Lehrveranstaltungen WiSe 2016/2017

Programmes for Exchange Students (Incomings)

Veranstaltungen anzeigen: alle | in englischer Sprache | für ältere Erwachsene

Programmes for Exchange Students (Incomings)

VAK Titel der Veranstaltung DozentIn
08-27-GS-1 Urban History and Geography of Bremen and Northern Germany (in englischer Sprache)
Stadtgeschichte und -geographie von Bremen

Seminar
ECTS: 4

Termine:
wöchentlich Fr 14:00 - 16:00 GW2 B1150 (Planungswerkstatt) (2 SWS) Certain sessions will end later than 16:00 (field trips in Bremen)

Einzeltermine:
Sa 03.12.16 08:15 - 20:00 Meeting inside Hauptbahnhof time at 08:20

NUR FÜR GASTSTUDIERENDE - EXCHANGE STUDENTS ONLY! Please sign up via StudIP starting September 1st.
This course is a special offer for international students who are interested in Regional and Urban Geography, and the local history of Bremen and Northwest Germany.
Content/Learning Outcome
- Students understand the historical development of cities and the processes connecting historical events and urban development
- Students understand the basic ideas of (Regional) and Urban Geography and History as a university science
- Students understand the most important historical events that shaped today’s Germany
- Students are able to give presentations about topics that they researched on their own (about an excursion destination as well as a unique city quarter of Bremen
Work Load (3 CP/ECTS equals 90 hours):
- 30 hours attendance in class
- 20 hours preparation (reading, homework tasks, preparation for exam)
- 40 hours (preparation of city quarter presentation, incl. powerpoint and 2 page handout)
Extra Credit work load (+1 CP/ECTS equals 30 hours):
- 12 hours attendance on field trio
- 18 hours (preparation of individual destination presentation, incl. powerpoint)

Michael Thiele
10-76-1-BA-01 Introduction to English Literatures Part I (in englischer Sprache)

Seminar

Termine:
wöchentlich Mo 08:15 - 09:45 GW2 B2890 (2 SWS) Gruppe A
wöchentlich Di 10:15 - 11:45 GW2 B2900 (2 SWS) Gruppe B
wöchentlich Mi 16:15 - 17:45 SFG 1030 (2 SWS) Gruppe C
wöchentlich Do 10:15 - 11:45 SFG 2010 (2 SWS) Gruppe D

This introductory course will attempt to offer students access to literary studies at university level and try to balance scholarly considerations with aesthetic enjoyment. It is the first part of a two-semester module, which will continue in the following Summer Term (Part II). In this first semester, we will look at the basic concepts not only of literature itself but also of the science of literary criticism /Literaturwissenschaft. As we read our primary texts, we will be able to look at questions of literary genre (poetry, drama, narrative texts) and literary history (different periods and different national contexts). In addition, we will look at current theories of literature and of course strategies of interpreting and analysing literary texts in a systematic, scholarly way, thus laying the theoretical and terminological groundwork to the study of literature, both from a methodological and a historical perspective.

The course will run as four groups. All students are required to register on Stud.IP for one of these four groups A, B, C or D by selecting the option “Participants/TeilnehmerInnen” on Stud.IP, followed by “Functions/Groups”. Please select only one group and be aware that the number of students who are permitted to sign up for each group is limited (room size) and that your registration is mandatory.

A: Monday: 08:15 - 09:45, weekly (from 17/10/16), GW2 B2890, Lecturer: Dr Jana Nittel
B: Tuesday: 10:15 - 11:45, weekly (from 18/10/16), GW2 B2900, Lecturer: Dr Jana Nittel
C: Wednesday: 16:15 - 17:45, weekly (from 19/10/16), SFG 1030; Lecturer: Cedric Essi
D: Thursday: 10:15 - 11:45, weekly (from 20/10/16), SFG 2010, Lecturer: Dr Jana Nittel

In addition, we would like you to register for:

a) Tutorials “Übung zum Seminar Introduction to English Literatures Part II”, VAK: 10-76-6-GS-04 [General Studies: 1-3 CPs] on Fridays 08:15 a. m. – 9:45 a. m.
b) Mobile Lectures/Digitales Lehrangebot: “Key Developments in Literary Histor(ies) and Literary Criticism in English”, VAK: 10-76-6-GS-06, [General Studies: 1-3 CPs]

Please download a copy of the learning compact for further details such as requirements, weekly schedule, select bibliography, reference only section in the library, modes of assessment and the exam schedule (“General data folder” on Stud. IP).

Module description: http://www.fb10.uni-bremen.de/anglistik/ba2/module.aspx
Departmental extended reading list (Literatures in English): http://www.fb10.uni-bremen.de/anglistik/literaturwissenschaft/default.aspx

Required reading materials (you will need a copy of these books for class):

Joyce, James. Dubliners (Italics). Ed. Margot Norris. Norton Critical Editions. New York: W. W. Norton, 2006. Print.
Miller, Arthur. Death of a Salesman (Italics). Eds. Manfred und Gunda Pütz. Stuttgart: Reclam, 1986. Print.
Nünning, Vera and Ansgar. An Introduction to the Study of English and American Literature (Italics). 2nd. Ed. Stuttgart: Klett, 2014. Print.
Pope, Rob. Studying English Literature and Language: An Introduction and Companion (Italics). Third Edition. Abingdon: Routledge, 2012. Print. (also course book for Part II)
Shakespeare, William. Hamlet (Italics). Ed. Robert S. Miola. Norton Critical Editions. New York: W. W. Norton, 2010. Print.

Copies of the texts are available for purchase in the Campus bookstore (Universitätsbuchhandlung Bremen: www.unibuch-bremen.de)

Requirements:
  • regular attendance, informed participation in class discussion,
  • in-depth knowledge of the selected reading material,
  • homework assignments and group presentation in tutorial sessions.

Students will take a final written exam.

Dr. Jana Nittel
Cedric-Akpeje Essi
10-76-1-BB-01 Introduction to English Linguistics 1 (in englischer Sprache)

Seminar

Termine:
wöchentlich Fr 10:15 - 11:45 SFG 1040 (2 SWS)

Einzeltermine:
Do 16.02.17 10:00 - 12:00 GW2 B1410
Do 16.02.17 10:00 - 12:00 GW2 B1400 NUR Mi. - So.
Do 16.02.17 14:00 - 18:00 GW2 B1400 NUR Mi. - So.
Do 16.02.17 14:00 - 18:00 GW2 B1410

Linguistics is the scientific study of language and communication. It deals with all aspects of how people use language and what they must know in order to do so. The purpose of this class is to give a systematic introduction to the variety of ways in which language can be examined scientifically. Students will be introduced to and equipped with the fundamental concepts, the adequate terminology and methodology for linguistic analysis. The class will thus provide an overview of the core areas of linguistics – phonetics and phonology (the study of speech sounds), morphology (the structure of words), syntax (the structure of sentences), semantics (the study of meaning) and pragmatics (the study of meaning and language use in context). Taking a contrastive German-English perspective whenever possible, this course will also cater for the needs and interests of students who want to become teachers of English.

READING
The following books, available in inexpensive paperback editions, are recommended (but need not be purchased as the key readings will be made available on the university’s e-learning platform Stud.IP):
  • Plag, Ingo; Braun, Maria; Lappe, Sabine and Mareile Schramm (2015), Introduction to English Linguistics. 3rd ed. Berlin: Mouton de Gruyter.
  • Finegan, Edward (2011), Language. Its structure and Use. 6th ed. Boston/MA: Thomson Wadsworth. (several other editions and publishers)
  • Kortmann, Bernd (2005), English Linguistics: Essentials. Berlin: Cornelsen.

Essential preparatory reading before the first meeting: Finegan (2011), ch. 1

ASSESSMENT
  • regular attendance and active participation in in-class data analysis and discussion
  • careful reading and preparation of assigned readings for each session, reading assignments
  • final exam ("E-Klausur")

Prof. Dr. Marcus Callies
10-76-1-BB-02 Introduction to English Linguistics 1 (in englischer Sprache)

Seminar

Termine:
wöchentlich Do 08:00 - 10:00 GW2 A4330
wöchentlich Do 12:15 - 13:45 SFG 1040

Linguistics is the scientific study of language and communication. It deals with all aspects of how people use language and what they must know in order to do so. The purpose of this class is to give a systematic introduction to the variety of ways in which language can be examined scientifically. Students will be introduced to and equipped with the fundamental concepts, the adequate terminology and methodology for linguistic analysis. The class will thus provide an overview of the core areas of linguistics – phonetics and phonology (the study of speech sounds), morphology (the structure of words), syntax (the structure of sentences), semantics (the study of meaning) and pragmatics (the study of meaning and language use in context). Taking a contrastive German-English perspective whenever possible, this course will also cater for the needs and interests of students who want to become teachers of English.

RECOMMENDED LITERATURE (please buy this book):
Kortmann, Bernd (2005), English Linguistics: Essentials. Berlin: Cornelsen.

Essential preparatory reading before the first meeting: Chapter 1 from Finegan (2011). This chapter is available for download on Stud.IP. Reference:
Finegan, Edward (2011), Language. Its structure and Use. 6th ed. Boston/MA: Thomson Wadsworth. (several other editions and publishers)

ASSESSMENT
  • regular attendance and active participation in in-class data analysis and discussion
  • careful reading and preparation of assigned readings for each session, reading assignments
  • final exam

Dr. Anke Schulz
10-76-1-BB-03 Introduction to English Linguistics 1 (in englischer Sprache)

Seminar

Termine:
wöchentlich Mi 12:00 - 14:00 GW2 B2880

Linguistics is the scientific study of language and communication. It deals with all aspects of how people use language and what they must know in order to do so. The purpose of this class is to give a systematic introduction to the variety of ways in which language can be examined scientifically. Students will be introduced to and equipped with the fundamental concepts, the adequate terminology and methodology for linguistic analysis. The class will thus provide an overview of the core areas of linguistics – phonetics and phonology (the study of speech sounds), morphology (the structure of words), syntax (the structure of sentences), semantics (the study of meaning) and pragmatics (the study of meaning and language use in context). Taking a contrastive German-English perspective whenever possible, this course will also cater for the needs and interests of students who want to become teachers of English.

READING
Recommended literature (please buy this book):
Kortmann, Bernd (2005), English Linguistics: Essentials. Berlin: Cornelsen.

Essential preparatory reading before the first meeting: Finegan (2011), chapter 1
Finegan, Edward (2011), Language. Its Structure and Use. 6th ed. Boston/MA: Thomson Wadsworth. (several other editions and publishers)

ASSESSMENT
  • regular attendance and active participation in in-class data analysis and discussion
  • careful reading and preparation of assigned readings for each session, reading assignments
  • final exam

Alexandra Kinne
10-76-1-BB-04 Introduction to English Linguistics 1 (in englischer Sprache)

Seminar

Termine:
wöchentlich Mo 14:15 - 15:45 GW2 B2890 (2 SWS)

Einzeltermine:
Mi 09.11.16 10:00 - 12:00 SpT C3140
Mi 23.11.16 10:00 - 12:00 SpT C3140
Mi 14.12.16 10:00 - 12:00 SpT C3140
Mi 25.01.17 10:00 - 12:00 SpT C3140

Linguistics is the scientific study of language and communication. It deals with all aspects of how people use language and what they must know in order to do so. The purpose of this class is to give a systematic introduction to the variety of ways in which language can be examined scientifically. Students will be introduced to and equipped with the fundamental concepts, the adequate terminology and methodology for linguistic analysis. The class will thus provide an overview of the core areas of linguistics – phonetics and phonology (the study of speech sounds), morphology (the structure of words), syntax (the structure of sentences), semantics (the study of meaning) and pragmatics (the study of meaning and language use in context). Taking a contrastive German-English perspective whenever possible, this course will also cater for the needs and interests of students who want to become teachers of English.

READING
The following books, available in inexpensive paperback editions, are recommended (but need not be purchased as the key readings will be made available on the university’s e-learning platform Stud.IP):
Plag, Ingo; Braun, Maria; Lappe, Sabine and Mareile Schramm (2015), Introduction to English Linguistics. 3rd ed. Berlin: Mouton de Gruyter.
Finegan, Edward (2011), Language. Its structure and Use. 6th ed. Boston/MA: Thomson Wadsworth. (several other editions and publishers)
Kortmann, Bernd (2005), English Linguistics: Essentials. Berlin: Cornelsen.
Essential preparatory reading before the first meeting: Finegan (2011), ch. 1

ASSESSMENT
regular attendance and active participation in in-class data analysis and discussion
careful reading and preparation of assigned readings for each session, reading assignments
final exam ("E-Klausur")

Dr. Inke Du Bois
10-76-1-BB-05 Introduction to English Linguistics 1 (in englischer Sprache)

Seminar

Termine:
wöchentlich Mo 16:15 - 17:45 GW2 B2890 (2 SWS)

Linguistics is the scientific study of language and communication. It deals with all aspects of how people use language and what they must know in order to do so. The purpose of this class is to give a systematic introduction to the variety of ways in which language can be examined scientifically. Students will be introduced to and equipped with the fundamental concepts, the adequate terminology and methodology for linguistic analysis. The class will thus provide an overview of the core areas of linguistics – phonetics and phonology (the study of speech sounds), morphology (the structure of words), syntax (the structure of sentences), semantics (the study of meaning) and pragmatics (the study of meaning and language use in context). Taking a contrastive German-English perspective whenever possible, this course will also cater for the needs and interests of students who want to become teachers of English.

READING
The following books, available in inexpensive paperback editions, are recommended (but need not be purchased as the key readings will be made available on the university’s e-learning platform Stud.IP):
Plag, Ingo; Braun, Maria; Lappe, Sabine and Mareile Schramm (2015), Introduction to English Linguistics. 3rd ed. Berlin: Mouton de Gruyter.
Finegan, Edward (2011), Language. Its structure and Use. 6th ed. Boston/MA: Thomson Wadsworth. (several other editions and publishers)
Kortmann, Bernd (2005), English Linguistics: Essentials. Berlin: Cornelsen.
Essential preparatory reading before the first meeting: Finegan (2011), ch. 1

ASSESSMENT
regular attendance and active participation in in-class data analysis and discussion
careful reading and preparation of assigned readings for each session, reading assignments
final exam ("E-Klausur")

Dr. Inke Du Bois
10-76-1-BC-01 Key Moments in the Cultural History of the English-Speaking-World (in englischer Sprache)

Seminar

Termine:
wöchentlich Mi 12:15 - 13:45 GW2 B2890 (2 SWS)

This course aims to introduce students to key moments in the social and cultural histories of English-speaking countries. In analyzing selected case studies from the Renaissance to postcolonialism we will take special interest in cultural encounters and their dynamics of difference and power. A range of texts and artifacts such as scholarly and fictional works, paintings, advertisements, moving pictures and photographs will be examined, employing a choice of theoretical and analytical concepts.

The course will run as four groups (A-B-C-D); students have to choose one of them. It is the first part of a two-semester module which will continue in the following summer semester as "Key Moments in the Linguistic History of the English-Speaking World". All primary and secondary texts will be available for download in Stud. IP.

Requirements:
  • Regular attendance and oral participation
  • In-depth knowledge of the reading material
  • Written summaries of key ideas of selected texts from the syllabus, to be handed in on the day of the respective session (max. ½ page each = max. 300 words)
  • Oral group presentation
Please note that prior enrollment via Stud. IP is mandatory.

Dr. Karin Esders-Angermund
10-76-1-BC-02 Key Moments in the Cultural History of the English-Speaking-World (in englischer Sprache)

Seminar

Termine:
wöchentlich Do 10:15 - 11:45 GW2 B2900 (2 SWS)

This course aims to introduce students to key moments in the social and cultural histories of English-speaking countries. In analyzing selected case studies from the Renaissance to postcolonialism we will take special interest in cultural encounters and their dynamics of difference and power. A range of texts and artifacts such as scholarly and fictional works, paintings, advertisements, moving pictures and photographs will be examined, employing a choice of theoretical and analytical concepts.

The course will run as four groups (A-B-C-D); students have to choose one of them. It is the first part of a two-semester module which will continue in the following summer semester as "Key Moments in the Linguistic History of the English-Speaking World". All primary and secondary texts will be available for download in Stud. IP.

Requirements:
  • Regular attendance and oral participation
  • In-depth knowledge of the reading material
  • Written summaries of key ideas of selected texts from the syllabus, to be handed in on the day of the respective session (max. ½ page each = max. 300 words)
  • Oral group presentation

Please note that prior enrollment via Stud. IP is mandatory.

Dr. Karin Esders-Angermund
10-76-1-BC-03 Key Moments in the Cultural History of the English-Speaking-World - Monday (in englischer Sprache)

Seminar
ECTS: 3

Termine:
wöchentlich Mo 16:15 - 17:45 SFG 1030 (2 SWS)

This course aims to introduce students to key moments in the social and cultural histories of English-speaking countries. In analyzing a range of case studies from the Renaissance to postcolonialism we will pay particular attention to historical shifts and cultural encounters and their dynamics of difference and power. We will draw for our discussions on a wide variety of sources, such as scholarly and fictional texts, paintings, advertisements, moving pictures and photographs, and will apply a range of theoretical and analytical concepts.

Students are required to enrol in one of the four parallel courses on offer. This seminar is the first part of a two-semester module which will continue in the following summer semester as "Key Moments in the Linguistic History of the English-Speaking World".
Please note that there is an optional tutorial for this seminar: 10-76-6-GS-05 Übung zum Seminar "Key Moments in the Cultural History of the English-Speaking World".

All reading material will be made available for download in StudIP.

Requirements:
# regular attendance and active participation
# in-depth knowledge of the reading material
# one oral group presentation
# a portfolio of written summaries of key ideas from the assigned texts (ca. 300 words each)

Please note that prior enrolment via Stud.IP is mandatory.

Irmgard Maassen
10-76-1-BC-04 Key Moments in the Cultural History of the English-Speaking-World-Tuesday (in englischer Sprache)

Seminar
ECTS: 3

Termine:
wöchentlich Di 12:15 - 13:45 GW2 B2880 (2 SWS)

This course aims to introduce students to key moments in the social and cultural histories of English-speaking countries. In analyzing a range of case studies from the Renaissance to postcolonialism we will pay particular attention to historical shifts and cultural encounters and their dynamics of difference and power. We will draw for our discussions on a wide variety of sources, such as scholarly and fictional texts, paintings, advertisements, moving pictures and photographs, and will apply a range of theoretical and analytical concepts.

Students are required to enrol in one of the four parallel courses on offer. This seminar is the first part of a two-semester module which will continue in the following summer semester as "Key Moments in the Linguistic History of the English-Speaking World".
Please note that there is an optional tutorial for this seminar: 10-76-6-GS-05 Übung zum Seminar "Key Moments in the Cultural History of the English-Speaking World".

All reading material will be made available for download in StudIP.

Requirements:
# regular attendance and active participation
# in-depth knowledge of the reading material
# one oral group presentation
# a portfolio of written summaries of key ideas from the assigned texts (ca. 300 words each)

Please note that prior enrolment via Stud.IP is mandatory.

Irmgard Maassen
10-76-3-D1-01 Key Topics in Linguistics: Comparing British and American English (in englischer Sprache)

Seminar

Termine:
wöchentlich Di 10:15 - 11:45 GW2 A3390 (CIP-Labor FB 10) (2 SWS)

“England and America are two nations divided by a common language.” (George Bernard Shaw)

This seminar explores the linguistic differences between the two main reference varieties of English, British English (BrE) and American English (AmE). We will examine these differences on various levels of language use, e.g. phonology, spelling, vocabulary, phraseology, grammar, and pragmatics. We will also look at the assumed widespread influence of AmE in terms of an “Americanization” of orther varieites of English. In addition, we will investigate patterns of language change in the two varieties under study. In the course of the seminar students will carry out small-scale empricial research projects based on computer corpora to examine differences between BrE and AmE in a data-driven, empirical way.

READING
The course will not be based on one single textbook, but key readings will be made available on an electronic bookshelf on the university’s e-learning platform Stud.IP.
Preparatory reading before the first meeting (available as PDF on Stud.IP after registration): chapter 8 in Svartvik, Jan & Geoffrey Leech (2006), English. One Tongue, Many Voices. Basingstoke: Palgrave Macmillan.

ASSESSMENT
  • regular attendance and active participation in in-class data analysis and discussion
  • careful reading and preparation of assigned readings for each session, reading assignments
  • oral presentation and/or term paper

Prof. Dr. Marcus Callies
10-76-3-D1/WD1-03 Key Topics in Cultural History: Black (and white) in the Union Jack (in englischer Sprache)

Seminar
ECTS: 3

Termine:
wöchentlich Di 16:15 - 17:45 SFG 1020 GW2 B1700 (2 SWS)

Taking its cue from Paul Gilroy’s famous observation, 'There ain’t no Black in the Union Jack‘, this seminar is going to explore the impact migration and diasporic communities have on the notion of British national identity. We shall view a range of recent films projecting images of English and/or British identities in order to investigate how British national identity gets (re)conceptualised in the days of globalisation and multiculturalism. Course discussions will focus on the interrelations between individual and political identities, and will analyse how these films narrate and negotiate the multiply intertwined transitions from being black in Britain to being a Black Briton. -
Students are required to invest much time and dedication into week-to-week preparations that include not just the attentive viewing of films but also a high amount of reading. A list of films will be agreed upon in the first session, and will be put on restricted loan for you in the Mediathek.

Reading material will be made available on Stud.IP.

Requirements:
# regular attendance and active participation
# in-depth knowledge of the viewing and reading material
# portfolio of worksheets (graded in WD-1b)
# for a grade in D-1b: an additional long term paper of 8-10 pp.

Prior enrolment via Stud.IP is mandatory.

Irmgard Maassen
10-76-3-D1/WD1-04 Key Topics in Cultural History: British History and National Heritage (in englischer Sprache)

Seminar
ECTS: 3

Termine:
wöchentlich Mi 12:15 - 13:45 GW2 A4020 (2 SWS)

This course has a twofold aim: It is first of all designed to introduce students to select issues in British history, to major historical events, figures, developments and topics that have shaped the face of contemporary Britain and remain points of reference in today's political and cultural debates. But the main focus will lie on the way in which 'history' is being conceptualized, reproduced, exhibited, commercialized, and ideologically exploited not just in current politics (viz. the Brexit campaign) but also by the 'heritage industry'. In a series of case studies across a range of media, we will discuss and analyze the manner, meanings, and implicit messages of current representations of historical epochs and events: political speeches, museums, heritage sites, architecture, films, literature, royal weddings, war monuments…. After the Brexit referendum, investigating the uses that invocations of ‘British/English history’ are being put to seems particularly urgent.

Reading material will be made available for download in Stud.IP. A list of suggested research topics and case studies will be negotiated in the first session.

Requirements:
# regular attendance and active participation
# in-depth knowledge of the reading material
# a self-researched case study presented to the class (group presentation)
# two brief written assignments (graded in WD-1b)
# alternatively, for a grade in D-1b: a term paper of 8-10 pp.

Prior enrolment via StudIP is mandatory.

Irmgard Maassen
10-76-3-D1/WD1-10 Key Topics in Literature: New American Classics (in englischer Sprache)

Seminar

Termine:
wöchentlich Do 14:15 - 15:45 GRA2 0080 (2 SWS) Seminar

Einzeltermine:
Mo 16.01.17 16:00 - 20:30 GW1 B0100

This seminar will be an excursion into close reading, and lots of it. We will read and study a series of post-2000 US American novels which have been nominees or winners in prestigious literary contests, such as the Pulitzer Price - thus, new "classics". Reading all the texts, preferably before semester beginning, will be a prerequisite; we will study them together in class, based on group or individual student presentations of each one. Which, and whose AMERICA do these novels represent? Which paradigmatic conflicts do they commit to cultural memory with their writing? Which contemporary or historical features of US American life and society do they draw readers' attention to? Can we discern shared aesthetic features of these texts?
The texts are, in no particular order:
Marilynne Robinson, Lila
Jesmyn Ward, Salvage the Bones
Chimamanda Adichie, Americanah
Richard Ford, Let Me Be Frank With You
Margaret Verble, Maud's Line
Maceo Montoya, The Deportation of Wopper Barraza: A Novel
David Anthony Durham, Walk Through Darkness

Prof. Dr. Sabine Bröck
10-76-3-D1/WD1-11 Key Topics in Literature: The Fabric of Slavery (in englischer Sprache)

Seminar

Termine:
wöchentlich Di 14:15 - 15:45 GW1 B1070 GW2 A3570 (FB 10 Besprechungsraum) (2 SWS) Seminar

Einzeltermine:
Mo 30.01.17 17:00 - 20:00 GW2 B1216

This is part one of a two semester class; each class may be taken separately, however. This winter semester we will, based on a general introduction to the history of New World enslavement, as well as on an introduction into the theory of representation (see Stuart Hall) watch and study three recent, very different films about modern enslavement:

Tarantino's Django Unchained
McQueen's 12 Years A Slave
and Asante's Belle.

While we will try our very best to avoid voyeuristic titillation, please come prepared to watch material, and talk about it which contains graphic images of violence against Black people. One of the main goals of the seminar will be, precisely, to ask which function does any representation of anti-black violence serve; which, and whose interests benefit, and what happens to different constitutions in the course of studying it? Which effect, on the contrary, does the avoidance of such representation have on viewers, and how does this evasion work?

Please read as prerequisite:
1. Hall, Stuart. "The Work of Representation." in Representation: Cultural Representations and Signifying Practices. ed. Stuart Hall. London: Sage, 1997. 1-74.
2. Kenneth Morgan, Transatlantic Slavery. Padstow,: T. J. International, 2016 ( a one-volume 180 pages concise history of slavery)

Further secondary material will be brought into class in the context of our debates.

Prof. Dr. Sabine Bröck
10-76-3-D1/WD1-12 Key Topics in Literature: Anatomy and Power in Jonathan Swift's Gulliver's Travels (in englischer Sprache)

Seminar

Termine:
wöchentlich Di 14:15 - 15:45 SuUB 4330 (Studio I Medienraum ) (2 SWS) Seminar

Most of us are familiar with the voyages of Lemuel Gulliver who heads out to the South Sea and is washed up on Lilliput, an island inhabited by tiny people who capture him. Gulliver eventually becomes friends with the Emperor of the Lilliputians whose customs he learns and wars he participates in. After a series of threats he escapes and returns to England. Only few know, that Gulliver is not only a surgeon, but travels to more islands including Broddingnag and its giants; Laputa, a floating island full of people only interested in mathematics and music; Glubbdubdrib and Luggnagg, islands of sorcerers and immortals; and finally the island of the beastly Yahoos and the horse-friendly Houyhnhnms.

Swift’s masterpiece is a well-known satire and mocks both human nature as well as travel literature – a highly popular genre in eighteenth-century Britain. Gulliver’s Travels is concerned with man’s intellectual pride and pretensions to reason while also addressing particularly scientific discoveries and developments. What this seminar focusses on are observations of the human body in Swift’s prose satire. Scholars agree on the blatant misogyny present in his text which manifests especially in Gulliver’s disgusted descriptions of female bodies or parts of it he comes across ranging from a nurse’s huge breast and nipple to a sexual encounter he has with one of the beast-like Yahoos.

The aim of this course is to shed light on discourses of gender and the female body apparent in eighteenth-century literature in order to examine if and how representations of anatomy are linked with patriarchal power structures.

Keywords: Body Studies, Gender Studies, Satire, History of Science, Medical Humanities, Adaptation Studies, Eighteenth-Century

Requirements:
• registration on Stud.IP
• in-depth knowledge of the reading material (i.e. read the novel[s] in advance!)*
• regular attendance and oral participation
• oral presentation and handout
• term paper (optional)

*NOTE: YOUR FAMILIARITY WITH THE PRIMARY TEXT(S) IS MANDATORY AND WILL BE EXAMINED IN ONE OF THE FIRST SESSIONS***

Text:
Swift, Jonathan [1726]. Gulliver’s Travels (Norton Critical Edition). New York: Norton, 2002.*

*NOTE: Please pay attention to the EXACT publication dates when purchasing the book(s) so we can all work with the same editions.

Dr. phil. Jennifer Henke
10-76-3-D1/WD1-13 Key Topics in Literature: Narratives of Illness (in englischer Sprache)

Seminar

Termine:
wöchentlich Fr 14:15 - 15:45 SFG 1060 Dezernetenbesprechnungsraum (2 SWS) Seminar

The purpose of this seminar is to introduce students to the flourishing genre of illness narratives. In recent decades, more and more literary and non-literary texts depict the experience of illness and its effects on people's lives. This course will use fictional writings (e.g. poems, short stories, and excerpts from novels) as well as autobiographical accounts by actual patients, family members, or healthcare professionals to explore the physical, psychological, and emotional aspects of a patient's, doctor's, or relative's experience of such conditions as Alzheimer's, cancer, or AIDS.

In addition to an in-depth analysis and interpretation of the selected texts, we will look at illness narratives in the context of the history of medicine, medical humanities, narrative medicine, literary history, body studies, life writing, and gender theory.

Requirements:
- regular attendance and active participation
- in-depth knowledge of the reading material
- presentation (and handout) and/or final paper

A detailed syllabus will be handed out in the first session.

Texts:

Please make sure that you purchase exactly the copies given below, so that we can all work with the same edition.

Edson, Margaret. Wit. New York: Faber and Faber, 1999. ISBN: 978-0-571-19877-1.
Kalanithi, Paul. When Breath Becomes Air. London: The Bodley Head, 2016. ISBN: 978-1-847-92367-7.

Additional primary texts and secondary materials will be made available on Stud.IP.

Please note that prior enrolment via Stud.IP is mandatory.

Christine Müller, M.A.
10-76-3-SP2-04 Content-Based Integrated Skills d (in englischer Sprache)

Übung
ECTS: 3

Termine:
wöchentlich Do 14:15 - 15:45 SuUB 4320 (Studio II Medienraum ) (2 SWS)

SUMMARY
We will be using a simulation on a politically and/or culturally relevant topic in which you are representatives (e.g. of a country, an NGO, an interest group) to a task force set up to examine aspects of the topic and negotiate a mutually acceptable solution with the other groups. The work will require you to work together with other groups and their members (as well as your own!), argue your case, persuade them, and reach consensus.
This framework will enable you to develop all four language skills (speaking & listening, writing & reading); to further your ability to use the correct register (formal<->informal, spoken<->written) when communicating in English; to expand your soft skills (e.g. time management; teamwork; taking responsibility for your own work and that of your team); and - of course - to develop your understanding of the issue at stake, as well as what a given formulation actually involves (and means) - in short, audience focus...
There will be some formal collaborative writing as members of your group, and all participants will be writing at least an initial piece to focus your thoughts on the topic, a summary in mid-simulation, and a reflective essay on what they have learnt and what skills they have acquired in the course of the semester's work.

Registration via Stud.IP
Advance registration deadlines on Stud.IP:
For courses offered in the winter term: September, 15th
For courses offered for first semester students: last Friday before the start of the lecture period

This course is not open to Erasmus students below a B2 English level.

Katja Müller, M.A.
10-76-3-SP2-05 Content-Based Integrated Skills e (in englischer Sprache)

Übung
ECTS: 3

Termine:
wöchentlich Fr 14:15 - 15:45 SFG 1030 (2 SWS)

SUMMARY
We will be using a simulation on a politically and/or culturally relevant topic in which you are representatives (e.g. of a country, an NGO, an interest group) to a task force set up to examine aspects of the topic and negotiate a mutually acceptable solution with the other groups. The work will require you to work together with other groups and their members (as well as your own!), argue your case, persuade them, and reach consensus.
This framework will enable you to develop all four language skills (speaking & listening, writing & reading); to further your ability to use the correct register (formal<->informal, spoken<->written) when communicating in English; to expand your soft skills (e.g. time management; teamwork; taking responsibility for your own work and that of your team); and - of course - to develop your understanding of the issue at stake, as well as what a given formulation actually involves (and means) - in short, audience focus...
There will be some formal collaborative writing as members of your group, and all participants will be writing at least an initial piece to focus your thoughts on the topic, a summary in mid-simulation, and a reflective essay on what they have learnt and what skills they have acquired in the course of the semester's work.

Registration via Stud.IP
Advance registration deadlines on Stud.IP:
For courses offered in the winter term: September, 15th
For courses offered for first semester students: last Friday before the start of the lecture period

This course is not open to Erasmus students below a B2 English level.

Katja Müller, M.A.
10-76-3-SP2-06 Content-Based Integrated Skills f: 'Language for Negotiation' (in englischer Sprache)

Übung
ECTS: 3

Termine:
wöchentlich Mi 16:15 - 17:45 GW2 B1632 (2 SWS)

Einzeltermine:
Fr 09.12.16 16:00 - 20:00 GW2 B2880
Fr 13.01.17 16:00 - 20:00 GW2 B2880

We will be using a simulation on a politically and/or culturally relevant topic in which you are representatives (e.g. of a country, an NGO, an interest group) to a fictitious task force set up to examine aspects of the topic and negotiate a mutually acceptable solution with the other groups. The work will require you to work together with other groups and their members (as well as your own!), argue your case, persuade them, and reach consensus.
This framework will enable you to develop all four language skills (speaking & listening, writing & reading); to further your ability to use the correct register (formal<->informal, spoken<->written) when communicating in English; to expand your soft skills (e.g. time management; teamwork; taking responsibility for your own work and that of your team); and - of course - to develop your understanding of the issue at stake, as well as what a given formulation actually involves (and means) - in short, audience focus...
There will be some formal collaborative writing as members of your group, and all participants will be writing at least an initial piece to focus your thoughts on the topic, a summary in mid-simulation, and a reflective essay on what they have learnt and what skills they have acquired in the course of the semester's work.
Registration for this CBIS class: There will initially be 18 places open for this class. Register in Stud.IP for the class by 12 noon on Thursday, 15th September. Once the registration process ends on that day, I will notify you (via Stud.IP) whether you have a seat in the class. Should you not receive a seat in the class, please proceed by first consulting StudIP to determine where seats remain available. (By simply clicking on the link to each respective parallel class and scrolling down to the "Number of Participants" section, one can see how many seats remain open.) Then contact the relevant CBIS class teacher.
If you believe you are in a situation of exceptional hardship and can truly only take part in my CBIS class despite the other parallel sections, contact me well in advance of 15th September to plead your case (i.e. provide proof of the conflict you have). I will consider your request and examine whether I can accommodate you.

Michael Claridge, M.A., Dip.Ed.
10-76-3-WD1-01 Key Topics in Linguistics: English-based Pidgins and Creoles (in englischer Sprache)

Seminar

Termine:
wöchentlich Di 14:15 - 15:45 GW2 A4020 (2 SWS)

Pidgins and creoles are contact languages that emerged from intense contact among two or more previously existing languages.
They usually serve as a lingua franca for speakers of different language backgrounds
and are therefore highly influenced by the speakers’ need for communication.
In this seminar, we will explore the linguistic features of English-based pidgins and creoles around the globe, such as Naija Pidgin or Jamaican Patois.
We will not only learn about the different linguistic properties of particular
pidgins/creoles and the processes that are at play in language contact and language change,
but also discuss the historical and sociolinguistic factors that had an impact on the emergence and
development of pidgins and creoles from their colonial context up until now.

Tonia Anni Sperling
10-76-6-AP-02 Begleitveranstaltung Kulturgeschichte - Colloquium Research and Writing (in englischer Sprache)

Übung

Termine:
wöchentlich Di 16:15 - 17:45 SuUB 4320 (Studio II Medienraum ) (2 SWS)

Diese Veranstaltung richtet sich besonders an Studierende, die in diesem Semester Hausarbeiten oder Abschlussarbeiten schreiben wollen. Die Studierenden werden in die Grundlagen des wissenschaftlichen Arbeitens eingeführt. Wir werden eine Bibliotheksschulung für fortgeschrittene Studierende bekommen und selbständig für eigene größere und kleinere Arbeiten bibliographieren, Thesen und Fragestellungen entwickeln, strukturierte Gliederungen entwerfen etc. Gemeinsam werden wir die Projekte diskutieren und voranbringen.

Dr. Karin Esders-Angermund
10-76-6-GS-02 Viewing Film Critically (in englischer Sprache)

Übung

Termine:
wöchentlich Di 18:00 - 21:00 SuUB 4330 (Studio I Medienraum ) (2 SWS)

Films are usually appreciated as mere entertainment. However, they always convey ideas about self and society, right and wrong, good and bad. Moreover, they offer specific conceptions of race, class and gender. In watching a selection of classical and post-classical Hollywood films we will prepare ourselves for the discussions in the course “Key Topics in Cultural History: Analyzing Hollywood Film”.
Requirements:
• regular attendance
• oral presentation and handout
Please note that prior enrollment via Stud.IP is mandatory.

Dr. Karin Esders-Angermund
10-76-6-GS-03 Forschungskolloquium für Promovierende und fortgeschrittene Studierende (in englischer Sprache)

Colloquium

Termine:
wöchentlich Mi 18:00 - 20:00 GW2 B3010 (Kleiner Studierraum) (2 SWS)
Prof. Dr. Sabine Bröck
10-76-6-GS-04 Übung zum Seminar "Introduction to English Literatures (Part I)" (in englischer Sprache)

Seminar

Termine:
wöchentlich Fr 08:15 - 09:45 GW2 B1400 NUR Mi. - So. (2 SWS)

These tutorials are offered in combination with the foundation module course "Introduction to English Literature Part I". In our weekly sessions we will explore some of the issues discussed during the seminar sessions in greater detail. In addition, we will further examine a number of text samples (poetry, drama, prose) and focus our attention on an adequate preparation for the written exam, scheduled for February 2017. Students who are currently taking the foundation module A "Introduction to English Literatures" are strongly encouraged to attend these tutorials and may gain credits in the process.

Dr. Jana Nittel
10-76-6-GS-05 Übung zum Seminar "Key Moments in the Cultural History of the English-Speaking World 10-76-1-BC-01 (in englischer Sprache)

Übung
ECTS: ///

Termine:
wöchentlich Di 18:00 - 19:30 GW2 B1700
wöchentlich Do 18:00 - 19:30 GW2 B2890

This tutorial is designed to assist students of the Basismodul 'Key Moments in Cultural History' in accomplishing the course requirements. Besides offering a forum for the discussion of those questions you were afraid to ask during the seminar sessions, the course will provide advice on the basic skills of academic study and research - tackling complex texts, writing a paper, citation rules, oral presentations, using the library and other research tools. Attendance is not obligatory but highly recommended. -
The tutorial will run in several parallel groups. Particulars will be explained in the first session of the 'Key Moments' course.

Dr. Karin Esders-Angermund
Irmgard Maassen
10-76-6-GS-06 Digitales Lehrangebot: Key Developments in Literary Histor(ies) and Literary Criticism in English (in englischer Sprache)
Mobile Lectures - Keine Präsenzlehrveranstaltung

Seminar

The lecture series is an additional offer for all students registered in the course programme English-Speaking Cultures and is attached to the General Studies Option, which means it is open to all interested parties within and outside of the faculty. Participants will have access to 10 videos upon registration. Please explored whether your study programme includes the General studies option before signing up. Please arrange for an appointment during my office hours and submit a completed “General Studies Certificate” (copies are available for download in the “General Document Folder” on Stud.IP by December 23rd, 2016.

Please explore the “Information” button for programme details, abstracts and biographical details of the individual speaker as well as requirements for gaining credit points.

Please click on “Mobile Lectures” to view the recorded sessions.

Dr. Jana Nittel
10-77-1-A3a-1 Introduction à l'histoire et à la civilisation française et francophone - groupe A
BA

Seminar

Termine:
wöchentlich Do 12:15 - 13:45 GW2 B2890 (2 SWS)
Aissatou Bouba ((LB))
10-77-1-A3a-2 Introduction à l'histoire et à la civilisation française et francophone - groupe B
BA

Seminar

Termine:
wöchentlich Do 14:15 - 15:45 GW2 B2900 (2 SWS)
Aissatou Bouba ((LB))
10-79-3-A3-05 Analytik und Synthetik. Methodische Grundlagen literaturwissenschaftlichen Arbeitens [NL]

Seminar

Termine:
wöchentlich Di 10:15 - 11:45 GW1 B0100 (2 SWS)

Einzeltermine:
Di 07.02.17 10:00 - 12:00 GW2 B1580
Do 09.02.17 11:00 - 12:00 GW2 B1580
Di 14.02.17 10:00 - 12:00 GW2 B1580

Allgemeine Einführungen in die Literaturwissenschaft sind ebenso zahlreich auf dem wissenschaftlichen Buchmarkt vorhanden wie Einführungen in die literaturwissenschaftlichen Teildisziplinen wie etwa in die Metrik, in die Rhetorik oder in die Narratologie. Zumeist jedoch konzentrieren sich diese Einführungen auf die jeweiligen fachspezifischen Aspekte einer solchen Teildisziplin oder beschränken sich auf einen allgemeinen Überblick über das Fach. Literaturtheoretisch reflektierte und zugleich anwendungsorientierte methodologische Einführungen in die Grundlagen des literaturwissenschaftlichen Arbeitsprozesses stellen dagegen noch immer ein gravierendes Desiderat dar. Das Seminar will mit engem Forschungsbezug dieses Desiderat füllen helfen und sich deshalb den methodischen Grundlagen literaturwissenschaftlichen Arbeitens widmen.

Es geht in diesem Zusammenhang um die grundlegenden Aspekte von Analytik und Synthetik, die – wie jeder geisteswissenschaftlichen Methodologie – auch der germanistischen Literaturwissenschaft zugrunde liegen. Im Bereich der Analytik sollen dabei insbesondere die Fragen der Struktur, der Narration und der Phänomenologie behandelt werden, im Bereich der Synthetik insbesondere die Fragen der Systematik und der Synthese.

Der Semesterplan und die Arbeitsmaterialien werden auf StudIP zur Verfügung gestellt.

Die Prüfungsleistung erfolgt in diesem Seminar durch eine mündliche Prüfung.

Dr. Hans Rudolf Wahl
10-82-1-LS2-1 Einführung in die Computerlinguistik / Introduction to Computational Linguistics
LS 2 (BPO 2011)

Seminar

Termine:
wöchentlich Mo 12:15 - 13:45 GW2 B1400 NUR Mo. + Di. (2 SWS)
Prof. John Arnold Bateman, Ph.D.
10-E76-3-KULT-1 Key Topics in Language and History for Teachers of English: The historical development of English around the world

Seminar

Termine:
wöchentlich Do 10:15 - 11:45 GW1 B2070 - gesperrt ab 01.10. - (Ersatz A1070) (2 SWS)
Dr. Susanne Dyka
10-E76-3-LING-1 Key Topics in Linguistics for Teachers of English: Varieties of English in the foreign language classroom (in englischer Sprache)

Seminar

Termine:
wöchentlich Mo 10:15 - 11:45 SuUB 4320 (Studio II Medienraum ) GW2 A3390 (CIP-Labor FB 10)

Einzeltermine:
Mo 31.10.16 16:00 - 18:00 SFG 2040

Das Englische als globale Lingua Franca verfügt über eine enorme Variationsbreite. Wie alle Sprachen zeigt es Variation entlang sozialer, funktionaler und regionaler Dimensionen, kommt aber darüber hinaus weit mehr als andere Sprachen in einer Vielzahl nationaler und regionaler Erscheinungsformen vor. Der traditionelle Englischunterricht orientiert sich aber noch immer nahezu ausschließlich an den beiden großen Referenzvarietäten, dem britischen und amerikanischen Englisch, wohingegen andere nationale Standardvarietäten, regionale Varietäten oder die „Postcolonial Englishes“ dagegen kaum Berücksichtigung finden.
Vor diesem Hintergrund stellt sich deshalb für die Ausbildung von EnglischlehrerInnen, die überwiegend selbst keine MuttersprachlerInnen des Englischen sind, sowie für den schulischen Englischunterricht die Frage nach der zu verwendenden Standardvarietät bzw. den -varietäten und wie diese Varietätenvielfalt (inklusive von Nicht-Standardvarietäten) in der LehrerInnenausbildung sowie später im Unterricht thematisiert werden soll. Dieses Seminar greift diese Fragestellungen explizit auf. Es werden zunächst zentrale Forschungsergebnisse zu Standard- und postkolonialen Varietäten des Englischen zusammengetragen, die für die LehrerInnenausbildung im Fach Englisch relevant und für das Verständnis der Rolle des Englischen als weltweite Lingua Franca sowie der verschiedenen Varietäten von Bedeutung sind. Anschliessend sollen existierende Lehrmaterialien für den Schulunterricht evaluiert und auf ihre Nutzbarkeit hin untersucht werden. Die daraus gewonnenen Erkenntnisse werden in Rückbezug auf gegenwärtige Bildungsstandards aufgearbeitet und nutzbar gemacht. In einer praktischen Phase werde dann Unterrichtsdesigns und Lehr- und Lernmaterialien entwickelt und in schulischen Praxisphasen in Zusammenarbeit mit einer Bremer Partnerschule erprobt. Das Seminar bietet auch die Möglichkeit, Themen für forschungsbasierte Masterarbeiten an der Schnittstelle von Sprachwissenschaft und Fremdsprachendidaktik zu entwickeln.

Literaturangaben

Bieswanger, Markus (2008): Varieties of English in current English language teaching. Stellenbosch Papers in Linguistics 38, 27-47.
Hutz, Matthias (2011): Variationen des Englischen. Praxis Fremdsprachenunterricht. Englisch 8 (6), 12-16.
Siemund, Peter, Davydova, Julia & Maier, Georg (2012): The Amazing World of Englishes. Berlin: De Gruyter Mouton. [als E-book verfügbar über die SuUB unter http://www.degruyter.com/viewbooktoc/product/179245]

Anforderungen: Kurzpräsentation und Hausarbeit (Modulprüfung).

Prof. Dr. Marcus Callies
10-E76-3-LIT-2 Literatures in English: Canada in the EFL-Classroom (in englischer Sprache)

Seminar

Termine:
wöchentlich Mi 16:15 - 17:45 MZH 1090 (2 SWS)

This class will introduce students to Canada, its colonial history, postcolonial cultures, and contemporary issues with a focus on didactic concerns and how to teach Canada in the EFL-classroom. We will learn about Canada through reading non-fiction texts, poetry, and two novels and watching four feature films.

All texts except the novels will be provided electronically. Class requirements are regular attendance, in-depth knowledge of reading and viewing material, and active class discussion. Reading the texts and watching the films is mandatory. The films will be shown on four Tuesday evenings from 6-8 pm, in all probability 1 Nov., 20 Dec., 10 Jan., 31 Jan. On 15 December 2016 we will organize a Canada-Study Day in cooperation with BIKQS with a reading by the Canadian author George Elliott Clarke as a highlight in the evening. Students are expected to participate in all events of the Canada Day.
Students are required to purchase and read Aritha van Herk’s The Tent Peg (by the beginning of November) and Eden Robinson’s Monkey Beach (by the middle of January). Ten copies of each are available at the university bookstore for ca. 8 € (van Herk) and ca. 17 € (Robinson) a few weeks before the start of the semester. You can also order them cheaper via amazon marketplace; allow for a 3 weeks international delivery time.
Please note that prior enrollment via Stud.IP is mandatory except for ERASMUS students.

Prof. Dr. Kerstin Knopf
10-E78-3-FD2-1 Wortschatzarbeit im FSU Spanisch
MEd. Spanisch (ausl.)

Seminar

Termine:
wöchentlich Mo 14:00 - 16:00 SuUB 4320 (Studio II Medienraum )
Barbara Roviro Llimiana
10-E78-3-FD2-2 Aufgaben zur Wortschatzarbeit im FSU Spanisch
MEd. Spanisch (ausl.)

Übung

Termine:
wöchentlich Di 16:15 - 17:45 GW2 A4330 (2 SWS)
Barbara Roviro Llimiana
10-M83-1-PRAI-S-2 Practical Translation (in englischer Sprache)

Übung

Termine:
wöchentlich Mo 16:15 - 17:45 SFG 2080 (2 SWS)

NOTE: This class is not open to ERASMUS students, unless their language skills in both English and German are demonstrably at least at C1 level.
The goal of this course is to develop your ability to translate correctly and efficiently and to identify the differences and similarities between German and English – especially those caused by interference. Beyond this, we will approach translation as the transferring of ideas and concepts from one language to another. The course has three linked elements:
• short texts (German into English only) to emphasize the importance of looking at the text 'as a whole' and to explore how this affects syntax and word choice.
• individual sentence translation (German into English only) to focus attention on possible syntactic and lexical traps resulting from language interference and/or intercultural differences;
• work on ‘false friends’ to foster awareness that what may seem the obvious word choice is not necessarily the best one.
Registration for this class: There will initially be 20 places open for this class. Register in Stud.IP for the class by 12 noon on Thursday, 15th September. Once the registration process ends on that day, I will notify you (via Stud.IP) whether you have a seat in the class. Once I have formally admitted you to the class, download the Practical Translation interference-exercises pack and the course programme, to be found under Practical Translation in Stud.IP, then print the interference-exercises pack out and bring it to class each week. Material for the work on ‘false friends’ will be provided. You are expected to have and be familiar with a good, comprehensive German-English dictionary (e.g. the Großwörterbuch published by Collins/Langenscheidt (Schulwörterbücher are not adequate at this level of language!) and either the Longman-Langenscheidt Dictionary of Contemporary English or the Oxford Advanced Learner's Dictionary.
If you believe you are in a situation of exceptional hardship and can truly only take part in my CBIS class despite the other parallel sections, contact me well in advance of 15th September to plead your case (i.e. provide proof of the conflict you have). I will consider your request and examine whether I can accommodate you. ERASMUS and other exchange students are requested to contact me in advance: some places will be reserved for you!

Michael Claridge, M.A., Dip.Ed.
10-M83-2-P1-1 Key Topics in Literature: Fictions of Migration (in englischer Sprache)

Seminar

Termine:
wöchentlich Mo 12:15 - 13:45 SuUB 4320 (Studio II Medienraum ) (2 SWS)

In this seminar we will read works of fiction, and critical essays and articles, by and about “migrant” authors and their works – those who come from one geographical location and write in/about another. We will explore the changing natures of migration, and the effects that the movements of people and cultures continue to have on such concepts as “home,” “nation” and “identity.” This course is designed to build on students’ existing familiarity with literary and cultural theory, and develop their application of critical reading skills. It is available in both the ‘English-Speaking Cultures,’ and the ‘Transnational Literatures’ degree programmes.

Dr. Janelle Rodriques
10-M83-2-P1-2 Key Topics in Cultural History: The Postcolonial World in Literature and Film: Africa (in englischer Sprache)

Seminar

Termine:
wöchentlich Do 12:15 - 13:45 SFG 2040 (2 SWS)

This course is a comparative survey of the aesthetics and nature of African film and literature. We shall examine the development of these two genres in the last and current centuries. With regard to films, we are not just talking about cinematic productions but also on what has been produced on TV, videos and DVDs.
Images matter; some of the most enduring images of Africa and Africans come from Hollywood representations; from Tarzan (1918) to Tsotsi (2005). Other films such as the African Queen (1951) use Africa as a mere backdrop in their glorification of the west, with many portraying Europeans and Americans as saviours of Africa. Work of literature by westerners such as Joseph Conrad’s Heart of Darkness (1901) have also made a lasting impression on generations of westerners. As a result of these depictions, many members of the first generation of modern African writers, film and television producers produced works that negated these stereotypes by portraying their societies from an African perspective. After colonial rule, many of these men and women focused not just replying back to the West but mainly on portraying the many changes and challenges their countries are undergoing. The past two decades have also witnessed a rapid rise of film industries spearheaded by Nigeria’s Nollywood. These platforms allow African producers to address fellow Africans directly. It is arguably, Africa speaking back to itself. Writers have also turned their attention to the online medium producing short stories and poems that are mainly targeted at a burgeoning online African communities. During the course of a semester, we shall analyse these developments through a study of relevant texts and films. Our analysis of literature will not be complete without discussing oral literature as well as work published online.

Please note that this course is designed to be critically engaged. Class sessions will consist of discussions of the assigned readings and collaborative analysis of selected works. Students are expected to do the readings and to fully contribute to discussions in the classroom.

Week 1: Detailed study of the map of Africa introduction to notable authors and film producers.
Assignment: Students should study a map of Africa and bring this to the first session. Each student is expected to do a five-minute presentation on an African country of their choice.

Week 2: Africa in the West imagination
Reading: Chapter 1 to 3 of Joseph Conrad’s Heart of Darkness

Week 3: The development of African films
We watch Ousmane Sembene’s Borom Sarret (1963)
Reading:
1. Cassis Kilian’s Glimmering Utopia: 50 Years of African Film (2011). This is available for free download at http://www.jstor.org/stable/41336270

2.David Murphy’s Africans filming Africa: questioning theories of an authentic African cinema. This is available for download at http://www.jstor.org/stable/pdf/1771833.pdf?_=1470602958262

Week 4 & 5: First generation of modern African canon
Readings:
Naguib Mahfouz’s A Voice from the Other World (translated from the Arabic by Raymond Stock). This is available for free download at http://www.jstor.org/stable/4338211
Ousmane Sembene’s Tribal Scars and Other Stories. This is available at http://mrchrisattlc.weebly.com/uploads/2/3/4/8/23481786/tribal_scars_and_other_stories_-_sembene_ousmane.pdf
Read at least a chapter from The Cambridge History of African and Caribbean Literature, Volume 1 and Volume 2, edited by F. Abiola Irele and Simon Gikandi.

Week 6 & 7: Written texts in the 20th Century – Language, Colonialism and the response to colonialism
Readings:
Ngugi wa Thiong’o’s Weep Not Child. You can either borrow a copy from the library or buy one from Amazon
L. Adele Jinadu’s Language and Politics: On the Cultural Basis of Colonialism. This is available for download at http://www.jstor.org/stable/pdf/4391483.pdf

Week 8: The Negritude Movement and its influences
Reading:
Poems from the Negritude movement
Christopher L. Miller’s The (Revised) Birth of Negritude: Communist Revolution and "the Immanent Negro" in 1935. This is available for download at http://www.jstor.org/stable/pdf/25704473.pdf

Week 9: Foreign films and their impacts: On censorship and culture War
Reading: James R. Brennan’s Democratising Cinema and Censorship in Tanzania: 1920 – 1980. This is available for download at - http://www.jstor.org/stable/40033967

Week 10: The introduction of films and the evolution of traditional drama
Reading: Students are expected to have read prior to this session, Karin Barber’s “Orality, the Media, and New Popular Cultures in Africa.” Kimani Njoku (ed.) Media and Identity in Africa. (2009: 3-18). The book is available at the University Library and this particular article can also be read on Google Scholar at this web-link

https://books.google.co.uk/books?id=OjWlBgAAQBAJ&pg=PA3&lpg=PA3&dq=%22ORALITY,+THE+MEDIA+AND+NEW+POPULAR+CULTURES+IN+AFRICA&source=bl&ots=EiT8-oF0Yv&sig=CAm4aEbkA1kqQ5ZyoCM5AX-Epx0&hl=en&sa=X&ved=0ahUKEwiG_53ewrTOAhXDCcAKHRYrAoUQ6AEIJjAC#v=onepage&q=%22ORALITY%2C%20THE%20MEDIA%20AND%20NEW%20POPULAR%20CULTURES%20IN%20AFRICA&f=false

Week 12: The rise and rise of Nollywood: How the Nigerian film industry rose to become the second largest in the world. Discussions of some of the key players and seminal works.
Reading:
Jonathan Haynes and Onookome Okome’s Evolving Popular Media Nigerian Video Films. It is available for download at http://www.jstor.org/stable/3820623

Week 13: From YouTube to Netflix: Nollywood in a Digital Age
Reading:
Noah Tsika’s From Yorùbá to YouTube: Studying Nollywood's Star System. This can be downloaded at http://www.jstor.org/stable/10.2979/blackcamera.5.2.95

Week 14: New Media and African literature: New media literary genres; critical discussion of creative works in digital media.
Readings: Students to select texts from Saraba online magazine, www.thenewblackmagazine.com, Brittle Paper etc.

Learning Outcomes: You are expected to write an essay at the end of the semester based on the materials used on this course. You are also expected to produce a detailed journal of external materials you may have read or seen relating to our discussions. In your essay and journal, you are expected to demonstrate you have grappled with most of the issues raised during our discussions.

Olorunshola Adenekan
10-M83-2-P1-3 Key Topics in Literature: Travel Writing: Texts, Contexts, Criticism (in englischer Sprache)

Seminar

Termine:
wöchentlich Di 16:15 - 17:45 GW2 B3010 (Kleiner Studierraum) (2 SWS)

Travel writing is an increasingly popular genre in terms of text production and commercial success, encompassing a fascinating diversity of literary forms, modes and itineraries which negate a forthright definition of the genre. As a repository for factual and fictional accounts of mobility and cross-cultural exchange, however, it has long been underestimated for its potential to contribute to a broad range of cultural, political and historical debates that seek to reassess the role of travel writing as a "vehicle for geographic, ethnographic and sociological knowledge." (Thompson 4). This course is designed to introduce students to the comprehensive history of this dynamic and complex genre within the socio-cultural framework of the English-speaking world. We will trace recurrent literary conventions, themes, motifs, functions and concerns in historical and contemporary travel narratives in English by various key contributors and engage with textual and contextual approaches. Since some of the participants are required to submit a research paper, we will use parts of our seminar discussions to the development of topics, the formulation of a thesis statement, as well as considerations about the methodological approaches of writing such a paper.

For Non-E-SC students and academic exchange students: Please contact your lecturer if you require more than 3 credit points.

Additional secondary sources can be accessed in the "Semesterapparat", a reference only section on the third floor of the library building. A reader with selected secondary text materials will be made available for download on Stud. IP. You may wish to check the learning compact for further details such as requirements, weekly schedule, select bibliography and modes of assessment ("Allgemeiner Dateiordner" on Stud. IP).

Please note that prior enrolment via Stud.IP is mandatory. Deadline: 15 September 2016.

Assessment:

regular attendance, informed participation in class discussion,
in-depth knowledge of the selected reading material,
homework assignments,
presentation of research paper or group project,
term paper.

The requirements as formulated above may vary depending on your overall degree program. E-SC students - Please check the departmental website for guidelines on modules and exams: http://www.fb10.uni-bremen.de/anglistik/ba2/profil/studienplan.aspx
MA TnL module: http://www.master-transnationale-literaturwissenschaft.uni-bremen.de/studium/modulbeschreibungen/

Required reading before the first session (you need a copy for class):

Thompson, Carl. Travel Writing (Italics). London: Routledge, 2011. Print.

Copies can be purchased at the bookstore on our campus (Universitätsbuchhandlung Bremen: www.unibuch-bremen.de)

Dr. Jana Nittel
10-M83-2-P3-1 Key Topics in Cultural History: Shakespeare on Screen (in englischer Sprache)
(also Key Topics in Literature)

Seminar

Termine:
wöchentlich Di 14:15 - 15:45 GW2 B3010 (Kleiner Studierraum) (2 SWS)

In 2016, the year marking the 400th anniversary of Shakespeare’s death, Shakespeare’s plays are as enticing to filmmakers and visual artists as they were in 1899 when the first Shakespeare film was screened. Since then the number of filmic contributions has increased steadily. Divided into three projects depending on the choice of play (Hamlet, Macbeth and Othello) and drawing equally on traditional as well as contemporary ideas, that have emerged in the fields of cultural studies, transnational film, world cinema as well as filmic and television storytelling, we will explore how three plays by William Shakespeare are re-imagined in different linguistic and cultural contexts in selected late 20th Century and post-2000 productions. Focusing on traditional as well as contemporary stories/modern updates course participants will be encouraged to investigate these films’ engagement with sexuality and gender, race and ethnicity and questions of power. In addition, the course is designed to introduce its participants to key terms and functional principles of filmic storytelling: Film editing and its functions, mise en scène (modification of space), cinematography (light and colour), camera usage as well as plot, character, and filmic space; the nature of narrative in film and its dramatic composition (composition, narration and focalisation). We may also engage with the following questions: What specific, distinguishable filmic distinctions guide viewers’ constructions of reading hypotheses? How do filmic cues guide the perception of the audience?
Since some of the participants are required to submit a research-based term paper, we will use parts of our seminar discussions to the development of topics, the formulation of a thesis statement, as well as considerations about the methodological approaches of writing such a paper.

Electronic resources for independent study:

Jahn, Manfred. 2003. A Guide to Narratological Film Analysis. Poems, Plays, and Prose: A Guide to the Theory of Literary Genres. English Department, University of Cologne. http://www.uni-koeln.de/~ame02/pppf.htm

Jahn, Manfred. 2003. A Guide to the Theory of Drama. Part II of Poems, Plays, and Prose: A Guide to the Theory of Literary Genres. English Department, University of Cologne. http://www.uni-koeln.de/~ame02/pppd.htm
Lexikon der Filmbegriffe: http://filmlexikon.uni-kiel.de/index.php?action=lexikon

For Non-E-SC students and academic exchange students: Please contact your lecturer if you require more than 3 credit points.

Additional secondary sources can be accessed in the "Semesterapparat", a reference only section on the third floor of the library building. A number of DVDs will be available in the “Semesterapparat” in the “Mediathek”, located on the fourth floor of the library building: http://www.suub.uni-bremen.de/standorte/zentrale/mediathek/.

Please note that prior enrolment via Stud.IP is mandatory. Deadline: 15 September 2016.

Assessment:

regular attendance, informed participation in class discussion,

in-depth knowledge of the selected reading material,

homework assignments,

presentation of research paper or group project,

term paper.

The requirements as formulated above may vary depending on your overall degree program.

E-SC students - Please check the departmental website for guidelines on modules and exams: http://www.fb10.uni-bremen.de/anglistik/ba2/profil/studienplan.aspx

MA TnL module: http://www.master-transnationale-literaturwissenschaft.uni-bremen.de/studium/modulbeschreibungen/

Please be familiar with the following materials:

Filmography:

Hamlet. (Italics)(UK, US 1996) Dir. Kenneth Branagh

Hamlet. (Italics) (US, 2000) Dir. Michael Almereyda

Haider. (Italics) (India, 2014) Dir. Vishal Bhardwaj

Macbeth. (Italics) (US, 1948) Dir. Orson Welles (optional)

Throne of Blood. (Italics) (Japan, 1957). Dir. Akira Kurosawa

Maqbool. (Italics) (India, 2004) Dir. Vishal Bhardwaj

Macbeth. (Italics) (UK, 2015) Dir. Justin Kurzel

Othello. (Italics) (UK, US 1995) Dir. Oliver Parker

Othello. (Italics) (UK, 2001) Dir. Geoffrey Sax

Omkara. (Italics) (India, 2006) Dir. Vishal Bhardwaj

Dr. Jana Nittel
10-M83-2/3-PRAII-S-1 Function & Form in Grammar (in englischer Sprache)

Übung

Termine:
wöchentlich Mi 14:15 - 15:45 GW2 A4020 (2 SWS)

This class is primarily for BA “English-Speaking Cultures”, MA “Transnational Literature” and MEd English students. It is not open to ERASMUS students, unless their language skills in both English and German are demonstrably at at least C1 level.
The class has developed out of a growing sense that “ESC” students frequently have good to excellent vocabulary but demonstrate a worrying weakness in their grasp of certain basic aspects of grammar – and accordingly have problems explaining that grammar. This is perhaps the result of an over-emphasis on the so-called ‘communicative’ approach at school level, teachers urging pupils to say and/or write anything, with linguistic accuracy playing a much less important role.
We will take a hands-on approach to certain areas of what many would regard as basic syntax – also known as ‘the usual suspects’! – such as tense selection and sequencing, use of the articles and reference, word order, and punctuation, examining how mis-selection can result in misunderstanding. Consideration of contrasting examples and work at the text level will underpin our analysis, which will also focus on the question of German interference. Students will be expected to give reasons for their syntactic choices. Thus, the class goes far beyond a merely ‘remedial’ level: if you can explain a grammatical point, you understand it, and can apply it correctly!
The core of the class consists of two things. First of all, some materials will be made available in Stud.IP; you will be expected to bring these either in print form or electronically on a laptop/notebook to class. Secondly, we will be working from what I believe is the best teaching/learning grammar of English currently available for foreign students of English at your advanced level, namely Foley, Mark & Diane Hall, Longman Advanced Learners' Grammar. A self-study reference & practice book with answers. Longman (Pearson Education Limited), 2003. ISBN 058240383-9. The book currently costs something like €25.99 from Amazon. It includes a comprehensive set of very helpful self-use diagnostic tests (with key) at the front, to enable you to identify your syntactic strengths and weaknesses. Each unit consists of explanations with examples, then of practice exercises; the key is at the back. You will be required to do work on your own using this book in preparation for each class: ensure that you have easy, regular access to it, either by buying your own copy or by sharing a copy with a friend.
Registration for this class: There will initially be 20 places open for this class. Register in Stud.IP for the class by 12 noon on Thursday, 15th September. Once the registration process ends on that day, I will notify you (via Stud.IP) whether you have a seat in the class. Download the class pack, once I have formally admitted you to the class.
If you believe you are in a situation of exceptional hardship and can truly only take part in my CBIS class despite the other parallel sections, contact me well in advance of 15th September to plead your case (i.e. provide proof of the conflict you have). I will consider your request and examine whether I can accommodate you. ERASMUS and other exchange students are requested to contact me in advance: some places will be reserved for you!

Michael Claridge, M.A., Dip.Ed.
10-M83-3-V-2 Key Topics in Cultural History: Gender - Culture - Feminism (in englischer Sprache)

Seminar

Termine:
wöchentlich Mi 16:15 - 17:45 GW2 B2890 (2 SWS)

Ziel der Ringvorlesung ist es, über gender-bezogene Themen und Forschungsansätze fachübergreifend ins Gespräch zu kommen und eine größere Sichtbarkeit für die vielfältigen diesbezüglichen wissenschaftlichen Aktivitäten im FB 10 herzustellen. Das erscheint uns in Zeiten, da es in der breiteren Öffentlichkeit vermehrt zu anti-feministischen, gender-studies-feindlichen und homophoben Polemiken kommt, aber gleichzeitig eine junge Generation von Aktivist*innen die Relevanz feministischer und queerer Analysen für sich neu entdeckt, besonders angebracht. Den Studierenden an unserem Fachbereich kann eine solche Reihe zugleich Ideengeber und Motivation für die eigene Spezialisierung sein. Die Vorträge finden im zweiwöchigen Rhythmus statt und sind in ein reguläres Seminar eingebettet, das von Dr Karin Esders geleitet wird.

This course is a mixture between a lecture course and a regular seminar. Scholars and teachers both from FB 10 and TU Berlin will deliver lectures on various aspects of our general topic initiating a transdisciplinary discourse on "Gender - Culture - Feminism". In the sessions between the lectures we will discuss corresponding texts and resources to prepare the diverse subjects of the presentations and to critically reflect on their respective ideas and arguments.

Please note that some of the lectures will be in German. You are welcome to attend lectures only without participating in the full seminar.
Essential readings will be available for download on Stud-IP. You should also consult the 'Semesterapparat' (SuUB) for further readings.
Requirements depend on the number of CPs you wish to achieve and will be announced at the beginning of the course.
Please note that prior enrollment via Stud.IP is mandatory for full seminar participation.

Dr. Karin Esders-Angermund
12-23-MAUMHET-122 School systems in a comparative perspective (englischsprachige Veranstaltung) (Prüfungsoption für 3. Semester MAUMHET) (in englischer Sprache)

Seminar
ECTS: 2-3

Termine:
wöchentlich Mo 16:00 - 18:00 GW2 B1700 (2 SWS)

M.Ed. GO / M.Ed. Grundschule
Umgang mit Heterogenität 1 (a)
Schwerpunkt: Interkulturelle Bildung

M.Ed. Gy/Ge
EW L4 (b)
Ankerkannt für Interkulturelle Bildung

Dr. Dita Vogel
FZHB 6000 Intensive German Course for New Exchange Students (Complete Beginners) (A1.1)
Eingangsniveau: Anfänger (Complete Beginners)

Blockveranstaltung
ECTS: 6

Einzeltermine:
Mo 26.09.16 - Fr 30.09.16 (Mo, Di, Mi, Do, Fr) 14:00 - 17:30 GW2 A4290 (FZHB )
Di 04.10.16 - Fr 07.10.16 (Di, Mi, Do, Fr) 14:00 - 18:15 GW2 A4290 (FZHB )
Mo 10.10.16 - Fr 14.10.16 (Mo, Di, Mi, Do, Fr) 14:00 - 17:30 GW2 A4290 (FZHB )


N. N.
FZHB 6001 Intensive German Course for New Exchange Students (Complete Beginners) (A1.1)
Eingangsniveau: Anfänger (Complete Beginners)

Blockveranstaltung
ECTS: 6

Einzeltermine:
Mo 26.09.16 - Fr 30.09.16 (Mo, Di, Mi, Do, Fr) 14:00 - 17:30 GW2 A4270 (CIP-Raum FZHB)
Di 04.10.16 - Fr 07.10.16 (Di, Mi, Do, Fr) 14:00 - 18:15 GW2 A4270 (CIP-Raum FZHB)
Mo 10.10.16 - Fr 14.10.16 (Mo, Di, Mi, Do, Fr) 14:00 - 17:30 GW2 A4270 (CIP-Raum FZHB)


N. N.
FZHB 6002 Intensive German Course for New Exchange Students (A2.2)
Eingangsniveau: A1.2

Blockveranstaltung
ECTS: 6

Einzeltermine:
Mo 26.09.16 - Fr 30.09.16 (Mo, Di, Mi, Do, Fr) 14:00 - 17:30 GW2 A3060 (FZHB Selbstlernzentrum)
Di 04.10.16 - Fr 07.10.16 (Di, Mi, Do, Fr) 14:00 - 18:15 GW2 A3060 (FZHB Selbstlernzentrum)
Mo 10.10.16 - Fr 14.10.16 (Mo, Di, Mi, Do, Fr) 14:00 - 17:30 GW2 A3060 (FZHB Selbstlernzentrum)


N. N.
FZHB 6003 Intensive German Course for New Exchange Students (B1.1)
Eingangsniveau: A2.2

Blockveranstaltung
ECTS: 6

Einzeltermine:
Mo 26.09.16 - Fr 30.09.16 (Mo, Di, Mi, Do, Fr) 14:00 - 17:30 Extern Goethe-Institut Bremen
Di 04.10.16 - Fr 07.10.16 (Di, Mi, Do, Fr) 14:00 - 18:15 Extern Goethe-Institut Bremen
Mo 10.10.16 - Fr 14.10.16 (Mo, Di, Mi, Do, Fr) 14:00 - 17:30 Extern Goethe-Institut Bremen


N. N.
FZHB 6004 Intensive German Course for New Exchange Students (B1.2)
Eingangsniveau: B1.1

Blockveranstaltung
ECTS: 6

Einzeltermine:
Mo 26.09.16 - Fr 30.09.16 (Mo, Di, Mi, Do, Fr) 14:00 - 17:30 GW2 A4170 (CIP-Raum FZHB)
Di 04.10.16 - Fr 07.10.16 (Di, Mi, Do, Fr) 14:00 - 18:15 GW2 A4170 (CIP-Raum FZHB)
Mo 10.10.16 - Fr 14.10.16 (Mo, Di, Mi, Do, Fr) 14:00 - 17:30 GW2 A4170 (CIP-Raum FZHB)


N. N.
FZHB 6005 Intensive German Course for New Exchange Students (B2.1)
Niveau: B1.2

Blockveranstaltung
ECTS: 6

Einzeltermine:
Mo 26.09.16 - Fr 30.09.16 (Mo, Di, Mi, Do, Fr) 14:00 - 17:30 GW2 A4240 (FZHB)
Di 04.10.16 - Fr 07.10.16 (Di, Mi, Do, Fr) 14:00 - 18:15 GW2 A4240 (FZHB)
Mo 10.10.16 - Fr 14.10.16 (Mo, Di, Mi, Do, Fr) 14:00 - 17:30 GW2 A4240 (FZHB)


N. N.
FZHB 6006 Intensive German Course for New Exchange Students (B2.2)
Eingangsniveau: B2.1

Blockveranstaltung
ECTS: 6

Einzeltermine:
Mo 26.09.16 - Fr 30.09.16 (Mo, Di, Mi, Do, Fr) 14:00 - 17:30 GW2 A4190 (FZHB)
Di 04.10.16 - Fr 07.10.16 (Di, Mi, Do, Fr) 09:00 - 13:15 GW2 A4190 (FZHB)
Di 11.10.16 - Fr 14.10.16 (Di, Mi, Do, Fr) 09:00 - 13:15 GW2 A4190 (FZHB)


N. N.
FZHB 6007 German - Complete Beginners (A1.1)
Eingangsniveau: Anfänger

Kurs
ECTS: 6

Termine:
wöchentlich Di 18:15 - 20:00 GW2 A4290 (FZHB ) (2 SWS)
wöchentlich Do 18:15 - 20:00 GW2 A4290 (FZHB ) (2 SWS)


N. N. (Erik Schuchort)
FZHB 6008 German - Complete Beginners (A1.1)
Eingangsniveau: Anfänger

Kurs
ECTS: 6

Termine:
wöchentlich Mo 18:15 - 20:00 GW 2 A 4320 (2 SWS)
wöchentlich Mi 18:15 - 20:00 GW 2 A 4320 (2 SWS)


N. N. (Hilde Maria Denker)
FZHB 6009 Deutsch (A1.2)
German (A1.2)
Eingangsniveau: A1.1

Kurs
ECTS: 6

Termine:
wöchentlich Di 16:00 - 17:45 GW2 A4290 (FZHB ) (2 SWS)
wöchentlich Do 16:00 - 17:45 GW2 A4290 (FZHB ) (2 SWS)


N. N. (Erik Schuchort)
FZHB 6010 Deutsch (A1.2)
German (A1.2)
Eingangsniveau: A1.1

Kurs
ECTS: 6

Termine:
wöchentlich Di 18:15 - 20:00 GW 2 A 4320 (2 SWS)
wöchentlich Do 18:15 - 20:00 GW 2 A 4320 (2 SWS)


N. N. (Helena Vydarena)
FZHB 6011 Deutsch für MINT-Studierende (A1.2)
German for MINT Students (A1.2)
Eingangsniveau: A1.1

Kurs
ECTS: 6

Termine:
wöchentlich Mo 16:00 - 17:45 GW2 A4240 (FZHB) (2 SWS)
wöchentlich Mi 16:00 - 17:45 GW2 A4240 (FZHB) (2 SWS)


N. N. (Marlene Schulze)
FZHB 6012 Deutsch (A2.1)
German (A2.1)
Eingangsniveau: A1.2

Kurs
ECTS: 6

Termine:
wöchentlich Di 18:15 - 20:00 GW2 A4240 (FZHB) (2 SWS)
wöchentlich Do 18:15 - 20:00 GW2 A4240 (FZHB) (2 SWS)


N. N. (Danuta Riechel)
FZHB 6013 German for MINT Students (A2.1)
Deutsch for MINT Students (A2.1)
Eingangsniveau: A1.2

Kurs
ECTS: 6

Termine:
wöchentlich Mo 16:00 - 17:45 GW 2 A 4320 (2 SWS)
wöchentlich Mi 16:00 - 17:45 GW 2 A 4320 (2 SWS)


N. N. (Hilde Maria Denker)
FZHB 6014 Deutsch (A2.2)
German (A2.2)
Eingangsniveau: A2.1

Kurs
ECTS: 6

Termine:
wöchentlich Di 16:00 - 17:45 GW2 A4240 (FZHB) (2 SWS)
wöchentlich Do 16:00 - 17:45 GW2 A4240 (FZHB) (2 SWS)


N. N. (Danuta Riechel)
FZHB 6015 Deutsch (A2.2)
German (A2.2)
Eingangsniveau: A2.1

Kurs
ECTS: 6

Termine:
wöchentlich Mo 18:15 - 20:00 GW2 A4240 (FZHB) (2 SWS)
wöchentlich Mi 18:15 - 20:00 GW2 A4240 (FZHB) (2 SWS)


Andreas Volk
FZHB 6016 Deutsch (A2.2)
German (A2.2)
Eingangsniveau: A2.1

Kurs
ECTS: 6

Termine:
wöchentlich Fr 12:00 - 15:30 GW1 B1070 (4 SWS)

Einzeltermine:
Sa 05.11.16 09:30 - 13:00 GW1 B1070


Inga Marjatta Jantunen-Rodeck
FZHB 6017 Deutsch (B1.1)
German (B1.1)
Eingangsniveau: A2.2

Kurs
ECTS: 6

Termine:
wöchentlich Di 14:00 - 18:00 (4 SWS)


N. N. (Hannelore Titgemeyer)
FZHB 6018 Deutsch (B1.1)
German (B1.1)
Eingangsniveau: A2.2

Kurs
ECTS: 6

Termine:
wöchentlich Mo 16:00 - 17:45 GW2 A4290 (FZHB ) (2 SWS)
wöchentlich Mi 16:00 - 17:45 GW2 A4290 (FZHB ) (2 SWS)


N. N. (Christel Claus)
FZHB 6019 Deutsch (B1.2)
German (B1.2)
Eingangsniveau: B1.1

Kurs
ECTS: 6

Termine:
wöchentlich Mo 18:00 - 19:45 GW2 A4290 (FZHB ) (2 SWS)
wöchentlich Mi 18:00 - 19:45 GW2 A4290 (FZHB ) (2 SWS)


N. N. (Christel Claus)
FZHB 6020 Deutsch - Sprechen und Strukturen (B1.2)
German - Talking and Structures (B1.2)
Eingangsniveau: B1.1

Kurs
ECTS: 3

Termine:
wöchentlich Fr 14:00 - 15:45 GW2 A4240 (FZHB) (2 SWS)


N. N. (Kristina Schmanke)
FZHB 6021 Deutsch - Sprechen und Strukturen (B1.2)
German - Talking and Structures (B1.2)
Eingangsniveau: B1.1

Kurs
ECTS: 3

Termine:
wöchentlich Di 14:00 - 15:45 GW2 A4190 (FZHB) (2 SWS)


N. N. (Christel Claus)
FZHB 6022 Deutsch - Gespräch und Diskussion (B2)
German - Conversation and Discussion (B2)
Eingangsniveau: B1.2

Kurs
ECTS: 3

Termine:
wöchentlich Fr 14:00 - 15:45 GW2 A3060 (FZHB Selbstlernzentrum) (2 SWS)


N. N.
FZHB 6023 Deutsch - Gespräch und Diskussion (B2)
German - Conversation and Discussion (B2)
Eingangsniveau: B1.2

Kurs
ECTS: 3

Termine:
wöchentlich Fr 16:00 - 17:45 GW 2 A4350 (2 SWS)


N. N. (Kristina Schmanke)
FZHB 6024 Deutsch - Hören und Schreiben (B2)
German - Listening and Writing (B2)
Eingangsniveau: B1.2

Kurs
ECTS: 3

Termine:
wöchentlich Fr 16:00 - 17:45 GW2 A3060 (FZHB Selbstlernzentrum) (2 SWS)


N. N. (Iris Steckemetz)
FZHB 6025 Deutsch - Schreiben und Textgrammatik (B2)
German - Writing and Grammar (B2)
Eingangsniveau: B1.2

Kurs
ECTS: 3


N. N. (Bärbel Holderied)
FZHB 6026 Wirtschaftsdeutsch - mit Exkursion (B2)
Business German - with Excursion (B2)

Kurs
ECTS: 3

Termine:
wöchentlich Fr 16:00 - 17:45 GW2 A4240 (FZHB) (2 SWS)


N. N.
FZHB 6027 Deutsch - Texte, Strukturen und Schreibtraining (C1)
German - Texts, Structures and Writing Practice (C1)

Kurs
ECTS: 3

Termine:
wöchentlich Mo 18:15 - 20:00 Extern Goethe-Institut Bremen (2 SWS)


Ruth Marianne Ils
FZHB 6028 Deutsch - Vortrag und Präsentation (C1)
German - Lecture and Presentation (C1)

Kurs
ECTS: 3

Termine:
wöchentlich Di 16:00 - 17:45 GW2 A4270 (CIP-Raum FZHB) (2 SWS)


N. N. (Bärbel Holderied)
FZHB 6029 Intensive German Course for New Exchange Students (A2.1)
Eingangsniveau: A1.2

Blockveranstaltung
ECTS: 6

Einzeltermine:
Mo 26.09.16 - Fr 30.09.16 (Mo, Di, Mi, Do, Fr) 14:00 - 17:30 GW2 B1170
Di 04.10.16 - Fr 07.10.16 (Di, Mi, Do, Fr) 14:00 - 18:15 GW2 B1170
Mo 10.10.16 - Fr 14.10.16 (Mo, Di, Mi, Do, Fr) 14:00 - 17:30 GW2 B1170


N. N. (Hilde Maria Denker)

Ansprechpartner für die Inhalte des Veranstaltungsverzeichnisses

Alte Vorlesungsverzeichnisse (bis Sommersemester 2012)