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Veranstaltungsverzeichnis

Lehrveranstaltungen WiSe 2019/2020

English-Speaking Cultures: Language, Text, Media, M. A.

Veranstaltungen anzeigen: alle | in englischer Sprache | für ältere Erwachsene

OrMo - Orientation Module (15 CP)

In this module participants are given an overview of the major research areas of the MA, spanning the three interrelated areas: language, text and
media. Read more... https://blogs.uni-bremen.de/maesc/modules/

Modulverantwortlicher: John Bateman
VAKTitel der VeranstaltungDozentIn
10-76-4-D1-a-07Key Topics in Literature: Hunger in Literature and Films in the nineteenth and twentieth centuries (in englischer Sprache)

Seminar

Termine:
wöchentlich Mi 12:15 - 13:45 GW2 B1400 NUR Mi. - So. SFG 0140 (2 SWS)

This course explores hunger as a perpetual force in societies and hunger literature as the corpus on which politics, social praxis, power struggles, and cultural meanings intersect. Focusing on major famine and starvation conditions like the Bengal Famine (1943), the Irish Potato Famine (1845-49), among others, the course offers a history of such occurrences, their consequence on the social fabric, and how that in turn shapes societies in the long run. Students will read a range of famine and starvation narratives from the nineteenth and twentieth centuries from across cultures, theorize them, and will learn to see hunger and starvation beyond their biological and statistical manifestations. The course includes lectures, class, presentations, and documentary/film.

Dr. Sukla Chatterjee
10-E76-3-Kult-1Key Topics in Cultural History for Master Students: (Re)Reading Popular Culture (in englischer Sprache)

Seminar

Termine:
wöchentlich Di 12:15 - 13:45 GW2 B1700 SpT C4180 (2 SWS)

In this course we will engage in critical debates on popular culture, discuss various ways and methods of analyzing it and carry out exemplary investigations of selected cases. Employing a cultural historical perspective we will focus on categories of difference such as race, class, gender, sexuality. Students will improve their critical reading skills that can be applied to academic as well as to popular texts. Moreover, we will develop ideas how to productively use popular culture in schools.
Essential readings will be available for download on Stud-IP. You should also consult the 'Semesterapparat' (SuUB) for further readings.
Requirements:
• regular attendance and oral participation
• in-depth knowledge of the reading material
• oral presentation and handout
• term paper

Dr. Karin Esders-Angermund
10-M80-1-OrMo-01Introduction to the theory and practice of multimodality: theories and applications (in englischer Sprache)

Seminar

Termine:
wöchentlich Di 12:00 - 14:00 GW1 A1260 GW1 B0080 (2 SWS)

This course gives a detailed overview of the growing field of multimodality, examining how different expressive resources (text, pictures, diagrams, layout, movement, sound, etc.) combine productively for effective communication. Discussion will proceed from page-paged artifacts to a focus on audiovisual (interactive) experiences, including film, comics/graphic novels, digital games, and electronic literature. The course will be example driven, looking at specific forms of multimodal communication to introduce some of the basic theoretical and practical methods for state of the art multimodality research. Several sessions will be participants-initiated, where participants analyze and discuss their selected media. Overall, the course is intended to equip participants with the theoretical and methodological knowledge for comprehensive, multimodal analyses, with specific attention on forming research questions, outlines, and structures to analyze the complexities, issues, and even failures of communication.

Course commitments include contributions to a digital multimodal archive and a multimodal analysis (including abstract and bibliography). Informing the seminar are diverse media encounters, critical discussions, works from academic and artistic sources, as well as hands-on analyses.

Prof. John Arnold Bateman, Ph.D.
Dr. Carman Ng
10-M80-1-OrMo-02Current Topics in Research on World Englishes (in englischer Sprache)
Modultyp B/C im Studiengang Language Sciences, M.A.

Seminar

Termine:
wöchentlich Di 10:00 - 12:00 GW2 A3390 (CIP-Labor FB 10) (2 SWS)

In the last decades, the research paradigm of World Englishes has experienced a proliferation of detailed studies of different aspects of Englishes across the world. These descriptions have largely focused on phonological, lexical, morphosyntactic, and, more recently, also pragmatic and cultural-cognitive aspects of World Englishes.

In this seminar we will review recent trends and current research topics and methods in the field (e.g. model formation, lexico-grammatical variation and innovation, pragmatics, and metaphor and idioms). Students will then develop and work on corpus-based empirical research projects in which they examine selected aspects of World Englishes.

Obligatory preparatory reading for this seminar:
Jenkins, Jennifer (2015). Global Englishes. A resource book for students. 3rd edition. London and New York: Routledge. Section A (pp. 1-56)

Prof. Dr. Marcus Callies
10-M80-1-OrMo-03Ian McEwan's Android Novel Machines Like Me (2019) (in englischer Sprache)

Seminar

Termine:
wöchentlich Fr 14:15 - 15:45 SFG 1080 (2 SWS)

This course is designed for students with a profound academic pioneer spirit. And this is mainly due to the text under scrutiny in this seminar. We shall discuss Ian McEwan's recently published android novel Machines Like Me (2019), a narrative which is too young to have already entailed critical response in terms of scholarly articles, let alone monographs etc. There are, however, quite a view reviews in the quality papers, and these early reactions tend to be full of praise.
Machines Like Me can be described as a piece of speculative fiction set in a counterfactual Britain of the 1980s. We as readers are confronted with an alternative course of history, which at times even anticipates topical political developments. In a highly computerised context, some androids represent the latest achievements. One of them, Adam, oscillates between his two functions of servant and intellectual superior. Yet it is the uncompromising decision logic of the machine mind that tends to miss the nuances of a serious moral dilemma. The corresponding ethical question will surely dominate our debate about McEwan's disturbing vision.

requirements:
• active participation
• in-depth knowledge of the reading material
• oral presentation (handout) or
• research in progress and final paper

Please note that prior enrolment via Stud.IP is mandatory. The number of participants is limited to 15 students.


text:
McEwan, Ian. Machines Like Me. London: Jonathan Cape, 2019.

Prof. Dr. Norbert Schaffeld
10-M80-1-OrMo-04Current Topics in Language Assessment (in englischer Sprache)

Seminar

Termine:
wöchentlich Mi 12:15 - 13:45 Externer Ort: SFG 1080

Assessment and evaluation play a crucial role in language learning and teaching, both in external and classroom-based contexts. The outcomes of (good quality) assessment procedures allow valuable insights into learning development and achievement. This proves beneficial for learners, who get feedback and can plan their next learning steps and goals, as well as for teachers, who gain insights into the effectiveness of their teaching.

In the seminar, we will discuss basic concepts and current notions in the field of language assessment and reflect on the complex interactions between learning, teaching and assessment. Against the backdrop of this theoretical basis, we will explore isolated and integrated assessment procedures across and beyond the four classical skills. Furthermore, we critically analyse assessment instruments applied in language learning contexts and finally develop instruments for diagnostic and assessment practices ourselves.

The overall aim of the seminar is to develop knowledge and skills with regard to language assessment and therefore to enhance “Language Assessment Literacy” (LAL), a competence which is critical for future teachers and other stakeholders in the educational context.

ASSESSMENT

regular attendance and active participation
careful reading and preparation of assigned readings and tasks
short in-class presentation
term paper

Please note that prior enrollment via Stud.IP is mandatory.

Anika Müller-Karabil
10-M80-1-OrMo-05Contemporary Travel Writing (in englischer Sprache)

Seminar

Termine:
wöchentlich Di 14:15 - 15:45 GW2 B1170 (2 SWS)

This course welcomes students who wish to complete the following modules:
M.A. E-SC: OrMO (Orientierungsmodul 1. Semester)
M.A. E-SC SpecMo (Spezialisierungsmodul 3. Semester);
M.A. TnL Vertiefungsmodul und Profilmodul Literatur
Non-E-SC students and academic exchange students

Travel writing is an increasingly popular genre in terms of text production and commercial success, encompassing a fascinating diversity of literary forms, modes and itineraries, which negate a forthright definition of the genre. As a repository for factual and fictional accounts of mobility and cross-cultural exchange, however, it has long been underestimated for its potential to contribute to a broad range of cultural, political and historical debates that seek to reassess the role of travel writing as a "vehicle for geographic, ethnographic and sociological knowledge." (Thompson 4). This seminar discusses diverse themes and characteristics of contemporary travel writing, postcolonial travel accounts and refugee writing and aims to map contemporary critical concepts regarding transnational and postcolonial perspectives in weekly readings of excerpts of selected travel accounts.

Since some of the participants are required to submit a research paper, we will use parts of our seminar discussions to the development of topics, the formulation of a thesis statement, as well as considerations about the methodological approaches of writing such a paper.

Additional secondary sources can be accessed in the “Semesterapparat”, a reference-only section on the third floor of the library building. A reader with selected secondary text materials will be made available for download on Stud. IP. Please be aware that your registration on Stud. IP. is mandatory (deadline September 15th, 2019).

You may wish to check the sections "Information" and "Schedule" further details such as requirements, weekly schedule, select bibliography and modes of assessment.

Requirements and Assessment
• Interest in the topic discussed and ideally a regular attendance and informed participation in class discussion (not part of your formal assessment);
• in-depth knowledge of the selected reading material,
• homework assignments,
• group projects and presentation of research paper proposals;
• research-based term paper.
The requirements as formulated above may vary depending on your overall degree program.
Copies of selected travel accounts can be purchased at the bookstore on our campus (Universitätsbuchhandlung Bremen: www.unibuch-bremen.de)

Dr. Jana Nittel
10-M80-1-OrMo-06Shakespeare's London (in englischer Sprache)
for B.A. students: Key Topics in Cultural History

Seminar
ECTS: Depends on module choice

Termine:
wöchentlich Mo 16:15 - 17:45 GW2 B1170 (2 SWS)

This course (VAK: 10-M80-1-OrMo-06) welcomes students who wish to complete the following modules:
M.A. E-SC Orientierungsmodul;
M.A. TnL Vertiefungsmodul und Profilmodul Literatur;
B.A. E-SC “Key Topics in Cultural History”- D1b /D1c und WD1b /WD1c
Non-E-SC students and academic exchange students

William Shakespeare’s London, and in this seminar, London in the Elizabethan Age as well as at his time in the city (c.1560 – 1616), was a rapidly growing and bustling metropolis. In the duration of this course, we will travel back in time seeking to explore the history and social geography of this largest city in England. Based on a research-based learning methodology, we will attempt to map out London’s key locations as the centre of government, the law and the church as well as being the focus of politics and culture during a time of intense political and religious upheaval. In addition, this course focuses on the following topics: Stage history, playhouses; the fundamental features of dramatic composition to issues such as political structures in Renaissance England, gender roles and relations, love and sexuality, constructions of nationhood, global expansion and their representation in Shakespeare’s plays.

Since some of the participants are required to submit a research paper, we will use parts of our seminar discussions to the development of topics, the formulation of a thesis statement, as well as considerations about the methodological approaches of writing such a paper.

Additional secondary sources can be accessed in the “Semesterapparat”, a reference-only section on the third floor of the library building. A reader with selected secondary text materials will be made available for download on Stud. IP. Please be aware that your registration on Stud. IP. is mandatory (deadline September 15th, 2019).

You may wish to check the sections "Information" and "Schedule" further details such as requirements, weekly schedule, select bibliography and modes of assessment.

Requirements and Assessment
• Interest in the topic discussed and ideally a regular attendance and informed participation in class discussion (not part of your formal assessment);
• in-depth knowledge of the selected reading material,
• homework assignments,
• group projects and presentation of research paper proposals;
• research-based term paper.
The requirements as formulated above may vary depending on your overall degree program.

Reading materials
MacGregor, Neil. Shakespeare's Restless World, Penguin Books, 2014.
Copies are available for purchase at the bookstore on our campus (Universitätsbuchhandlung Bremen: www.unibuch-bremen.de)

Dr. Jana Nittel
10-M80-1-OrMo-07Imperial Fictions: From Defoe to Edgeworth to Wells (in englischer Sprache)

Seminar

Einzeltermine:
Fr 10.01.20 10:00 - 16:00 GW1 A0160
Fr 31.01.20 10:00 - 18:00 GW1-HS H1000
Sa 01.02.20 10:00 - 18:00 GW2 B2890

This course explores the ways in which debates about empire are negotiated in selected classics of British fiction. Covering a period of roughly 200 years, we shall turn to three key texts consisting of Daniel Defoe’s Robinson Crusoe (1719), Maria Edgeworth’s Castle Rackrent (1800) as well as H. G. Wells’ The Time Machine (1895) and focus on notions of gender, race, class and colonialism in order to question aspects of (British) national self-consciousness. While the seminar’s emphasis is on the socio-historical contextualization of the primary works, it will also build and expand on already existing knowledge of literary theories and cultural methods. All students are expected to participate in the discussions and activities and prepare a research-oriented (group) presentation based on their chosen topics and concepts. We will also jointly watch and discuss one film that helps to shed light on the link between the history of the British Empire and its colonial aftermath. Please note: Students must have read all three novels in advance of the very first session – familiarity with the primary literature is essential for a successful participation.

Keywords: British Empire, colonialism, cultural history, gender, class, slavery, nature, genre, science

Requirements:
• registration on Stud.IP
• in-depth knowledge of the reading material, i.e. read the text(s) in advance!
• regular attendance and oral participation
• oral presentation and handout
• term paper (optional)

Texts:
Defoe, Daniel. Robinson Crusoe. New York [et al.]: Norton, 1994. [pages 1-221]
Edgeworth, Maria. Castle Rackrent. New York [et al.]: Norton, 2015. [pages 1-62]
Wells, H. G. The Time Machine. New York [et al.]: Norton, 2009. [pages 1-73]

Dr. phil. Jennifer Henke
10-M80-1-OrMo-08Lecture Series: Studying English-Speaking Cultures - Topics, Theories and Methods (in englischer Sprache) (in englischer Sprache)

Vorlesung

Termine:
wöchentlich Mi 14:15 - 15:45 CART Rotunde - 0.67 (2 SWS)

Einzeltermine:
Mi 04.12.19 17:00 - 21:00 GW2 B3009 (Großer Studierraum)

This lecture series provides an overview of current research trends, theories and methods in the three profile areas of the MA programme (British, North American and Postcolonial Literatures; Linguistics: Varieties, Medialities, Applications; British, North American and Postcolonial Cultural History) by addressing the three interrelated areas of language, text, and media. In the lectures, we will first provide an overview on the approaches and methods of the three fields of study and in the second part of the series highlight the research topics and methods that feature prominent-ly in the current research and publications by the faculty members teaching in the programme. We will discuss the film BlacKkKlansman (2018) in the lectures featuring case studies from the per-spectives of cultural history, linguistics, and literary studies.
Please watch the BlacKkKlansman and engage actively during discussion periods. Please note that prior enrollment via Stud.IP is mandatory.

A more in-depth introduction to further fields of specialisation is given in supporting overview seminars, which present a range of hands-on as well as theoretical and methodological case stud-ies and foundational literature for the profile areas. Two overview seminars have to be chosen in addition to the lecture series in order to complete the Orientation Module.

Dr. Inke Du Bois
Prof. Dr. Marcus Callies
Dr. Sukla Chatterjee
Dr. Karin Esders-Angermund
Prof. Dr. Kerstin Knopf
Prof. John Arnold Bateman, Ph.D.
Prof. Dr. Norbert Schaffeld
Prof. Dr. Claudia Harsch
Prof. Dr. Sabine Bröck
10-M80-1-OrMo-09Cultural History: Studying and Working with Indigenous Short Films (in englischer Sprache)

Seminar

Termine:
wöchentlich Mi 16:15 - 17:45 GW1 B0080 (2 SWS)

In this seminar we will learn about Indigenous history, issues, problems, and identities through watching documentaries and short films dealing with Indigenous topics in North America. Initially we will learn about how to assess short films and watch a few Indigenous short films before looking at some lesser known ones that have just been released. We will cooperate with the 'Indianer Inuit Filmfestival' in Stuttgart and will watch a selection of the films that will be shown there in February 2020. We will form a jury that will select the best one to be awarded the Best Short Film Award. We will also transcribe, translate and provide the German subtitles for a few films that will run at the festival in Stuttgart. As a highlight, a selection of students will go to the festival (6-9 February 2020; https://www.nordamerika-filmfestival.com/) and participate in all showings and events and present the film award on the festival stage.

Prof. Dr. Kerstin Knopf

UEP Part 1 - Using English in the Professional World (6 CP)

The module provides the more practically-focused language, presentation and negotiation skills foundation for the other modules in the study programme.
Read more... https://blogs.uni-bremen.de/maesc/modules/

Modulverantwortliche: Katja Müller
VAKTitel der VeranstaltungDozentIn
10-M80-1-UEP1-01Using English in the Professional World 1 (in englischer Sprache)

Übung

Termine:
wöchentlich Mo 10:00 - 12:00 GW2 A4020
wöchentlich Mo 14:00 - 16:00 GW2 A4020
Dr. Vanessa Herrmann

SuStMo - Supplementary Studies Module (9 CP)

Students may opt for language courses offered both by Faculty 10 and the Foreign Language Centre (Fremdsprachenzentrum Bremen - FZHB), relevant courses and lecture series offered both by Faculty 10 and other faculties, or receive credit points for additional internships and academic exchange to Anglophone countries.
Read more... https://blogs.uni-bremen.de/maesc/modules/

Modulverantwortliche: Jana Wachsmuth
VAKTitel der VeranstaltungDozentIn
10-GS-9-04Writing Academic Papers (in englischer Sprache)

Seminar

Termine:
wöchentlich Mi 08:00 - 10:00 GW2 B1170 (2 SWS)
Anne Kirkham, M.A.

ExMo 1 - Extention Module 1 (9 CP)

In Extension Module 1, students develop the competence to deal with more complex theoretical, conceptual and methodological approaches within the three interrelated profile areas, i.e. language, text and media.
Read more... https://blogs.uni-bremen.de/maesc/modules/

Modulbeauftragter: Nobert Schaffeld
VAKTitel der VeranstaltungDozentIn
10-M82-1-4-MM-1Language and cognition (in englischer Sprache)
Modultyp B/C im Studiengang Language Sciences, M.A.

Seminar

Termine:
wöchentlich Di 08:00 - 10:00 GW2 B1630 (2 SWS)

Language and Cognition (for both BA and MA levels)
How do we produce and interpret language? By human brains. This means that for any enterprise that enhances human comprehension and knowledge, what goes on inside individuals’ heads must be a prime concern.
In this course, we will draw on sights and tools from cognitive science, cognitive linguistics, and cognitive psychology to explore the links between language, cognitive, and social/political action. Among the topics we will discuss are frame semantics, conceptual metaphor theory, conceptual binding and neural reuse, relevance theory, the discourse-knowledge interface, systems of the human mind, categorization, moral-political reasoning, cognitive grammar, contextualization, mental models of events, discourse (language use) and gender, power abuse and manipulation, and identity construction.
Here, the term 'language' is extended to include, not just words and sentences, but all forms of symbolic interaction (gesture, sign language, art, architecture, dance, music, etc.).

Ahmed Elsayed

AWE 1 - Academic Work Experience 1 (9CP)

In this module students will choose two seminars either from different profile areas or from only one profile area to specialise in the respective field of interest.
Read more... https://blogs.uni-bremen.de/maesc/modules/

Modulbeauftragter: Marcus Callies
VAKTitel der VeranstaltungDozentIn
10-M80-3-AW1-AW2-01Mastervision: ESC Student Conference 2019 (in englischer Sprache)

Praktikum
ECTS: 3

Einzeltermine:
Fr 06.12.19 09:00 - 17:00 GW1 B0080
Sa 07.12.19 09:00 - 17:00 GW2 B2890
Steffen Schaub, M.A.

ReMo - Research Module (9 CP)

In this module, students prepare their MA thesis with regard to content and methodology.
Read more... https://blogs.uni-bremen.de/maesc/modules/

Modulbeauftragte: Claudia Harsch
VAKTitel der VeranstaltungDozentIn
10-E76-3-FD-03Fun with Data - Research Methods in Language, Linguistics and Cultural Studies (in English Language) (in englischer Sprache)

Seminar

Einzeltermine:
Mo 21.10.19 10:00 - 14:00 GW2 A3220
Mo 04.11.19 10:00 - 14:00 GW2 A3220
Mo 18.11.19 10:00 - 14:00 GW2 A3220
Mo 02.12.19 10:00 - 14:00 GW2 A3220
Mo 16.12.19 10:00 - 14:00 GW2 A3220
Mo 06.01.20 10:00 - 14:00 GW2 A3220
Mo 13.01.20 10:00 - 14:00 GW2 A3220

In the seminar, we will explore selected research approaches and analytic methods relevant for language, linguistics and cultural studies. On the one hand, the seminar aims to develop your skills in understanding and critically evaluating methodological aspects in the research literature. On the other hand, the seminar will prepare you for your own research projects and your BA or MA thesis: We will look at important steps for planning, design, data collection, analysis and presentation.
We will cover empirical and hermeneutical approaches, quantitative and qualitative analyses, mixed-methods designs, and instruments such as questionnaires, interviews and think-aloud approaches. Besides these, you are welcome to bring your own focus to the seminar. We will illustrate theoretical aspects with practical examples – you are very welcome to bring in your own ideas and projects.
At the end of the seminar, you will have developed a mock research proposal that you present in class. (You are welcome to turn this later into your “real BA or MA thesis proposal” with your supervisor.)
Learning outcomes
At the end of the seminar, students are familiar with:
  • a variety of field-relevant data collection methods,
  • techniques for processing data,
  • methods of data evaluation,
  • key components of a research proposal.
Students will develop:
  • an in-depth understanding and awareness of selected key themes and approaches in language, linguistics and cultural studies,
  • an advanced comprehension of sophisticated theories and methodologies,
  • the ability to apply theoretical approaches and methodologies to the reading and analysis of a range of primary sources.
Students’ skills include:
  • finding and formulating research questions,
  • justifying the choice of appropriate research methods and methods of data evaluation,
  • developing and structuring a research proposal.
Overview and dates
We meet on the following seven Mondays, in room GW2, A3220, from 10 am to 2pm.
This way we have enough space to engage in group work and discussions.
Preliminary semester plan:
21.10.2019 Introduction: research traditions, research designs, research questions, first steps in planning and structuring research
04.11.2019 Quantitative and qualitative approaches: data collection and analyses
18.11.2019 Key concepts of research quality, introduction to basic statistical terms; what do data sets look like; how do I handle my variables
02.12.2019 Interviews, think-aloud protocols, retrospective interviews: design, coding, analyses
16.12.2019 Surveys and questionnaires: Interviews: design, coding, analyses
06.01.2020 Mixed-methods approaches: design and analyses, how to handle data sets
13.01.2020 Presentation of proposals, feedback
Initial reading
Cohen, L., L. Mannion and K. Morrison. 2002. Research methods in education. Fifth edition. London and New York: Routledge Falmer.
Creswell, J. W. 2003. Research Design: Qualitative, Quantitative, and Mixed Methods Approaches. (2nd ed.) Thousand Oaks, CA: Sage.
Seminar 3 ECTS points (Studienleistung, unbenotet):
1. Regular and active participation in preparatory tasks, seminar groups, discussions, and teamwork.
2. Preparatory reading of the assigned texts and preparation of the tasks that will be published in advance on StudIP.
3. Development and presentation of a (mock) research proposal (which can be developed later into your real proposal with your supervisor).
For a total of 6 ECTS points and a grade, in addition to the above:
4. Final written assignment.
Further reading
Brown, J. D. & Rodgers, T. S. 2002. Doing Second Language Research. Oxford: Oxford University Press.
Dörnyei, Z. 2007. Research Methods in Applied Linguistics. Oxford: Oxford University Press.
Hua, Z. (ed.) 2016. Research Methods in Intercultural Communication: A Practical Guide. Chichester: Wiley-Blackwell.
Mackey, A. & Gass, S. M. 2012. Research Methods in Second Language Acquisition: A Practical Guide. Chichester: Wiley-Blackwell.
McDonough, J. & McDonough, S. 1997. Research Methods for English Language Teachers. London: Hodder.
Muijs, D. 2004. Doing Quantitative Research in Education with SPSS. London: Sage.
Nunan, D. 1992. Research Methods in Language Learning. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.
Saldana, J. 2009. The coding manual for qualitative researchers. London: Sage.
Research Examples that will be discussed in the seminar
Mixed-methods design:
Harsch, C., Ushioda, E. & Ladroue, C. 2017. Investigating the predictive validity of TOEFL iBT scores and their use in informing policy in a U.K. university setting (TOEFL iBT Research Report TOEFL iBT – 30, ETS Research Report RR – 17-41). Princeton, NJ: Educational Testing Service (peer-reviewed). Available online at http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1002/ets2.12167/full
Quantitative design:
Harsch, C. & Hartig, J. 2016. Comparing C-tests and Yes/No vocabulary size tests as predictors of receptive language skills. Language Testing 33, 555-575. https://journals.sagepub.com/doi/abs/10.../0265532215594642
Qualitative design:
Harsch, C. & Poehner, M. 2016. Enhancing student experience abroad: The potential of dynamic assessment to develop student interculturality. Language and Intercultural Communication 16(3), 470-490. https://www.tandfonline.com/doi/abs/.../14708477.2016.1168043

Prof. Dr. Claudia Harsch
10-M80-3-ReMo-01Research Colloquium for MA and PhD Students (in englischer Sprache)

Seminar

Termine:
wöchentlich Do 09:00 - 11:00 GW2 A3340 (2 SWS)

This is a research colloquium for MA and PhD students who are planning on writing or are are currently working on their final theses in the fields of (applied) English linguistics, World Englishes or SLA.

Prof. Dr. Marcus Callies
10-M80-3-ReMo-02Researching Postcolonial Literatures and Cultures (in englischer Sprache)

Seminar

Termine:
wöchentlich Mi 12:15 - 13:45 SH D1020 (2 SWS)

In this class students will learn how to develop a research topic, do research and collect bibliographical material, develop the theoretical background and formulate research questions. They will then individually develop the research topic for their master’s thesis. Finally students will write research proposals and individually present these in class for peer-review.
Class requirements are regular attendance, developing theoretical and historical backgrounds of topic reading, read secondary sources at home, and active class participation. Please note that prior enrollment via Stud.IP is mandatory.

Prof. Dr. Kerstin Knopf
10-M80-3-ReMo-03Preparing and designing research projects in multimodality: Research Colloquium for MA and PhD Students (in englischer Sprache)

Seminar

Termine:
wöchentlich Mi 12:00 - 14:00 SFG 1020 (2 SWS)

This course is intended as an accompanying course to specific research topics that will form the content of Masters theses or further research for PhD etc. Attention will be paid specifically to carrying out the necessary research, defining the form of presentation of the results, style of presentation discussion of potential further publication possibilities, and ensuring that the final product meets all the international standards of research in the area of multimodality as well as any specific areas that are being addressed as the objects of analysis.

Prof. John Arnold Bateman, Ph.D.
Dr. Claudia Lehmann
10-M80-3-SpecMo-03Critical Game Studies (in englischer Sprache)

Seminar

Termine:
wöchentlich Di 14:15 - 15:45 SFG 0140 (2 SWS)

This course examines how digital games interact with contemporary society as medium, emerging technology, and evolving experiences and creative expressions. Participants will engage with diverse (digital) games, including mainstream / independent / experimental titles, role-playing games, serious games, and more. Organizing the course are selected motifs that invite critical thought on the sociocultural, political, economic, and artistic dimensions of games, supplemented with weekly media encounters and readings across academic, journalistic, and creative sources. These materials will guide participants in thinking about game studies from several theoretical perspectives and parallel movements, such as ludology, narratology, transmedia design, and queer game studies. Throughout the course, participants will explore different contexts and critical vocabulary to reflect on dynamics among digital games and other audiovisual media, theories and research methods, associated concepts, phenomena, and social issues, ranging from multimodality, embodiment, affect, to surveillance capitalism and human-robot interaction.

Dr. Carman Ng

SpecMo - Specialisation Module (12 CP)

In this module students will choose two seminars either from different profile areas or from only one profile area to specialise in the respective field of interest.
Read more... https://blogs.uni-bremen.de/maesc/modules/

Modulbeauftragte: Karin Esders
VAKTitel der VeranstaltungDozentIn
10-76-4-D1-a-07Key Topics in Literature: Hunger in Literature and Films in the nineteenth and twentieth centuries (in englischer Sprache)

Seminar

Termine:
wöchentlich Mi 12:15 - 13:45 GW2 B1400 NUR Mi. - So. SFG 0140 (2 SWS)

This course explores hunger as a perpetual force in societies and hunger literature as the corpus on which politics, social praxis, power struggles, and cultural meanings intersect. Focusing on major famine and starvation conditions like the Bengal Famine (1943), the Irish Potato Famine (1845-49), among others, the course offers a history of such occurrences, their consequence on the social fabric, and how that in turn shapes societies in the long run. Students will read a range of famine and starvation narratives from the nineteenth and twentieth centuries from across cultures, theorize them, and will learn to see hunger and starvation beyond their biological and statistical manifestations. The course includes lectures, class, presentations, and documentary/film.

Dr. Sukla Chatterjee
10-E76-3-FD-03Fun with Data - Research Methods in Language, Linguistics and Cultural Studies (in English Language) (in englischer Sprache)

Seminar

Einzeltermine:
Mo 21.10.19 10:00 - 14:00 GW2 A3220
Mo 04.11.19 10:00 - 14:00 GW2 A3220
Mo 18.11.19 10:00 - 14:00 GW2 A3220
Mo 02.12.19 10:00 - 14:00 GW2 A3220
Mo 16.12.19 10:00 - 14:00 GW2 A3220
Mo 06.01.20 10:00 - 14:00 GW2 A3220
Mo 13.01.20 10:00 - 14:00 GW2 A3220

In the seminar, we will explore selected research approaches and analytic methods relevant for language, linguistics and cultural studies. On the one hand, the seminar aims to develop your skills in understanding and critically evaluating methodological aspects in the research literature. On the other hand, the seminar will prepare you for your own research projects and your BA or MA thesis: We will look at important steps for planning, design, data collection, analysis and presentation.
We will cover empirical and hermeneutical approaches, quantitative and qualitative analyses, mixed-methods designs, and instruments such as questionnaires, interviews and think-aloud approaches. Besides these, you are welcome to bring your own focus to the seminar. We will illustrate theoretical aspects with practical examples – you are very welcome to bring in your own ideas and projects.
At the end of the seminar, you will have developed a mock research proposal that you present in class. (You are welcome to turn this later into your “real BA or MA thesis proposal” with your supervisor.)
Learning outcomes
At the end of the seminar, students are familiar with:
  • a variety of field-relevant data collection methods,
  • techniques for processing data,
  • methods of data evaluation,
  • key components of a research proposal.
Students will develop:
  • an in-depth understanding and awareness of selected key themes and approaches in language, linguistics and cultural studies,
  • an advanced comprehension of sophisticated theories and methodologies,
  • the ability to apply theoretical approaches and methodologies to the reading and analysis of a range of primary sources.
Students’ skills include:
  • finding and formulating research questions,
  • justifying the choice of appropriate research methods and methods of data evaluation,
  • developing and structuring a research proposal.
Overview and dates
We meet on the following seven Mondays, in room GW2, A3220, from 10 am to 2pm.
This way we have enough space to engage in group work and discussions.
Preliminary semester plan:
21.10.2019 Introduction: research traditions, research designs, research questions, first steps in planning and structuring research
04.11.2019 Quantitative and qualitative approaches: data collection and analyses
18.11.2019 Key concepts of research quality, introduction to basic statistical terms; what do data sets look like; how do I handle my variables
02.12.2019 Interviews, think-aloud protocols, retrospective interviews: design, coding, analyses
16.12.2019 Surveys and questionnaires: Interviews: design, coding, analyses
06.01.2020 Mixed-methods approaches: design and analyses, how to handle data sets
13.01.2020 Presentation of proposals, feedback
Initial reading
Cohen, L., L. Mannion and K. Morrison. 2002. Research methods in education. Fifth edition. London and New York: Routledge Falmer.
Creswell, J. W. 2003. Research Design: Qualitative, Quantitative, and Mixed Methods Approaches. (2nd ed.) Thousand Oaks, CA: Sage.
Seminar 3 ECTS points (Studienleistung, unbenotet):
1. Regular and active participation in preparatory tasks, seminar groups, discussions, and teamwork.
2. Preparatory reading of the assigned texts and preparation of the tasks that will be published in advance on StudIP.
3. Development and presentation of a (mock) research proposal (which can be developed later into your real proposal with your supervisor).
For a total of 6 ECTS points and a grade, in addition to the above:
4. Final written assignment.
Further reading
Brown, J. D. & Rodgers, T. S. 2002. Doing Second Language Research. Oxford: Oxford University Press.
Dörnyei, Z. 2007. Research Methods in Applied Linguistics. Oxford: Oxford University Press.
Hua, Z. (ed.) 2016. Research Methods in Intercultural Communication: A Practical Guide. Chichester: Wiley-Blackwell.
Mackey, A. & Gass, S. M. 2012. Research Methods in Second Language Acquisition: A Practical Guide. Chichester: Wiley-Blackwell.
McDonough, J. & McDonough, S. 1997. Research Methods for English Language Teachers. London: Hodder.
Muijs, D. 2004. Doing Quantitative Research in Education with SPSS. London: Sage.
Nunan, D. 1992. Research Methods in Language Learning. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.
Saldana, J. 2009. The coding manual for qualitative researchers. London: Sage.
Research Examples that will be discussed in the seminar
Mixed-methods design:
Harsch, C., Ushioda, E. & Ladroue, C. 2017. Investigating the predictive validity of TOEFL iBT scores and their use in informing policy in a U.K. university setting (TOEFL iBT Research Report TOEFL iBT – 30, ETS Research Report RR – 17-41). Princeton, NJ: Educational Testing Service (peer-reviewed). Available online at http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1002/ets2.12167/full
Quantitative design:
Harsch, C. & Hartig, J. 2016. Comparing C-tests and Yes/No vocabulary size tests as predictors of receptive language skills. Language Testing 33, 555-575. https://journals.sagepub.com/doi/abs/10.../0265532215594642
Qualitative design:
Harsch, C. & Poehner, M. 2016. Enhancing student experience abroad: The potential of dynamic assessment to develop student interculturality. Language and Intercultural Communication 16(3), 470-490. https://www.tandfonline.com/doi/abs/.../14708477.2016.1168043

Prof. Dr. Claudia Harsch
10-M80-1-OrMo-03Ian McEwan's Android Novel Machines Like Me (2019) (in englischer Sprache)

Seminar

Termine:
wöchentlich Fr 14:15 - 15:45 SFG 1080 (2 SWS)

This course is designed for students with a profound academic pioneer spirit. And this is mainly due to the text under scrutiny in this seminar. We shall discuss Ian McEwan's recently published android novel Machines Like Me (2019), a narrative which is too young to have already entailed critical response in terms of scholarly articles, let alone monographs etc. There are, however, quite a view reviews in the quality papers, and these early reactions tend to be full of praise.
Machines Like Me can be described as a piece of speculative fiction set in a counterfactual Britain of the 1980s. We as readers are confronted with an alternative course of history, which at times even anticipates topical political developments. In a highly computerised context, some androids represent the latest achievements. One of them, Adam, oscillates between his two functions of servant and intellectual superior. Yet it is the uncompromising decision logic of the machine mind that tends to miss the nuances of a serious moral dilemma. The corresponding ethical question will surely dominate our debate about McEwan's disturbing vision.

requirements:
• active participation
• in-depth knowledge of the reading material
• oral presentation (handout) or
• research in progress and final paper

Please note that prior enrolment via Stud.IP is mandatory. The number of participants is limited to 15 students.


text:
McEwan, Ian. Machines Like Me. London: Jonathan Cape, 2019.

Prof. Dr. Norbert Schaffeld
10-M80-1-OrMo-05Contemporary Travel Writing (in englischer Sprache)

Seminar

Termine:
wöchentlich Di 14:15 - 15:45 GW2 B1170 (2 SWS)

This course welcomes students who wish to complete the following modules:
M.A. E-SC: OrMO (Orientierungsmodul 1. Semester)
M.A. E-SC SpecMo (Spezialisierungsmodul 3. Semester);
M.A. TnL Vertiefungsmodul und Profilmodul Literatur
Non-E-SC students and academic exchange students

Travel writing is an increasingly popular genre in terms of text production and commercial success, encompassing a fascinating diversity of literary forms, modes and itineraries, which negate a forthright definition of the genre. As a repository for factual and fictional accounts of mobility and cross-cultural exchange, however, it has long been underestimated for its potential to contribute to a broad range of cultural, political and historical debates that seek to reassess the role of travel writing as a "vehicle for geographic, ethnographic and sociological knowledge." (Thompson 4). This seminar discusses diverse themes and characteristics of contemporary travel writing, postcolonial travel accounts and refugee writing and aims to map contemporary critical concepts regarding transnational and postcolonial perspectives in weekly readings of excerpts of selected travel accounts.

Since some of the participants are required to submit a research paper, we will use parts of our seminar discussions to the development of topics, the formulation of a thesis statement, as well as considerations about the methodological approaches of writing such a paper.

Additional secondary sources can be accessed in the “Semesterapparat”, a reference-only section on the third floor of the library building. A reader with selected secondary text materials will be made available for download on Stud. IP. Please be aware that your registration on Stud. IP. is mandatory (deadline September 15th, 2019).

You may wish to check the sections "Information" and "Schedule" further details such as requirements, weekly schedule, select bibliography and modes of assessment.

Requirements and Assessment
• Interest in the topic discussed and ideally a regular attendance and informed participation in class discussion (not part of your formal assessment);
• in-depth knowledge of the selected reading material,
• homework assignments,
• group projects and presentation of research paper proposals;
• research-based term paper.
The requirements as formulated above may vary depending on your overall degree program.
Copies of selected travel accounts can be purchased at the bookstore on our campus (Universitätsbuchhandlung Bremen: www.unibuch-bremen.de)

Dr. Jana Nittel
10-M80-1-OrMo-07Imperial Fictions: From Defoe to Edgeworth to Wells (in englischer Sprache)

Seminar

Einzeltermine:
Fr 10.01.20 10:00 - 16:00 GW1 A0160
Fr 31.01.20 10:00 - 18:00 GW1-HS H1000
Sa 01.02.20 10:00 - 18:00 GW2 B2890

This course explores the ways in which debates about empire are negotiated in selected classics of British fiction. Covering a period of roughly 200 years, we shall turn to three key texts consisting of Daniel Defoe’s Robinson Crusoe (1719), Maria Edgeworth’s Castle Rackrent (1800) as well as H. G. Wells’ The Time Machine (1895) and focus on notions of gender, race, class and colonialism in order to question aspects of (British) national self-consciousness. While the seminar’s emphasis is on the socio-historical contextualization of the primary works, it will also build and expand on already existing knowledge of literary theories and cultural methods. All students are expected to participate in the discussions and activities and prepare a research-oriented (group) presentation based on their chosen topics and concepts. We will also jointly watch and discuss one film that helps to shed light on the link between the history of the British Empire and its colonial aftermath. Please note: Students must have read all three novels in advance of the very first session – familiarity with the primary literature is essential for a successful participation.

Keywords: British Empire, colonialism, cultural history, gender, class, slavery, nature, genre, science

Requirements:
• registration on Stud.IP
• in-depth knowledge of the reading material, i.e. read the text(s) in advance!
• regular attendance and oral participation
• oral presentation and handout
• term paper (optional)

Texts:
Defoe, Daniel. Robinson Crusoe. New York [et al.]: Norton, 1994. [pages 1-221]
Edgeworth, Maria. Castle Rackrent. New York [et al.]: Norton, 2015. [pages 1-62]
Wells, H. G. The Time Machine. New York [et al.]: Norton, 2009. [pages 1-73]

Dr. phil. Jennifer Henke
10-M80-1-OrMo-09Cultural History: Studying and Working with Indigenous Short Films (in englischer Sprache)

Seminar

Termine:
wöchentlich Mi 16:15 - 17:45 GW1 B0080 (2 SWS)

In this seminar we will learn about Indigenous history, issues, problems, and identities through watching documentaries and short films dealing with Indigenous topics in North America. Initially we will learn about how to assess short films and watch a few Indigenous short films before looking at some lesser known ones that have just been released. We will cooperate with the 'Indianer Inuit Filmfestival' in Stuttgart and will watch a selection of the films that will be shown there in February 2020. We will form a jury that will select the best one to be awarded the Best Short Film Award. We will also transcribe, translate and provide the German subtitles for a few films that will run at the festival in Stuttgart. As a highlight, a selection of students will go to the festival (6-9 February 2020; https://www.nordamerika-filmfestival.com/) and participate in all showings and events and present the film award on the festival stage.

Prof. Dr. Kerstin Knopf
10-M80-3-SpecMo-01Metaphor at the Nexus of Language and Culture in World Englishes (in englischer Sprache)
Modultyp B/C im Studiengang Language Sciences, M.A.

Seminar

Termine:
wöchentlich Mo 10:00 - 12:00 GW2 A3390 (CIP-Labor FB 10) (2 SWS)

In the last decades, the research paradigm of World Englishes has experienced a proliferation of detailed studies of different aspects of Englishes across the world. These descriptions have largely focused on phonological, lexical, morphosyntactic, and, more recently, also pragmatic characteristics of World Englishes. However, the field of figurative language use, as manifest e.g. in conceptual metaphors and idioms, has largely been neglected so far. The English language and its worldwide diversification provides rich potential for looking into aspects of variation in conceptual and linguistic metaphor, and for exploring how the culturally specific settings of the many Englishes may determine some of that variation. Thus, research on metaphor in World Englishes addresses the nexus of language and culture and is therefore a truly interdisciplinary research field located at the interface of Cognitive Linguistics and Conceptual Metaphor Theory, Cultural Linguistics, and World Englishes.

In this seminar, we will first deal with Conceptual Metaphor Theory as a major strand within Cognitive Linguistics and then address recent developments in Cognitive Sociolinguistics and Cultural Linguistics before reviewing the merging research on metaphor in World Englishes. The following main questions will be discussed:

­To what extent are electronic corpora viable sources of data to examine metaphor and figurative language in World Englishes, and what are state-of-the-art approaches to the identification and retrieval of metaphorical expressions and idioms from corpus data?

­What source and target domains can be identified as fruitful for the study of metaphor and idioms in World Englishes (e.g. the conceptualization of emotions, FOOD / EATING as source domains)?

­Can certain types of figurative language serve as markers of nativization / indigenization in World Englishes?

­How do metaphors and idioms relate to underlying differences in cultural conceptualizations in World Englishes?

Required preparatory reading for this class:
Kövecses, Z. (2010), Metaphor. A Practical Introduction. 2nd edition. Oxford: Oxford University Press. Chapters 1 and 14.

Prof. Dr. Marcus Callies
10-M80-3-SpecMo-02Advanced Methods and Theories of Multimodality: Communicating Effectively with Words, Pictures, Design, Sounds and Movement (in englischer Sprache)

Seminar

Termine:
wöchentlich Di 16:00 - 18:00 UNICOM 3; 0. Ebene; Seminarraum 2 (2 SWS)

This course is for carrying out guided projects in any areas of potential relevance to multimodality studies, for practising techniques, and learning analytic methods that can support research projects. Participants can bring their own projects or be guided towards research projects at the outset of the course. Relevant reading and literature, and other useful resources, will be discussed for each type of project carried out.

Prof. John Arnold Bateman, Ph.D.
Tamara Drummond
10-M80-3-SpecMo-03Critical Game Studies (in englischer Sprache)

Seminar

Termine:
wöchentlich Di 14:15 - 15:45 SFG 0140 (2 SWS)

This course examines how digital games interact with contemporary society as medium, emerging technology, and evolving experiences and creative expressions. Participants will engage with diverse (digital) games, including mainstream / independent / experimental titles, role-playing games, serious games, and more. Organizing the course are selected motifs that invite critical thought on the sociocultural, political, economic, and artistic dimensions of games, supplemented with weekly media encounters and readings across academic, journalistic, and creative sources. These materials will guide participants in thinking about game studies from several theoretical perspectives and parallel movements, such as ludology, narratology, transmedia design, and queer game studies. Throughout the course, participants will explore different contexts and critical vocabulary to reflect on dynamics among digital games and other audiovisual media, theories and research methods, associated concepts, phenomena, and social issues, ranging from multimodality, embodiment, affect, to surveillance capitalism and human-robot interaction.

Dr. Carman Ng

AWE 2 - Academic Work Experience 2 (9CP)

Students individually organise their active participation in various forms of academic work and practice in co-operation and under the supervision of their mentor.
Read more... https://blogs.uni-bremen.de/maesc/modules/

Modulbeauftragter: Marcus Callies
VAKTitel der VeranstaltungDozentIn
10-M80-3-AW1-AW2-01Mastervision: ESC Student Conference 2019 (in englischer Sprache)

Praktikum
ECTS: 3

Einzeltermine:
Fr 06.12.19 09:00 - 17:00 GW1 B0080
Sa 07.12.19 09:00 - 17:00 GW2 B2890
Steffen Schaub, M.A.
Aktualisiert von: TYPO3-Support