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Veranstaltungsverzeichnis

Lehrveranstaltungen WiSe 2019/2020

General Studies und Schlüsselqualifikationen (Wahlpflichtbereich) - FB 09

Veranstaltungen anzeigen: alle | in englischer Sprache | für ältere Erwachsene

Modul GS III - Ausgewählte Fachveranstaltungen

Fuer den "Blick über den Tellerrand" des BA-Curriculums können die Studierenden hier u.a. aus den Veranstaltungen des Fachbereichs 09 auswählen. Nach Absprache zwischen Studierenden und den jeweiligen Lehrenden koennen auch Veranstaltungen anderer Fachbereiche besucht werden.

Anmeldung: Die Veranstaltungsorganisation erfolgt ueber StudIP.
Prüfungsleistung: aktive Teilnahme an der Lehrveranstaltung (ggf. Referat, schriftliche Ausarbeitung)
Anerkennung: von Lehrendem/Lehrender unterzeichneter "Leistungsnachweis" wird entweder in den Institutssekretariaten gesiegelt oder im Studienzentrum FB 09 gestempelt
Leistungspunkte: i.d.R. 2 CP (keine Note), kann nach Umfang der Arbeit und Absprache mit dem/der Lehrenden variieren
VAKTitel der VeranstaltungDozentIn
08-29-3-SP12-1Development Sociology: Theory and Policy in Practice (in englischer Sprache)
[Entwicklungssoziologie: Theorie und Politik in ihrer Umsetzung]

Vorlesung

Termine:
wöchentlich Di 08:00 - 10:00 SFG 2060 (2 SWS)

Development Sociology emerged and was actively developed by scholars in many countries in the 1960s and 1970s and sharpened as a result of emerging tensions between modernisation and dependency theories. It was the disciplinary child of the project of international development, and as such also the child of colonialism, growing up and being shaped by imperial and colonial pasts, Cold War legacies, , together with increasing wealth inequalities both across and between the North and South.
The module ‘Development Sociology’ introduces the students to (1) the different theories of development, (2) the implementation of development theory inspired policies in development practice, as well as (3) the epistemological and methodological tools of development research.
The lecture ‘Development Sociology: Theory and Policy in Practice’ will cover the following development theories and their influences on policy practice:
• Modernisation and Growth
• Dependency and Self-Reliance
• Neoliberalism and Structural Adjustment
• Participation and Sustainability
• Women and Gender
• Post-Development and Alternatives
• Multiple Modernities, Risks and Acceleration

Each theoretical approach will be dealt with in two sessions of the lecture. The first deals with the theory itself and will be based on the obligatory readings, the second deals with its implementation in practice by drawing on key empirical research findings and country examples.
The seminar ‘Development Theory in Practice: Empirical Examples and Methodological Tools’ will deepen and extend reflection of selected key themes engaged with in the lecture by exploring empirical examples. Additionally it introduces the students to the following methodological considerations and tools for empirical development research:
• Relative and Multi-dimensional Poverty analyses, Growth and Well-being Indices and Knowledge Society Indices – capitalist/market-led influences on data collection, sharing and dissemination
• Community-based participatory tools: mixed methods household surveying, group-based interviewing and focus groups, and Participatory Learning & Action (PLA) approaches
• Long term field research: Emic and etic worldviews, embeddedness, participant observation, researcher reflectivity, positionality, ethics and role of local language skills
• Development policy analyses (drawing from Critical Policy Studies)
• Mobile ethnographies and ethnographies of mobility: Follow the Innovation, the Migrant, the Epistemology, non-human natures & multi-sited Research Methodologies
• Audio-visual and inter-textual methods in research

The seminar will utilize varied teaching formats and styles that place emphasis on nurturing students´ independent thinking, the development of their own thematic fields of interest and the ability to write. The experiential element will include features such as situational presentations (e.g. pitching a project idea), poster sharing sessions and experimentation with other self-selected genres (e.g. life history narratives, scripts for short sketches, infographics and political cartoons), together with the development of academic material in the form of short papers and small-project proposals. The students are particularly encouraged to use the seminar to develop their ability to formulate arguments and substantiate these in a written format – also linked to their own thesis topics.
Irrespective of the teaching format, all sessions will substantially build on obligatory readings and the writing samples produced by the students. The completion of individual and group project work is vital to ensuring the quality of in-class discussions. All obligatory and recommended readings will be made available for download via StudIP.

Course requirements:
For 3 CPs: Active participation, having read the obligatory reading for each week, in only the lecture or the seminar (36+36 = 72 hours) and the submission of 3 text summaries (72+30 = 102 hours)
For 6 CPs: Participation in the lecture and the seminar (72+72 = 144 hours), submission of 3 text summaries (144+30 = 174 hours) and the giving of an oral presentation (174+40 = 214 hours).
For 9 CPs: Participation in the lecture and the seminar (72+72 = 144 hours), submission of 3 text summaries (144+30 = 174 hours) and the giving of an oral presentation (174+40 = 214 hours) and the writing of a 10-page-seminar paper (214 + 80 = 294 hours).

The text summaries of obligatory readings have to be submitted always before 8pm on the day before the seminar / lecture in which the reading is obligatory. The seminar paper has to be submittet by 31.3.20 and 30.6.20.

Consultation Hours of Lecturers:
In case of general questions, please arrange an appointment with anna-katharina.hornidge@leibniz-zmt.de.

Prof. Dr. Anna-Katharina Hornidge
08-29-3-SP12-2Development Sociology: Empirical Examples and Methodological Tools (in englischer Sprache)
[Entwicklungstheorie in der Praxis: Empirische Fallstudien und Methoden]

Seminar

Einzeltermine:
Fr 25.10.19 08:00 - 12:00 ZMT, Wiener Str. 7, 3. Ebene, Raum "The BOX"
Fr 22.11.19 08:00 - 16:00 ZMT, Wiener Str. 7, 3. Ebene, Raum "The BOX"
Fr 13.12.19 08:00 - 16:00 ZMT, Wiener Str. 7, 3. Ebene, Raum "The BOX"
Fr 31.01.20 08:00 - 16:00 ZMT, Wiener Str. 7, 3. Ebene, Raum "The BOX"

Development Sociology emerged and was actively developed by scholars in many countries in the 1960s and 1970s and sharpened as a result of emerging tensions between modernisation and dependency theories. It was the disciplinary child of the project of international development, and as such also the child of colonialism, growing up and being shaped by imperial and colonial pasts, Cold War legacies, , together with increasing wealth inequalities both across and between the North and South.
The module ‘Development Sociology’ introduces the students to (1) the different theories of development, (2) the implementation of development theory inspired policies in development practice, as well as (3) the epistemological and methodological tools of development research.
The lecture ‘Development Sociology: Theory and Policy in Practice’ will cover the following development theories and their influences on policy practice:
• Modernisation and Growth
• Dependency and Self-Reliance
• Neoliberalism and Structural Adjustment
• Participation and Sustainability
• Women and Gender
• Post-Development and Alternatives
• Multiple Modernities, Risks and Acceleration

Each theoretical approach will be dealt with in two sessions of the lecture. The first deals with the theory itself and will be based on the obligatory readings, the second deals with its implementation in practice by drawing on key empirical research findings and country examples.
The seminar ‘Development Theory in Practice: Empirical Examples and Methodological Tools’ will deepen and extend reflection of selected key themes engaged with in the lecture by exploring empirical examples. Additionally it introduces the students to the following methodological considerations and tools for empirical development research:
• Relative and Multi-dimensional Poverty analyses, Growth and Well-being Indices and Knowledge Society Indices – capitalist/market-led influences on data collection, sharing and dissemination
• Community-based participatory tools: mixed methods household surveying, group-based interviewing and focus groups, and Participatory Learning & Action (PLA) approaches
• Long term field research: Emic and etic worldviews, embeddedness, participant observation, researcher reflectivity, positionality, ethics and role of local language skills
• Development policy analyses (drawing from Critical Policy Studies)
• Mobile ethnographies and ethnographies of mobility: Follow the Innovation, the Migrant, the Epistemology, non-human natures & multi-sited Research Methodologies
• Audio-visual and inter-textual methods in research

The seminar will utilize varied teaching formats and styles that place emphasis on nurturing students´ independent thinking, the development of their own thematic fields of interest and the ability to write. The experiential element will include features such as situational presentations (e.g. pitching a project idea), poster sharing sessions and experimentation with other self-selected genres (e.g. life history narratives, scripts for short sketches, infographics and political cartoons), together with the development of academic material in the form of short papers and small-project proposals. The students are particularly encouraged to use the seminar to develop their ability to formulate arguments and substantiate these in a written format – also linked to their own thesis topics.
Irrespective of the teaching format, all sessions will substantially build on obligatory readings and the writing samples produced by the students. The completion of individual and group project work is vital to ensuring the quality of in-class discussions. All obligatory and recommended readings will be made available for download via StudIP.

Course requirements:
For 3 CPs: Active participation, having read the obligatory reading for each week, in only the lecture or the seminar (36+36 = 72 hours) and the submission of 3 text summaries (72+30 = 102 hours)
For 6 CPs: Participation in the lecture and the seminar (72+72 = 144 hours), submission of 3 text summaries (144+30 = 174 hours) and the giving of an oral presentation (174+40 = 214 hours).
For 9 CPs: Participation in the lecture and the seminar (72+72 = 144 hours), submission of 3 text summaries (144+30 = 174 hours) and the giving of an oral presentation (174+40 = 214 hours) and the writing of a 10-page-seminar paper (214 + 80 = 294 hours).

The text summaries of obligatory readings have to be submitted always before 8pm on the day before the seminar / lecture in which the reading is obligatory. The seminar paper has to be submittet by 31.3.20 and 30.6.20.

Consultation Hours of Lecturers:
In case of general questions, please arrange an appointment with anna-katharina.hornidge@leibniz-zmt.de.

Prof. Dr. Anna-Katharina Hornidge
09-60-M8/9-HAutomated Text Analysis of Political Communication (in englischer Sprache)

Seminar

Termine:
wöchentlich Mo 12:00 - 14:00 SFG 2070 (2 SWS)


Stefanie Walter, Ph.D.

Modul GS VII - Studienrelevante Auslandsaufenthalte/Internationales/Sprachen

Auslandsaufenthalte im Rahmen des Studiums können für den Bereich der GS geltend gemacht werden, wenn sie nicht Teil des Pflichtcurriculums eines der studierten Fächer sind.
Es werden auch Veranstaltungen des Fachbereichs (nach Absprache auch anderer Fachbereiche) im Forschungs- und Berufsfeldbezug zum Themenkomplex "Internationales/Interkulturalität" sowie sowie Angebote des International Office wie "Interkulturelles Zertifikat" (http://www.uni-bremen.de/international/internationaler-campus/interkulturelles-zertifikat.html) oder das Programm "Study Buddy" (http://www.uni-bremen.de/international/internationaler-campus/kompass/study-buddy.html) anerkannt.

Prüfungsleistung: Der studienrelevante Auslandsaufenthalt ist nachzuweisen durch entsprechende Bescheinigungen sowie einen Lern-/Erfahrungsbericht (3-5 Seiten) nach Absprache mit dem/der Erasmusbeauftragten (näheres zum Bericht, siehe Homepage Studienzentrum FB 09: http://www.studienzentrum-fb9.uni-bremen.de/de/bachelor-neu/general-studies/lern-erfahrungsberichte.html).
Beim Programm "Study Buddy" geht der Bericht an das International Office.
Prüfungsleistungen bei Veranstaltungen: gemäß Ankuendigung

Anerkennung: durch Erasmusbeauftragte/n des Faches oder Studienzentrum FB 09 bzw. International Office Leistungspunkte: CP nach Dauer des Auslandsaufenthaltes (i.d.R. 6 CP pro Semester); anerkannt werden Aufenthalte ab einer Dauer von 4 Wochen.
Leistungspunkte für Veranstaltungen: gemäß Ankündigung der Veranstaltung

Im Rahmen des Studiums erworbene Fremdsprachenkenntnisse, die nicht laut Prüfungsordnungen der studierten Fächer verpflichtend sind, können für die GS geltend gemacht werden.

Prüfungsleistung: Nachweis des absolvierten Kurses, der Prüfungsleistung und der Stundenanzahl
Anerkennung: Zertifikat durch das FZHB einreichen, bei außeruniversitären Nachweisen durch Vorlage beim Studienzentrum FB 09
Leistungspunkte: richten sich nach der für universitäre Sprachkurse üblichen Vergabe (vgl. FZHB); anerkannt werden können Leistungen im Umfang von max. 12 CP.
VAKTitel der VeranstaltungDozentIn
FZHB 0623Für Studierende des Fachbereiches 9: Englisch für die Qualifizierung im Studium/Part 1 of UNIcert III (C1.1) (in englischer Sprache)
Eingangsniveau: B2.3

Kurs
ECTS: 3

Termine:
wöchentlich Mo 14:15 - 15:45 GW2 A4240 (FZHB) (2 SWS)


Anna Makarova, EdD
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