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Single-Subject Bachelor

A single-subject bachelor's program on one subject. All contents, including complementary modules, are integrated into the curriculum (the degree program). The subject-specific program components are complemented by career-relevant elements and courses dealing with learning techniques. In degree programs including an academic specialty, these components are referred to as general studies (GS). They contain 10-25% of the program. In General Studies, students acquire generic competencies, eg scientific methods, literature search, foreign languages, writing, presentation and moderation techniques, project management, time management, and media literacy. These program components are generally free electives.

The range of single-subject bachelor programs at the University of Bremen includes the fields of mathematics, science and technology as well as the social sciences. The prescribed period of study is usually 6 semesters, although some programs take 7-8 semesters to complete. An overview of all single-subject bachelor programs offered at the University of Bremen can be found in the Studies Database.

Study componentsShare for RSZ = 6 semesters
Scientific shares75 to 90%
General Studies

10 to 25%

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Modular studies and credit points

Studies are divided into modules. These are individual learning units, each completed with an exam. The time spent studying is measured in Credit Points (CP), which are acquired continuously during the studies. The final grade awarded results from the sum of the CP-weighted module grades. Thus, the student input over the entire course of studies flows into the final grade. One CP entails a workload of 30 hours. Each semester, students should aim at earning approximately 30 CP. This requires an average workload of approximately 40 hours per week.

The number of credit points that have to be earned in General Studies or in the career-related area varies according to the program in question. Students have to earn a total of 180 CP for the award of a bachelor's degree.

 

Program Structure Bachelor

Discipline-oriented Studies

75-90% of the bachelor's program with a subject-specific profile is used to impart specialist knowledge. In the single-subject bachelor’s program, discipline-oriented knowledge is taught in one subject. In the two-subject bachelor’s program, discipline-oriented knowledge is spread over two subjects. In the bachelor's teaching degree program, 70-80% is for the acquisition of discipline-oriented knowledge, whereby the studies encompass either two subjects (secondary school) or three subjects (teaching degree elementary school).

General Studies / Educational Science

The subject-specific study program is supplemented by study-related components. There are also courses in which study techniques are taught.

For study programs with a specialized academic profile, these components are called General Studies (GS) and comprise 10-25% of the study program. The area of General Studies encompasses so-called key qualifications, e.g. scientific methods, literature search, foreign languages, writing, presentation and facilitation techniques, project management, time management, and media literacy. As a rule, these subject options are electives.

In the bachelor's teaching degree program, the occupational-field components are in the educational sciences, which account for 20-30% of the bachelor's degree, depending on the targeted school type.

Modularization and Credit Points

Studies are divided into modules. These are individual learning units, each completed with an exam. The time spent studying is measured in Credit Points (CP), which are acquired continuously during the studies. The final grade awarded results from the sum of the CP-weighted module grades. Thus, the student input over the entire course of studies flows into the final grade. One CP entails a workload of 30 hours. Each semester, students should aim at earning approximately 30 CP. This requires an average workload of approximately 40 hours per week.The number of credit points that have to be earned in General Studies or the area of ​​professionalization vary for the different bachelor’s programs. As a rule students have to earn a total of 180 CP for the award of a bachelor's degree.

Single-subject Bachelor and two-subject Bachelor in comparison

Single-subject Bachelor

The single-subject bachelor's degree focuses on one subject. All contents are integrated into the curriculum (the study program,) including supporting non-specialist subjects. General Studies account for 10-25% of the program. Any subject in the areas of mathematics, science and technology can be chosen as the major in the single-subject bachelor, but also social sciences are offered as a single-subject bachelor. The standard period of study (SPS) is usually 6 semesters; some courses require 7-8 semesters to complete.

Study componentsShare for RSZ = 6 semesters
Scientific shares75 to 90%
General Studies10 to 25%

Two-subject Bachelor

In the case of the two-subject Bachelor with a profile and a complementary subject, the program focus is on the profile subject. The degree program comprises 67% of the profile subject and 33% of the complementary subject. In the profile subject, 15 to 38% of the courses are in General Studies. Mostly, subjects from the humanities, language, culture, arts, social sciences and economics are chosen as majors in the two-subject bachelor’s programs.

In the two-subject bachelor’s with a subject-specific profile, the profile subject can be combined with any complementary subject. But not all combinations make sense for everyone! Think carefully about what qualifications you would like to acquire, what you are interested in and what you would like to learn. Find out about program contents and recommendations for complementary subjects under www.studium.uni-bremen.de, and consult the study center of the profile subject, if necessary.

Study componentsproportion of

Profile subject, of which
- scientific basics
- profile area (specialization, general studies)

67%
42 to 57%
10 to 25%

complementary specialist33%