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Modules

Module Schedule

Taken as a Major the course comprises a total of 12 modules as well as General Studies. The Major in Cultural Research also includes a Minor. The course schedule has obligatory modules O and obligatory elective modules OE that are offered on an annually rotating basis.

The Subsidiary Subject or Minor in Cultural Research comprises modules 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 7, 8/9 (one as an elective) and 11, which are taken in the following order. As for the Major, the course schedule includes obligatory modules O and obligatory elective modules OE that are offered on an annually rotating basis.

Module 2a is waived for students who choose Cultural Researchas a Major or Minor and who are studying Communication and Media Studies: Media Analysis and Media Practice as either a Minor or Major in the Bachelor’s program. Instead they choose Module 2b (or electively four one-hour sessions per week per semester from Module 4). In addition, they need to take Modules 8a and 9a from the option Anthropology / Cultural Research. The selection does not allow you to take courses in Communication and Media Studies (8b, 9b).

The following rules apply for both Major and Minor students:
CP stands for Credit Points. Credit Points are awarded for a given course based on the volume of work involved. One credit point is roughly equivalent to 30 working hours. The work-load covers attendance time spent at university and time spent preparing for a course and assimilating course material subsequent to class, including research and reading,  written assignments or revising for mid-term exams.

Note:
The following table provides an overview of core course content, study goals, types of course offerings and examination requirements for individual modules in the BA inCultural Research. A complete module guide is available in German as an appendix to the Examination Regulations:

The examination schedule for both new and old Bachelor’s program (based on information provided by module coordinators) can be found here.

 

 

Cultural Research as a Major

Cultural Research as a Minor


M1: Introductory Module: Anthropology (Obligatory Module)

M2: Introduction to Communication and Media Studies

M3: Intermediate Module: Subject Classification (Economics, Politics, Religion) (Obligatory Module)

M4: Intermediate Module: Current Fields and Sub-Disciplines in Anthropology (Obligatory Elective Module)

M5: Method Module I (Qualitative Methods) (Obligatory Module)

M6: Method Module II (Qualitative Methods) (Obligatory Elective Module)

M7: Advanced Module: Regional / Local Studies (Obligatory Elective Module)

M8/9: Obligatory Elective Modules 8 / 9: Intermediate / Advanced Modules Focus:  a) Anthropology b) Media

M10: Vocational Module (Obligatory Elective)

M11: Advanced Module: Practice / Teaching / Research (Independent-Study Module) (Obligatory Elective Module)

M12: Final Module: BA ThesisandSupporting Seminar (Obligatory Module)

General Studies

BA Cultural Research as a Major (120 CP)

   

BA Cultural Research as a Minor (60 CP)

   

List of Modules

Module 1: Introductory Module: Anthropology (Obligatory Module)

Content and Goals:
The module introduces students to key concepts and sub-disciplines in the Bachelor’s Program in Cultural Research, as well as history of theories and methods. Students are able to familiarize themselves with subject areas, typical questions and methods through in-depth analysis of specialist debates.

Course offerings and examination requirements:
M1 spans 2 semesters, offering a lecture in each with supporting seminars. Module completion requires passing a double test.

 

Module 2a: Introduction to Communication and Media Studies

Content and Goals:
M2a provides an overview of Communication and Media Studies, as well as furnishing key concepts needed for analyzing media-based communication processes. Course content is broken down into two main segments, first media theory and second communication theory.

Course offerings and examination requirements:
The module comprises a lecture with supervised tutorials and exercises covering advanced readings and discussions of selected texts. It is completed via a final written exam.

 

 

Module 3: Intermediate Module: Subject Classification (Economics, Politics, Religion)

Content and Goals
This module builds on the basic skills that students will have developed during the introductory phase and presents an overview of the discipline. You will study connections between economics, culture, politics, social problems and religion while addressing core areas in Anthropology.

Course offerings and examination requirements:
During lectures and an accompanying seminar, core theories and research work are discussed and relevant knowledgeanchored in practical exercises. The module exam takes the form of short written assignments, such as a portfolio or online blog.

 

Module 4: Intermediate Module: Current Fields and Sub-Disciplines in Anthropology (Obligatory Elective Module)

Content and Goals: '
Building on M1 to M3, this module aims to deepen knowledge acquired previously and provide an overview of current fieldswithin the discipline. Theories and methods used in Anthropology and Cultural Research are reviewed in areas of Department specializations.

Course offerings and examination requirements:
Students choose two seminars from amongst the pool of seminars on offer. The module exam takes place in one of the two seminars: either an oral exam, a practical output or creation, a documentation or preferably an academic paper.

Module 5: Method Module I (Qualitative Methods) (Obligatory Module)

Content and Goals:
The module provides students with in-depth methods training allowing them to carry out independent anthropological fieldwork. The emphasis is placed on qualitative methods of empirical cultural research with a focus on ethnographic practices.
 

Course offerings and examination requirements:'
The module comprises a lecture and accompanying exercise (tutorial) in which teams of students conduct their own research in a research-based learning optic. The module exam is organized in the form of a written research report.

Module 6: Method Module II (Qualitative Methods) (Obligatory Elective Module)

Content and Goals:
The aim of the module is to further advance methods training and to familiarize students with a select set ofqualitative techniques.


Course offerings and examination requirements:
During seminars students apply their knowledge of methods to their chosen field / documentation of choice in line with the goal of research-based learning. The module exam takes the form of a written research report.
 

Module 7: Advanced Module: Regional / Local Studies (Obligatory Elective Module)

Content and Goals:
In this module students familiarize themselves with a specific place or region. The aim is to develop an analytic approach to understanding the underlying relationships between the various subject areas in specific local contexts and their cultural, economic, political and historical embeddedness.
 

Course offerings and examination requirements:
Students are required to choose a seminar (two one-hour sessions perweek per semester) from an available pool. The module exam takes place during seminar and can either be an oral exam, a specific output or creation, documentation or an academic essay.

Obligatory Elective Modules 8 / 9: Intermediate / Advanced Modules Focus: a) Anthropology b) Media

Goals and Content:
Modules M 8 and M9 deliver in-depth academic knowledge on historical and contemporary questions in Cultural Research. Methods-training and students’ ability to critically reflect on material are tested in relation to specific theories and sets of facts. In this way M8 and M9 build on specialist knowledge in areas of Department research strength and subjects taught at the Department.
The variety of subjects on offer enables students to personalize their own study profile in line with underlying career goals and interests.
 

Course offerings and examination requirements:
Each of the two specialization modules (M8 and M9) consists of 4 SWS (one-hour sessions per week per semester), making up a total of 9 CP respectively. Taken together, M8 and M9 therefore count for 18 CP and consist of8 SWS (one-hour sessions per week per semester).

Students usually select two seminars from amongst the varied pool of seminars on offer in Modules M8 and M9, each of which consist of 2 SWS. Module exams take place in one of the two seminars in the form of an out-of-class academic essay (6 CP for the graded examination). In the second seminar, students need to complete a further (ungraded) academic attainment (counting 3 CP), which includes active class attendance and a number of shorter assignments or tasks.

If Module M8 or M9 offers courses consisting of 4 SWS, students can complete examination requirements (6 ungraded CP) and coursework requirements (3 ungraded CP) - i.e. a total of 9 CP - for the entire module during class sessions.
All course offerings in M8 and M9 are either in the area of a) Anthropology or b) Media Studies. Students can choose themselves whether they take an entire M8 or M9 module (i.e. 4 SWS, counting 9 CP) in the field of Anthropology or Media Studies. The option also exists to to take both M8 and M9 exclusively in one of the two subjects - i.e in a) or b).

The option does not exist to combine courses from a) and b) for an entire M8 or M9 module: all 9 CP for an entire M8 or M9 module need to be selected from the same subject area – i.e. either a) or b) respectively.
Students who have chosen the combination KUWI/KMW are only permitted to attend seminars in the area of a) Anthropology for M8 and M9.

Module 10: Vocational Module (Obligatory Elective)

Goals and Content:
In the Vocational Module you get to apply knowledge acquired during studies to practical, real-world contexts. The objective is to deliver practical, social, cultural, organizational, business and legal skills relevant to a subsequent career. The core of the module comprises a minimum six-week external internship that can be extended in connection with M11.

Examination requirements:
The module exam is based on an internship report of 10 pages and completion of the evaluation sheet / questionnaireused to assess the internship experience.

Module 11: Advanced Module: Practice / Teaching / Research (Independent-Study Module) (Obligatory Elective Module)

Goals and Content:
The module aims to promote independent and autonomous work and to advance the choice of specialization in view of further career planning subsequent to study. Students determine the bulk ofmodule content themselves in consultation with module coordinators - available areas being vocational practice, reading or research. The option exists to choose either one specific subject area or a combination of fields.

Examination requirements:
Module exam: Depending on how self-study is organized, this can be an internship report, written journal, research report, specific creation or documentation.

You can find further information on the Self-Study Module M11 by clicking here.

 

Module 12 Final Module: BA Thesis and Supporting Seminar (Obligatory Module)

Goals and Content:
In the concluding module students put together a large-scale, independent project. The core of the Final Module is made up of the BA Thesis which needs to be completed during semester within 12 weeks of registration. The thesis is supervised by a member of teaching staff and is roughly 30 pages (or 10,000 words) in length.
 

Course offerings and examination requirements:
A supporting seminar underpins the drafting process for the BA thesis and allows exam candidates to present their ongoing work. Both the final BA thesis itself and presentation during seminar make up the actual exam.

General Studies (GS)

Information on General Studies Courses for the BA in Cultural Research

# How to choose specializations in the curriculum?

# What´s missing from teaching – what else would I like to attend?

# Where can I find information on further courses and study-relevant resources? 

General Studies (GS) allows students to focus on and / or deepen knowledge in specialist areas of interest. As such you can develop your own study profile while giving weight to particular subject areas. The BA with Cultural Research as a Major contains a General Studies component of 15 CP, which can be achieved through Obligatory Electives for Cultural Research, course offerings in other subjects, General Studies courses in Faculty 09 or the complementary subject group areas. You can also obtain more than the mandatory number of CP. GS courses attended are listed in the final BA Diploma. Where grades are awarded for a given course these can also be included in the Certificate in consultation with lecturers.

GS can be awarded in the following areas:

  • Kuwi Obligatory Electives in Modules 6, 7, 8, 9
  • Kuwi Complementary Courses e.g. Kuwi-Capacities as a Blended-Learning Module
  • Studies and Career e.g. Cultural Management
  • Other Subjects areas
  • Transdisciplinary course offeringse.g. Diversity and Anti-discrimination
  • Language skillse.g. language courses at the Foreign Language Center 
  • Core skills e.g. working with digital media
  • Study-relevant stays abroad and vocational experience
  • University-wide and academic engagement
  • Department / Subject-specific offerings
Advisory services for GS

at the Department:

  • Lecturers
  • Personnel in charge of academic recognitions for Cultural Research

at centralized university-wide services in Faculty 09:

You can find the exact addresses here: http://www.fb9.uni-bremen.de

Faculty 09 includes a specific course organized as a GS module that includes a variety of different study options. The course is listed on the current course noticeboard and is summarized on the following page:

GS I – Course Offerings on Study and Careers Orientation

These are key transdisciplinary qualifications or courses that provide impetus for careers planning. Recognitions: Course organizers, Careers Center, Study Center

GS II – Profile-building at the Department / Faculty  

such as types of research-based study: dealing with Diversity or Culture4all
Recognitions: Course organizers, Study Center

GS III – Select Specialist Lectures (GS from the entire university-wide lecture pool)

in consultation with relevant lecturers (including others Departments / Faculties).
Recognitions: Lecturers, Academic Recognitions Coordinator, Study Center

GS IV – Transdisciplinary Course Offerings: University-wide Offerings and E-learning for Careers

Centrally organized university-wide courses listed in the Lecture Schedule / Course Prospectus under: ’Complementary Studies‘ (courses organized by Career-Center, International Office, e n t e r  s c i e n c e, Study Workshop, Foreign Language Center, eGeneral Studies http://mlecture.uni-bremen.de/egs/ u.a.), Recognitions by course organizers

GS V – Vocational Experience

Internships and study-relevant professional experience completed in the framework of the current BA course on top of the obligatory internship.
Examination requirements: learning / achievement report of 3 to 5 pages.
Recognitions: Career Center, Study Center, Internship Coordinators, Academic Recognitions Coordinator
Additional internships / professional work experience can be recognized from a minimum of 4 weeks (4CP) up to a maximum of 12 weeks duration (12 CP)

GS VI - Tutorials, Writing and Research-related Coaching

Tutorials and / or writing and research coaching can be counted towards GS if a) training as a Tutor / or as a Writing or Research Coach has been completed, b) the module that needs to be complemented by further attainments has already been completed.
Examination requirements: learning / achievement report of 3 to 5 pages.
Recognitions need to be clearly agreed upon with: Lecturers, Academic Recognitions Coordinators, Study Center, e n t e r s c i e n c e, 6CP (including 1 CP for training as a Tutor), or emolument.

 GS VII – Study-relevant Foreign Stays / International Achievements / Languages

Study-relevant foreign stays can be counted towards GS during study time so long as they are not part of the obligatory curriculum for chosen subjects. The study-relevant foreign stay can be documented through corresponding certificates or a learning / achievement report (3 to 5 pages in length).
Recognitions: Erasmus Coordinators, AcademicRecognitions Coordinators: CP attribution based on length of internship (as a rule 6 CP per semester). Stays of a minimum of 4 weeks can be recognized. Foreign language skills acquired in the course of study that are not mandatory for examinations in chosen subjects can also be recognized for GS purposes. Proof of completion of a given course; of having completed examination requirements; and required number of hours – max 12 CP

GS VIII – Writing Skills

Student workshops and individual coaching / one-on-one support. Recognitions: Academic Recognitions Coordinator, ForstA Officer

GS IX – University-wide Engagement

Contributions to StugA, AStA, Appointment / Appeals Boards, independently organized university-wide AGs, Committee work (usually of a duration of at least one semester in length). Examination requirements: learning / achievement report (3 to 5 pages in length) Recognitions: Lecturers, Academic Recognitions Coordinators, Study Center. Max 6 CP  

GS X – Academic Engagement

Contributions to research projects, attendance of specialist symposia, congresses, guest lectures. Please consult with lecturers / teaching staff prior to courses to ensure that a given course can be recognized.
Examination requirements: learning / achievement report (3 to 5 pages in length), Recognitions: Lecturers, Academic Recognitions Coordinators, Study Center, 1 – 3 CP

 

Blended Learning Module: Kuwi Capacities [Cultural Research Resources]

The module comprises a combination of online tasks and labs (classroom teaching), coveringpractical work techniques in Cultural Research such as: identifying appropriate subjects, developing research questions, literature searches, writing / drafting, reading techniques, using quotes and more. During labs, course content is amplified, and supplementary knowledge delivered. Students are awarded 3 CP in the area of GS.

The module was designed jointly between students and staff, and as such is perfectly geared to student needs. Beginningstudents in particular, and all those wishing to refresh their grasp of practical work techniques, are likely to benefit most. The module offers support and guidance for producing academic research / out-of-class assignments / the final written paper.

The complete module guide can be found here.

You can browse the online area here: https://blogs.uni-bremen.de/kuwicapacities/