics in Linguistics" zu erbringen =
Klausur/Written Test oder benotete Präsentationsleistung/Presentation

Modulbeauftragte/r: Dr. Inke du Bois, dubois@uni-bremen.de und Prof. Dr. Marcus Callies, callies@uni-bremen.de
VAK Titel der Veranstaltung DozentIn
10-76-4-D2/WD2-01 Key Topics in Cultural History: Critical Concepts of Race, Class, Gender, Sexuality (in englischer Sprache)

Seminar

Termine:
wöchentlich Di 12:15 - 13:45 MZH 1460 (2 SWS)

This seminar will focus on class, gender and race/ethnicity as historically specific, structured relations of privilege and domination. We will examine the interconnections of these categories and explore some of the main theories which have been developed to account for them.
NB: This seminar is part of a collaborative focus on Black Lives Matter and the Critique of White Supremacy.
Essential readings will be available for download on Stud-IP. You should also consult the ‘Semesterapparat’ (SuUB) for further readings.

Dr. Karin Esders-Angermund
10-76-4-D2/WD2-02 Key Topics in Cultural History: Hollywood Orientalism (in englischer Sprache)

Seminar

Termine:
wöchentlich Do 10:15 - 11:45 SuUB 4330 (Studio I Medienraum ) (2 SWS)

This course aims to provide students with a critical perspective on Hollywood films that deal with and at the same time construct an imaginary "orient". We will deal with basic features of orientalism and postcolonial theory, film theory and film analysis. Using a number of examples we will engage in a a discussion of Hollywood's orientalism: How is the "east" visualized, how are femininity, masculinity, and sexuality presented, how is interracial romance portrayed and restricted? What kind of fears and anxieties, desires and wishes are hidden behind the narrative and visual schemes of the films?

The participation in the course "Exemplary Screenings-Screening Examples" (General Studies / Schlüsselqualifikation / Global Education) is highly recommended.

The course includes weekly reading assignments and requires active participation in discussions based on a thorough preparation of the required reading and film viewing. In addition, you must always bring at least one question or comment about the required reading with you to class (in hard copy). Students will give an oral presentation including a handout and may write a term paper.

A reader with course material will be made available at the beginning of the class. You will also find a choice of books on reserve shelf in the SUuB, 3rd floor.

Please note that prior enrollment via Stud.IP is mandatory

Dr. Karin Esders-Angermund
10-76-4-D2/WD2-03 Key Topics in Cultural History: The Cultural Politics of Sugar (in englischer Sprache)

Seminar

Termine:
wöchentlich Mi 12:15 - 13:45 GW2 A4330 (2 SWS)

This course examines the sociohistorical and political legacy of sugar. Interdisciplinary course readings introduce the history of sugar production and consumption with its thorough dependency on slavery and slave labor. We will also look into more recent developments and investigate how contemporary artists like Kara Walker in her work "A Subtlety. Or the Marvelous Sugar Baby" deals with sugar as a cultural, historical and social artifact.

Dr. Karin Esders-Angermund
10-76-4-D2/WD2-04 Key Topics in Cultural History: Cultural Representations of Empire (in englischer Sprache)

Seminar
ECTS: 3

Termine:
wöchentlich Mi 14:15 - 15:45 GW1 C1070 SFG 1030 GW2 B2900 (2 SWS)

This seminar aims to explore the ways in which the British Empire was (and is) imagined, represented and fictionalized, predominantly for the British public. A brief historical survey will be complemented by the analysis of cultural representations of colonial rule in a range of different media, covering Victorian visual culture both high and popular, older and more recent films about the ‘Raj’ in India, and fictional narratives from the heydays of imperialism such as Kipling’s ambivalent depictions of the Anglo-Indian experience, or Rider Haggard’s African adventure tales for boys. We will investigate issues such as orientalist stereotyping, the native ‘other’, and white masculine self-constructions, discuss both the romance and the anxiety of imperial conquest, and consider the representational strategies employed to defend, critique or undermine the imperial project.

Requirements:
# regular attendance and active participation
# in-depth knowledge of the reading and viewing material
# portfolio of worksheets (graded in WD-2b)
# for a grade in D-2a: an additional long term paper of 8-10 pp.

Texts to be purchased:
- Rudyard Kipling, Plain Tales from the Hills (Oxford UP 2001 or any other, also on the net)
- H. Rider Haggard, King Solomon's Mines (Oxford UP 1998 or Penguin 1994)

Prior enrolment via StudIP is mandatory.

Irmgard Maassen
10-76-4-D2/WD2-05 Key Topics in Cultural History: From Gentleman to Essex Lad - British Masculinities (in englischer Sprache)

Seminar
ECTS: 3

Termine:
wöchentlich Di 14:15 - 15:45 GW2 B3770 (2 SWS)

While gender difference is one of the basic binary opposites by which we construct cultural meaning, the hierarchisation of this difference, the subordination of women to men, is at the core of patriarchal ideology. This course aims to reverse the more usual direction of inquiry by looking at what patriarchal ideology assumes as the norm, and therefore tends to keep from critical view - at masculinity. We shall take a broad historical approach, surveying a wide range of conceptualisations of manhood, covering the Petrarchist lover and the transmutations of the gentleman ideal, the decline of working-class masculinity, Dandies and boy-scouts, the homosociality of the military, and the dissolution of gender stereotypes in consumer cultures and queer cultures. Examples will mainly be taken from British literary and visual culture, both high and popular, and may include Henry VIII, James Bond and David Beckham, but analysis will be supported by theories of gender from, among others, Aristotle, Laqueur, Freud, Kimmel, and R.W.Connell.
"It's a tough job but someone's gotta do it!"

Reading material will be made available on Stud.IP.

Requirements:
# regular attendance and active participation
# in-depth knowledge of the viewing and reading material
# oral presentation and portfolio of short papers (graded in WD-2b)
# for a grade in D-2a: an additional long term paper of 8-10 pp.
Prior enrolment via Stud.IP is mandatory.

Irmgard Maassen
10-76-4-D2/WD2-07 Key Topics in Cultural History: Gender and Power in 20/21st Century U.S. Culture and Media (in englischer Sprache)

Seminar

Einzeltermine:
Fr 12.05.17 14:00 - 16:00 SFG 2030
Fr 30.06.17 15:00 - 19:00 GW2 B3770
Sa 01.07.17 - So 02.07.17 (So, Sa) 10:00 - 19:00 GW2 B2880
Anne Marie Scholz
10-76-4-D2/WD2-08 Key Topics in Cultural History: Postcolonial (Literary) Theory (in englischer Sprache)

Seminar

Termine:
wöchentlich Di 10:15 - 11:45 SuUB 4320 (Studio II Medienraum ) (2 SWS)

Einzeltermine:
Mi 19.04.17 12:15 - 13:45 GW2 B1216
Mo 12.06.17 10:15 - 11:45 GW2 A4330
Di 27.06.17 12:00 - 13:15 SuUB 4330 (Studio I Medienraum )

In this course we will read and discuss contemporary postcolonial theory, with occasional reference to "postcolonial" literary texts. Students will be encouraged to contribute to class discussions on the intersections of class, gender, race, sexuality and space, and how these affect our current understanding of what it means to be "postcolonial" in our contemporary world.

Dr. Janelle Rodriques
10-76-4-D2/WD2-14 Key Topics in Cultural History: Media History and Media Aesthetics (in englischer Sprache)

Seminar

Termine:
wöchentlich Do 10:15 - 11:45 GW2 A4330 (2 SWS)

We are thoroughly surrounded by media on a daily basis, living, so to speak, in a “mediatized” society (Voigts-Virchow, 2005: 5), where the majority of information and knowledge is not perceived through a first-hand experience, i.e. somatically, but information that came to us via a medium, in other words, symbolically (Ott and Mack, 2010: 1). According to a number of critical textbooks in Media studies in English, a course on media aesthetics can supply the basis for media literacy by examining the meaning of visual images for use in film and electronic media.
Delineating from a quintessential understanding of media aesthetics as a study in sensory perception, as a study in value, and a study in the stylistic and formal properties of artistic products, the course will maintain a more philosophically minded orientation in the first half of the course by providing students with an extensive overview of the field of old, new and hybrid forms of media (print, painting, and photography, broadcast, radio play, TV, film, hypertext, simulation systems, videogames and digital art). The sessions on film analysis (narratological and dramatic composition) will however incorporate some aspects of applied media aesthetics by exploring major aesthetic image elements including light, colour and sound in greater detail. Since some of the participants are required to submit a research paper, we will use parts of our seminar discussions to the development of topics, the formulation of a thesis statement, as well as considerations about the methodological approaches of writing such a paper.
Additional secondary sources can be accessed in the “Semesterapparat”, a reference only section on the third floor of the library building. A reader with selected secondary text materials will be made available for download on Stud. IP. Please be aware that your registration on Stud. IP. is mandatory (deadline March 15th, 2017). You may wish to check the sections "Information" and "Schedule" further details such as requirements, weekly schedule, select bibliography and modes of assessment.
For Non-E-SC students and academic exchange students: Please contact me if you require more than 3 credit points.

Assessment (Available for modules D2-a and WD2-b/c)

regular attendance, informed participation in class discussion,
in-depth knowledge of the selected reading material,
homework assignments,
presentation of research paper or group project,
term paper.

The requirements as formulated above may vary depending on your overall degree program. Please check the departmental website for guidelines on modules and exams: http://www.fb10.uni-bremen.de/anglistik/ba2/profil/studienplan.aspx

Please submit your completed data sheet indicating your module choice in week 2 (available on Stud.IP “Allgemeiner Dateiordner”)

Dr. Jana Nittel
10-76-4-D2/WD2-21 Key Topics in Cultural History: Screening America at War: Filmic Representations of Armed Conflict in US Culture (in englischer Sprache)

Seminar

Termine:
wöchentlich Do 16:00 - 18:00 SuUB 4330 (Studio I Medienraum ) (2 SWS)

War is one of the most fundamental topics of US cinema. Since most American conflicts are fought overseas, movies provide images of events that few Americans experience for themselves, thus creating a kind of surrogate war experience. At the same time, combat films are highly artificial constructs that employ a set of cinematic conventions to affect the audience’s emotions through spectacle. As a result, war movies are never objective; their scope ranges from patriotic propaganda pieces to scathing critiques of war’s inhumanity.

This course will explore film as a central cultural arena wherein discourses on armed conflict are negotiated. The seminar’s main focus will lie on the field of representation: What filmic devices are used to portray America’s wars on screen? How do war films influence each other through intertextual referencing? How do these films perpetuate or challenge concepts of gender? How do they portray enemies, and in contrast, what does this portrayal tell us about America’s self-image? How do combat movies affect collective memories of past wars? And finally, what does the representation of a certain conflict on film tell us about the socio-cultural background of its time?

Requirements:
• Regular attendance and active participation
• In-depth knowledge of the reading materials
• Oral presentation and/or term paper

Please note that prior enrollment via Stud. IP is mandatory.

Katalina Kopka
Prof. Dr. Norbert Schaffeld (Mentor)
10-76-4-WD2-1 Key Topics in Linguistics: Linguistic variation in English (in englischer Sprache)

Seminar

Termine:
wöchentlich Di 12:00 - 14:00 GW1 B1070 (2 SWS)

This seminar will explore the notion of linguistic variation in English. Linguistic variation refers to differences in the ways a particular language is used. Variation is inherent in human language. It occurs between speakers of a particular language but also within the language of a single speaker and is possible on all structural levels: phonology, morphology, lexis and syntax.

This seminar will look at linguistic variation in English from three different perspectives. It will address (1) regional variation, i.e. how language varies regionally, (2) social variation, i.e. how language varies according to social factors such as the speakers’ social class, ethnicity, gender and age, and (3) functional variation, i.e. how language varies according to the characteristics of a communicative situation such as the level of formality, mode, or text type/genre. It will also address how linguistic variation is connected with language change.


Recommended preparatory reading
Kortmann, Bernd (2005), English Linguistics: Essentials. Berlin: Cornelsen, chapter 8

Alexandra Kinne
10-76-4-WD2-2 Key Topics in Linguistics: Human-Machine: the process of meaning-making in digital texts (in englischer Sprache)

Seminar

Termine:
wöchentlich Fr 10:15 - 11:45 SFG 2040 (2 SWS)

Seminar

Termine:
wöchentlich Fr 10:15 - 11:45, SFG 2040

In this seminar, we will focus on the way meaning is originated while reading shapeshifting, multimodal and responsive texts comprised of code, verbal language, images, icons, audio or video files.
The relationship between human and machine has been depicted in various ways by different forms of text, and continues to develop with huge diversity. Even though human and machine have often been considered as members of a dichotomic pair, there seems to be rather a strong affinity, and even symbiotic link, between both. From the nineteenth century luddite attacks on factories, to the almost inevitable dependency on computers and other digital devices, the “human-machine” theme has been intensely explored by writers, film-makers, and scholars. During this seminar, debates concerning human identity, as well as the place of print book in a digital age, might emerge. We will begin by focusing our attention on how the “machine” has been described throughout the history of humankind. In a second part of our seminar, we will discuss some examples of the impact of digital media on the use of verbal language among social media users and gamers. Finally, the reception of digital texts, namely, of electronic literature (a literary form read and created on a computer), will be analysed by focusing on human-machine interaction. The materials selected for this course will range from science fiction’s cautionary tales (along with filmic reinterpretations), and news articles about human-machine co-existence/binarism, to literary digital works which offer multiple reading experiences, often turning the reader into a player or a viewer.

Essential bibliography (excerpts will be provided):
Hayles, N. Katherine (2011). How We Think: Digital Media and Contemporary Technogenesis. Chicago: The University Chicago Press.

Dr. Daniela Cortes Maduro
10-76-4-WD2-3 Key Topics in Linguistics: Linguistic analysis of literary texts (in englischer Sprache)

Seminar

Termine:
wöchentlich Do 10:15 - 11:45 GW2 A3390 (CIP-Labor FB 10) (2 SWS)

In this seminar, we want to apply linguist theories and methods to investigate different kinds of literary texts, e.g. novels, plays and poems. This is a branch of applied linguistics often called ‘stylistics’. The Systemic Functional Grammar provides us with the theoretical background to investigate, for example, transitivity and theme in texts. In addition, we will use corpus linguistic methods, e.g. word frequencies, keywords and collocations, to describe the style of a literary text. You will learn how to do automatic analyses with the AntConc software, and do some computer-assisted manual annotations with the UAM corpus tool software.
Each student will do analyses of different linguistic aspects of a text of their choice. In the end, you will be able to find, analyse and present aspects of literary texts that exceed what can be described with methods from literature studies alone.

Requirements
Regular attendance and active participation in class, working through texts / exercises / discussions.
Homework assignments (reading 10-30 pages each week; doing the exercises and analyses).

BA ESC ( 2011) WD 2 a: An analysis + poster presentation (not graded, 3 CP)
BA ESC ( 2011) WD 2 c: An analysis + portfolio (graded, 3 CP)
Erasmus 3 CP An analysis and poster presentation (graded), 6 CP An analysis, poster presentation and portfolio (graded)

Literature
Goatly, Andrew. 2008. Explorations in Stylistics. Equinox. Available as e-book from the library.
McEnery, Tony & Richard Xiao & Yukio Tono. 2006. Corpus-based Language Studies: An Advanced Resource Book. Routledge.
Toolan, Michael. 2009. Narrative Progression in the Short Story: A Corpus Stylistic Approach. John Benjamins. Available as e-book from the library.

Dr. Anke Schulz
10-82-4-TM II-2 Computer-mediated Communication | Mo 18-20 (in englischer Sprache)

Seminar

Termine:
wöchentlich Mo 18:00 - 20:00 SFG 1010 (2 SWS)

The advent of the Internet has changed human communication drastically. Along with and dependent on technical development, new communicative patterns have emerged such as emailing, chatting, blogging and vlogging. Although some of these practices still show quite a number of parallels to offline communication - emails resemble letters and a blog may remind us of a diary, they are distinctively new with regards to a number of other features. Computer-mediated communication is a very exciting research object for text and discourse linguistics. Established descriptive tools such as multimodal genre analysis, theoretical approaches to politeness, audience design, or word-formation patterns serve to "ride the rough waves of genre research" on the web. They deliver fascinating insights into those communicative practices all of us engage in on a daily basis: on Facebook, on Twitter, on WhatsApp - and by signing up for this class ;).

Jana Pflaeging
10-M82-1-4-ME-2 Introduction to Multimodal Text Analysis | Mo 10-12
Modultyp B/C im Studiengang Language Sciences, M.A.

Seminar

Termine:
wöchentlich Mo 10:00 - 12:00 UNICOM 3; 0. Ebene; Seminarraum 1

Einzeltermine:
Do 29.06.17 10:00 - 12:00

This seminar daws our attention to something researchers describe as "the discovery of the obvious": every instance of communication is (and has been) multimodal. Although verbal language might seem the most obvious means of communication, there are other semiotic resources people additonally draw on when, for instance, composing a newspaper article, shooting a film, designing advertisements or IKEA furniture, giving firm handshakes or soft air-kisses. In this introductory class we will scrutinize multimodality from both a theoretical and an empirical perspective. By discussing key research papers in multimodality studies, we shall lay the foundations for many empirical investigations of static, dynamic, spatial, temporal, and/or interactive examples of multimodal texts that we'll find in- and outside the classroom.

Jana Pflaeging

SP-K Basismodul: Sprachpraxis/Practical-Language Foundation (BIPEP Klein)

VAK Titel der Veranstaltung DozentIn
10-76-4/2-SPG/SPK-01 University Language Skills 1 for BiPeB (in englischer Sprache)

Übung
ECTS: 3

Termine:
wöchentlich Fr 10:15 - 11:45 SuUB 4330 (Studio I Medienraum ) SuUB 4320 (Studio II Medienraum ) (2 SWS)

Registration for this University Language Skills 1 (BIPEB): SEE BELOW

Participation
1) This class is open to students studying under the BiPEb 'Großes Fach' regulations, 4th semester and BiPEb 'Kleines Fach' students in their 2nd semester.
2) ERASMUS or other exchange students can participate in this class if they can provide me with proof of a C1 level (GER, CEFR) in English. Exchange students wishing to participate who have a level below C1, but above B2 need to contact Katja Müller before joining a class. (kamueller(at)uni-bremen.de)


BiPEb 'Großes Fach' will also have to take 'Classroom discourse', offered this semester.

Coursework
This (BiPEb) 'University Language Skills 1' class offers you the opportunity to analyse and evaluate your own language skills in English to enable you to choose areas in which you see room for improvement. Starting from there, we will move on to cover some basic and, nonetheless, grammatically challenging areas, to introduce you to different rhetorical writing strategies and essay planning structures. Last but not least, we will focus on sentence structure and try out several strategies to further improve your writing style.

REGISTRATION
Online registration by 15th March is manadatory. Anyone who has missed the deadline for registration is asked to come to the 'Sprachpraxis Informationsveranstaltung' (the so-called 'Börse') on Friday 31st March at 3.30 o'clock (for BIPEB students).
ERASMUS or other exchange students please send me an email to register for this class (kamueller@uni-bremen.de)

Katja Müller, M.A.
10-76-4/2-SPG/SPK-02 Classroom Discourse for BiPeB (in englischer Sprache)

Übung
ECTS: 3

Termine:
wöchentlich Fr 16:15 - 17:45 SFG 1020 (2 SWS)

Registration for this Classroom Discourse course: SEE BELOW

Participation
1) This class is open to students studying under the BiPEb 'Großes Fach' regulations, 4th semester
BiPEb 'Großes Fach' will also have to take "University Language Skills 1 (BiPEb)", offered this semester.
2) BiPEb 'Kleines Fach', GTW and FaBiWi students interested in taking an additional class with focus on teaching language are very welcome to join in.
3) This class is not recommended for Erasmus or other exchange students, unless they have an English language level above C1 (GER, CEFR) AND are studying English to become a teacher. Any exchange student with a level below C1 but above B2 wishing to attend Classroom Discourse needs to contact Katja Müller before joining a class. (kamueller(at)uni-bremen.de).

This class is designed to foster your communicative skills in the classroom - here at university and in any school you might be teaching, now or in the future. The focus will be on how to communicate effectively. On the one hand you will be working on expanding your own knowledge of the English language, working on sentence construction, grammar in general, or improving your vocabulary; on the other hand you will be planning to speak and teach "simple" English in class. For future teachers in a primary school this could mean to paraphrase a difficult word, give synonyms to improve the pupils' vocabulary, or to show/draw/mimic situations/actions/people or animals.
Trying out games is also part of the plan, introducing a fun factor to the classroom while at the same time testing the pupils' listening and speaking skills, ensuring that pupils understand instructions, and can communicate appropiately in English themselves, for example when exchanging information or ideas.

REGISTRATION
Online registration by 15th March is manadatory. ERASMUS or other exchange students please send me an email to register for this class (kamueller@uni-bremen.de)
An information session for all BiPEb students, the so called 'Börse', will take place on Friday 31st April at 3.30 pm (for BIPEB students)
Anyone having missed the deadline for registration is asked to come to the 'Sprachpraxis Informationsveranstaltung' (the so-called 'Börse') to register for the class.

Katja Müller, M.A.

SP-G Basismodul: Sprachpraxis/Practical-Language Foundation (BIPEP Groß)

VAK Titel der Veranstaltung DozentIn
10-76-4/2-SPG/SPK-01 University Language Skills 1 for BiPeB (in englischer Sprache)

Übung
ECTS: 3

Termine:
wöchentlich Fr 10:15 - 11:45 SuUB 4330 (Studio I Medienraum ) SuUB 4320 (Studio II Medienraum ) (2 SWS)

Registration for this University Language Skills 1 (BIPEB): SEE BELOW

Participation
1) This class is open to students studying under the BiPEb 'Großes Fach' regulations, 4th semester and BiPEb 'Kleines Fach' students in their 2nd semester.
2) ERASMUS or other exchange students can participate in this class if they can provide me with proof of a C1 level (GER, CEFR) in English. Exchange students wishing to participate who have a level below C1, but above B2 need to contact Katja Müller before joining a class. (kamueller(at)uni-bremen.de)


BiPEb 'Großes Fach' will also have to take 'Classroom discourse', offered this semester.

Coursework
This (BiPEb) 'University Language Skills 1' class offers you the opportunity to analyse and evaluate your own language skills in English to enable you to choose areas in which you see room for improvement. Starting from there, we will move on to cover some basic and, nonetheless, grammatically challenging areas, to introduce you to different rhetorical writing strategies and essay planning structures. Last but not least, we will focus on sentence structure and try out several strategies to further improve your writing style.

REGISTRATION
Online registration by 15th March is manadatory. Anyone who has missed the deadline for registration is asked to come to the 'Sprachpraxis Informationsveranstaltung' (the so-called 'Börse') on Friday 31st March at 3.30 o'clock (for BIPEB students).
ERASMUS or other exchange students please send me an email to register for this class (kamueller@uni-bremen.de)

Katja Müller, M.A.
10-76-4/2-SPG/SPK-02 Classroom Discourse for BiPeB (in englischer Sprache)

Übung
ECTS: 3

Termine:
wöchentlich Fr 16:15 - 17:45 SFG 1020 (2 SWS)

Registration for this Classroom Discourse course: SEE BELOW

Participation
1) This class is open to students studying under the BiPEb 'Großes Fach' regulations, 4th semester
BiPEb 'Großes Fach' will also have to take "University Language Skills 1 (BiPEb)", offered this semester.
2) BiPEb 'Kleines Fach', GTW and FaBiWi students interested in taking an additional class with focus on teaching language are very welcome to join in.
3) This class is not recommended for Erasmus or other exchange students, unless they have an English language level above C1 (GER, CEFR) AND are studying English to become a teacher. Any exchange student with a level below C1 but above B2 wishing to attend Classroom Discourse needs to contact Katja Müller before joining a class. (kamueller(at)uni-bremen.de).

This class is designed to foster your communicative skills in the classroom - here at university and in any school you might be teaching, now or in the future. The focus will be on how to communicate effectively. On the one hand you will be working on expanding your own knowledge of the English language, working on sentence construction, grammar in general, or improving your vocabulary; on the other hand you will be planning to speak and teach "simple" English in class. For future teachers in a primary school this could mean to paraphrase a difficult word, give synonyms to improve the pupils' vocabulary, or to show/draw/mimic situations/actions/people or animals.
Trying out games is also part of the plan, introducing a fun factor to the classroom while at the same time testing the pupils' listening and speaking skills, ensuring that pupils understand instructions, and can communicate appropiately in English themselves, for example when exchanging information or ideas.

REGISTRATION
Online registration by 15th March is manadatory. ERASMUS or other exchange students please send me an email to register for this class (kamueller@uni-bremen.de)
An information session for all BiPEb students, the so called 'Börse', will take place on Friday 31st April at 3.30 pm (for BIPEB students)
Anyone having missed the deadline for registration is asked to come to the 'Sprachpraxis Informationsveranstaltung' (the so-called 'Börse') to register for the class.

Katja Müller, M.A.

LEHRVERANSTALTUNGEN DES 3. JAHRES:

P Abschlussmodul Profilfach "Sprachwissenschaft" oder "Literaturwissenschaft" oder "Kulturgeschichte"

Modulbeauftragte/r: Prof. Dr. John Bateman, bateman@uni-bremen.de

Laut PO des BA ESC von 2011 (§6;1 werden die 3 CP des Begleitseminars (im Profilfach obligatorisch) im Bereich General Studies angerechnet; die Studierenden, die bestanden haben, sind daher Irmgard Maassen (maassen@uni-bremen.de), der Modulbeauftragten für General Studies, zu melden.
VAK Titel der Veranstaltung DozentIn
10-76-6-AP-01 Begleitveranstaltung Literaturwissenschaft - Research Colloquium in Literatures in English (in englischer Sprache)

Colloquium

Termine:
wöchentlich Mo 16:15 - 17:45 SuUB 4320 (Studio II Medienraum ) (2 SWS)

This course is one of the specific colloquia designed for Bachelor students planning their BA-thesis (PO 2011) in the field of literary studies. We shall look at a number of strategies for planning, structuring and writing longer pieces of work and this programme will also include formal issues such as format and layout of the final assignment.

The mode by which students will be allocated to the two or three classes clearly corresponds to the lecturer's research and teaching focus. I would therefore be interested in supervising students whose B.A. thesis deals with topics located in the following areas of research:
• 18th – 21st Century British, Anglo-American and Anglo-Canadian Literatures;
• Film and Media studies;
• Postcolonial theory/transcultural studies;
• Gender Theory/ Literary Masculinity studies;
• Gender- and genre-specific developments in anglophone crime fiction and film;
• Postcolonial and transcultural perspectives in anglophone travel literature (13th-21st Century).

At some point during the semester, you will be expected to present your thesis project, or a selected part of it, to the whole group. In terms of thematic scope the weekly schedule will be arranged in the first session, when every participant will have to name and briefly outline his or her topic. Given the underlying division and the structure of the colloquium, it is, therefore, absolutely vital for you to have a rough idea of your project. Please follow the link to explore the department's website “Literatures in English” http://www.fb10.uni-bremen.de/anglistik/literaturwissenschaft/default.aspx and the department’s guidelines on BA dissertations: http://www.fb10.uni-bremen.de/anglistik/ba2/bachelorarbeit.aspx

Please be aware that online advance registration on Stud.IP is mandatory.

Dr. Jana Nittel
10-76-6-AP-02 Begleitveranstaltung Literaturwissenschaft - Research Colloquium in Literatures in English (in englischer Sprache)

Colloquium

Termine:
wöchentlich Do 14:15 - 15:45 GW2 B1632 (2 SWS) this class will start next week (week 2) because of invited lecture prof. broeck at university graz
Prof. Dr. Sabine Bröck
10-76-6-AP-03 Begleitveranstaltung Kulturgeschichte (in englischer Sprache)

Colloquium

Termine:
wöchentlich Mi 16:15 - 17:45 (2 SWS)

This colloquium is designed for Bachelor students planning to write their BA-thesis in the field of cultural history. We will discuss theoretical and methodological approaches, develop outlines and structures as well as strong thesis statements in order to focus your search for information, to tackle your subject and to specify your argument. Students will be expected to present and discuss their project in various stages of progression both in class as well as in individual monitoring sessions.
We will follow the MLA Handbook for Writers of Research Papers, eighth edition.

Dr. Karin Esders-Angermund
10-76-6-AP-05 Begleitveranstaltung Kulturgeschichte: British Cultural History (in englischer Sprache)

Colloquium
ECTS: 3 (in General Studies)

Termine:
wöchentlich Mo 14:15 - 15:45 Externer Ort: GW2 A3610 (2 SWS)

This colloquium is designed for students planning to write their BA-thesis in the fields of either British Studies or Postcolonial Studies. Students who are interested in a topic from one of the following research areas are especially invited to participate:

British (or Britain-centred) film; British social or cultural history from the 16th to the 21st century (including cultural-historical perspectives on Shakespeare); issues of race, class, gender/sexuality, nation, and heritage in British literary and non-literary texts or films; history of the British empire (esp. in literature or film); Black and Asian British cultures; postcolonial writing and film (esp. British, South Asian, Caribbean, South African). Other topics can be negotiated.

The course offers assistance and supervision at all relevant stages of thesis writing: from specifying a topic and formulating productive guiding questions via organising your research findings and structuring your argument, to the formal requirements of academic papers. We will also discuss theoretical and methodological questions related to your chosen topics.

Requirements:
• Regular and active participation
• Presentation of your topic in class and hand-out
• Prior enrolment via Stud.IP

Useful advice:

# MLA Handbook for Writers of Research Papers (7th edition). New York: Modern Language Association of America, 2009. Print (paperback edition, ISBN: 9781603290241, see http://www.mla.org/store/CID24/PID363).
# Michael Meyer. English and American Literatures. Tübingen: A. Francke Verlag, 2004, chap. 6.
# Ewald Standop und Matthias L.G. Meyer. Die Form der wissenschaftlichen Arbeit. Wiebelsheim: Quelle & Meyer/UTB, 2008.

Irmgard Maassen
10-76-6-AP-06 Begleitveranstaltung Sprachwissenschaft (in englischer Sprache)

Seminar

Termine:
wöchentlich Do 14:15 - 15:45 GW2 A3340 (2 SWS)

This colloquium is for all students who plan to write their BA thesis in Linguistics in the summer term. Together we will find a topic for you and go through all the steps towards your final thesis: search for literature in the library catalogue and linguistic databases, find or collect the data for the analysis, choose an appropriate methodology, and do the actual research. You will learn how to plan your time realistically (and stick to the plan), how to structure your BA thesis, and you will write your thesis in less than one semester.

Recommended literature:
Cottrell, Stella. 2008/2013. The Study Skills Handbook. Palgrave Macmillan. 3rd or 4th ed.
Frank, Andrea & Stefanie Haacke & Swantje Lahm. 2013. Schluesselkompetenzen: Schreiben in Studium und Beruf. 2. Auflage. Stuttgart: Metzler.
Rothstein, Bjoern. 2011. Wissenschaftliches Arbeiten fuer Linguisten. Tuebingen: Narr.

Dr. Anke Schulz
10-76-6-AP-07 Begleitveranstaltung Sprachwissenschaft: Multimodal linguistics (in englischer Sprache)
Achtung! Seminar beginnt erst in der 2. Woche, also ab 11.04.17

Seminar

Termine:
wöchentlich Di 10:15 - 11:45 MZH 1090 (2 SWS)

This colloquium is designed for Bachelor students planning to write their BA-thesis in the field of (multimodal) linguistics and its application to treatments of mixed media artefacts or performances: for example, film, comics, graphic novels, advertisements and so on. Particularly focused are areas where language (spoken or written) works together with visual representations of any kind. We will discuss theoretical and methodological approaches for characterising combinations of language and visual information, develop outlines and structures of the thesis, and consider how to construct strong thesis statements in order to focus your search for information, to tackle your subject and to construct your argument. Students will be expected to present and discuss their project in various stages of progression both in class as well as in individual monitoring sessions as well as to give input to others. Standard styles of presenting work within linguistics will be discussed as well as ways of addressing and analysing data and showing that analyses are adequate.

Prof. John Arnold Bateman, Ph.D.

Abschlussmodul L - Lehramt (12 CP) - 10-76-6-314 (nur für das Sommersemester)

Modulbeauftragte/r: Tim Giesler, giesler@uni-bremen.de
VAK Titel der Veranstaltung DozentIn
10-76-6-AL-01 Begleitveranstaltung: Fachdidaktik

Seminar

Termine:
wöchentlich Do 14:15 - 15:45 GW2 A4330 (2 SWS)

In diesem Modul erarbeiten die Studierenden spezifische Inhalte der Fremdsprachendidaktik, sowohl unter unterrichtsbezogenen Gesichtspunkten als auch unter forschungsbezogenen Aspekten mit Fokus auf gegenwärtige Entwicklungen und zukünftige Perspektiven. Die Inhalte des Kolloquiums fokussieren unterschiedliche schul- bzw. unterrichtsrelevante Themenbereiche. Bei Wahl der B.A.-Thesis in der Fachdidaktik Englisch können hier auch themenspezifische Fragestellungen erörtert werden.
Die Studierenden sollen in diesem Modul neben den fachlichen Inhalten ihre grundlegenden Vermittlungs- und Reflexionskompetenzen vertiefen und spezifizieren. Im Rahmen dieser Kompetenzen sollen die Studierenden insbesondere ihre bisherigen Praxiserfahrungen einbringen, kritisch reflektieren und themenspezifisch modifizieren.

Bachelorarbeiten (B.A.-Theses) in der Fremdsprachendidaktik Englisch können nur bei Besuch dieses Kolloquiums betreut werden können. BA-Themen sollten möglichst frühzeitig im Rahmen einer Sprechstunde vorbesprochen werden. Bitte beachten Sie folgende Informationen: http://www.fb10.uni-bremen.de/anglistik/ba2/bachelorarbeit.aspx

Tim Giesler

GENERAL STUDIES - siehe auch die Veranstaltungen von General Studies - Sprach- und Literaturwissenschaften

Modulbeauftragte/r: Irmgard Maassen, maassen@uni-bremen.de
VAK Titel der Veranstaltung DozentIn
10-76-4-D2/WD2-04 Key Topics in Cultural History: Cultural Representations of Empire (in englischer Sprache)

Seminar
ECTS: 3

Termine:
wöchentlich Mi 14:15 - 15:45 GW1 C1070 SFG 1030 GW2 B2900 (2 SWS)

This seminar aims to explore the ways in which the British Empire was (and is) imagined, represented and fictionalized, predominantly for the British public. A brief historical survey will be complemented by the analysis of cultural representations of colonial rule in a range of different media, covering Victorian visual culture both high and popular, older and more recent films about the ‘Raj’ in India, and fictional narratives from the heydays of imperialism such as Kipling’s ambivalent depictions of the Anglo-Indian experience, or Rider Haggard’s African adventure tales for boys. We will investigate issues such as orientalist stereotyping, the native ‘other’, and white masculine self-constructions, discuss both the romance and the anxiety of imperial conquest, and consider the representational strategies employed to defend, critique or undermine the imperial project.

Requirements:
# regular attendance and active participation
# in-depth knowledge of the reading and viewing material
# portfolio of worksheets (graded in WD-2b)
# for a grade in D-2a: an additional long term paper of 8-10 pp.

Texts to be purchased:
- Rudyard Kipling, Plain Tales from the Hills (Oxford UP 2001 or any other, also on the net)
- H. Rider Haggard, King Solomon's Mines (Oxford UP 1998 or Penguin 1994)

Prior enrolment via StudIP is mandatory.

Irmgard Maassen
10-76-4-D2/WD2-05 Key Topics in Cultural History: From Gentleman to Essex Lad - British Masculinities (in englischer Sprache)

Seminar
ECTS: 3

Termine:
wöchentlich Di 14:15 - 15:45 GW2 B3770 (2 SWS)

While gender difference is one of the basic binary opposites by which we construct cultural meaning, the hierarchisation of this difference, the subordination of women to men, is at the core of patriarchal ideology. This course aims to reverse the more usual direction of inquiry by looking at what patriarchal ideology assumes as the norm, and therefore tends to keep from critical view - at masculinity. We shall take a broad historical approach, surveying a wide range of conceptualisations of manhood, covering the Petrarchist lover and the transmutations of the gentleman ideal, the decline of working-class masculinity, Dandies and boy-scouts, the homosociality of the military, and the dissolution of gender stereotypes in consumer cultures and queer cultures. Examples will mainly be taken from British literary and visual culture, both high and popular, and may include Henry VIII, James Bond and David Beckham, but analysis will be supported by theories of gender from, among others, Aristotle, Laqueur, Freud, Kimmel, and R.W.Connell.
"It's a tough job but someone's gotta do it!"

Reading material will be made available on Stud.IP.

Requirements:
# regular attendance and active participation
# in-depth knowledge of the viewing and reading material
# oral presentation and portfolio of short papers (graded in WD-2b)
# for a grade in D-2a: an additional long term paper of 8-10 pp.
Prior enrolment via Stud.IP is mandatory.

Irmgard Maassen
10-76-4-D2/WD2-17 Key Topics in Literature: Literary London (in englischer Sprache)

Seminar

Termine:
wöchentlich Do 12:15 - 13:45 GW2 B3010 (Kleiner Studierraum) (2 SWS)

This course seeks to familiarise students with a number of selected authors, poets and writers, in general, who have held lifelong connections with London, may it be historic or contemporary. We will aim to discuss their continued engagement with the city by exploring a selections of excerpts from Alexander Pope, Olaudah Equiano, Daniel Defoe, Alfred Lord Tennyson, Charles Dickens, Thomas Hardy, Elizabeth Bowen, Sir Arthur Conan Doyle, and George Eliot, just to name a few. By tracing forgotten as well as prominent landmarks of the urban centre, we seek to connect the literary representations of the city with historical and cultural developments, present and past.

Since some of the participants are required to submit a research paper, we will use parts of our seminar discussions to the development of topics, the formulation of a thesis statement, as well as considerations about the methodological approaches of writing such a paper.

Additional secondary sources can be accessed in the “Semesterapparat”, a reference only section on the third floor of the library building. A reader with selected secondary text materials will be made available for download on Stud. IP. Please be aware that your registration on Stud. IP. is mandatory (deadline March 15th, 2017). You may wish to check the sections "Information" and "Schedule" further details such as requirements, weekly schedule, select bibliography and modes of assessment.

For Non-E-SC students and academic exchange students: Please contact me if you require more than 3 credit points.

Assessment (Available for modules D2-c and WD2-a/b)

regular attendance, informed participation in class discussion,
in-depth knowledge of the selected reading material,
homework assignments,
presentation of research paper or group project,
term paper.

The requirements as formulated above may vary depending on your overall degree program. Please check the departmental website for guidelines on modules and exams: http://www.fb10.uni-bremen.de/anglistik/ba2/profil/studienplan.aspx

Please submit your completed data sheet indicating your module choice in week 2 (available on Stud.IP “Allgemeiner Dateiordner”)

Required reading materials (you may wish to purchase a copy of these publications for class):

Bowen, Elizabeth. The Heat of the Day. (Italics) 1948. New York: Anchor Books, 2002. Print.
Conrad, Joseph. Heart of Darkness. (Italics) 1902. CreateSpace Independent Publishing Platform, 2014. Print.
Defoe, Daniel. Roxana: The Fortunate Mistress. (Italics) 1724. Oxford: OUP, 2008. Print.
Dickens, Charles. David Copperfield: The Personal History of David Copperfield. (Italics) 1849-50. London: Penguin Classics, 2004. Print.
Doyle, Sir Arthur Conan. The Memoirs of Sherlock Holmes. (Italics) 1894. London: Penguin, 2011. Print.
Eliot, George. Daniel Deronda. (Italics) 1876. London: Penguin Classics, 1995. Print.
Equiano, Olaudah. The Interesting Narrative of the Life of Olaudah Equiano, or Gustavus Vassa, the African. Written by Himself. 1789. (Italics) Print.

Copies of the texts can be purchased at the bookstore on our campus (Universitätsbuchhandlung Bremen: www.unibuch-bremen.de)

Dr. Jana Nittel
10-76-6-AP-04 Forschungskolloquium - Current Research in Cultural History (in englischer Sprache)

Colloquium

Termine:
wöchentlich Di 16:15 - 17:45 Externer Ort: GW2 A3780 (2 SWS)

In diesem Seminar werden wir uns zentrale Theorien, Ansätze und Methoden der Cultural History erarbeiten und auf eigene Projekte anwenden. Wie können wir die Kategorien von race, class, gender, sexuality, ethnicity etc. einsetzen und in ihren intersektionalen Bezügen produktiv machen? Welche hegemoniekritischen Fragestellungen können wir entwickeln, um historische und gegenwärtige Diskurse und Praktiken zu analysieren? Die Bereitschaft, sich mit komplexen Texten auseinanderzusetzen, wird vorausgesetzt.

Dr. Karin Esders-Angermund
10-76-6-GS-01 Forschunskolloquium für Promovierende / fortgeschrittene Studierende (in englischer Sprache)

Colloquium

Termine:
wöchentlich Do 09:30 - 11:00 GW2 A3340 (2 SWS)

Dies ist ein Kolloquium für Doktoranden und Studierende, die an Dissertationen und Abschlussarbeiten im Bereich der (angewandten) englischen Sprachwissenschaft und (Lerner-) Korpuslinguistik arbeiten. Teilnahme nur auf Einladung.

Prof. Dr. Marcus Callies
10-76-6-GS-02 Exemplary Screenings - Screening Examples (in englischer Sprache)

Übung

Termine:
wöchentlich Mi 18:00 - 21:00 SuUB 4330 (Studio I Medienraum ) (2 SWS)

Films are usually appreciated as mere entertainment. However, they always convey ideas about self and society, right and wrong, good and bad. Moreover, they offer specific conceptions of race, class,gender, ethnicity, sexuality. In watching a selection of classical and post-classical Hollywood films we will focus on the representation of the Orient as an imaginary space that serves as a canvas upon which fears and anxieties are projected.
This course is highly recommended to students participating in the course “Key Topics in Cultural History: Hollywood Orientalism”.
Requirements:
• regular attendance
• oral presentation and handout
Please note that prior enrollment via Stud.IP is mandatory.

Dr. Karin Esders-Angermund
10-76-6-GS-03 Forschungskolloquium für Promovierende und fortgeschrittene Studierende

Colloquium

Termine:
wöchentlich Mi 18:00 - 20:00 SFG 2060 (2 SWS)
Prof. Dr. Sabine Bröck
10-76-6-GS-04 Digitales Lehrangebot: "Key Developments in Literary Histor(ies) and Literary Criticism in English (in englischer Sprache)
Mobile Lectures - Keine Präsenzlehrveranstaltung

Seminar

Mobile Lectures - Keine Präsenzlehrveranstaltung

The lecture series is an additional offer for all students registered in the course programme English-Speaking Cultures and is attached to the General Studies Option, which means it is open to all interested parties within and outside of the faculty. Participants will have access to nine videos upon registration. Please explored whether your study programme includes the General studies option before signing up. Please arrange for an appointment during my office hours and submit a completed “General Studies Certificate” (copies are available for download in the “General Document Folder” on Stud.IP by June 30th, 2017. Please explore the “Information” button for programme details, abstracts and biographical details of the individual speaker as well as requirements for gaining credit points.

Please click on “Mobile Lectures” to view the recorded sessions.

Programme – Mobile Lectures

1) Katalina Kopka and Jana Nittel, Universität Bremen, Germany
“Geoffrey Chaucer’s Canterbury Tales: Exploring the Historical Context of this Middle English Masterpiece”
2) Janelle Rodriques, Universität Bremen, Germany
“Obeah and the West Indian Short Story”
3) Ian Watson, Independent Scholar and poet
“First World War Poetry”
4.) Susan M. Gaines, writer-in-residence, Universität Bremen, Germany
“Exploring Worlds of Knowledge in Fiction”
5) Amatoritsero Ede, Independent Scholar, Ottawa, Canada
“Talk & Poetry Reading by Writer-in-Residence and poetry and short story readings by Creative Writing Students”
6) Birte Heidemann-Malreddy, Universität Bremen, Germany
“Post-Agreement Northern Irish Literature”
7) Derrais Carter, Portland State University, Oregon, USA
"Undisclosed: Refusal and Possibility in Black Narrative History"
8) Louisa Uchum Egbunike, Manchester Metropolitan University, UK
“Reflections on How to Read Africa: Centring Africa in Literary Analysis”
9) Katrin Berndt, Universität Bremen, Germany
“Writing after Clarissa: British Epistolary Novels in the Romantic Decades“

Dr. Jana Nittel
10-76-6-GS-05 Übung zum Seminar "Introduction to English Literatures (Part II)" (in englischer Sprache)

Übung

Termine:
wöchentlich Fr 08:15 - 09:45 SFG 2040 (2 SWS)

These tutorials are offered in combination with the foundation module A course "Introduction to English Literatures Part II". In our weekly sessions, we will explore some of the issues discussed during the seminar sessions in detail. In addition, we will further examine a number of theoretical texts and focus our attention on an adequate preparation for the written exam. We will also focus on developing your writing strategies and presentation techniques. Students who are currently taking the foundation module A "Introduction to English Literatures" are strongly encouraged to attend our tutorials and may gain credits points in the process. All students registered for the seminar session are required to at least one tutorial session.

Dr. Jana Nittel
Annemieke Kuper, B.A.
10-76-6-GS-06 Ringvorlesung "Language and Gender" (in englischer Sprache)

Vorlesung

Termine:
wöchentlich Mo 16:15 - 17:45 GW2 B2890 (2 SWS)

Vorläufiges Programm (Stand: 03.02.2017)

03.04. Inke DuBois & Marcus Callies (Bremen): The study of language and gender - Theoretical and methodological developments

10.04. Marcus Callies (Bremen): Is English (still) a gender-biased language?

08.05. Inke DuBois (Bremen): Beyond gender dichotomies: Constructing new forms of gender

15.05. Carolin Patzelt (Bremen): Sprachpolitisch induzierter Sprachwandel? Zur Feminisierung von Funktions- und Berufsbezeichnungen in der Romania

22.05. Lann Hornscheid (Berlin): Gibt es Sprache ohne Geschlecht? Und Geschlecht ohne Sprache? Anmerkungen zum Zusammenwirken von Gewalt und SprachHandlungen

29.05. Paul Baker (Lancaster, UK): Corpus approaches to language, gender and sexuality

12.06. Ingo Warnke (Bremen): Queering Linguistics, oder: was in der Sprachwissenschaft gerne in den Wandschrank gestellt wird

19.06. Anke Lensch (Mainz): Women and men's use of causal and concessive clauses

26.06. Lars Vorberger & Simon Falk (Marburg): Stereotypen schwuler (Aus)Sprache

Prof. Dr. Marcus Callies
Dr. Inke Du Bois
10-76-6-GS-07 Key Topics in Cultural History: Bremen Dekolonisieren. (Wie) Geht Das?: Recherche - Kreation - Dokumentation / Key Topics in Cultural History: Decolonize Bremen. (How) Does it work?: Research - Creation - Documentation (in englischer Sprache)
INPUTS-Artist in Residence Nadja Ofuatey - Alazard

Seminar

Einzeltermine:
Mi 05.04.17 10:15 - 13:45 GW2 A3390 (CIP-Labor FB 10)
Mi 26.04.17 10:15 - 13:45 GW2 A3390 (CIP-Labor FB 10)
Mi 03.05.17 10:15 - 13:45 GW2 A3390 (CIP-Labor FB 10)
Mi 10.05.17 10:15 - 13:45 GW2 A3390 (CIP-Labor FB 10)
Mi 17.05.17 10:15 - 13:45 GW2 A3390 (CIP-Labor FB 10)
Mi 24.05.17 10:15 - 13:45 GW2 A3390 (CIP-Labor FB 10)

Bremen Dekolonisieren. (Wie) Geht das?
Recherche – Kreation – Dokumentation

»Zum Dekolonisierungsprozess gehören das Erinnern, das Aussprechen, das Gedenken und das Überwinden«, so die Ingeborg-Bachmann Preisträgerin Sharon Dodua Otoo kürzlich in einem Interview. Der Ruf »Decolonize!« ist in den letzten Jahren in etlichen deutschen Städten zu vernehmen. Auch in der Hansestadt Bremen gibt es eine Reihe von Initiativen und Akteur*innen, die eine Dekolonisierung der Stadt fordern und umsetzen wollen.

Wie lassen sich entsprechend die Spuren der kolonialen Geschichte in der Stadt, aber auch die Geschichten des Widerstands sichtbar(er) machen? Welche zivilgesellschaftlichen, bildungspolitischen, stadtpolitischen, künstlerischen Perspektiven und Praktiken sind notwendig, um den angestrebten Dekolonisierungsprozess zu vertiefen?

Die Teilnehmer*innen des Blockseminars erstellen gemeinsam ein Recherchedesign, um dann in Arbeitsteilung die relevanten Bremer Akteur*innen in Verwaltung und Zivilgesellschaft zu befragen sowie die (de)kolonialen Erinnerungsorte der Stadt zu (be)suchen. So entsteht eine polyphone Collage aus Texten und Filmen.

Die gebürtige Schwarzwälderin Nadja Ofuatey-Alazard, Dipl. Journ., ist Kulturaktivistin, Produktionsmanagerin, Journalistin, Moderatorin und Filmemacherin. Jüngste Projekte umfassen u.a. die Veranstaltungs- und Filmreihe »ReMIX. Africa in Translation« (2016/17) sowie die Buchpublikationen »African Futures and Beyond. Visions in Transition« (co-ed, im Erscheinen), »Wie Rassismus aus Wörtern spricht. (K)Erben des Kolonialismus im Wissensarchiv deutsche Sprache« (co-ed 2011) und »200 Years Later … Commemorating the 200 Year Anniversary of the Abolition of the Transatlantic Slave Trade« (2008)

Decolonize Bremen. (How) Does it work?
Research – Creation – Documentation

»Decolonization means remembering, articulating, commemorating and overcoming«, thus Ingeborg-Bachmann Prize-Winner Sharon Dodua Otoo recently stated in an interview. Meanwhile, the call »Decolonize!« can be heard in numerous German cities. Likewise, in the Hanseatic town of Bremen a number of players and initiatives demand and strive for the decolonisation of their cityscape. Therefore, how can the traces of colonial history as well as anti- and de-colonial resistance be rendered (more) visible? Which perspectives and practices in the areas of civil society, education, politics and the arts are required to deepen processes of decolonisation? The participants of this block seminar jointly develop a research design in order to identify and interrogate stakeholders and their agendas in civil society and administration and visit relevant sites linked to Bremen’s colonial past and (de)colonial present. Thus results a polyphonic collage of texts and films.

Nadja Ofuatey-Alazard, Dipl. Journ., is a Black Forest born cultural activist, production manager, journalist, moderator and filmmaker. Her recent projects and publications include the event- and film series »ReMIX. Africa in Translation« (2016/17), the books »African Futures and Beyond. Visions in Transition« (co-ed, in publication), »Wie Rassismus aus Wörtern spricht. (K)Erben des Kolonialismus im Wissensarchiv deutsche Sprache« (co-ed 2011) and »200 Years Later … Commemorating the 200 Year Anniversary of the Abolition of the Transatlantic Slave Trade« (2008)

Nadja Ofuatey-Alazard
10-GS-9-04 Linguistische Werkstatt
Forschendes Studieren und Lernen mit linguistischen Daten

Seminar
ECTS: 1

Termine:
wöchentlich Mo 10:15 - 11:45 GW2 A3340 (2 SWS)
wöchentlich Fr 10:15 - 11:45 GW2 A3340 (2 SWS)

Einzeltermine:
Di 18.04.17 14:15 - 17:45
Do 27.07.17 10:15 - 11:45 GW2 A3340
Di 01.08.17 10:30 - 12:00 GW2 A3340
Fr 11.08.17 10:15 - 11:45

Die Linguistische Werkstatt steht allen Studierenden des FB 10 offen, die mit sprachlichen Daten arbeiten, etwa im Rahmen von sprachwissenschaftlichen Haus- und Abschlussarbeiten oder Referaten. Sie bekommen hier z.B. Unterstützung bei der Nutzung von Korpora und der Software AntConc, der Erstellung von Fragebögen, der Durchführung und Transkription von Sprachaufnahmen oder der Erstellung von Linguistic Landscape Fotodokumentationen.
Die Veranstaltung kann auch nur an einzelnen Terminen besucht werden, eine kontinuierliche Teilnahme ist nicht erforderlich.
Ein Erwerb von Credit Points im Bereich General Studies ist nach Absprache möglich.

Weitere Informationen finden Sie im Blog der Linguistischen Werkstatt:
https://blogs.uni-bremen.de/lingwerk/

Cordula Voigts
10-M82-1-4-LE-2 Changing ecologies: language, culture and the environment (in englischer Sprache)
Modultyp B im Studiengang Language Sciences, M.A.

Vorlesung

Termine:
wöchentlich Do 14:00 - 16:00 Externer Ort: GW2 A3770 Externer Ort: GW2 A3570 (FB-Raum) Externer Ort: GW2 B3009 (2 SWS)

This lecture series will focus on changing ecologies in the global era from linguistic, cultural and environmental perspectives. The ecological approach functions as a transdisciplinary platform for studying the coexistence of languages, communities, and cultures in a society and their interactions with each other and the natural environment. Within this approach, languages and cultures are studied as systems of interrelations; they cannot be studied in isolation from the totality of human behaviour and from natural circumstances, and these circumstances both affect and are shaped by languages and cultures.

The series is organized in cooperation with the Institute for postcolonial and transcultural studies (INPUTS) at the University of Bremen and it serves as the platform for the INPUTS forum. It will feature introductory thematic lectures followed by guest lectures on current research topics.

Prof. Dr. Eeva Sippola
Dr. Joanna Chojnicka
10-M83-2/3-PRAII-T-1 English Theatre Workshop (in englischer Sprache)

Übung
ECTS: 3-18

Termine:
wöchentlich Di 18:00 - 22:00 GW2 B3009 (Großer Studierraum) GW2 B3850
wöchentlich Mi 18:00 - 22:00 GW2 B3009 (Großer Studierraum)

Einzeltermine:
Mi 22.02.17 18:00 - 22:00 GW2 B1410
Mo 27.02.17 14:00 - 22:00 GW2 B1410
Mo 03.04.17 18:00 - 22:00 GW2 B3010 (Kleiner Studierraum)
Mo 10.04.17 18:00 - 22:00 GW2 B3010 (Kleiner Studierraum)
Mo 24.04.17 18:00 - 22:00 GW2 B3850
Mo 01.05.17 10:00 - 22:00 GW2 B3009 (Großer Studierraum)
Mo 08.05.17 18:00 - 22:00 GW2 B3010 (Kleiner Studierraum)
Sa 13.05.17 - So 14.05.17 (So, Sa) 10:00 - 22:00 GW2 B3009 (Großer Studierraum)
Mo 15.05.17 18:00 - 22:00 GW2 B3010 (Kleiner Studierraum)
Sa 20.05.17 - So 21.05.17 (So, Sa) 10:00 - 22:00 GW2 B3009 (Großer Studierraum)
Mo 22.05.17 18:00 - 22:00 GW2 B3010 (Kleiner Studierraum)
Do 25.05.17 10:00 - 22:00 GW2 B3009 (Großer Studierraum)
Sa 27.05.17 - So 28.05.17 (So, Sa) 10:00 - 22:00 GW2 B3009 (Großer Studierraum)
Mo 29.05.17 18:00 - 22:00 GW2 B3010 (Kleiner Studierraum)

This class is already taking place, although we may still need people to help e.g. as stage crew, musicians, technicians and publicity crew – if you are interested, contact me at the email address below.
I expect to offer a workshop (without performances) next Winter Semester. The next workshop working on a production will be in June/July 2018, with opportunities to audition and/or sign up for set design, costumes, PR, lighting/sound, music, make-up etc. in January 2018: contact me under claridge@uni-bremen.de in advance. BA students can get General Studies credit points for participation in these workshops; BA students working towards the lehramtsorientierter Abschluss can get Professionalisierungsbereich CPs for it. MA TnL students can combine this with “Theatre Workshop ‘Presentation & Performance’” to get 6, 12 or 18 credits points for their Praxismodul, depending on how much they invest in the project.
Please note that English-language skills at the B2 level (cf. Europarat Rererenzrahmen) are required of every participant; evidence of this (e.g. through one of the international certificates, or a certificate from the Fremdsprachenzentrum) must be submitted to Michael by anyone not already accepted into the BA “English-Speaking Cultures”, MEd English or Masters “Transnationale Literaturen” degree courses.

Michael Claridge, M.A., Dip.Ed.
10-M83-2/3-PRAII-T-2 Theatre Workshop 'Presentation & Performance' (in englischer Sprache)

Übung

Einzeltermine:
Fr 07.04.17 16:00 - 20:00 GW2 B2900
Fr 21.04.17 14:00 - 18:00 GW2 B3009 (Großer Studierraum)
Fr 28.04.17 16:00 - 20:00 GW2 B2900
Fr 05.05.17 14:00 - 18:00 GW2 B3009 (Großer Studierraum)
Fr 12.05.17 16:00 - 20:00 GW2 B2900
Fr 19.05.17 14:00 - 18:00 GW2 B3009 (Großer Studierraum)
Fr 26.05.17 16:00 - 20:00 GW2 B2900
Fr 02.06.17 14:00 - 18:00 GW2 B3009 (Großer Studierraum)

Please see the description for 'English Theatre Workshop'

Michael Claridge, M.A., Dip.Ed.

Ansprechpartner für die Inhalte des Veranstaltungsverzeichnisses

Alte Vorlesungsverzeichnisse (bis Sommersemester 2012)