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Course Catalog

Study Program WiSe 2019/2020

English-Speaking Cultures / Englisch, B.A.

Show courses: all | in english | for older adults

LEHRVERANSTALTUNGEN DES 1. JAHRES (PO 2011)

Basismodul A: Englische Literaturwissenschaft (6 CP)

6 CP (3 CP + 3 CP)

Modulbeauftragte/r: Dr. Jana Nittel, jnittel@uni-bremen.de
Course numberTitle of eventLecturer
10-76-1-BasismodulA-01Introduction to English Literatures (Part I) (3CP) (in English)

Seminar (Teaching)
ECTS: 3

Dates:
weekly (starts in week: 1) Mon. 14:15 - 15:45 SFG 1080 (2 Credit hours)
weekly (starts in week: 1) Tue. 12:15 - 13:45 GW2 B1216 (2 Credit hours)
weekly (starts in week: 1) Wed. 12:15 - 13:45 SFG 2040 (2 Credit hours)
weekly (starts in week: 1) Thu. 14:15 - 15:45 GW1 B0100 (2 Credit hours)

Module convenor: Dr Jana Nittel (jnittel@uni-bremen.de)
Lecturers: Dr. Jana Nittel (Groups A and B), Samira Spatzek (Group C) and Paula von Gleich (Group D)

Introduction to English Literatures [Part 1] (3 CP)
This introductory course will offer students access to literary studies at university level and try to balance scholarly considerations with aesthetic enjoyment. It is the first part of a two-semester module, which will continue in the following Summer Term (Part II). In this first semester, we will look at the basic concepts not only of literature itself but also of literary criticism /Literaturwissenschaft. As we read our primary texts, we will be able to look at questions of literary genre (poetry, drama, narrative texts) and literary history (different periods and different national contexts). In addition, we will look at current theories of literature and of course strategies of interpreting and analysing literary texts in a systematic, scholarly way, thus laying the theoretical and terminological groundwork to the study of literature, both from a methodological and a historical perspective.

The course will run in four groups. All students are required to register on Stud.IP for one of these four groups A, B, C or D by selecting the option “Participants/TeilnehmerInnen” on Stud.IP, followed by “Functions/Groups”. Please select only one group and be aware that the number of students who are permitted to sign up for each group is limited (room size) and that your registration is mandatory. Deadline for courses offered for first semester students: last Friday before the start of the lecture period

Please explore the sections “Information” and “Schedule” on Stud. IP. for further details such as requirements, weekly schedule, select bibliography, reference-only section in the library, modes of assessment and the exam schedule. Erasmus Exchange Students and Free Movers - please check requirements as outlined.

Module description: http://www.fb10.uni-bremen.de/anglistik/ba2/module.aspx
Departmental extended reading list (Literatures in English): http://www.fb10.uni-bremen.de/anglistik/literaturwissenschaft/default.aspx

Required reading materials (you will need a copy of these books for class):
Nünning, Vera, and Ansgar Nünning. An Introduction to the Study of English and American Literature (Italics). 4. Auflage, Klett Lerntraining, 2018.
Shakespeare, William, and Robert S. Miola. Hamlet (Italics). 1st ed., W.W. Norton & Co, 2011.

Availability: Copies of the texts can be purchased at the bookstore on our campus (Universitätsbuchhandlung Bremen: www.unibuch-bremen.de). In addition, you will find copies in the reference-only section on the third floor of the library building.

Requirements:
• Interest in the topics discussed and ideally a regular attendance and informed participation in class discussion (not part of your formal assessment);
• in-depth knowledge of the selected reading material and course materials,
• final written test at Test Center (University Boulevard)

Dr. Jana Nittel
Samira Spatzek, M.A.
Paula von Gleich, M.A.

Basismodul B: Englische Sprachwissenschaft (6 CP)

6 CP (3 CP + 3 CP)

Modulbeauftragte/r: Prof. Dr. John Bateman, bateman@uni-bremen.de
Course numberTitle of eventLecturer
10-76-1-Basismodul B-01Introduction to Linguistics (in English)

Seminar (Teaching)

Dates:
weekly (starts in week: 1) Mon. 12:00 - 14:00 SFG 1030 (2 Credit hours) Introduction to Linguistics

Linguistics is the scientific study of language and communication. It deals with all aspects of how people use language and what they must know in order to do so. The purpose of this class is to give a systematic introduction to the variety of ways in which language can be examined scientifically. Students will be introduced to and equipped with the fundamental concepts, the adequate terminology and methodology for linguistic analysis. The class will thus provide an overview of the core areas of linguistics – phonetics and phonology (the study of speech sounds), morphology (the structure of words), syntax (the structure of sentences), semantics (the study of meaning) and pragmatics (the study of meaning and language use in context). Taking a contrastive German-English perspective whenever possible, this course will also cater for the needs and interests of students who want to become teachers of English.

RECOMMENDED LITERATURE (please buy this book):
Kortmann, Bernd (2005), English Linguistics: Essentials. Berlin: Cornelsen.

ASSESSMENT
  • regular attendance and active participation in in-class data analysis and discussion
  • careful reading and preparation of assigned readings for each session
  • final exam

Dr. Inke Du Bois
Dr. Anke Schulz
10-76-1-Basismodul B-02Introduction to Linguistics (in English)

Seminar (Teaching)

Dates:
weekly (starts in week: 1) Mon. 14:00 - 16:00 SFG 1030 (2 Credit hours)

Linguistics is the scientific study of language and communication. It deals with all aspects of how people use language and what they must know in order to do so. The purpose of this class is to give a systematic introduction to the variety of ways in which language can be examined scientifically. Students will be introduced to and equipped with the fundamental concepts, the adequate terminology and methodology for linguistic analysis. The class will thus provide an overview of the core areas of linguistics – phonetics and phonology (the study of speech sounds), morphology (the structure of words), syntax (the structure of sentences), semantics (the study of meaning) and pragmatics (the study of meaning and language use in context). Taking a contrastive German-English perspective whenever possible, this course will also cater for the needs and interests of students who want to become teachers of English.

RECOMMENDED LITERATURE (please buy this book):
Kortmann, Bernd (2005), English Linguistics: Essentials. Berlin: Cornelsen.

ASSESSMENT
  • regular attendance and active participation in in-class data analysis and discussion
  • careful reading and preparation of assigned readings for each session
  • final exam

Dr. Inke Du Bois
Dr. Anke Schulz
10-76-1-Basismodul C-5Introduction to English Linguistics I (in English)

Seminar (Teaching)

Dates:
weekly (starts in week: 1) Tue. 10:00 - 12:00 GW2 B1216 (2 Credit hours)

Linguistics is the scientific study of language and communication. It deals with all aspects of how people use language and what they must know in order to do so. The purpose of this class is to give a systematic introduction to the variety of ways in which language can be examined scientifically. Students will be introduced to and equipped with the fundamental concepts, the adequate terminology and methodology for linguistic analysis. The class will thus provide an overview of the core areas of linguistics – phonetics and phonology (the study of speech sounds), morphology (the structure of words), syntax (the structure of sentences), semantics (the study of meaning) and pragmatics (the study of meaning and language use in context). Taking a contrastive German-English perspective whenever possible, this course will also cater for the needs and interests of students who want to become teachers of English.

RECOMMENDED LITERATURE (please buy this book):
Kortmann, Bernd (2005), English Linguistics: Essentials. Berlin: Cornelsen.

ASSESSMENT
  • regular attendance and active participation in in-class data analysis and discussion
  • careful reading and preparation of assigned readings for each session
  • final exam

Steffen Schaub, M.A.
10-76-1-Basismodul C-6Introduction to English Linguistics I (in English)

Seminar (Teaching)

Dates:
weekly (starts in week: 1) Tue. 14:00 - 16:00 GW2 B2890 (2 Credit hours)

Linguistics is the scientific study of language and communication. It deals with all aspects of how people use language and what they must know in order to do so. The purpose of this class is to give a systematic introduction to the variety of ways in which language can be examined scientifically. Students will be introduced to and equipped with the fundamental concepts, the adequate terminology and methodology for linguistic analysis. The class will thus provide an overview of the core areas of linguistics – phonetics and phonology (the study of speech sounds), morphology (the structure of words), syntax (the structure of sentences), semantics (the study of meaning) and pragmatics (the study of meaning and language use in context). Taking a contrastive German-English perspective whenever possible, this course will also cater for the needs and interests of students who want to become teachers of English.

RECOMMENDED LITERATURE (please buy this book):
Kortmann, Bernd (2005), English Linguistics: Essentials. Berlin: Cornelsen.

ASSESSMENT
  • regular attendance and active participation in in-class data analysis and discussion
  • careful reading and preparation of assigned readings for each session
  • final exam

Steffen Schaub, M.A.

Basismodul C: Kultur- und Sprachgeschichte der englischsprachigen Welt (6 CP)

6 CP (3 CP + 3 CP)

Modulbeauftragte/r: Dr. Karin Esders, esders@uni-bremen.de und Dr. Inke Du Bois, dubois@uni-bremen.de
Course numberTitle of eventLecturer
10-76-1-Basismodul C-1A - Key Moments in the Cultural History of the English-Speaking World (in English)

Seminar (Teaching)

Dates:
weekly (starts in week: 1) Wed. 12:00 - 14:00 GW2 B2890 (2 Credit hours)

This course aims to introduce students to key moments in the social and cultural histories of English-speaking countries. In analyzing selected case studies from the Renaissance to postcolonialism we will pay particular attention to historical shifts and cultural encounters and their dynamics of difference and power. We will draw for our discussions on a wide variety of sources, such as scholarly and fictional texts, paintings, advertisements, moving pictures and photographs, and will apply a choice of theoretical and analytical concepts.

The course will run as four groups (A-B-C-D); students have to choose one of them. It is the first part of a two-semester module which will continue in the following summer semester as "Key Moments in the Linguistic History of the English-Speaking World". All reading material will be made available for download in Stud. IP.

Leistungsnachweis/Requirements:
Regular attendance and oral participation
• In-depth knowledge of the reading material
• Oral group presentation
• five very short papers (mirco papers)

Please note that prior enrollment via Stud. IP is mandatory.

Dr. Karin Esders-Angermund
10-76-1-Basismodul C-2B - Key Moments in the Cultural History of the English-Speaking World (in English)

Seminar (Teaching)

Dates:
weekly (starts in week: 1) Thu. 10:00 - 12:00 SFG 2040 (2 Credit hours)

This course aims to introduce students to key moments in the social and cultural histories of English-speaking countries. In analyzing selected case studies from the Renaissance to postcolonialism we will pay particular attention to historical shifts and cultural encounters and their dynamics of difference and power. We will draw for our discussions on a wide variety of sources, such as scholarly and fictional texts, paintings, advertisements, moving pictures and photographs, and will apply a choice of theoretical and analytical concepts.

The course will run as four groups (A-B-C-D); students have to choose one of them. It is the first part of a two-semester module which will continue in the following summer semester as "Key Moments in the Linguistic History of the English-Speaking World". All reading material will be made available for download in Stud. IP.

Leistungsnachweis/Requirements:
Regular attendance and oral participation
• In-depth knowledge of the reading material
• Oral group presentation
• five very short papers (mirco papers)

Please note that prior enrollment via Stud. IP is mandatory.

Dr. Karin Esders-Angermund
10-76-1-Basismodul C-33-Key Moments in the Cultural History of the English-Speaking World (in English)

Seminar (Teaching)
ECTS: 3

Dates:
weekly (starts in week: 1) Tue. 12:00 - 14:00 GW2 B2900 (2 Credit hours)

This course aims to introduce students to key moments in the social and cultural histories of English-speaking countries. In analyzing a range of case studies from the Renaissance to postcolonialism we will pay particular attention to historical shifts and cultural encounters and their dynamics of difference and power. We will draw for our discussions on a wide variety of sources, above all scholarly texts, but also paintings, advertisements, and moving pictures, and will get acquainted with a range of theoretical and analytical concepts.

Students are requested to enrol in one of the four parallel courses on offer. This seminar is the first part of a two-semester module which will continue in the following summer semester as "Key Moments in the Linguistic History of the English-Speaking World".
Please note that there is an optional tutorial (“Übung”) for this seminar. Please register for the tutorial on StudIP to enable the tutors to form groups, communicate with you, and let you have all information concerning dates, times, and study materials.

All reading material will be made available for download in StudIP.

Requirements:
# regular and active participation
# in-depth knowledge of the reading material
# one oral group presentation
# a portfolio of micropapers summarising key ideas from the assigned texts (ca. 300 words each), each paper to be handed in on the day of the respective seminar session

Please note that prior enrolment via Stud.IP is mandatory.

Irmgard Maassen
10-76-1-Basismodul C-44-Key Moments in the Cultural History of the English-Speaking World (in English)

Seminar (Teaching)
ECTS: 3

Dates:
weekly (starts in week: 1) Mon. 16:00 - 18:00 GW2 B2890 (2 Credit hours)

This course aims to introduce students to key moments in the social and cultural histories of English-speaking countries. In analyzing a range of case studies from the Renaissance to postcolonialism we will pay particular attention to historical shifts and cultural encounters and their dynamics of difference and power. We will draw for our discussions on a wide variety of sources, above all scholarly texts, but also paintings, advertisements, and moving pictures, and will get acquainted with a range of theoretical and analytical concepts.

Students are requested to enrol in one of the four parallel courses on offer. This seminar is the first part of a two-semester module which will continue in the following summer semester as "Key Moments in the Linguistic History of the English-Speaking World".
Please note that there is an optional tutorial (“Übung”) for this seminar. Please register for the tutorial on StudIP to enable the tutors to form groups, communicate with you, and let you have all information concerning dates, times, and study materials.

All reading material will be made available for download in StudIP.

Requirements:
# regular and active participation
# in-depth knowledge of the reading material
# one oral group presentation
# a portfolio of micropapers summarising key ideas from the assigned texts (ca. 300 words each), each paper to be handed in on the day of the respective seminar session

Please note that prior enrolment via Stud.IP is mandatory.

Irmgard Maassen
10-76-1-Basismodul C-7Übung/Tutorial zum Basismodul: Key Moments in the Cultural History of the English-Speaking World (in English)

Exercises (Teaching)

Dates:
weekly (starts in week: 2) Mon. 18:00 - 20:00 GW2 B3770
weekly (starts in week: 2) Mon. 18:00 - 20:00 GW2 B1700
weekly (starts in week: 2) Wed. 18:00 - 20:00 GW2 B1700
weekly (starts in week: 2) Thu. 18:00 - 20:00 GW2 B1216

This tutorial is designed to assist students of the Basismodul C 'Key Moments in Cultural History' in accomplishing the course requirements. Besides offering a forum for the discussion of those questions you were afraid to ask during the seminar sessions, the course will provide advice on the basic skills of academic study and research - tackling complex texts, writing a paper, citation rules, oral presentations, using the library and other research tools. Attendance is not obligatory but highly recommended.
For the tutorial students will be divided into several parallel groups. Particulars will be explained in the first session of the 'Key Moments' course.

Dr. Karin Esders-Angermund
Irmgard Maassen

SP-1 Basismodul: Sprachpraxis/Practical Language Foundation Module (Part 1) (nur für das Wintersemester) (9 CP)

9 CP (3 CP + 6 CP)

Modulbeauftragte/r: Anne Kirkham, Kontakt: kirkham@uni-bremen.de
Course numberTitle of eventLecturer
10-76-1-SP-1-01University Language Skills 1 - a (in English)

Exercises (Teaching)

Dates:
weekly (starts in week: 1) Tue. 14:00 - 16:00 GW2 B1405 NUR Mo. + Di. (2 Credit hours)

ULS 1 is the first half of the “SP-1 Sprachpraxis Basismodul”. As it is an introductory module, it lays the foundations on which you build on in ULS 2 during the summer semester. ULS 1 involves 90 hours of work and earn you 3 credit points.

This course requires you to use English in an academic context at university level. It emphasizes writing skills in three broad categories: paragraphing, structure, and argumentation. Students will practice structural elements such as topic sentences, outlining strategies, and cohesion devices. Of course, ways to reduce writing errors in grammar, syntax, spelling, and punctuation will be part of the course throughout the semester.

Required material will be made available via StudIP.

Dr. Vanessa Herrmann
10-76-1-SP-1-02University Language Skills 1 - b (in English)

Exercises (Teaching)

Dates:
weekly (starts in week: 1) Tue. 08:00 - 10:00 GW2 B2900 (2 Credit hours)

ULS 1 is the first half of the “SP-1 Sprachpraxis Basismodul”. As it is an introductory module, it lays the foundations on which you build on in ULS 2 during the summer semester. ULS 1 involves 90 hours of work and earn you 3 credit points.

This course requires you to use English in an academic context at university level. It emphasizes writing skills in three broad categories: paragraphing, structure, and argumentation. Students will practice structural elements such as topic sentences, outlining strategies, and cohesion devices. Of course, ways to reduce writing errors in grammar, syntax, spelling, and punctuation will be part of the course throughout the semester.

Required material will be made available via StudIP.

Dr. Vanessa Herrmann
10-76-1-SP-1-03University Language Skills 1 - c (in English)

Exercises (Teaching)

Dates:
weekly (starts in week: 1) Wed. 12:00 - 14:00 GW2 A4330 GW2 B2880 (2 Credit hours)

ULS 1 is the first half of the “SP-1 Sprachpraxis Basismodul”. As it is an introductory module, it lays the foundations on which you build on in ULS 2 during the summer semester. ULS 1 involves 90 hours of work and earn you 3 credit points.

This course requires you to use English in an academic context at university level. It emphasizes writing skills in three broad categories: paragraphing, structure, and argumentation. Students will practice structural elements such as topic sentences, outlining strategies, and cohesion devices. Of course, ways to reduce writing errors in grammar, syntax, spelling, and punctuation will be part of the course throughout the semester.

Required material will be made available via StudIP.

Dr. Vanessa Herrmann
10-76-1-SP-1-04University Language Skills 1d (in English)

Exercises (Teaching)
ECTS: 3

Dates:
weekly (starts in week: 1) Mon. 10:00 - 12:00 SFG 1030 (2 Credit hours)

ULS 1 and ULS 2 together form the SP-1 “Basismodul” for the practical-language module to be taken during your first year of the E-SC BA study programme.
ULS 1 (Winter Semester) lays the foundations upon which you build in ULS 2 (Summer Semester). Successful completion of ULS 1 involves 90 hours of work and earns you 3 Credit Points. Classes will take once a week for 90 minutes with time requires outside class for thorough preparation. You will be asked to submit a portfolio at the end of the reaching period which will be graded and will serve as an indicator of performance and work still to be done.
The purpose of ULS 1 is to introduce you to the skill of writing academic essays. We will focus on the following key areas:
• You will learn that writing is a process which comprises different steps, including planning, pre-writing, writing, editing and revising.
• We will be focusing on how to structure a good academic text and how to develop relevant, interesting and coherent ideas.
• You will be required to review your own language and style and thus learn how to identify your challenges and work on them both independently and in class. In this way, you can expand your language skills while learning to write coherently, convincingly and with the necessary reader focus.
Required literature for ULS1
Meyers, Alan Longman Academic Writing Series (level 5) Essays to Research Papers. Pearson 2014
(copy available in the library for reference)
Required handout material will be made available via StudIP;
Erasmus students are welcome to join the class as long as they can demonstrate a B2 level.

Lisa Nehls, M.A.
10-76-1-SP-1-05University Language Skills 1e (in English)

Exercises (Teaching)
ECTS: 3

Dates:
weekly (starts in week: 1) Mon. 12:00 - 14:00 SFG 1040 (2 Credit hours)

ULS 1 and ULS 2 together form the SP-1 “Basismodul” for the practical-language module to be taken during your first year of the E-SC BA study programme.
ULS 1 (Winter Semester) lays the foundations upon which you build in ULS 2 (Summer Semester). Successful completion of ULS 1 involves 90 hours of work and earns you 3 Credit Points. Classes will take once a week for 90 minutes with time requires outside class for thorough preparation. You will be asked to submit a portfolio at the end of the reaching period which will be graded and will serve as an indicator of performance and work still to be done.
The purpose of ULS 1 is to introduce you to the skill of writing academic essays. We will focus on the following key areas:
• You will learn that writing is a process which comprises different steps, including planning, pre-writing, writing, editing and revising.
• We will be focusing on how to structure a good academic text and how to develop relevant, interesting and coherent ideas.
• You will be required to review your own language and style and thus learn how to identify your challenges and work on them both independently and in class. In this way, you can expand your language skills while learning to write coherently, convincingly and with the necessary reader focus.
Required literature for ULS1
Meyers, Alan Longman Academic Writing Series (level 5) Essays to Research Papers. Pearson 2014
(copy available in the library for reference)
Required handout material will be made available via StudIP;
Erasmus students are welcome to join the class as long as they can demonstrate a B2 level.

Lisa Nehls, M.A.
10-76-1-SP-1-06University Language Skills 1f (in English)

Exercises (Teaching)
ECTS: 3

Dates:
weekly (starts in week: 1) Tue. 10:00 - 12:00 SFG 1030 (2 Credit hours)

IMPORTANT: Please REGISTER for ONE University Language Skills 1 course ONLY! We offer a sufficient number of 'University Language Skills 1' courses for all E-SC students. Any double (or triple) registration prevents students (including yourself?) from receiving a seat in a(nother) course and requires much extra time for reorganising registration.

SUMMARY
ULS 1 is the first half of the 'SP-1 Sprachpraxis Basismodul' introductory module. As such, it lays the foundations on which you build in ULS 2 during the summer semester.

ULS 1 requires you to use English in an academic context at university level. The emphasis is on audience focus, especially with regard to academic writing. Learning how to plan and structure your essay prior to the actual writing process is the first step. You will learn to see writing as a recursive process, which not only includes planning, pre-writing and writing but also editing and revising your texts. Consequently, you will be expanding your English language skills regarding grammar, vocabulary, and register to be able to produce text in a convincing and persuasive academic style; some short quizzes help you check your progress. Finally, in-class discussions of (your) texts, group work, and peer feedback on writing assignments allow you to practise all four language skills.

The first class meeting will provide you with information regarding class requirements, where to buy and find books and other material you will be working with during the semester to support your language-learning process. Hand out material will be made available via StudIP; the textbooks we will work with in ULS 1 are entitled 'What's the Difference?' and 'English Collocations in Use'.
Required literature for ULS1
Meyers, Alan Longman Academic Writing Series (level 5) Essays to Research Papers. Pearson 2014
(copy available in the library for reference)

To earn credit for the SP-1 module (9 CP in total), you are required to earn a minimum of 60% or more on the written assignments given in both ULS 1 (800-1000 words; 3 CP) and ULS 2 (1500-2000 words; 6 CP) respectively.

N.B.:
1) This course is not open to ERASMUS students below a B2 level in English. Erasmus students can earn 3 CPs in this class.
2) Students in situations of exceptional hardship (who can indeed only take part in a specific class) are asked to contact the teacher directly. Please do so well BEFORE the end of the registration procedure (i.e. BEFORE October 11th 2019). You will need to provide proof of the time conflict you have.

Stud.IP REGISTRATION
1. Advance REGISTRATION deadlines on Stud.IP:
For courses offered in the winter term: 15th September
For courses offered for first-semester students: last Friday before the start of the lecture period. (Oct 12th 2018)
2. Students who have missed the registration deadline or have not received a seat in their class of choice need to check Stud.IP for classes which have places available, and go to the session in the first week of teaching.
3.Your personal settings on the platform must indicate that you are an English-Speaking Cultures student. See “Stud.IP –FAQ,” scroll down to and then click on “Stud.IP für Studierende…” and follow the instructions provided under “Sie belegen leider keinen passenden Studiengang!”

Katja Müller, M.A.
10-76-1-SP-1-07University Language Skills 1g (in English)

Exercises (Teaching)
ECTS: 3

Dates:
weekly (starts in week: 1) Wed. 14:00 - 16:00 MZH 1110 MZH 1460 (2 Credit hours)

IMPORTANT: Please REGISTER for ONE University Language Skills 1 course ONLY! We offer a sufficient number of 'University Language Skills 1' courses for all E-SC students. Any double (or triple) registration prevents students (including yourself?) from receiving a seat in a(nother) course and requires much extra time for reorganising registration.

SUMMARY
ULS 1 is the first half of the 'SP-1 Sprachpraxis Basismodul' introductory module. As such, it lays the foundations on which you build in ULS 2 during the summer semester.

ULS 1 requires you to use English in an academic context at university level. The emphasis is on audience focus, especially with regard to academic writing. Learning how to plan and structure your essay prior to the actual writing process is the first step. You will learn to see writing as a recursive process, which not only includes planning, pre-writing and writing but also editing and revising your texts. Consequently, you will be expanding your English language skills regarding grammar, vocabulary, and register to be able to produce text in a convincing and persuasive academic style; some short quizzes help you check your progress. Finally, in-class discussions of (your) texts, group work, and peer feedback on writing assignments allow you to practise all four language skills.

The first class meeting will provide you with information regarding class requirements, where to buy and find books and other material you will be working with during the semester to support your language-learning process. Hand out material will be made available via StudIP; the textbooks we will work with in ULS 1 are entitled 'What's the Difference?' and 'English Collocations in Use'.
Required literature for ULS1
Meyers, Alan Longman Academic Writing Series (level 5) Essays to Research Papers. Pearson 2014
(copy available in the library for reference)

To earn credit for the SP-1 module (9 CP in total), you are required to earn a minimum of 60% or more on the written assignments given in both ULS 1 (800-1000 words; 3 CP) and ULS 2 (1500-2000 words; 6 CP) respectively.

N.B.:
1) This course is not open to ERASMUS students below a B2 level in English. Erasmus students can earn 3 CPs in this class.
2) Students in situations of exceptional hardship (who can indeed only take part in a specific class) are asked to contact the teacher directly. Please do so well BEFORE the end of the registration procedure (i.e. BEFORE October 11th 2019). You will need to provide proof of the time conflict you have.

Stud.IP REGISTRATION
1. Advance REGISTRATION deadlines on Stud.IP:
For courses offered in the winter term: 15th September
For courses offered for first-semester students: last Friday before the start of the lecture period. (Oct 12th 2018)
2. Students who have missed the registration deadline or have not received a seat in their class of choice need to check Stud.IP for classes which have places available, and go to the session in the first week of teaching.
3.Your personal settings on the platform must indicate that you are an English-Speaking Cultures student. See “Stud.IP –FAQ,” scroll down to and then click on “Stud.IP für Studierende…” and follow the instructions provided under “Sie belegen leider keinen passenden Studiengang!”

Katja Müller, M.A.
10-76-1-SP-1-08University Language Skills 1h (in English)

Exercises (Teaching)
ECTS: 3

Dates:
weekly (starts in week: 1) Thu. 10:00 - 12:00 SFG 2060 (2 Credit hours)

IMPORTANT: Please REGISTER for ONE University Language Skills 1 course ONLY! We offer a sufficient number of 'University Language Skills 1' courses for all E-SC students. Any double (or triple) registration prevents students (including yourself?) from receiving a seat in a(nother) course and requires much extra time for reorganising registration.

SUMMARY
ULS 1 is the first half of the 'SP-1 Sprachpraxis Basismodul' introductory module. As such, it lays the foundations on which you build in ULS 2 during the summer semester.

ULS 1 requires you to use English in an academic context at university level. The emphasis is on audience focus, especially with regard to academic writing. Learning how to plan and structure your essay prior to the actual writing process is the first step. You will learn to see writing as a recursive process, which not only includes planning, pre-writing and writing but also editing and revising your texts. Consequently, you will be expanding your English language skills regarding grammar, vocabulary, and register to be able to produce text in a convincing and persuasive academic style; some short quizzes help you check your progress. Finally, in-class discussions of (your) texts, group work, and peer feedback on writing assignments allow you to practise all four language skills.

The first class meeting will provide you with information regarding class requirements, where to buy and find books and other material you will be working with during the semester to support your language-learning process. Hand out material will be made available via StudIP; the textbooks we will work with in ULS 1 are entitled 'What's the Difference?' and 'English Collocations in Use'.
Required literature for ULS1
Meyers, Alan Longman Academic Writing Series (level 5) Essays to Research Papers. Pearson 2014
(copy available in the library for reference)

To earn credit for the SP-1 module (9 CP in total), you are required to earn a minimum of 60% or more on the written assignments given in both ULS 1 (800-1000 words; 3 CP) and ULS 2 (1500-2000 words; 6 CP) respectively.

N.B.:
1) This course is not open to ERASMUS students below a B2 level in English. Erasmus students can earn 3 CPs in this class.
2) Students in situations of exceptional hardship (who can indeed only take part in a specific class) are asked to contact the teacher directly. Please do so well BEFORE the end of the registration procedure (i.e. BEFORE October 11th 2019). You will need to provide proof of the time conflict you have.

Stud.IP REGISTRATION
1. Advance REGISTRATION deadlines on Stud.IP:
For courses offered in the winter term: 15th September
For courses offered for first-semester students: last Friday before the start of the lecture period. (Oct 12th 2018)
2. Students who have missed the registration deadline or have not received a seat in their class of choice need to check Stud.IP for classes which have places available, and go to the session in the first week of teaching.
3.Your personal settings on the platform must indicate that you are an English-Speaking Cultures student. See “Stud.IP –FAQ,” scroll down to and then click on “Stud.IP für Studierende…” and follow the instructions provided under “Sie belegen leider keinen passenden Studiengang!”

Katja Müller, M.A.
10-76-1-SP-1-09University Language Skills 1i (in English)

Exercises (Teaching)

Dates:
weekly (starts in week: 1) Mon. 08:00 - 10:00 GW2 A4330 (2 Credit hours)
Anne Kirkham, M.A.
10-76-1-SP-1-10University Language Skills 1j (in English)

Exercises (Teaching)

Dates:
weekly (starts in week: 1) Mon. 10:00 - 12:00 GW2 A4330 (2 Credit hours)
Anne Kirkham, M.A.
10-76-1-SP-1-11University Language Skills 1k (in English)

Exercises (Teaching)

Dates:
weekly (starts in week: 1) Mon. 12:00 - 14:00 GW2 A4330 (2 Credit hours)
Anne Kirkham, M.A.

LEHRVERANSTALTUNGEN DES 2. JAHRES (PO 2011)

D-1a: Aufbaumodul (6 CP) (nur für das Wintersemester)

Literatur- und Sprachwissenschaft (3 CP + 3 CP) (1PL = Term paper/Hausarbeit)

Es gilt zu beachten: Laut SK-Beschluss (E-SC) vom 21.11.2012 ist die Pruefungsleistung im Bereich "Key Topics in Literature" zu erbringen = Schriftliche Hausarbeit/Term paper.

Modulbeauftragte/r: Prof. Dr. Sabine Broeck, broeck@uni-bremen.de
Course numberTitle of eventLecturer
10-76-3-D-1b/c-WD-1b/c-01Key Topics in Literature: The Victorian Novel - Charles Dickens (in English)

Seminar (Teaching)

Dates:
weekly (starts in week: 1) Tue. 16:15 - 17:45 GW2 B1170 (2 Credit hours)

This course welcomes students who wish to complete the following modules:
B.A. E-SC D-1a, D-1b und WD-1a, WD-1b
Non-E-SC students and academic exchange students

This seminar focuses predominantly on novels exemplifying the predominance of fictional prose in the Victoria era. We will explore fictional and non-fictional writings by the English writer and social critic Charles Dickens (1812 – 1870), in particular Oliver Twist (February 1837 to April 1839) and Bleak House (March 1852 to September 1853). Using text-centred and contextual approaches, this course wishes to enable students to explore language, form, genre, and style of the novels, as well as to engage critically with themes, issues, and key concerns of Dickens’s writing and corresponding contemporary adaptions. Along with our weekly discussions of selected chapters - reader responses are strongly encouraged - we will also touch upon key developments in the history of nineteen-century novels as well as selected historical and literary contexts of the period.

Since some of the participants are required to submit a research paper, we will use parts of our seminar discussions to the development of topics, the formulation of a thesis statement, as well as considerations about the methodological approaches of writing such a paper.

Additional secondary sources can be accessed in the “Semesterapparat”, a reference-only section on the third floor of the library building. A reader with selected secondary text materials will be made available for download on Stud. IP. Please be aware that your registration on Stud. IP. is mandatory (deadline September 15th, 2019). You may wish to check the sections "Information" and "Schedule" further details such as requirements, weekly schedule, select bibliography and modes of assessment.

Requirements and Assessment
• Interest in the topic discussed and ideally a regular attendance and informed participation in class discussion (not part of your formal assessment);
• in-depth knowledge of the selected reading material,
• homework assignments,
• group projects and presentation of research paper proposals;
• research-based term paper.
The requirements as formulated above may vary depending on your overall degree program.

Required reading materials (you need a copy of these publications for class):
Dickens, Charles, and Fred Kaplan. Oliver Twist (Italics), Norton, 1993.
Dickens, Charles, and Nicola Bradbury. Bleak House (Italics), Penguin, 2003.
Copies can be purchased at the bookstore on our campus (Universitätsbuchhandlung Bremen: www.unibuch-bremen.de)

Dr. Jana Nittel
10-76-3-D1-a/b-WD-1a/b-01Key Topics in Literature: Women and Fiction - Virginia Woolf (in English)

Seminar (Teaching)
ECTS: 3

Dates:
weekly (starts in week: 1) Wed. 16:15 - 17:45 GW2 A4330 (2 Credit hours)

This course welcomes students who wish to complete the following modules:
B.A. E-SC D-1a, D-1b und WD-1a, WD-1b
Non-E-SC students and academic exchange students
Lecturer: Dr. Jana Nittel

According to Bonnie Kime Scott, modernist women “actively transformed the novel to reflect their unique perceptions of everyday life […] as critics and creative writers”. This course is designed to aesthetically appreciate and to critically explore selected works by the 20th-Century British female author and critic Virginia Woolf using text-centred and contextual approaches. We will explore the relation of women and fiction in the first three decades of the 20th century in Woolf’s feminist literary criticism, revisit modernist writing strategies and discuss several gender-related aspects of the novels, which have remained highly topical, then and now.

Since some of the participants are required to submit a research paper, we will use parts of our seminar discussions to the development of topics, the formulation of a thesis statement, as well as considerations about the methodological approaches of writing such a paper.

Additional secondary sources can be accessed in the “Semesterapparat”, a reference-only section on the third floor of the library building. A reader with selected secondary text materials will be made available for download on Stud. IP. Please be aware that your registration on Stud. IP. is mandatory (deadline September 15th, 2019). You may wish to check the sections "Information" and "Schedule" further details such as requirements, weekly schedule, select bibliography and modes of assessment.

Requirements and Assessment
• Interest in the topic discussed and ideally a regular attendance and informed participation in class discussion (not part of your formal assessment);
• in-depth knowledge of the selected reading material,
• homework assignments,
• group projects and presentation of research paper proposals;
• research-based term paper.
The requirements as formulated above may vary depending on your overall degree program.

Required reading materials (you need a copy of these publications for class):
Woolf, Virginia. Mrs. Dalloway: with a foreword by Maureen Howard (Italics). 1st Harvest/HBJ ed., Harcourt Brace Jovanovich, 1990.
Woolf, Virginia. Orlando. Introduction and notes by Merry M. Pawlowski (Italics), Wordsworth Classics, 2003.
Woolf, Virginia, and Morag Shiach. A Room of One's Own; Three guineas (Italics), Oxford University Press, 1992.
Copies can be purchased at the bookstore on our campus (Universitätsbuchhandlung Bremen: www.unibuch-bremen.de)

Dr. Jana Nittel
10-76-4-D-1a-01Key Topics in Linguistics: The Language and Discourse of Sports (in English)

Seminar (Teaching)

Dates:
weekly (starts in week: 1) Mon. 14:00 - 16:00 GW2 A3390 (CIP-Labor FB 10) (2 Credit hours)

This seminar explores the specifics of language used in the context of sports. We will look at the structure of language in a variety of sports-related contexts and discourse domains (e.g. newspaper reporting and different types of live sports commentary). How do the context- and situation specific circumstances of live sports commentary (or any other online form of commentary) shape the structure of the language used in this register? Is the language of sports only a narrow, specialised domain or can it be transferred to other domains?

After a general introduction to the concepts of register, genre and style we will examine phonological, lexical, syntactic, sociolinguistic and cognitive aspects of the language of sports. In the course of the seminar students will carry out small-scale empricial research projects in which they collect and analyse data.

Preparatory reading: No mandatory reading required, but for those with a keen interest the following books are recommended for browsing:

Burkhardt, Armin & Peter Schlobinski (eds.) 2009. Flickflack, Foul und Tsukuhara. Der Sport und seine Sprache. Mannheim: Duden.

Caldwell, David, John Walsh, Elaine W. Vine & Jon Jureid (eds.) 2016. The Discourse of Sport. Analyses from Social Linguistics. London & New York: Routledge.

Lavric, Eva, Gerhard Pisek, Andrew Skinner & Wolfgang Stadler (eds.) 2008. The Linguistics of Football. Tübingen: Narr.

Prof. Dr. Marcus Callies
10-76-4-D-1a-02Key Topics in Linguistics: English as a Global Language (in English)

Seminar (Teaching)

Dates:
weekly (starts in week: 1) Thu. 12:00 - 14:00 GW1 B0100 (2 Credit hours)

English is one - if not the(!) - global language. Spread across the world as the language of the British Empire, and corroborated by the cultural and economic influence of the USA, its status as a global language appears unchallenged. Its use as a lingua franca in politics, air travel, military and the international organisations has shown that 'global English' entails many advantages.

However, the rise to (and status of) English as the global language has also created numerous problems, both on the local and the global level. Contentious issues around global English continue to be discussed by experts, the press and the public, affecting (often politically charged) topics, such as education, identity and nationality, Anglicization of other languages, and even language death.

In this seminar, we will explore the status and functions of the English language (complex) in times of globalization. Instead of describing and comparing the linguistic properties of varieties of English, we will adopt an applied-linguistic approach by focusing on the real-world problems and issues connected to the global spread of English. These include questions of language and identity, fears of language attrition and death, as well as political and cultural issues. The emergence of English as a global lingua franca presents practical challenges, primarily in the areas of language teaching and language policy:

    • Which standard/variety should be taught in school?
    • What is a native speaker, and who ‘owns’ English?
    • What are Anglicisms, and is English killing other languages?
    • Can English act as both a global lingua franca and a marker of local identity?
    • What are consequences of and reactions to the global spread of English?

We will touch upon these and other issues, such as the use of English in the post-Brexit EU, English as the official language of the USA, fear of Anglicisms in European languages, and language endangerment around the world. The schedule (see Stud.IP) is based on a number of contentious questions, which we will explore within their social, cultural and linguistic implications, and discuss how they are (or might be) addressed by language practitioners. In a final step, we will relate the issues to the continuing academic discourse, thereby uniting current practice and contemporary theory.

Students are encouraged to conduct their own small empirical research projects, for which they can choose from a wide array of methodologies and data resources (all of which will be introduced in the course):

  • demographics | language census data;
  • attitude surveys;
  • linguistic landscaping;
  • corpus linguistics;
  • grammaticality judgement tests;
  • perceptual dialectology
...

Steffen Schaub, M.A.
10-76-4-D-1a-03Key Topics in Linguistics: The Grammar Detective (in English)

Seminar (Teaching)

Dates:
weekly (starts in week: 1) Wed. 12:15 - 13:45 GW2 A3390 (CIP-Labor FB 10) (2 Credit hours)

In this class, we want to investigate the English language, especially its grammar and lexis. In particular, we will look for things that are not there, which is not an easy task. To give you an example, think of the way the agent of an action can be hidden by using the short passive voice; compare “I drowned your hamster in the washing machine” (active voice) with “your hamster was drowned in the washing machine” (passive voice). Other grammatical means to make things, or people, disappear from language include ellipsis and reference. For example, is it true that male humans are more active participants in society, as is suggested by the much more frequent use of the personal pronoun he, compared to she? With regard to lexis; if there are groups of people that are never mentioned in texts, what does that mean? That they don’t exist? That they are being discriminated against? And who is the agent in that action?
If we assume that all grammatical choices are meaningful, can these choices be used on purpose to manipulate people? In order to find grammatical features and also words or phrases of interest, both present in the text and absent from it, you will learn to use a software for manual annotation of written and spoken texts (UAM corpus tool by Mick O’Donnell), but also use online corpora.
So, grab your magnifying glass and join the hunt!
Requirements
Homework assignments (reading 10-30 pages each week; possibly some exercises)
Regular and active participation in all class work
BA ESC D 1a Portfolio: collection of 3 assignments (unbenotete Studienleistung)
BA ESC D 1c Portfolio: collection of 3 assignments AND term paper, 10 pages (benotete Prüfungsleistung)
Erasmus: regular and active participation 3 CP, one assignment adds 1 CP (max 6 CP for attendance and 3 assignments)

Literature
Carter, Ronald & Angela Goddard & Danuta Reah & Keith Sanger & Nikki Swift. 2008. Working with Texts: A Core Introduction to Language Analysis. 3rd ed. London; New York: Routledge.

Dr. Anke Schulz
10-76-4-D-1a-04Key Topics in Linguistics: Sociolinguistics (in English)

Seminar (Teaching)

Dates:
weekly (starts in week: 1) Wed. 16:15 - 17:45 GW1 A0150 (2 Credit hours)

Additional dates:
Wed. 20.11.19 16:00 - 18:00 GW2 B1580

This seminar provides a basic introduction to the field of sociolinguistics. In presenting key concepts and terminologies from variationist sociolinguistics as well as from interactional sociolinguistics, students will be given an overview of different approaches in these fields and their underlying research paradigms.
We will work together on groundbreaking studies as well as newer approaches in order to become acquainted with specific methods of data collection and analysis, their benefits and their limitations, respectively. In line with the subject, the seminar not only encompasses a focus on the social relevance of language in society, but also discusses its implications for social life with reference to contemporary social theory.
Requirements:
A graded proof of performance involves a short in-class presentation on one of the seminar topics as well as a short paper on the same topic.

Henning Vahlenkamp
10-76-4-D-1a-05Key Topics in Literature: Jane Austen: Then and Now (in English)

Blockveranstaltung (Teaching)

Additional dates:
Fri. 08.11.19 14:00 - 17:00 GW1 B0100
Fri. 10.01.20 - Sat. 11.01.20 (Fri., Sat.) 10:00 - 17:00 GW1 B0080
Fri. 17.01.20 10:00 - 17:00 GW1 B0080

This seminar will explore the historical and contemporary significance of one of Britain’s foremost female writers, Jane Austen (1775-1817). Focusing on her most well-known novel Pride and Prejudice (1813) and reading/viewing selected twentieth and twenty-first century adaptations and variations of this classic of English literature, we will discuss how and why Jane Austen and her literary works continue to fascinate us today.

Please note that this is a four-day intensive course taking place on
Friday November 8, 2019, 2pm (sharp!)-5pm;
Friday January 10, Saturday January 11, and Friday January 17, 2020, 10am (sharp!)-5pm

All information regarding the syllabus, course materials, and exam regulations will be discussed during the introductory session. Please make sure that you attend the first meeting if you would like to participate in this class.

Prior enrollment via Stud.IP is mandatory.

Christine Müller, M.A.
10-76-4-D1-a-06Key Topics in Literature: The Postcolonial World in Literature and Film: India (in English)

Seminar (Teaching)

Dates:
weekly (starts in week: 1) Thu. 12:15 - 13:45 GW2 B2900 SuUB 4320 (Studio II Medienraum ) SFG 2020 (2 Credit hours)

This course will offer a comprehensive overview of the history of colonialism in India, the anti-colonial resistance that was generated in the society as a result, as well as the effects of decolonization. The course will familiarize students with South-Asia’s contribution to postcolonialism, with a major focus on how Indian culture, literature, and societies, were shaped by the forces of colonialism and how the societies, in turn, negotiated with their positions in the postcolonial world. Throughout the course, students will critically read and evaluate the works of major postcolonial Indian/South Asian theorists and writers. The course includes and will equally emphasize theories, novels, and films, in an attempt to explore how the different media reflects and mediates with the postcolonial realities.

Dr. Sukla Chatterjee
10-76-4-D1-a-07Key Topics in Literature: Hunger in Literature and Films in the nineteenth and twentieth centuries (in English)

Seminar (Teaching)

Dates:
weekly (starts in week: 1) Wed. 12:15 - 13:45 GW2 B1400 NUR Mi. - So. SFG 0140 (2 Credit hours)

This course explores hunger as a perpetual force in societies and hunger literature as the corpus on which politics, social praxis, power struggles, and cultural meanings intersect. Focusing on major famine and starvation conditions like the Bengal Famine (1943), the Irish Potato Famine (1845-49), among others, the course offers a history of such occurrences, their consequence on the social fabric, and how that in turn shapes societies in the long run. Students will read a range of famine and starvation narratives from the nineteenth and twentieth centuries from across cultures, theorize them, and will learn to see hunger and starvation beyond their biological and statistical manifestations. The course includes lectures, class, presentations, and documentary/film.

Dr. Sukla Chatterjee
10-76-4-D1a-08Shakespeare's Richard III (in English)

Seminar (Teaching)

Dates:
weekly (starts in week: 1) Tue. 16:00 - 18:00 SFG 1080 (2 Credit hours)

In his well-known history play King Richard III, William Shakespeare offered a dramatically effective portrait of a malicious king, a villain whose unscrupulous and sinister machinations have turned him into a highly politicised icon of a power-thirsty, diabolic ruler. Yet one has to bear in mind that the drama was written on the biased evidence of Tudor historiography, while contemporary historians tend to look at Richard III in a slightly different way.

In the course of this seminar we shall address two major topics, i.e. the reaction of an audience torn between disgust and fascination as well as the contrast between the ideological construction of a Machiavellian king and the findings of recent historical research.

requirements:
• active participation
• in-depth knowledge of the reading material
• presentation and/or final paper

Please note that prior enrolment via Stud.IP is mandatory. The enrolment period ends on September 15.
The number of participants is limited to 15 students.

text:
Shakespeare, William. King Richard III. The Arden Shakespeare. London: Methuen Drama, 2009.

Prof. Dr. Norbert Schaffeld
10-76-D1-a-13Tracing the Fabric of Slavery: Close Reading of Cambridge and Property (in English)

Seminar (Teaching)

Dates:
weekly (starts in week: 1) Thu. 14:15 - 15:45 UNICOM 3; 0. Ebene; Seminarraum 4 (2 Credit hours)

This seminar will take as its focus of research and seminar discussion two novels, Caryl Phillips' CAMBRIDGE and Valerie Martin's PROPERTY. Both texts address the historical issue of transatlantic slavery (the interests and actors who created and sustained it, as well as the resistance against it by black and white people, enslaved and free), and the question of representation: how to write about the propertization, commodification and thingification of Black life and being.
Please have copies of those two novels IN HAND at the beginning of the semester.
For secondary reading requirements/suggestions and specific seminar layout please check in on STUD IP regularly.
Our methodological 'tool' as it were, will be Stuart Hall's rightly famous essay on REPRESENTATION, see here:
https://culturetechnologypolitics.files.wordpress.com/2015/09/stuart-hall-on-representation-1.pdf

for later discussion of critical questions:
Sabine Broeck: Enslavement as Regime of Western Modernity: Re-reading Gender Studies Epistemology Through Black Feminist Critique, see in:
http://genderforum.org/black-womens-writing-revisited-issue-22-2008/http://genderforum.org/black-womens-writing-revisited-issue-22-2008/

Prof. Dr. Sabine Bröck
10-76-D1-a-14Writing White America: A Critical Look at Contemporary US Literature (in English)

Seminar (Teaching)

Dates:
weekly (starts in week: 1) Tue. 12:00 - 14:00 GW1 B2070 (2 Credit hours)

PLEASE TAKE NOTICE: REGISTRATION FOR THIS CLASS HAS BEEN CLOSED TODAY. THE ROOM WE HAVE BEEN ALLOTTED IS FULLY BOOKED TO CAPACITY.
This seminar will study the ways contemporary white American writers have addressed "white America", in its many, oftentimes contradictory facets of racialized empowerment, gender embattledness, as well as class erosion and segregation of wealth. Those discourses are in a way over-determined by the acting president's ascendancy to social media hegemony but are by no means exhausted by the ultra-right discourses and practices backing him. We will read novels and essays that have contributed to the recent debates and have also been shaped in response to those vernacular interventions.
Required readings:
Richard Russo, Everybody's Fool
Liane Moriarty, Big Little Lies

Prospective participants: you are urgently requested to have those novels IN HAND before class beginning.
Our methodological 'tool' as it were, will be Stuart Hall's rightly famous essay on REPRESENTATION, see here:
https://culturetechnologypolitics.files.wordpress.com/2015/09/stuart-hall-on-representation-1.pdf

We will also read a series of essays by Joan Didion, Rebecca Solnit, Tim Wise, Barbara Ehrenreich and others. Titles will be listed on stud ip in due course. Please check back regularly, thank you!

Prof. Dr. Sabine Bröck
10-76-D1-a-15Key Topics in Literature: The Postcolonial World in Literature and Film: The Pacific (in English)

Seminar (Teaching)

Dates:
weekly (starts in week: 1) Thu. 12:00 - 14:00 SFG 0150 (2 Credit hours)

This class will introduce students to the Pacific area – ocean, island and continental regions that cover various nations. Many Pacific regions have been colonized by European powers and have experienced very different colonial histories. Indigenous people have been living in these areas for centuries, have accordingly developed diverse cultures and structures, have to live with manifold challenges and experience various postcolonial and neocolonial conditions. This class will look at Pacific colonial histories, postcolonial cultures, and contemporary issues with a focus on Indigenous populations. We will learn about the Pacific through reading non-fiction and fiction texts, and watching a few documentary and feature films by Indigenous and non-Indigenous directors.
The films will be shown on Tuesday evenings from 6-8 pm. You are required to purchase and read Ellen van Neerven’s Heat and Light (app 18 €) and Kiana Davenport’s Shark Dialogues (app 16 €) available at the Universitätsbuchhandlung or on amazon.de (allow up to 3 weeks delivery for marketplace books). All texts except these novels will be provided electronically through StudIP. Class requirements are regular attendance, in-depth knowledge of reading and viewing material, and active class discussion. Reading the texts and watching the films is mandatory. Please note that prior enrollment via Stud.IP is mandatory.

Prof. Dr. Kerstin Knopf

D-1b: Aufbaumodul (6 CP) (nur für das Wintersemester)

Literatur- und Kulturgeschichte (3 CP + 3 CP) (1PL = Term paper/Hausarbeit)

Es gilt zu beachten: Laut SK-Beschluss (E-SC) vom 21.11.2012 ist die Pruefungsleistung im Bereich "Key Topics in Cultural History" zu erbringen = Schriftliche Hausarbeit/Term paper.

Modulbeauftragte/r: Prof. Dr. Sabine Broeck, broeck@uni-bremen.de
Course numberTitle of eventLecturer
10-76-3-D-1b/c-WD-1b/c-01Key Topics in Literature: The Victorian Novel - Charles Dickens (in English)

Seminar (Teaching)

Dates:
weekly (starts in week: 1) Tue. 16:15 - 17:45 GW2 B1170 (2 Credit hours)

This course welcomes students who wish to complete the following modules:
B.A. E-SC D-1a, D-1b und WD-1a, WD-1b
Non-E-SC students and academic exchange students

This seminar focuses predominantly on novels exemplifying the predominance of fictional prose in the Victoria era. We will explore fictional and non-fictional writings by the English writer and social critic Charles Dickens (1812 – 1870), in particular Oliver Twist (February 1837 to April 1839) and Bleak House (March 1852 to September 1853). Using text-centred and contextual approaches, this course wishes to enable students to explore language, form, genre, and style of the novels, as well as to engage critically with themes, issues, and key concerns of Dickens’s writing and corresponding contemporary adaptions. Along with our weekly discussions of selected chapters - reader responses are strongly encouraged - we will also touch upon key developments in the history of nineteen-century novels as well as selected historical and literary contexts of the period.

Since some of the participants are required to submit a research paper, we will use parts of our seminar discussions to the development of topics, the formulation of a thesis statement, as well as considerations about the methodological approaches of writing such a paper.

Additional secondary sources can be accessed in the “Semesterapparat”, a reference-only section on the third floor of the library building. A reader with selected secondary text materials will be made available for download on Stud. IP. Please be aware that your registration on Stud. IP. is mandatory (deadline September 15th, 2019). You may wish to check the sections "Information" and "Schedule" further details such as requirements, weekly schedule, select bibliography and modes of assessment.

Requirements and Assessment
• Interest in the topic discussed and ideally a regular attendance and informed participation in class discussion (not part of your formal assessment);
• in-depth knowledge of the selected reading material,
• homework assignments,
• group projects and presentation of research paper proposals;
• research-based term paper.
The requirements as formulated above may vary depending on your overall degree program.

Required reading materials (you need a copy of these publications for class):
Dickens, Charles, and Fred Kaplan. Oliver Twist (Italics), Norton, 1993.
Dickens, Charles, and Nicola Bradbury. Bleak House (Italics), Penguin, 2003.
Copies can be purchased at the bookstore on our campus (Universitätsbuchhandlung Bremen: www.unibuch-bremen.de)

Dr. Jana Nittel
10-76-3-D-1b/c-WD-1b/c-02Key Topics in Cultural History: Gender - Culture - Feminism (in English)

Lecture (Teaching)

Dates:
weekly (starts in week: 1) Wed. 16:00 - 18:00 GW2 B2900 (2 Credit hours)

This is course is a mixture between a lecture course and a regular class. Scholars and teachers both from FB 10 and from other universities will deliver lectures on various aspects of our general topic initiating a transdisciplinary discourse on "Gender - Culture - Feminism". In the sessions between the lectures we will discuss corresponding texts and resources to prepare ourselves for the diverse subject matters of the presentations and to critically reflect on their respective ideas and arguments.
Essential readings will be available for download on Stud-IP. You should also consult the 'Semesterapparat' (SuUB) for further readings.
Requirements:
• regular attendance and oral participation
• in-depth knowledge of the reading material
• oral presentation and handout
Please note that prior enrollment via Stud.IP is mandatory.

Dr. Karin Esders-Angermund
10-76-3-D-1c/b-WD-1c/b-03Key Topics in Cultural History: Analyzing Hollywood Cinema (in English)

Seminar (Teaching)

Dates:
weekly (starts in week: 1) Thu. 14:00 - 16:00 SuUB 4330 (Studio I Medienraum ) (2 Credit hours)

This course is designed to introduce students to critical scholarship on US-American film history and culture. Basic introductions to the analytical categories of race, class, gender, and sexuality will help students to analyze how films construct and limit representations of African-Americans, Native Americans, women and femininity, men and masculinity, sexuality, class struggle and class difference.
Our major textbook will be Benshoff and Griffin: America on film: Representing race, class, gender, and sexuality at the movies. (Purchase is is suggested.)
Essential readings from the textbook will be also available for download on Stud-IP. You should also consult the 'Semesterapparat' (SuUB) for further readings.
Requirements:
• regular attendance and oral participation
• in-depth knowledge of the reading material
• oral presentation and handout
Please note that prior enrollment via Stud.IP is mandatory.

Dr. Karin Esders-Angermund
10-76-3-D1-a/b-WD-1a/b-01Key Topics in Literature: Women and Fiction - Virginia Woolf (in English)

Seminar (Teaching)
ECTS: 3

Dates:
weekly (starts in week: 1) Wed. 16:15 - 17:45 GW2 A4330 (2 Credit hours)

This course welcomes students who wish to complete the following modules:
B.A. E-SC D-1a, D-1b und WD-1a, WD-1b
Non-E-SC students and academic exchange students
Lecturer: Dr. Jana Nittel

According to Bonnie Kime Scott, modernist women “actively transformed the novel to reflect their unique perceptions of everyday life […] as critics and creative writers”. This course is designed to aesthetically appreciate and to critically explore selected works by the 20th-Century British female author and critic Virginia Woolf using text-centred and contextual approaches. We will explore the relation of women and fiction in the first three decades of the 20th century in Woolf’s feminist literary criticism, revisit modernist writing strategies and discuss several gender-related aspects of the novels, which have remained highly topical, then and now.

Since some of the participants are required to submit a research paper, we will use parts of our seminar discussions to the development of topics, the formulation of a thesis statement, as well as considerations about the methodological approaches of writing such a paper.

Additional secondary sources can be accessed in the “Semesterapparat”, a reference-only section on the third floor of the library building. A reader with selected secondary text materials will be made available for download on Stud. IP. Please be aware that your registration on Stud. IP. is mandatory (deadline September 15th, 2019). You may wish to check the sections "Information" and "Schedule" further details such as requirements, weekly schedule, select bibliography and modes of assessment.

Requirements and Assessment
• Interest in the topic discussed and ideally a regular attendance and informed participation in class discussion (not part of your formal assessment);
• in-depth knowledge of the selected reading material,
• homework assignments,
• group projects and presentation of research paper proposals;
• research-based term paper.
The requirements as formulated above may vary depending on your overall degree program.

Required reading materials (you need a copy of these publications for class):
Woolf, Virginia. Mrs. Dalloway: with a foreword by Maureen Howard (Italics). 1st Harvest/HBJ ed., Harcourt Brace Jovanovich, 1990.
Woolf, Virginia. Orlando. Introduction and notes by Merry M. Pawlowski (Italics), Wordsworth Classics, 2003.
Woolf, Virginia, and Morag Shiach. A Room of One's Own; Three guineas (Italics), Oxford University Press, 1992.
Copies can be purchased at the bookstore on our campus (Universitätsbuchhandlung Bremen: www.unibuch-bremen.de)

Dr. Jana Nittel
10-76-4-D-1a-05Key Topics in Literature: Jane Austen: Then and Now (in English)

Blockveranstaltung (Teaching)

Additional dates:
Fri. 08.11.19 14:00 - 17:00 GW1 B0100
Fri. 10.01.20 - Sat. 11.01.20 (Fri., Sat.) 10:00 - 17:00 GW1 B0080
Fri. 17.01.20 10:00 - 17:00 GW1 B0080

This seminar will explore the historical and contemporary significance of one of Britain’s foremost female writers, Jane Austen (1775-1817). Focusing on her most well-known novel Pride and Prejudice (1813) and reading/viewing selected twentieth and twenty-first century adaptations and variations of this classic of English literature, we will discuss how and why Jane Austen and her literary works continue to fascinate us today.

Please note that this is a four-day intensive course taking place on
Friday November 8, 2019, 2pm (sharp!)-5pm;
Friday January 10, Saturday January 11, and Friday January 17, 2020, 10am (sharp!)-5pm

All information regarding the syllabus, course materials, and exam regulations will be discussed during the introductory session. Please make sure that you attend the first meeting if you would like to participate in this class.

Prior enrollment via Stud.IP is mandatory.

Christine Müller, M.A.
10-76-4-D1-a-06Key Topics in Literature: The Postcolonial World in Literature and Film: India (in English)

Seminar (Teaching)

Dates:
weekly (starts in week: 1) Thu. 12:15 - 13:45 GW2 B2900 SuUB 4320 (Studio II Medienraum ) SFG 2020 (2 Credit hours)

This course will offer a comprehensive overview of the history of colonialism in India, the anti-colonial resistance that was generated in the society as a result, as well as the effects of decolonization. The course will familiarize students with South-Asia’s contribution to postcolonialism, with a major focus on how Indian culture, literature, and societies, were shaped by the forces of colonialism and how the societies, in turn, negotiated with their positions in the postcolonial world. Throughout the course, students will critically read and evaluate the works of major postcolonial Indian/South Asian theorists and writers. The course includes and will equally emphasize theories, novels, and films, in an attempt to explore how the different media reflects and mediates with the postcolonial realities.

Dr. Sukla Chatterjee
10-76-4-D1-a-07Key Topics in Literature: Hunger in Literature and Films in the nineteenth and twentieth centuries (in English)

Seminar (Teaching)

Dates:
weekly (starts in week: 1) Wed. 12:15 - 13:45 GW2 B1400 NUR Mi. - So. SFG 0140 (2 Credit hours)

This course explores hunger as a perpetual force in societies and hunger literature as the corpus on which politics, social praxis, power struggles, and cultural meanings intersect. Focusing on major famine and starvation conditions like the Bengal Famine (1943), the Irish Potato Famine (1845-49), among others, the course offers a history of such occurrences, their consequence on the social fabric, and how that in turn shapes societies in the long run. Students will read a range of famine and starvation narratives from the nineteenth and twentieth centuries from across cultures, theorize them, and will learn to see hunger and starvation beyond their biological and statistical manifestations. The course includes lectures, class, presentations, and documentary/film.

Dr. Sukla Chatterjee
10-76-4-D1-b-D1-c-01Key Topics in Cultural History: Royals and Rebels - British History on Film (in English)

Seminar (Teaching)
ECTS: 3

Dates:
weekly (starts in week: 1) Tue. 18:00 - 20:00 SuUB 4320 (Studio II Medienraum )
weekly (starts in week: 1) Wed. 14:00 - 16:00 IW3 0390 (2 Credit hours)

Investigating the uses that invocations of ‘British/English history’ are being put to seems particularly urgent at a time when the Brexit crisis is being fuelled by an upsurge of nationalist sentiments. In this seminar, we will analyse feature films that circulate images and narrativizations of British history and work to construct versions of social and national identity. We are going to explore how major historical events, figures and epochs are re-imagined, commemorated, and ideologically appropriated in a range of historical films, and discuss the ways in which cinematographic constructions of the nation’s past reflect and negotiate traditional symbolic meanings as well as present-day anxieties. Topics include Golden Ages and Darkest Hours, covering kings, queens and the monarchy, colonialism and slavery, feminism and class struggle, and commemorations of war.

This course is work-intensive: students are required to invest much time and dedication into week-to-week preparations that include not just the viewing of films before the seminar sessions but also a high amount of reading. A list of films will be agreed upon in the first session, and will be put on restricted loan in the Mediathek.
Reading material will be made available on Stud.IP.

Requirements:
# regular and active participation
# in-depth knowledge of the viewing and reading material
# portfolio of worksheets (graded in WD-1b)
# one oral team presentation
# for a grade in D-1b: an additional long term paper of 10-12 pp.

Prior enrolment via Stud.IP is mandatory.

Irmgard Maassen
10-76-4-D1a-08Shakespeare's Richard III (in English)

Seminar (Teaching)

Dates:
weekly (starts in week: 1) Tue. 16:00 - 18:00 SFG 1080 (2 Credit hours)

In his well-known history play King Richard III, William Shakespeare offered a dramatically effective portrait of a malicious king, a villain whose unscrupulous and sinister machinations have turned him into a highly politicised icon of a power-thirsty, diabolic ruler. Yet one has to bear in mind that the drama was written on the biased evidence of Tudor historiography, while contemporary historians tend to look at Richard III in a slightly different way.

In the course of this seminar we shall address two major topics, i.e. the reaction of an audience torn between disgust and fascination as well as the contrast between the ideological construction of a Machiavellian king and the findings of recent historical research.

requirements:
• active participation
• in-depth knowledge of the reading material
• presentation and/or final paper

Please note that prior enrolment via Stud.IP is mandatory. The enrolment period ends on September 15.
The number of participants is limited to 15 students.

text:
Shakespeare, William. King Richard III. The Arden Shakespeare. London: Methuen Drama, 2009.

Prof. Dr. Norbert Schaffeld
10-76-D1-a-15Key Topics in Literature: The Postcolonial World in Literature and Film: The Pacific (in English)

Seminar (Teaching)

Dates:
weekly (starts in week: 1) Thu. 12:00 - 14:00 SFG 0150 (2 Credit hours)

This class will introduce students to the Pacific area – ocean, island and continental regions that cover various nations. Many Pacific regions have been colonized by European powers and have experienced very different colonial histories. Indigenous people have been living in these areas for centuries, have accordingly developed diverse cultures and structures, have to live with manifold challenges and experience various postcolonial and neocolonial conditions. This class will look at Pacific colonial histories, postcolonial cultures, and contemporary issues with a focus on Indigenous populations. We will learn about the Pacific through reading non-fiction and fiction texts, and watching a few documentary and feature films by Indigenous and non-Indigenous directors.
The films will be shown on Tuesday evenings from 6-8 pm. You are required to purchase and read Ellen van Neerven’s Heat and Light (app 18 €) and Kiana Davenport’s Shark Dialogues (app 16 €) available at the Universitätsbuchhandlung or on amazon.de (allow up to 3 weeks delivery for marketplace books). All texts except these novels will be provided electronically through StudIP. Class requirements are regular attendance, in-depth knowledge of reading and viewing material, and active class discussion. Reading the texts and watching the films is mandatory. Please note that prior enrollment via Stud.IP is mandatory.

Prof. Dr. Kerstin Knopf
10-M80-1-OrMo-06Shakespeare's London (in English)
for B.A. students: Key Topics in Cultural History

Seminar (Teaching)
ECTS: Depends on module choice

Dates:
weekly (starts in week: 1) Mon. 16:15 - 17:45 GW2 B1170 (2 Credit hours)

This course (VAK: 10-M80-1-OrMo-06) welcomes students who wish to complete the following modules:
M.A. E-SC Orientierungsmodul;
M.A. TnL Vertiefungsmodul und Profilmodul Literatur;
B.A. E-SC “Key Topics in Cultural History”- D1b /D1c und WD1b /WD1c
Non-E-SC students and academic exchange students

William Shakespeare’s London, and in this seminar, London in the Elizabethan Age as well as at his time in the city (c.1560 – 1616), was a rapidly growing and bustling metropolis. In the duration of this course, we will travel back in time seeking to explore the history and social geography of this largest city in England. Based on a research-based learning methodology, we will attempt to map out London’s key locations as the centre of government, the law and the church as well as being the focus of politics and culture during a time of intense political and religious upheaval. In addition, this course focuses on the following topics: Stage history, playhouses; the fundamental features of dramatic composition to issues such as political structures in Renaissance England, gender roles and relations, love and sexuality, constructions of nationhood, global expansion and their representation in Shakespeare’s plays.

Since some of the participants are required to submit a research paper, we will use parts of our seminar discussions to the development of topics, the formulation of a thesis statement, as well as considerations about the methodological approaches of writing such a paper.

Additional secondary sources can be accessed in the “Semesterapparat”, a reference-only section on the third floor of the library building. A reader with selected secondary text materials will be made available for download on Stud. IP. Please be aware that your registration on Stud. IP. is mandatory (deadline September 15th, 2019).

You may wish to check the sections "Information" and "Schedule" further details such as requirements, weekly schedule, select bibliography and modes of assessment.

Requirements and Assessment
• Interest in the topic discussed and ideally a regular attendance and informed participation in class discussion (not part of your formal assessment);
• in-depth knowledge of the selected reading material,
• homework assignments,
• group projects and presentation of research paper proposals;
• research-based term paper.
The requirements as formulated above may vary depending on your overall degree program.

Reading materials
MacGregor, Neil. Shakespeare's Restless World, Penguin Books, 2014.
Copies are available for purchase at the bookstore on our campus (Universitätsbuchhandlung Bremen: www.unibuch-bremen.de)

Dr. Jana Nittel

D-1c: Aufbaumodul (6 CP) (nur für das Wintersemester)

Sprachwissenschaft und Kulturgeschichte (3 CP + 3 CP) (1PL = Term paper/Hausarbeit)

Es gilt zu beachten: Laut SK-Beschluss (E-SC) vom 21.11.2012 ist die Pruefungsleistung im Bereich "Key Topics in Linguistics" zu erbringen = Schriftliche Hausarbeit/Term paper.

Modulbeauftragte/r: Prof. Dr. Sabine Broeck, broeck@uni-bremen.de
Course numberTitle of eventLecturer
10-76-3-D-1b/c-WD-1b/c-02Key Topics in Cultural History: Gender - Culture - Feminism (in English)

Lecture (Teaching)

Dates:
weekly (starts in week: 1) Wed. 16:00 - 18:00 GW2 B2900 (2 Credit hours)

This is course is a mixture between a lecture course and a regular class. Scholars and teachers both from FB 10 and from other universities will deliver lectures on various aspects of our general topic initiating a transdisciplinary discourse on "Gender - Culture - Feminism". In the sessions between the lectures we will discuss corresponding texts and resources to prepare ourselves for the diverse subject matters of the presentations and to critically reflect on their respective ideas and arguments.
Essential readings will be available for download on Stud-IP. You should also consult the 'Semesterapparat' (SuUB) for further readings.
Requirements:
• regular attendance and oral participation
• in-depth knowledge of the reading material
• oral presentation and handout
Please note that prior enrollment via Stud.IP is mandatory.

Dr. Karin Esders-Angermund
10-76-3-D-1c/b-WD-1c/b-03Key Topics in Cultural History: Analyzing Hollywood Cinema (in English)

Seminar (Teaching)

Dates:
weekly (starts in week: 1) Thu. 14:00 - 16:00 SuUB 4330 (Studio I Medienraum ) (2 Credit hours)

This course is designed to introduce students to critical scholarship on US-American film history and culture. Basic introductions to the analytical categories of race, class, gender, and sexuality will help students to analyze how films construct and limit representations of African-Americans, Native Americans, women and femininity, men and masculinity, sexuality, class struggle and class difference.
Our major textbook will be Benshoff and Griffin: America on film: Representing race, class, gender, and sexuality at the movies. (Purchase is is suggested.)
Essential readings from the textbook will be also available for download on Stud-IP. You should also consult the 'Semesterapparat' (SuUB) for further readings.
Requirements:
• regular attendance and oral participation
• in-depth knowledge of the reading material
• oral presentation and handout
Please note that prior enrollment via Stud.IP is mandatory.

Dr. Karin Esders-Angermund
10-76-4-D-1a-01Key Topics in Linguistics: The Language and Discourse of Sports (in English)

Seminar (Teaching)

Dates:
weekly (starts in week: 1) Mon. 14:00 - 16:00 GW2 A3390 (CIP-Labor FB 10) (2 Credit hours)

This seminar explores the specifics of language used in the context of sports. We will look at the structure of language in a variety of sports-related contexts and discourse domains (e.g. newspaper reporting and different types of live sports commentary). How do the context- and situation specific circumstances of live sports commentary (or any other online form of commentary) shape the structure of the language used in this register? Is the language of sports only a narrow, specialised domain or can it be transferred to other domains?

After a general introduction to the concepts of register, genre and style we will examine phonological, lexical, syntactic, sociolinguistic and cognitive aspects of the language of sports. In the course of the seminar students will carry out small-scale empricial research projects in which they collect and analyse data.

Preparatory reading: No mandatory reading required, but for those with a keen interest the following books are recommended for browsing:

Burkhardt, Armin & Peter Schlobinski (eds.) 2009. Flickflack, Foul und Tsukuhara. Der Sport und seine Sprache. Mannheim: Duden.

Caldwell, David, John Walsh, Elaine W. Vine & Jon Jureid (eds.) 2016. The Discourse of Sport. Analyses from Social Linguistics. London & New York: Routledge.

Lavric, Eva, Gerhard Pisek, Andrew Skinner & Wolfgang Stadler (eds.) 2008. The Linguistics of Football. Tübingen: Narr.

Prof. Dr. Marcus Callies
10-76-4-D-1a-02Key Topics in Linguistics: English as a Global Language (in English)

Seminar (Teaching)

Dates:
weekly (starts in week: 1) Thu. 12:00 - 14:00 GW1 B0100 (2 Credit hours)

English is one - if not the(!) - global language. Spread across the world as the language of the British Empire, and corroborated by the cultural and economic influence of the USA, its status as a global language appears unchallenged. Its use as a lingua franca in politics, air travel, military and the international organisations has shown that 'global English' entails many advantages.

However, the rise to (and status of) English as the global language has also created numerous problems, both on the local and the global level. Contentious issues around global English continue to be discussed by experts, the press and the public, affecting (often politically charged) topics, such as education, identity and nationality, Anglicization of other languages, and even language death.

In this seminar, we will explore the status and functions of the English language (complex) in times of globalization. Instead of describing and comparing the linguistic properties of varieties of English, we will adopt an applied-linguistic approach by focusing on the real-world problems and issues connected to the global spread of English. These include questions of language and identity, fears of language attrition and death, as well as political and cultural issues. The emergence of English as a global lingua franca presents practical challenges, primarily in the areas of language teaching and language policy:

    • Which standard/variety should be taught in school?
    • What is a native speaker, and who ‘owns’ English?
    • What are Anglicisms, and is English killing other languages?
    • Can English act as both a global lingua franca and a marker of local identity?
    • What are consequences of and reactions to the global spread of English?

We will touch upon these and other issues, such as the use of English in the post-Brexit EU, English as the official language of the USA, fear of Anglicisms in European languages, and language endangerment around the world. The schedule (see Stud.IP) is based on a number of contentious questions, which we will explore within their social, cultural and linguistic implications, and discuss how they are (or might be) addressed by language practitioners. In a final step, we will relate the issues to the continuing academic discourse, thereby uniting current practice and contemporary theory.

Students are encouraged to conduct their own small empirical research projects, for which they can choose from a wide array of methodologies and data resources (all of which will be introduced in the course):

  • demographics | language census data;
  • attitude surveys;
  • linguistic landscaping;
  • corpus linguistics;
  • grammaticality judgement tests;
  • perceptual dialectology
...

Steffen Schaub, M.A.
10-76-4-D-1a-03Key Topics in Linguistics: The Grammar Detective (in English)

Seminar (Teaching)

Dates:
weekly (starts in week: 1) Wed. 12:15 - 13:45 GW2 A3390 (CIP-Labor FB 10) (2 Credit hours)

In this class, we want to investigate the English language, especially its grammar and lexis. In particular, we will look for things that are not there, which is not an easy task. To give you an example, think of the way the agent of an action can be hidden by using the short passive voice; compare “I drowned your hamster in the washing machine” (active voice) with “your hamster was drowned in the washing machine” (passive voice). Other grammatical means to make things, or people, disappear from language include ellipsis and reference. For example, is it true that male humans are more active participants in society, as is suggested by the much more frequent use of the personal pronoun he, compared to she? With regard to lexis; if there are groups of people that are never mentioned in texts, what does that mean? That they don’t exist? That they are being discriminated against? And who is the agent in that action?
If we assume that all grammatical choices are meaningful, can these choices be used on purpose to manipulate people? In order to find grammatical features and also words or phrases of interest, both present in the text and absent from it, you will learn to use a software for manual annotation of written and spoken texts (UAM corpus tool by Mick O’Donnell), but also use online corpora.
So, grab your magnifying glass and join the hunt!
Requirements
Homework assignments (reading 10-30 pages each week; possibly some exercises)
Regular and active participation in all class work
BA ESC D 1a Portfolio: collection of 3 assignments (unbenotete Studienleistung)
BA ESC D 1c Portfolio: collection of 3 assignments AND term paper, 10 pages (benotete Prüfungsleistung)
Erasmus: regular and active participation 3 CP, one assignment adds 1 CP (max 6 CP for attendance and 3 assignments)

Literature
Carter, Ronald & Angela Goddard & Danuta Reah & Keith Sanger & Nikki Swift. 2008. Working with Texts: A Core Introduction to Language Analysis. 3rd ed. London; New York: Routledge.

Dr. Anke Schulz
10-76-4-D-1a-04Key Topics in Linguistics: Sociolinguistics (in English)

Seminar (Teaching)

Dates:
weekly (starts in week: 1) Wed. 16:15 - 17:45 GW1 A0150 (2 Credit hours)

Additional dates:
Wed. 20.11.19 16:00 - 18:00 GW2 B1580

This seminar provides a basic introduction to the field of sociolinguistics. In presenting key concepts and terminologies from variationist sociolinguistics as well as from interactional sociolinguistics, students will be given an overview of different approaches in these fields and their underlying research paradigms.
We will work together on groundbreaking studies as well as newer approaches in order to become acquainted with specific methods of data collection and analysis, their benefits and their limitations, respectively. In line with the subject, the seminar not only encompasses a focus on the social relevance of language in society, but also discusses its implications for social life with reference to contemporary social theory.
Requirements:
A graded proof of performance involves a short in-class presentation on one of the seminar topics as well as a short paper on the same topic.

Henning Vahlenkamp
10-76-4-D1-b-D1-c-01Key Topics in Cultural History: Royals and Rebels - British History on Film (in English)

Seminar (Teaching)
ECTS: 3

Dates:
weekly (starts in week: 1) Tue. 18:00 - 20:00 SuUB 4320 (Studio II Medienraum )
weekly (starts in week: 1) Wed. 14:00 - 16:00 IW3 0390 (2 Credit hours)

Investigating the uses that invocations of ‘British/English history’ are being put to seems particularly urgent at a time when the Brexit crisis is being fuelled by an upsurge of nationalist sentiments. In this seminar, we will analyse feature films that circulate images and narrativizations of British history and work to construct versions of social and national identity. We are going to explore how major historical events, figures and epochs are re-imagined, commemorated, and ideologically appropriated in a range of historical films, and discuss the ways in which cinematographic constructions of the nation’s past reflect and negotiate traditional symbolic meanings as well as present-day anxieties. Topics include Golden Ages and Darkest Hours, covering kings, queens and the monarchy, colonialism and slavery, feminism and class struggle, and commemorations of war.

This course is work-intensive: students are required to invest much time and dedication into week-to-week preparations that include not just the viewing of films before the seminar sessions but also a high amount of reading. A list of films will be agreed upon in the first session, and will be put on restricted loan in the Mediathek.
Reading material will be made available on Stud.IP.

Requirements:
# regular and active participation
# in-depth knowledge of the viewing and reading material
# portfolio of worksheets (graded in WD-1b)
# one oral team presentation
# for a grade in D-1b: an additional long term paper of 10-12 pp.

Prior enrolment via Stud.IP is mandatory.

Irmgard Maassen
10-M80-1-OrMo-06Shakespeare's London (in English)
for B.A. students: Key Topics in Cultural History

Seminar (Teaching)
ECTS: Depends on module choice

Dates:
weekly (starts in week: 1) Mon. 16:15 - 17:45 GW2 B1170 (2 Credit hours)

This course (VAK: 10-M80-1-OrMo-06) welcomes students who wish to complete the following modules:
M.A. E-SC Orientierungsmodul;
M.A. TnL Vertiefungsmodul und Profilmodul Literatur;
B.A. E-SC “Key Topics in Cultural History”- D1b /D1c und WD1b /WD1c
Non-E-SC students and academic exchange students

William Shakespeare’s London, and in this seminar, London in the Elizabethan Age as well as at his time in the city (c.1560 – 1616), was a rapidly growing and bustling metropolis. In the duration of this course, we will travel back in time seeking to explore the history and social geography of this largest city in England. Based on a research-based learning methodology, we will attempt to map out London’s key locations as the centre of government, the law and the church as well as being the focus of politics and culture during a time of intense political and religious upheaval. In addition, this course focuses on the following topics: Stage history, playhouses; the fundamental features of dramatic composition to issues such as political structures in Renaissance England, gender roles and relations, love and sexuality, constructions of nationhood, global expansion and their representation in Shakespeare’s plays.

Since some of the participants are required to submit a research paper, we will use parts of our seminar discussions to the development of topics, the formulation of a thesis statement, as well as considerations about the methodological approaches of writing such a paper.

Additional secondary sources can be accessed in the “Semesterapparat”, a reference-only section on the third floor of the library building. A reader with selected secondary text materials will be made available for download on Stud. IP. Please be aware that your registration on Stud. IP. is mandatory (deadline September 15th, 2019).

You may wish to check the sections "Information" and "Schedule" further details such as requirements, weekly schedule, select bibliography and modes of assessment.

Requirements and Assessment
• Interest in the topic discussed and ideally a regular attendance and informed participation in class discussion (not part of your formal assessment);
• in-depth knowledge of the selected reading material,
• homework assignments,
• group projects and presentation of research paper proposals;
• research-based term paper.
The requirements as formulated above may vary depending on your overall degree program.

Reading materials
MacGregor, Neil. Shakespeare's Restless World, Penguin Books, 2014.
Copies are available for purchase at the bookstore on our campus (Universitätsbuchhandlung Bremen: www.unibuch-bremen.de)

Dr. Jana Nittel

SP-2 Aufbaumodul: Sprachpraxis/ Practical-Language Proficiency Module (Part 1) (6 CP) (nur für das Wintersemester)

6 CP (3 CP+ 3 CP)

Modulbeauftragte/r: Michael Claridge, claridge@uni-bremen.de
Course numberTitle of eventLecturer
10-76-3-SP-2-01Content-based Integrated Skills - a (in English)

Exercises (Teaching)

Dates:
weekly (starts in week: 1) Wed. 08:00 - 10:00 GW2 B1216 (2 Credit hours)

Content-Based Integrated Skills (CBIS) permits students to implement all four core language skills (speaking, writing, listening, reading) while turning a theoretical challenge into a practical success.

Participants will learn through preparing group presentations on current topics revolving around the United Kingdom and Ireland. Students will learn about language, culture, geography and history of this region through their presentations. Rather than engaging in a role-playing simulating as is done in other CBIS classes, this particular group will establish and put their own unique ideas into practice. This will require (allow) you to independently make decisions, solve problems, follow through with, and present the fruits of your labours.

Dr. Vanessa Herrmann
10-76-3-SP-2-02Content-based Integrated Skills - b (in English)

Exercises (Teaching)

Dates:
weekly (starts in week: 1) Thu. 10:00 - 12:00 GW2 A4020 (2 Credit hours)

Content-Based Integrated Skills (CBIS) permits students to implement all four core language skills (speaking, writing, listening, reading) while turning a theoretical challenge into a practical success.

Participants will learn through preparing group presentations on current topics revolving around the United Kingdom and Ireland. Students will learn about language, culture, geography and history of this region through their presentations. Rather than engaging in a role-playing simulating as is done in other CBIS classes, this particular group will establish and put their own unique ideas into practice. This will require (allow) you to independently make decisions, solve problems, follow through with, and present the fruits of your labours.

Dr. Vanessa Herrmann
10-76-3-SP-2-03Content-based Integrated Skills - c (in English)

Exercises (Teaching)

Dates:
weekly (starts in week: 1) Thu. 12:00 - 14:00 GW2 A4020 (2 Credit hours)

Content-Based Integrated Skills (CBIS) permits students to implement all four core language skills (speaking, writing, listening, reading) while turning a theoretical challenge into a practical success.

Participants will learn through preparing group presentations on current topics revolving around the United Kingdom and Ireland. Students will learn about language, culture, geography and history of this region through their presentations. Rather than engaging in a role-playing simulating as is done in other CBIS classes, this particular group will establish and put their own unique ideas into practice. This will require (allow) you to independently make decisions, solve problems, follow through with, and present the fruits of your labours.

Dr. Vanessa Herrmann
10-76-3-SP-2-04CBIS Content-Based Integrated Skills d (in English)

Exercises (Teaching)
ECTS: 3

Dates:
weekly (starts in week: 1) Fri. 10:00 - 12:00 SuUB 4330 (Studio I Medienraum ) (2 Credit hours)

In this class, you will be taking part in a simulation where we look closely at topics related to human rights. You will be representatives (e.g. of a country, an NGO) to a task force set up to examine questions related to human rights in your fictitious country within the context of the European Convention on Human Rights. The work will require you to work together with other groups within your delegation as well as members from other parallel CBIS classes in order to develop skills enabling you to argue your case, persuade and reach consensus.
This framework will enable you to develop all four language skills (speaking & listening, writing & reading); to further your ability to use the correct register (formal<->informal, spoken<->written) when communicating in English; to expand your soft skills (e.g. time management; teamwork; taking responsibility for your own work and that of your team); and - of course - to develop your understanding of the complex and fascinating area of human rights..

Lisa Nehls, M.A.
10-76-3-SP-2-05CBIS Content-Based Integrated Skills e (in English)

Exercises (Teaching)
ECTS: 3

Dates:
weekly (starts in week: 1) Fri. 12:00 - 14:00 GW2 B2900 SuUB 4330 (Studio I Medienraum ) (2 Credit hours)

In this class, you will be taking part in a simulation where we look closely at topics related to human rights. You will be representatives (e.g. of a country, an NGO) to a task force set up to examine questions related to human rights in your fictitious country within the context of the European Convention on Human Rights. The work will require you to work together with other groups within your delegation as well as members from other parallel CBIS classes in order to develop skills enabling you to argue your case, persuade and reach consensus.
This framework will enable you to develop all four language skills (speaking & listening, writing & reading); to further your ability to use the correct register (formal<->informal, spoken<->written) when communicating in English; to expand your soft skills (e.g. time management; teamwork; taking responsibility for your own work and that of your team); and - of course - to develop your understanding of the complex and fascinating area of human rights..

Lisa Nehls, M.A.
10-76-3-SP-2-06Content-Based Integrated Skills f (in English)

Exercises (Teaching)
ECTS: 3

Dates:
weekly (starts in week: 1) Tue. 12:00 - 14:00 GW1 C1070 (2 Credit hours)

In this class, you will be taking part in a simulation where we look closely at topics related to human rights. You will be representatives (e.g. of a country, an NGO) to a task force set up to examine questions related to human rights in your fictitious country within the context of the European Convention on Human Rights. The work will require you to work together with other groups within your delegation as well as members from other parallel CBIS classes in order to develop skills enabling you to argue your case, persuade and reach consensus.
This framework will enable you to develop all four language skills (speaking & listening, writing & reading); to further your ability to use the correct register (formal<->informal, spoken<->written) when communicating in English; to expand your soft skills (e.g. time management; teamwork; taking responsibility for your own work and that of your team); and - of course - to develop your understanding of the complex and fascinating area of human rights.

Katja Müller, M.A.
10-76-3-SP-2-07Content-Based Integrated Skills g (in English)

Exercises (Teaching)
ECTS: 3

Dates:
weekly (starts in week: 1) Thu. 14:00 - 16:00 SH D1020 (2 Credit hours)

In this class, you will be taking part in a simulation where we look closely at topics related to human rights. You will be representatives (e.g. of a country, an NGO) to a task force set up to examine questions related to human rights in your fictitious country within the context of the European Convention on Human Rights. The work will require you to work together with other groups within your delegation as well as members from other parallel CBIS classes in order to develop skills enabling you to argue your case, persuade and reach consensus.
This framework will enable you to develop all four language skills (speaking & listening, writing & reading); to further your ability to use the correct register (formal<->informal, spoken<->written) when communicating in English; to expand your soft skills (e.g. time management; teamwork; taking responsibility for your own work and that of your team); and - of course - to develop your understanding of the complex and fascinating area of human rights.

Katja Müller, M.A.
10-76-3-SP-2-08Content-Based Integrated Skills h (in English)

Exercises (Teaching)
ECTS: 3

Dates:
weekly (starts in week: 1) Fri. 14:00 - 16:00 SFG 1030 (2 Credit hours)

In this class, you will be taking part in a simulation where we look closely at topics related to human rights. You will be representatives (e.g. of a country, an NGO) to a task force set up to examine questions related to human rights in your fictitious country within the context of the European Convention on Human Rights. The work will require you to work together with other groups within your delegation as well as members from other parallel CBIS classes in order to develop skills enabling you to argue your case, persuade and reach consensus.
This framework will enable you to develop all four language skills (speaking & listening, writing & reading); to further your ability to use the correct register (formal<->informal, spoken<->written) when communicating in English; to expand your soft skills (e.g. time management; teamwork; taking responsibility for your own work and that of your team); and - of course - to develop your understanding of the complex and fascinating area of human rights.

Katja Müller, M.A.
10-76-3-SP-2-09Content-Based Integrated Skills i (in English)

Exercises (Teaching)

Dates:
weekly (starts in week: 1) Tue. 12:00 - 14:00 GW2 A4330 (2 Credit hours)
Anne Kirkham, M.A.
10-76-3-SP-2-10Content-based Integrated Skills - j (in English)

Exercises (Teaching)

Dates:
weekly (starts in week: 1) Wed. 12:00 - 14:00 SFG 2020 (2 Credit hours)
Anne Kirkham, M.A.
10-76-3-SP-2-11Content-Based Integrated Skills k (in English)

Exercises (Teaching)

Dates:
weekly (starts in week: 1) Wed. 14:00 - 16:00 GW2 B1170 (2 Credit hours)
Anne Kirkham, M.A.

WD-1a: Aufbaumodul: Literatur- und Sprachwissenschaft (Wahlpflichtmodul 6 CP) (nur für das Wintersemester)

(3 CP + 3 CP)

Es gilt zu beachten: Laut SK-Beschluss (E-SC) vom 21.11.2012 ist die Pruefungsleistung im Bereich "Key Topics in Literature" zu erbringen = Klausur/Written test oder benotete Präsentationsleistung/presentation.

Modulbeauftragte/r: Dr. Jana Nittel, jnittel@uni-bremen.de
Course numberTitle of eventLecturer
10-76-3-D-1b/c-WD-1b/c-01Key Topics in Literature: The Victorian Novel - Charles Dickens (in English)

Seminar (Teaching)

Dates:
weekly (starts in week: 1) Tue. 16:15 - 17:45 GW2 B1170 (2 Credit hours)

This course welcomes students who wish to complete the following modules:
B.A. E-SC D-1a, D-1b und WD-1a, WD-1b
Non-E-SC students and academic exchange students

This seminar focuses predominantly on novels exemplifying the predominance of fictional prose in the Victoria era. We will explore fictional and non-fictional writings by the English writer and social critic Charles Dickens (1812 – 1870), in particular Oliver Twist (February 1837 to April 1839) and Bleak House (March 1852 to September 1853). Using text-centred and contextual approaches, this course wishes to enable students to explore language, form, genre, and style of the novels, as well as to engage critically with themes, issues, and key concerns of Dickens’s writing and corresponding contemporary adaptions. Along with our weekly discussions of selected chapters - reader responses are strongly encouraged - we will also touch upon key developments in the history of nineteen-century novels as well as selected historical and literary contexts of the period.

Since some of the participants are required to submit a research paper, we will use parts of our seminar discussions to the development of topics, the formulation of a thesis statement, as well as considerations about the methodological approaches of writing such a paper.

Additional secondary sources can be accessed in the “Semesterapparat”, a reference-only section on the third floor of the library building. A reader with selected secondary text materials will be made available for download on Stud. IP. Please be aware that your registration on Stud. IP. is mandatory (deadline September 15th, 2019). You may wish to check the sections "Information" and "Schedule" further details such as requirements, weekly schedule, select bibliography and modes of assessment.

Requirements and Assessment
• Interest in the topic discussed and ideally a regular attendance and informed participation in class discussion (not part of your formal assessment);
• in-depth knowledge of the selected reading material,
• homework assignments,
• group projects and presentation of research paper proposals;
• research-based term paper.
The requirements as formulated above may vary depending on your overall degree program.

Required reading materials (you need a copy of these publications for class):
Dickens, Charles, and Fred Kaplan. Oliver Twist (Italics), Norton, 1993.
Dickens, Charles, and Nicola Bradbury. Bleak House (Italics), Penguin, 2003.
Copies can be purchased at the bookstore on our campus (Universitätsbuchhandlung Bremen: www.unibuch-bremen.de)

Dr. Jana Nittel
10-76-3-D1-a/b-WD-1a/b-01Key Topics in Literature: Women and Fiction - Virginia Woolf (in English)

Seminar (Teaching)
ECTS: 3

Dates:
weekly (starts in week: 1) Wed. 16:15 - 17:45 GW2 A4330 (2 Credit hours)

This course welcomes students who wish to complete the following modules:
B.A. E-SC D-1a, D-1b und WD-1a, WD-1b
Non-E-SC students and academic exchange students
Lecturer: Dr. Jana Nittel

According to Bonnie Kime Scott, modernist women “actively transformed the novel to reflect their unique perceptions of everyday life […] as critics and creative writers”. This course is designed to aesthetically appreciate and to critically explore selected works by the 20th-Century British female author and critic Virginia Woolf using text-centred and contextual approaches. We will explore the relation of women and fiction in the first three decades of the 20th century in Woolf’s feminist literary criticism, revisit modernist writing strategies and discuss several gender-related aspects of the novels, which have remained highly topical, then and now.

Since some of the participants are required to submit a research paper, we will use parts of our seminar discussions to the development of topics, the formulation of a thesis statement, as well as considerations about the methodological approaches of writing such a paper.

Additional secondary sources can be accessed in the “Semesterapparat”, a reference-only section on the third floor of the library building. A reader with selected secondary text materials will be made available for download on Stud. IP. Please be aware that your registration on Stud. IP. is mandatory (deadline September 15th, 2019). You may wish to check the sections "Information" and "Schedule" further details such as requirements, weekly schedule, select bibliography and modes of assessment.

Requirements and Assessment
• Interest in the topic discussed and ideally a regular attendance and informed participation in class discussion (not part of your formal assessment);
• in-depth knowledge of the selected reading material,
• homework assignments,
• group projects and presentation of research paper proposals;
• research-based term paper.
The requirements as formulated above may vary depending on your overall degree program.

Required reading materials (you need a copy of these publications for class):
Woolf, Virginia. Mrs. Dalloway: with a foreword by Maureen Howard (Italics). 1st Harvest/HBJ ed., Harcourt Brace Jovanovich, 1990.
Woolf, Virginia. Orlando. Introduction and notes by Merry M. Pawlowski (Italics), Wordsworth Classics, 2003.
Woolf, Virginia, and Morag Shiach. A Room of One's Own; Three guineas (Italics), Oxford University Press, 1992.
Copies can be purchased at the bookstore on our campus (Universitätsbuchhandlung Bremen: www.unibuch-bremen.de)

Dr. Jana Nittel
10-76-4-D-1a-05Key Topics in Literature: Jane Austen: Then and Now (in English)

Blockveranstaltung (Teaching)

Additional dates:
Fri. 08.11.19 14:00 - 17:00 GW1 B0100
Fri. 10.01.20 - Sat. 11.01.20 (Fri., Sat.) 10:00 - 17:00 GW1 B0080
Fri. 17.01.20 10:00 - 17:00 GW1 B0080

This seminar will explore the historical and contemporary significance of one of Britain’s foremost female writers, Jane Austen (1775-1817). Focusing on her most well-known novel Pride and Prejudice (1813) and reading/viewing selected twentieth and twenty-first century adaptations and variations of this classic of English literature, we will discuss how and why Jane Austen and her literary works continue to fascinate us today.

Please note that this is a four-day intensive course taking place on
Friday November 8, 2019, 2pm (sharp!)-5pm;
Friday January 10, Saturday January 11, and Friday January 17, 2020, 10am (sharp!)-5pm

All information regarding the syllabus, course materials, and exam regulations will be discussed during the introductory session. Please make sure that you attend the first meeting if you would like to participate in this class.

Prior enrollment via Stud.IP is mandatory.

Christine Müller, M.A.
10-76-4-D1-a-06Key Topics in Literature: The Postcolonial World in Literature and Film: India (in English)

Seminar (Teaching)

Dates:
weekly (starts in week: 1) Thu. 12:15 - 13:45 GW2 B2900 SuUB 4320 (Studio II Medienraum ) SFG 2020 (2 Credit hours)

This course will offer a comprehensive overview of the history of colonialism in India, the anti-colonial resistance that was generated in the society as a result, as well as the effects of decolonization. The course will familiarize students with South-Asia’s contribution to postcolonialism, with a major focus on how Indian culture, literature, and societies, were shaped by the forces of colonialism and how the societies, in turn, negotiated with their positions in the postcolonial world. Throughout the course, students will critically read and evaluate the works of major postcolonial Indian/South Asian theorists and writers. The course includes and will equally emphasize theories, novels, and films, in an attempt to explore how the different media reflects and mediates with the postcolonial realities.

Dr. Sukla Chatterjee
10-76-4-D1-a-07Key Topics in Literature: Hunger in Literature and Films in the nineteenth and twentieth centuries (in English)

Seminar (Teaching)

Dates:
weekly (starts in week: 1) Wed. 12:15 - 13:45 GW2 B1400 NUR Mi. - So. SFG 0140 (2 Credit hours)

This course explores hunger as a perpetual force in societies and hunger literature as the corpus on which politics, social praxis, power struggles, and cultural meanings intersect. Focusing on major famine and starvation conditions like the Bengal Famine (1943), the Irish Potato Famine (1845-49), among others, the course offers a history of such occurrences, their consequence on the social fabric, and how that in turn shapes societies in the long run. Students will read a range of famine and starvation narratives from the nineteenth and twentieth centuries from across cultures, theorize them, and will learn to see hunger and starvation beyond their biological and statistical manifestations. The course includes lectures, class, presentations, and documentary/film.

Dr. Sukla Chatterjee
10-76-4-D1a-08Shakespeare's Richard III (in English)

Seminar (Teaching)

Dates:
weekly (starts in week: 1) Tue. 16:00 - 18:00 SFG 1080 (2 Credit hours)

In his well-known history play King Richard III, William Shakespeare offered a dramatically effective portrait of a malicious king, a villain whose unscrupulous and sinister machinations have turned him into a highly politicised icon of a power-thirsty, diabolic ruler. Yet one has to bear in mind that the drama was written on the biased evidence of Tudor historiography, while contemporary historians tend to look at Richard III in a slightly different way.

In the course of this seminar we shall address two major topics, i.e. the reaction of an audience torn between disgust and fascination as well as the contrast between the ideological construction of a Machiavellian king and the findings of recent historical research.

requirements:
• active participation
• in-depth knowledge of the reading material
• presentation and/or final paper

Please note that prior enrolment via Stud.IP is mandatory. The enrolment period ends on September 15.
The number of participants is limited to 15 students.

text:
Shakespeare, William. King Richard III. The Arden Shakespeare. London: Methuen Drama, 2009.

Prof. Dr. Norbert Schaffeld
10-76-4-WD-1a-01Key Topics in Linguistics: Linguistic Analysis of Literary Texts (in English)

Seminar (Teaching)

Dates:
weekly (starts in week: 1) Thu. 12:15 - 13:45 GW2 A3390 (CIP-Labor FB 10) (2 Credit hours)

In this seminar, we want to apply linguist theories and methods to investigate different kinds of literary texts, e.g. novels, plays and poems. This is a branch of applied linguistics often called ‘stylistics’. The Systemic Functional Grammar (Halliday) provides us with the theoretical background to investigate, for example, transitivity and theme in texts. In addition, we will use corpus linguistic methods, e.g. word frequencies, keywords and collocations, to describe the style of a literary text. You will learn how to do automatic analyses with the AntConc software (Laurence), and do some computer-assisted manual annotations with the UAM corpus tool software (O’Donnell).
Each student will do analyses of different linguistic aspects of a text of their choice. In the end, you will be able to find, analyze and present aspects of literary texts that exceed what we can describe with methods from literature studies alone.
If you have taken the ‘Language and Media’ class, please do not choose this class, as there is quite a bit of overlap.

Requirements
Regular attendance and active participation in class, working through texts / exercises / discussions.
Homework assignments (reading 10-30 pages each week; doing the exercises and analyses).

BA ESC ( 2011) WD 2 a: An analysis + poster presentation (not graded, 3 CP)
BA ESC ( 2011) WD 2 c: An analysis + poster presentation (graded, 3 CP)
Erasmus 3 CP active participation, 6 CP An analysis + poster presentation (graded)

Literature
Goatly, Andrew. 2008. Explorations in Stylistics. Equinox. Available as e-book from the library.
McEnery, Tony & Richard Xiao & Yukio Tono. 2006. Corpus-based Language Studies: An Advanced Resource Book. Routledge.

Dr. Anke Schulz
10-76-4-WD-1c-01Key Topics in Linguistics: Linguistic Methods for Socio-Critical Reading: Society and Gender

Seminar (Teaching)

Dates:
weekly (starts in week: 1) Tue. 12:00 - 14:00 SFG 2010 (2 Credit hours)

This course will deal with the principles underlying language use, with a specific focus on differences and the construction of gender and sexual orientation. We will learn that gender is seen as a dichotomy in some research such as sociolinguistics and that other research claims that gender interactional patterns are not a reflection of the individual’s nature but rather of some performance that the individual is accomplishing. According to this view, "gender is doing, not being." But also there is more to know about the different research methodologies of language, sex and gender categories. These include Sociolinguistics, Conversation analysis, Corpus linguistics, Critical discourse analysis, Discursive Psychology, Feminist Post-Structuralist Discourse Analysis and Queer Theory. Subsequently, students will be required to develop a project of their own, analysing the language used by people of different gender, sex or sexual orientation in a particular communication situation of their own choice.

Dr. Inke Du Bois
10-76-D1-a-13Tracing the Fabric of Slavery: Close Reading of Cambridge and Property (in English)

Seminar (Teaching)

Dates:
weekly (starts in week: 1) Thu. 14:15 - 15:45 UNICOM 3; 0. Ebene; Seminarraum 4 (2 Credit hours)

This seminar will take as its focus of research and seminar discussion two novels, Caryl Phillips' CAMBRIDGE and Valerie Martin's PROPERTY. Both texts address the historical issue of transatlantic slavery (the interests and actors who created and sustained it, as well as the resistance against it by black and white people, enslaved and free), and the question of representation: how to write about the propertization, commodification and thingification of Black life and being.
Please have copies of those two novels IN HAND at the beginning of the semester.
For secondary reading requirements/suggestions and specific seminar layout please check in on STUD IP regularly.
Our methodological 'tool' as it were, will be Stuart Hall's rightly famous essay on REPRESENTATION, see here:
https://culturetechnologypolitics.files.wordpress.com/2015/09/stuart-hall-on-representation-1.pdf

for later discussion of critical questions:
Sabine Broeck: Enslavement as Regime of Western Modernity: Re-reading Gender Studies Epistemology Through Black Feminist Critique, see in:
http://genderforum.org/black-womens-writing-revisited-issue-22-2008/http://genderforum.org/black-womens-writing-revisited-issue-22-2008/

Prof. Dr. Sabine Bröck
10-76-D1-a-14Writing White America: A Critical Look at Contemporary US Literature (in English)

Seminar (Teaching)

Dates:
weekly (starts in week: 1) Tue. 12:00 - 14:00 GW1 B2070 (2 Credit hours)

PLEASE TAKE NOTICE: REGISTRATION FOR THIS CLASS HAS BEEN CLOSED TODAY. THE ROOM WE HAVE BEEN ALLOTTED IS FULLY BOOKED TO CAPACITY.
This seminar will study the ways contemporary white American writers have addressed "white America", in its many, oftentimes contradictory facets of racialized empowerment, gender embattledness, as well as class erosion and segregation of wealth. Those discourses are in a way over-determined by the acting president's ascendancy to social media hegemony but are by no means exhausted by the ultra-right discourses and practices backing him. We will read novels and essays that have contributed to the recent debates and have also been shaped in response to those vernacular interventions.
Required readings:
Richard Russo, Everybody's Fool
Liane Moriarty, Big Little Lies

Prospective participants: you are urgently requested to have those novels IN HAND before class beginning.
Our methodological 'tool' as it were, will be Stuart Hall's rightly famous essay on REPRESENTATION, see here:
https://culturetechnologypolitics.files.wordpress.com/2015/09/stuart-hall-on-representation-1.pdf

We will also read a series of essays by Joan Didion, Rebecca Solnit, Tim Wise, Barbara Ehrenreich and others. Titles will be listed on stud ip in due course. Please check back regularly, thank you!

Prof. Dr. Sabine Bröck
10-76-D1-a-15Key Topics in Literature: The Postcolonial World in Literature and Film: The Pacific (in English)

Seminar (Teaching)

Dates:
weekly (starts in week: 1) Thu. 12:00 - 14:00 SFG 0150 (2 Credit hours)

This class will introduce students to the Pacific area – ocean, island and continental regions that cover various nations. Many Pacific regions have been colonized by European powers and have experienced very different colonial histories. Indigenous people have been living in these areas for centuries, have accordingly developed diverse cultures and structures, have to live with manifold challenges and experience various postcolonial and neocolonial conditions. This class will look at Pacific colonial histories, postcolonial cultures, and contemporary issues with a focus on Indigenous populations. We will learn about the Pacific through reading non-fiction and fiction texts, and watching a few documentary and feature films by Indigenous and non-Indigenous directors.
The films will be shown on Tuesday evenings from 6-8 pm. You are required to purchase and read Ellen van Neerven’s Heat and Light (app 18 €) and Kiana Davenport’s Shark Dialogues (app 16 €) available at the Universitätsbuchhandlung or on amazon.de (allow up to 3 weeks delivery for marketplace books). All texts except these novels will be provided electronically through StudIP. Class requirements are regular attendance, in-depth knowledge of reading and viewing material, and active class discussion. Reading the texts and watching the films is mandatory. Please note that prior enrollment via Stud.IP is mandatory.

Prof. Dr. Kerstin Knopf

WD-1b Aufbaumodul: Literaturwissenschaft und Kulturgeschichte (Wahlpflichtmodul 6 CP) - (nur für das Wintersemester)

(3 CP + 3 CP)

Es gilt zu beachten: Laut SK-Beschluss (E-SC) vom 21.11.2012 ist die Pruefungsleistung im Bereich "Key Topics in Cultural History" zu erbringen = Klausur/Written test oder benotete Präsentationsleistung/presentation.

Modulbeauftragte/r: Dr. Jana Nittel, jnittel@uni-bremen.de
Course numberTitle of eventLecturer
10-76-3-D-1b/c-WD-1b/c-01Key Topics in Literature: The Victorian Novel - Charles Dickens (in English)

Seminar (Teaching)

Dates:
weekly (starts in week: 1) Tue. 16:15 - 17:45 GW2 B1170 (2 Credit hours)

This course welcomes students who wish to complete the following modules:
B.A. E-SC D-1a, D-1b und WD-1a, WD-1b
Non-E-SC students and academic exchange students

This seminar focuses predominantly on novels exemplifying the predominance of fictional prose in the Victoria era. We will explore fictional and non-fictional writings by the English writer and social critic Charles Dickens (1812 – 1870), in particular Oliver Twist (February 1837 to April 1839) and Bleak House (March 1852 to September 1853). Using text-centred and contextual approaches, this course wishes to enable students to explore language, form, genre, and style of the novels, as well as to engage critically with themes, issues, and key concerns of Dickens’s writing and corresponding contemporary adaptions. Along with our weekly discussions of selected chapters - reader responses are strongly encouraged - we will also touch upon key developments in the history of nineteen-century novels as well as selected historical and literary contexts of the period.

Since some of the participants are required to submit a research paper, we will use parts of our seminar discussions to the development of topics, the formulation of a thesis statement, as well as considerations about the methodological approaches of writing such a paper.

Additional secondary sources can be accessed in the “Semesterapparat”, a reference-only section on the third floor of the library building. A reader with selected secondary text materials will be made available for download on Stud. IP. Please be aware that your registration on Stud. IP. is mandatory (deadline September 15th, 2019). You may wish to check the sections "Information" and "Schedule" further details such as requirements, weekly schedule, select bibliography and modes of assessment.

Requirements and Assessment
• Interest in the topic discussed and ideally a regular attendance and informed participation in class discussion (not part of your formal assessment);
• in-depth knowledge of the selected reading material,
• homework assignments,
• group projects and presentation of research paper proposals;
• research-based term paper.
The requirements as formulated above may vary depending on your overall degree program.

Required reading materials (you need a copy of these publications for class):
Dickens, Charles, and Fred Kaplan. Oliver Twist (Italics), Norton, 1993.
Dickens, Charles, and Nicola Bradbury. Bleak House (Italics), Penguin, 2003.
Copies can be purchased at the bookstore on our campus (Universitätsbuchhandlung Bremen: www.unibuch-bremen.de)

Dr. Jana Nittel
10-76-3-D-1b/c-WD-1b/c-02Key Topics in Cultural History: Gender - Culture - Feminism (in English)

Lecture (Teaching)

Dates:
weekly (starts in week: 1) Wed. 16:00 - 18:00 GW2 B2900 (2 Credit hours)

This is course is a mixture between a lecture course and a regular class. Scholars and teachers both from FB 10 and from other universities will deliver lectures on various aspects of our general topic initiating a transdisciplinary discourse on "Gender - Culture - Feminism". In the sessions between the lectures we will discuss corresponding texts and resources to prepare ourselves for the diverse subject matters of the presentations and to critically reflect on their respective ideas and arguments.
Essential readings will be available for download on Stud-IP. You should also consult the 'Semesterapparat' (SuUB) for further readings.
Requirements:
• regular attendance and oral participation
• in-depth knowledge of the reading material
• oral presentation and handout
Please note that prior enrollment via Stud.IP is mandatory.

Dr. Karin Esders-Angermund
10-76-3-D-1c/b-WD-1c/b-03Key Topics in Cultural History: Analyzing Hollywood Cinema (in English)

Seminar (Teaching)

Dates:
weekly (starts in week: 1) Thu. 14:00 - 16:00 SuUB 4330 (Studio I Medienraum ) (2 Credit hours)

This course is designed to introduce students to critical scholarship on US-American film history and culture. Basic introductions to the analytical categories of race, class, gender, and sexuality will help students to analyze how films construct and limit representations of African-Americans, Native Americans, women and femininity, men and masculinity, sexuality, class struggle and class difference.
Our major textbook will be Benshoff and Griffin: America on film: Representing race, class, gender, and sexuality at the movies. (Purchase is is suggested.)
Essential readings from the textbook will be also available for download on Stud-IP. You should also consult the 'Semesterapparat' (SuUB) for further readings.
Requirements:
• regular attendance and oral participation
• in-depth knowledge of the reading material
• oral presentation and handout
Please note that prior enrollment via Stud.IP is mandatory.

Dr. Karin Esders-Angermund
10-76-3-D1-a/b-WD-1a/b-01Key Topics in Literature: Women and Fiction - Virginia Woolf (in English)

Seminar (Teaching)
ECTS: 3

Dates:
weekly (starts in week: 1) Wed. 16:15 - 17:45 GW2 A4330 (2 Credit hours)

This course welcomes students who wish to complete the following modules:
B.A. E-SC D-1a, D-1b und WD-1a, WD-1b
Non-E-SC students and academic exchange students
Lecturer: Dr. Jana Nittel

According to Bonnie Kime Scott, modernist women “actively transformed the novel to reflect their unique perceptions of everyday life […] as critics and creative writers”. This course is designed to aesthetically appreciate and to critically explore selected works by the 20th-Century British female author and critic Virginia Woolf using text-centred and contextual approaches. We will explore the relation of women and fiction in the first three decades of the 20th century in Woolf’s feminist literary criticism, revisit modernist writing strategies and discuss several gender-related aspects of the novels, which have remained highly topical, then and now.

Since some of the participants are required to submit a research paper, we will use parts of our seminar discussions to the development of topics, the formulation of a thesis statement, as well as considerations about the methodological approaches of writing such a paper.

Additional secondary sources can be accessed in the “Semesterapparat”, a reference-only section on the third floor of the library building. A reader with selected secondary text materials will be made available for download on Stud. IP. Please be aware that your registration on Stud. IP. is mandatory (deadline September 15th, 2019). You may wish to check the sections "Information" and "Schedule" further details such as requirements, weekly schedule, select bibliography and modes of assessment.

Requirements and Assessment
• Interest in the topic discussed and ideally a regular attendance and informed participation in class discussion (not part of your formal assessment);
• in-depth knowledge of the selected reading material,
• homework assignments,
• group projects and presentation of research paper proposals;
• research-based term paper.
The requirements as formulated above may vary depending on your overall degree program.

Required reading materials (you need a copy of these publications for class):
Woolf, Virginia. Mrs. Dalloway: with a foreword by Maureen Howard (Italics). 1st Harvest/HBJ ed., Harcourt Brace Jovanovich, 1990.
Woolf, Virginia. Orlando. Introduction and notes by Merry M. Pawlowski (Italics), Wordsworth Classics, 2003.
Woolf, Virginia, and Morag Shiach. A Room of One's Own; Three guineas (Italics), Oxford University Press, 1992.
Copies can be purchased at the bookstore on our campus (Universitätsbuchhandlung Bremen: www.unibuch-bremen.de)

Dr. Jana Nittel
10-76-4-D-1a-05Key Topics in Literature: Jane Austen: Then and Now (in English)

Blockveranstaltung (Teaching)

Additional dates:
Fri. 08.11.19 14:00 - 17:00 GW1 B0100
Fri. 10.01.20 - Sat. 11.01.20 (Fri., Sat.) 10:00 - 17:00 GW1 B0080
Fri. 17.01.20 10:00 - 17:00 GW1 B0080

This seminar will explore the historical and contemporary significance of one of Britain’s foremost female writers, Jane Austen (1775-1817). Focusing on her most well-known novel Pride and Prejudice (1813) and reading/viewing selected twentieth and twenty-first century adaptations and variations of this classic of English literature, we will discuss how and why Jane Austen and her literary works continue to fascinate us today.

Please note that this is a four-day intensive course taking place on
Friday November 8, 2019, 2pm (sharp!)-5pm;
Friday January 10, Saturday January 11, and Friday January 17, 2020, 10am (sharp!)-5pm

All information regarding the syllabus, course materials, and exam regulations will be discussed during the introductory session. Please make sure that you attend the first meeting if you would like to participate in this class.

Prior enrollment via Stud.IP is mandatory.

Christine Müller, M.A.
10-76-4-D1-a-06Key Topics in Literature: The Postcolonial World in Literature and Film: India (in English)

Seminar (Teaching)

Dates:
weekly (starts in week: 1) Thu. 12:15 - 13:45 GW2 B2900 SuUB 4320 (Studio II Medienraum ) SFG 2020 (2 Credit hours)

This course will offer a comprehensive overview of the history of colonialism in India, the anti-colonial resistance that was generated in the society as a result, as well as the effects of decolonization. The course will familiarize students with South-Asia’s contribution to postcolonialism, with a major focus on how Indian culture, literature, and societies, were shaped by the forces of colonialism and how the societies, in turn, negotiated with their positions in the postcolonial world. Throughout the course, students will critically read and evaluate the works of major postcolonial Indian/South Asian theorists and writers. The course includes and will equally emphasize theories, novels, and films, in an attempt to explore how the different media reflects and mediates with the postcolonial realities.

Dr. Sukla Chatterjee
10-76-4-D1-a-07Key Topics in Literature: Hunger in Literature and Films in the nineteenth and twentieth centuries (in English)

Seminar (Teaching)

Dates:
weekly (starts in week: 1) Wed. 12:15 - 13:45 GW2 B1400 NUR Mi. - So. SFG 0140 (2 Credit hours)

This course explores hunger as a perpetual force in societies and hunger literature as the corpus on which politics, social praxis, power struggles, and cultural meanings intersect. Focusing on major famine and starvation conditions like the Bengal Famine (1943), the Irish Potato Famine (1845-49), among others, the course offers a history of such occurrences, their consequence on the social fabric, and how that in turn shapes societies in the long run. Students will read a range of famine and starvation narratives from the nineteenth and twentieth centuries from across cultures, theorize them, and will learn to see hunger and starvation beyond their biological and statistical manifestations. The course includes lectures, class, presentations, and documentary/film.

Dr. Sukla Chatterjee
10-76-4-D1-b-D1-c-01Key Topics in Cultural History: Royals and Rebels - British History on Film (in English)

Seminar (Teaching)
ECTS: 3

Dates:
weekly (starts in week: 1) Tue. 18:00 - 20:00 SuUB 4320 (Studio II Medienraum )
weekly (starts in week: 1) Wed. 14:00 - 16:00 IW3 0390 (2 Credit hours)

Investigating the uses that invocations of ‘British/English history’ are being put to seems particularly urgent at a time when the Brexit crisis is being fuelled by an upsurge of nationalist sentiments. In this seminar, we will analyse feature films that circulate images and narrativizations of British history and work to construct versions of social and national identity. We are going to explore how major historical events, figures and epochs are re-imagined, commemorated, and ideologically appropriated in a range of historical films, and discuss the ways in which cinematographic constructions of the nation’s past reflect and negotiate traditional symbolic meanings as well as present-day anxieties. Topics include Golden Ages and Darkest Hours, covering kings, queens and the monarchy, colonialism and slavery, feminism and class struggle, and commemorations of war.

This course is work-intensive: students are required to invest much time and dedication into week-to-week preparations that include not just the viewing of films before the seminar sessions but also a high amount of reading. A list of films will be agreed upon in the first session, and will be put on restricted loan in the Mediathek.
Reading material will be made available on Stud.IP.

Requirements:
# regular and active participation
# in-depth knowledge of the viewing and reading material
# portfolio of worksheets (graded in WD-1b)
# one oral team presentation
# for a grade in D-1b: an additional long term paper of 10-12 pp.

Prior enrolment via Stud.IP is mandatory.

Irmgard Maassen
10-76-4-D1a-08Shakespeare's Richard III (in English)

Seminar (Teaching)

Dates:
weekly (starts in week: 1) Tue. 16:00 - 18:00 SFG 1080 (2 Credit hours)

In his well-known history play King Richard III, William Shakespeare offered a dramatically effective portrait of a malicious king, a villain whose unscrupulous and sinister machinations have turned him into a highly politicised icon of a power-thirsty, diabolic ruler. Yet one has to bear in mind that the drama was written on the biased evidence of Tudor historiography, while contemporary historians tend to look at Richard III in a slightly different way.

In the course of this seminar we shall address two major topics, i.e. the reaction of an audience torn between disgust and fascination as well as the contrast between the ideological construction of a Machiavellian king and the findings of recent historical research.

requirements:
• active participation
• in-depth knowledge of the reading material
• presentation and/or final paper

Please note that prior enrolment via Stud.IP is mandatory. The enrolment period ends on September 15.
The number of participants is limited to 15 students.

text:
Shakespeare, William. King Richard III. The Arden Shakespeare. London: Methuen Drama, 2009.

Prof. Dr. Norbert Schaffeld
10-76-D1-a-15Key Topics in Literature: The Postcolonial World in Literature and Film: The Pacific (in English)

Seminar (Teaching)

Dates:
weekly (starts in week: 1) Thu. 12:00 - 14:00 SFG 0150 (2 Credit hours)

This class will introduce students to the Pacific area – ocean, island and continental regions that cover various nations. Many Pacific regions have been colonized by European powers and have experienced very different colonial histories. Indigenous people have been living in these areas for centuries, have accordingly developed diverse cultures and structures, have to live with manifold challenges and experience various postcolonial and neocolonial conditions. This class will look at Pacific colonial histories, postcolonial cultures, and contemporary issues with a focus on Indigenous populations. We will learn about the Pacific through reading non-fiction and fiction texts, and watching a few documentary and feature films by Indigenous and non-Indigenous directors.
The films will be shown on Tuesday evenings from 6-8 pm. You are required to purchase and read Ellen van Neerven’s Heat and Light (app 18 €) and Kiana Davenport’s Shark Dialogues (app 16 €) available at the Universitätsbuchhandlung or on amazon.de (allow up to 3 weeks delivery for marketplace books). All texts except these novels will be provided electronically through StudIP. Class requirements are regular attendance, in-depth knowledge of reading and viewing material, and active class discussion. Reading the texts and watching the films is mandatory. Please note that prior enrollment via Stud.IP is mandatory.

Prof. Dr. Kerstin Knopf
10-M80-1-OrMo-06Shakespeare's London (in English)
for B.A. students: Key Topics in Cultural History

Seminar (Teaching)
ECTS: Depends on module choice

Dates:
weekly (starts in week: 1) Mon. 16:15 - 17:45 GW2 B1170 (2 Credit hours)

This course (VAK: 10-M80-1-OrMo-06) welcomes students who wish to complete the following modules:
M.A. E-SC Orientierungsmodul;
M.A. TnL Vertiefungsmodul und Profilmodul Literatur;
B.A. E-SC “Key Topics in Cultural History”- D1b /D1c und WD1b /WD1c
Non-E-SC students and academic exchange students

William Shakespeare’s London, and in this seminar, London in the Elizabethan Age as well as at his time in the city (c.1560 – 1616), was a rapidly growing and bustling metropolis. In the duration of this course, we will travel back in time seeking to explore the history and social geography of this largest city in England. Based on a research-based learning methodology, we will attempt to map out London’s key locations as the centre of government, the law and the church as well as being the focus of politics and culture during a time of intense political and religious upheaval. In addition, this course focuses on the following topics: Stage history, playhouses; the fundamental features of dramatic composition to issues such as political structures in Renaissance England, gender roles and relations, love and sexuality, constructions of nationhood, global expansion and their representation in Shakespeare’s plays.

Since some of the participants are required to submit a research paper, we will use parts of our seminar discussions to the development of topics, the formulation of a thesis statement, as well as considerations about the methodological approaches of writing such a paper.

Additional secondary sources can be accessed in the “Semesterapparat”, a reference-only section on the third floor of the library building. A reader with selected secondary text materials will be made available for download on Stud. IP. Please be aware that your registration on Stud. IP. is mandatory (deadline September 15th, 2019).

You may wish to check the sections "Information" and "Schedule" further details such as requirements, weekly schedule, select bibliography and modes of assessment.

Requirements and Assessment
• Interest in the topic discussed and ideally a regular attendance and informed participation in class discussion (not part of your formal assessment);
• in-depth knowledge of the selected reading material,
• homework assignments,
• group projects and presentation of research paper proposals;
• research-based term paper.
The requirements as formulated above may vary depending on your overall degree program.

Reading materials
MacGregor, Neil. Shakespeare's Restless World, Penguin Books, 2014.
Copies are available for purchase at the bookstore on our campus (Universitätsbuchhandlung Bremen: www.unibuch-bremen.de)

Dr. Jana Nittel

WD-1c: Aufbaumodul: Sprachwissenschaft und Kulturgeschichte (Wahlpflichtmodul 6 CP) - (nur für das Wintersemester)

(3 CP + 3 CP)

Es gilt zu beachten: Laut SK-Beschluss (E-SC) vom 21.11.2012 ist die Pruefungsleistung im Bereich "Key Topics in Linguistics" zu erbringen = Klausur/Written test oder benotete Praesentationsleistung/Presentation.

Modulbeauftragte/r: Dr. Jana Nittel, jnittel@uni-bremen.de
Course numberTitle of eventLecturer
10-76-3-D-1b/c-WD-1b/c-02Key Topics in Cultural History: Gender - Culture - Feminism (in English)

Lecture (Teaching)

Dates:
weekly (starts in week: 1) Wed. 16:00 - 18:00 GW2 B2900 (2 Credit hours)

This is course is a mixture between a lecture course and a regular class. Scholars and teachers both from FB 10 and from other universities will deliver lectures on various aspects of our general topic initiating a transdisciplinary discourse on "Gender - Culture - Feminism". In the sessions between the lectures we will discuss corresponding texts and resources to prepare ourselves for the diverse subject matters of the presentations and to critically reflect on their respective ideas and arguments.
Essential readings will be available for download on Stud-IP. You should also consult the 'Semesterapparat' (SuUB) for further readings.
Requirements:
• regular attendance and oral participation
• in-depth knowledge of the reading material
• oral presentation and handout
Please note that prior enrollment via Stud.IP is mandatory.

Dr. Karin Esders-Angermund
10-76-3-D-1c/b-WD-1c/b-03Key Topics in Cultural History: Analyzing Hollywood Cinema (in English)

Seminar (Teaching)

Dates:
weekly (starts in week: 1) Thu. 14:00 - 16:00 SuUB 4330 (Studio I Medienraum ) (2 Credit hours)

This course is designed to introduce students to critical scholarship on US-American film history and culture. Basic introductions to the analytical categories of race, class, gender, and sexuality will help students to analyze how films construct and limit representations of African-Americans, Native Americans, women and femininity, men and masculinity, sexuality, class struggle and class difference.
Our major textbook will be Benshoff and Griffin: America on film: Representing race, class, gender, and sexuality at the movies. (Purchase is is suggested.)
Essential readings from the textbook will be also available for download on Stud-IP. You should also consult the 'Semesterapparat' (SuUB) for further readings.
Requirements:
• regular attendance and oral participation
• in-depth knowledge of the reading material
• oral presentation and handout
Please note that prior enrollment via Stud.IP is mandatory.

Dr. Karin Esders-Angermund
10-76-4-D1-b-D1-c-01Key Topics in Cultural History: Royals and Rebels - British History on Film (in English)

Seminar (Teaching)
ECTS: 3

Dates:
weekly (starts in week: 1) Tue. 18:00 - 20:00 SuUB 4320 (Studio II Medienraum )
weekly (starts in week: 1) Wed. 14:00 - 16:00 IW3 0390 (2 Credit hours)

Investigating the uses that invocations of ‘British/English history’ are being put to seems particularly urgent at a time when the Brexit crisis is being fuelled by an upsurge of nationalist sentiments. In this seminar, we will analyse feature films that circulate images and narrativizations of British history and work to construct versions of social and national identity. We are going to explore how major historical events, figures and epochs are re-imagined, commemorated, and ideologically appropriated in a range of historical films, and discuss the ways in which cinematographic constructions of the nation’s past reflect and negotiate traditional symbolic meanings as well as present-day anxieties. Topics include Golden Ages and Darkest Hours, covering kings, queens and the monarchy, colonialism and slavery, feminism and class struggle, and commemorations of war.

This course is work-intensive: students are required to invest much time and dedication into week-to-week preparations that include not just the viewing of films before the seminar sessions but also a high amount of reading. A list of films will be agreed upon in the first session, and will be put on restricted loan in the Mediathek.
Reading material will be made available on Stud.IP.

Requirements:
# regular and active participation
# in-depth knowledge of the viewing and reading material
# portfolio of worksheets (graded in WD-1b)
# one oral team presentation
# for a grade in D-1b: an additional long term paper of 10-12 pp.

Prior enrolment via Stud.IP is mandatory.

Irmgard Maassen
10-76-4-WD-1a-01Key Topics in Linguistics: Linguistic Analysis of Literary Texts (in English)

Seminar (Teaching)

Dates:
weekly (starts in week: 1) Thu. 12:15 - 13:45 GW2 A3390 (CIP-Labor FB 10) (2 Credit hours)

In this seminar, we want to apply linguist theories and methods to investigate different kinds of literary texts, e.g. novels, plays and poems. This is a branch of applied linguistics often called ‘stylistics’. The Systemic Functional Grammar (Halliday) provides us with the theoretical background to investigate, for example, transitivity and theme in texts. In addition, we will use corpus linguistic methods, e.g. word frequencies, keywords and collocations, to describe the style of a literary text. You will learn how to do automatic analyses with the AntConc software (Laurence), and do some computer-assisted manual annotations with the UAM corpus tool software (O’Donnell).
Each student will do analyses of different linguistic aspects of a text of their choice. In the end, you will be able to find, analyze and present aspects of literary texts that exceed what we can describe with methods from literature studies alone.
If you have taken the ‘Language and Media’ class, please do not choose this class, as there is quite a bit of overlap.

Requirements
Regular attendance and active participation in class, working through texts / exercises / discussions.
Homework assignments (reading 10-30 pages each week; doing the exercises and analyses).

BA ESC ( 2011) WD 2 a: An analysis + poster presentation (not graded, 3 CP)
BA ESC ( 2011) WD 2 c: An analysis + poster presentation (graded, 3 CP)
Erasmus 3 CP active participation, 6 CP An analysis + poster presentation (graded)

Literature
Goatly, Andrew. 2008. Explorations in Stylistics. Equinox. Available as e-book from the library.
McEnery, Tony & Richard Xiao & Yukio Tono. 2006. Corpus-based Language Studies: An Advanced Resource Book. Routledge.

Dr. Anke Schulz
10-76-4-WD-1c-01Key Topics in Linguistics: Linguistic Methods for Socio-Critical Reading: Society and Gender

Seminar (Teaching)

Dates:
weekly (starts in week: 1) Tue. 12:00 - 14:00 SFG 2010 (2 Credit hours)

This course will deal with the principles underlying language use, with a specific focus on differences and the construction of gender and sexual orientation. We will learn that gender is seen as a dichotomy in some research such as sociolinguistics and that other research claims that gender interactional patterns are not a reflection of the individual’s nature but rather of some performance that the individual is accomplishing. According to this view, "gender is doing, not being." But also there is more to know about the different research methodologies of language, sex and gender categories. These include Sociolinguistics, Conversation analysis, Corpus linguistics, Critical discourse analysis, Discursive Psychology, Feminist Post-Structuralist Discourse Analysis and Queer Theory. Subsequently, students will be required to develop a project of their own, analysing the language used by people of different gender, sex or sexual orientation in a particular communication situation of their own choice.

Dr. Inke Du Bois
10-M80-1-OrMo-06Shakespeare's London (in English)
for B.A. students: Key Topics in Cultural History

Seminar (Teaching)
ECTS: Depends on module choice

Dates:
weekly (starts in week: 1) Mon. 16:15 - 17:45 GW2 B1170 (2 Credit hours)

This course (VAK: 10-M80-1-OrMo-06) welcomes students who wish to complete the following modules:
M.A. E-SC Orientierungsmodul;
M.A. TnL Vertiefungsmodul und Profilmodul Literatur;
B.A. E-SC “Key Topics in Cultural History”- D1b /D1c und WD1b /WD1c
Non-E-SC students and academic exchange students

William Shakespeare’s London, and in this seminar, London in the Elizabethan Age as well as at his time in the city (c.1560 – 1616), was a rapidly growing and bustling metropolis. In the duration of this course, we will travel back in time seeking to explore the history and social geography of this largest city in England. Based on a research-based learning methodology, we will attempt to map out London’s key locations as the centre of government, the law and the church as well as being the focus of politics and culture during a time of intense political and religious upheaval. In addition, this course focuses on the following topics: Stage history, playhouses; the fundamental features of dramatic composition to issues such as political structures in Renaissance England, gender roles and relations, love and sexuality, constructions of nationhood, global expansion and their representation in Shakespeare’s plays.

Since some of the participants are required to submit a research paper, we will use parts of our seminar discussions to the development of topics, the formulation of a thesis statement, as well as considerations about the methodological approaches of writing such a paper.

Additional secondary sources can be accessed in the “Semesterapparat”, a reference-only section on the third floor of the library building. A reader with selected secondary text materials will be made available for download on Stud. IP. Please be aware that your registration on Stud. IP. is mandatory (deadline September 15th, 2019).

You may wish to check the sections "Information" and "Schedule" further details such as requirements, weekly schedule, select bibliography and modes of assessment.

Requirements and Assessment
• Interest in the topic discussed and ideally a regular attendance and informed participation in class discussion (not part of your formal assessment);
• in-depth knowledge of the selected reading material,
• homework assignments,
• group projects and presentation of research paper proposals;
• research-based term paper.
The requirements as formulated above may vary depending on your overall degree program.

Reading materials
MacGregor, Neil. Shakespeare's Restless World, Penguin Books, 2014.
Copies are available for purchase at the bookstore on our campus (Universitätsbuchhandlung Bremen: www.unibuch-bremen.de)

Dr. Jana Nittel

FD 1 - Basismodul Fachdidaktik 10-76-3-204 (nur für das Wintersemester)

Pflichtmodul: Gy, BIPEB
ECTS: 6

Modulbeauftragte/r: Tim Giesler, giesler@uni-bremen.de
Course numberTitle of eventLecturer
10-76-3-FD1-01Introduction to English Language Education (BiPEB) (in English)

Seminar (Teaching)

Dates:
weekly (starts in week: 1) Thu. 12:15 - 13:45 GW2 B1216 (2 Credit hours)

This introductory course will provide an insight into important aspects and theoretical foundations of English Language Teaching (ELT) which is an indispensable part of every teacher's knowledge base. Participants will get an overview of theoretical as well as practical issues. Starting from a look at the history of ELT we will then move on to Foreign Language Politics in Germany and Europe before we begin to discuss more practical concerns, for example:

  • In how far do the different varieties of English in the world take an effect on ELT?
  • How can teachers foster the development of the students' language skills?

Apart from that, we will be looking at special forms of ELT, for example English in Primary Schools and Content and Language Integrated Learning (CLIL), and also the role of course books and literature in the classroom will be investigated. It is most important that participants actively engage with these topics, as it is crucial for teacher trainees to form an opinion about their future way of teaching.

There will be a special emphasis on English in Primary Schools in this course.

Christine Ringwald, M.A.
10-76-3-FD1-02Introduction to English Language Education (Gy) (in English)

Seminar (Teaching)

Dates:
weekly (starts in week: 1) Thu. 08:00 - 10:00 GW2 B1216 (2 Credit hours)

This introductory course will provide an insight into important aspects and theoretical foundations of English Language Teaching (ELT) which is an indispensable part of every teacher's knowledge base. Participants will get an overview of theoretical as well as practical issues. Starting from a look at the history of ELT we will then move on to Foreign Language Politics in Germany and Europe before we begin to discuss more practical concerns, for example:

  • In how far do the different varieties of English in the world take an effect on ELT?
  • How can teachers foster the development of the students' language skills?

Apart from that, we will be looking at special forms of ELT, for example English in Primary Schools and Content and Language Integrated Learning (CLIL), and also the role of course books and literature in the classroom will be investigated. It is most important that participants actively engage with these topics, as it is crucial for teacher trainees to form an opinion about their future way of teaching.

Nelli Mehlmann
10-76-3-FD1-03Introduction to English Language Education (Gy) (in English)

Seminar (Teaching)

Dates:
weekly (starts in week: 1) Tue. 14:15 - 15:45 GW2 B1216 (2 Credit hours)

This introductory course will provide an insight into important aspects and theoretical foundations of English Language Teaching (ELT) which is an indispensable part of every teacher's knowledge base. Participants will get an overview of theoretical as well as practical issues. Starting from a look at the history of ELT we will then move on to Foreign Language Politics in Germany and Europe before we begin to discuss more practical concerns, for example:

  • In how far do the different varieties of English in the world take an effect on ELT?
  • How can teachers foster the development of the students' language skills?

Apart from that, we will be looking at special forms of ELT, for example English in Primary Schools and Content and Language Integrated Learning (CLIL), and also the role of course books and literature in the classroom will be investigated. It is most important that participants actively engage with these topics, as it is crucial for teacher trainees to form an opinion about their future way of teaching.

Mareike Vanessa Tödter
10-76-3-FD1-04Introduction to English Language Teaching Practice (BiPEB) (in English)
Blockveranstaltung: Termine folgen!

Seminar (Teaching)
ECTS: 3

Begleitseminar in Verbindung mit den Praxisorientierten Elementen im Fach Englisch.

Bitte melden Sie sich über das Zentrum für Lehrerbildung (Startseite stud.IP: Schulpraktika) für die Praxisorientierten Elemente an. Sie werden dann nach der Schulzuweisung automatisch einem der Begleitseminare zugewiesen.

Ina Schünhof
10-76-3-FD1-05Introduction to English Language Teaching Practice (Gy) (in English)
Blockveranstaltung: Termine folgen!

Seminar (Teaching)
ECTS: 3

Additional dates:
Sat. 25.01.20 09:30 - 15:30 GW2 B1216
Tue. 11.02.20 15:00 - 19:00 GW2 B2890
Tue. 18.02.20 15:00 - 19:00 GW2 B2890
Tue. 25.02.20 15:00 - 19:00 GW2 B2890

Begleitseminar in Verbindung mit den Praxisorientierten Elementen im Fach Englisch.

Bitte melden Sie sich über das Zentrum für Lehrerbildung (Startseite stud.IP: Schulpraktika) für die Praxisorientierten Elemente an. Sie werden dann nach der Schulzuweisung automatisch einem der Begleitseminare zugewiesen.

Heather Haase
10-76-3-FD1-06Introduction to English Language Teaching Practice (Gy) (in English)
Blockveranstaltung: Termine folgen!

Seminar (Teaching)
ECTS: 3

Begleitseminar in Verbindung mit den Praxisorientierten Elementen im Fach Englisch.

Bitte melden Sie sich über das Zentrum für Lehrerbildung (Startseite stud.IP: Schulpraktika) für die Praxisorientierten Elemente an. Sie werden dann nach der Schulzuweisung automatisch einem der Begleitseminare zugewiesen.

Matthias Myrczek
10-76-3-FD1-07Introduction to English Language Teaching Practice (Gy) (in English)

Seminar (Teaching)
ECTS: 3

Additional dates:
Tue. 11.02.20 - Wed. 12.02.20 (Tue., Wed.) 15:00 - 19:00 LIS
Tue. 18.02.20 - Wed. 19.02.20 (Tue., Wed.) 15:00 - 19:00 LIS
Tue. 25.02.20 16:00 - 18:00 LIS

Begleitseminar in Verbindung mit den Praxisorientierten Elementen im Fach Englisch.

Bitte melden Sie sich über das Zentrum für Lehrerbildung (Startseite stud.IP: Schulpraktika) für die Praxisorientierten Elemente an. Sie werden dann nach der Schulzuweisung automatisch einem der Begleitseminare zugewiesen.

Tobias Peter Carus (LA LIS)
10-76-3-FD1-08Introduction to English Language Teaching Practice (Gy) (in English)

Seminar (Teaching)
ECTS: 3

Additional dates:
Tue. 11.02.20 15:00 - 18:00 GW2 B3010 (Kleiner Studierraum)
Tue. 18.02.20 15:00 - 18:00 GW2 B3770
Tue. 25.02.20 15:00 - 18:00 GW2 B3010 (Kleiner Studierraum)
Tue. 03.03.20 15:00 - 18:00 GW2 B3010 (Kleiner Studierraum)
Tue. 10.03.20 15:00 - 18:00 GW2 B3010 (Kleiner Studierraum)
Tue. 24.03.20 15:00 - 18:00 GW2 B3010 (Kleiner Studierraum)

Begleitseminar in Verbindung mit den Praxisorientierten Elementen im Fach Englisch.

Bitte melden Sie sich über das Zentrum für Lehrerbildung (Startseite stud.IP: Schulpraktika) für die Praxisorientierten Elemente an. Sie werden dann nach der Schulzuweisung automatisch einem der Begleitseminare zugewiesen.

Angela Hamilton
10-76-3-FD1-09Introduction to English Language Teaching Practice (Gy) (in English)
Blockveranstaltung / Termine folgen später

Seminar (Teaching)
ECTS: 3

Begleitseminar in Verbindung mit den Praxisorientierten Elementen im Fach Englisch.

Bitte melden Sie sich über das Zentrum für Lehrerbildung (Startseite stud.IP: Schulpraktika) für die Praxisorientierten Elemente an. Sie werden dann nach der Schulzuweisung automatisch einem der Begleitseminare zugewiesen.

Jan Eric Ströh (LA LIS)
10-76-3-FD1-10Introduction to English Language Teaching Practice (Gy) (in English)

Seminar (Teaching)
ECTS: 3

Additional dates:
Sat. 01.02.20 09:00 - 15:00 GW2 B3010 (Kleiner Studierraum)
Sat. 15.02.20 09:00 - 15:00 GW2 B3010 (Kleiner Studierraum)
Sat. 29.02.20 09:00 - 15:00 GW2 B3010 (Kleiner Studierraum)

Begleitseminar in Verbindung mit den Praxisorientierten Elementen im Fach Englisch.

Bitte melden Sie sich über das Zentrum für Lehrerbildung (Startseite stud.IP: Schulpraktika) für die Praxisorientierten Elemente an. Sie werden dann nach der Schulzuweisung automatisch einem der Begleitseminare zugewiesen.

Dr. Tim Giesler

Zusatzqualifikation Bilinguales Lehren und Lernen

Interessenten an der Zusatzqualifikation belegen im Wintersemester die unten stehende Einführungsveranstaltung.
Nähere Informationen erhalten Sie unter giesler@uni-bremen.de
Course numberTitle of eventLecturer
10-76-3FD1-10Grundbegriffe der Didaktik des bilingualen Sachfachunterrichts

Seminar (Teaching)
ECTS: 3

Dates:
weekly (starts in week: 1) Thu. 10:15 - 11:45 External location: GW2 B3230 (2 Credit hours)

Einführungsveranstaltung für die Zusatzqualifikation "Bilinguales Lernen und Lehren". Mehr Infos dazu finden Sie hier: http://www.fb10.uni-bremen.de/anglistik/fd/studieninfos.aspx

Das Angebot richtet sich an Lehramtsstudierende des Studiengangs English-Speaking Cultures, die ein Sachfach als Zeitfach studieren.

Bei ausreichend freien Plätzen können auch weitere interessierte Studierende aufgenommen werden.

Dr. Tim Giesler

LEHRVERANSTALTUNGEN DES 3. JAHRES:

P Abschlussmodul Profilfach (15 CP) "Sprachwissenschaft" oder "Literaturwissenschaft" oder "Kulturgeschichte"

Modulbeauftragte/r: Prof. Dr. John Bateman, bateman@uni-bremen.de

Laut PO des BA ESC von 2011 (§6;1 werden die 3 CP des Begleitseminars (im Profilfach obligatorisch) im Bereich General Studies angerechnet; die Studierenden, die bestanden haben, sind daher Irmgard Maassen (maassen@uni-bremen.de), der Modulbeauftragten für General Studies, zu melden.
Course numberTitle of eventLecturer
10-76-5-P-01Begleitveranstaltung Sprachwissenschaft (in English)

Seminar (Teaching)

Dates:
weekly (starts in week: 1) Tue. 16:15 - 17:45 GW2 A3390 (CIP-Labor FB 10) (2 Credit hours)

This colloquium is for all students who plan to write their BA thesis in Linguistics in the winter term. Together we will find a topic for you and go through all the steps towards your final thesis: search for literature in the library catalogue and linguistic databases, find or collect the data for the analysis, choose an appropriate methodology, and do the actual research. You will learn how to plan your time realistically (and stick to the plan), how to structure your BA thesis, and you will write your thesis in less than one semester.

Recommended literature:
Cottrell, Stella. 2008/2013. The Study Skills Handbook. Palgrave Macmillan. 3rd or 4th ed.
Frank, Andrea & Stefanie Haacke & Swantje Lahm. 2013. Schlüsselkompetenzen: Schreiben in Studium und Beruf. 2. Auflage. Stuttgart: Metzler.
Rothstein, Björn. 2011. Wissenschaftliches Arbeiten für Linguisten. Tübingen: Narr.

Dr. Anke Schulz
10-76-5-P-02Key Topics in Cultural History: Colloquium Research and Writing

Seminar (Teaching)

Dates:
weekly (starts in week: 1) Tue. 16:00 - 18:00 UNICOM 3; 0. Ebene; Seminarraum 1 (2 Credit hours)

Diese Veranstaltung richtet sich besonders an Studierende, die in diesem Semester Hausarbeiten oder Abschlussarbeiten schreiben wollen. Die Studierenden werden in die Grundlagen des wissenschaftlichen Arbeitens eingeführt. Wir werden eine Bibliotheksschulung für fortgeschrittene Studierende bekommen und selbständig für eigene größere und kleinere Arbeiten bibliographieren, Thesen und Fragestellungen entwickeln, strukturierte Gliederungen entwerfen etc. Gemeinsam werden wir die Projekte diskutieren und voranbringen.

Dr. Karin Esders-Angermund

GENERAL STUDIES - siehe auch die Veranstaltungen von General Studies - Sprach- und Literaturwissenschaften

Modulbeauftragte/r: Irmgard Maassen, maassen@uni-bremen.de
Course numberTitle of eventLecturer
10-76-1-SP-1-12Giving Presentations (in English)
Blockseminar Februar 2020

Exercises (Teaching)
ECTS: 3

Additional dates:
Tue. 18.02.20 - Thu. 20.02.20 (Tue., Wed., Thu.) 09:00 - 13:00 GW2 B2900
Tue. 25.02.20 - Thu. 27.02.20 (Tue., Wed., Thu.) 09:00 - 13:00 GW2 B2900

Class sessions:
Tue 18th Feb 9.00 – 13.00
Wed 19th Feb 9.00 – 13.00
Thu 20th Feb 9.00 – 13.00
21st – 24th Feb: self-study work, preparing for the presentation
Tue 25th Feb 9.00 – 13.00
Wed 26th Feb 9.00 – 13.00
Thu 27th Feb 9.00 – 13.00

Course description
“My topic is, um, let me think, well, right here, on my paper ... it says that my topic is ...”

Notes, structure, projector, hand-out, posture, eye-contact, gestures, lay-out, language accuracy, register, pronunciation, time and of course CONTENT… are far too many things to attend to in just ONE presentation? An enigma?

A few hands-on sessions while practising effective presentation strategies might unravel the Gordian knot. We will look at all aspects of planning, structuring, and giving a presentation – while at the same time boosting your self-confidence through hands-on practice in a relaxed atmosphere. Be prepared to discuss all aspects of your topic to become an expert in your field, while profiting from your audience's questions. Explore, delve, probe, analyse, evaluate, compare, give reasons, offer solutions …

N.B.:Please come prepared. Since this IS an intensive class (only six days), students need to have researched a possible (academic) topic prior to the start of the class and need to bring notes and research material to the first session.

Katja Müller, M.A.
10-76-3-D-1b/c-WD-1b/c-01Key Topics in Literature: The Victorian Novel - Charles Dickens (in English)

Seminar (Teaching)

Dates:
weekly (starts in week: 1) Tue. 16:15 - 17:45 GW2 B1170 (2 Credit hours)

This course welcomes students who wish to complete the following modules:
B.A. E-SC D-1a, D-1b und WD-1a, WD-1b
Non-E-SC students and academic exchange students

This seminar focuses predominantly on novels exemplifying the predominance of fictional prose in the Victoria era. We will explore fictional and non-fictional writings by the English writer and social critic Charles Dickens (1812 – 1870), in particular Oliver Twist (February 1837 to April 1839) and Bleak House (March 1852 to September 1853). Using text-centred and contextual approaches, this course wishes to enable students to explore language, form, genre, and style of the novels, as well as to engage critically with themes, issues, and key concerns of Dickens’s writing and corresponding contemporary adaptions. Along with our weekly discussions of selected chapters - reader responses are strongly encouraged - we will also touch upon key developments in the history of nineteen-century novels as well as selected historical and literary contexts of the period.

Since some of the participants are required to submit a research paper, we will use parts of our seminar discussions to the development of topics, the formulation of a thesis statement, as well as considerations about the methodological approaches of writing such a paper.

Additional secondary sources can be accessed in the “Semesterapparat”, a reference-only section on the third floor of the library building. A reader with selected secondary text materials will be made available for download on Stud. IP. Please be aware that your registration on Stud. IP. is mandatory (deadline September 15th, 2019). You may wish to check the sections "Information" and "Schedule" further details such as requirements, weekly schedule, select bibliography and modes of assessment.

Requirements and Assessment
• Interest in the topic discussed and ideally a regular attendance and informed participation in class discussion (not part of your formal assessment);
• in-depth knowledge of the selected reading material,
• homework assignments,
• group projects and presentation of research paper proposals;
• research-based term paper.
The requirements as formulated above may vary depending on your overall degree program.

Required reading materials (you need a copy of these publications for class):
Dickens, Charles, and Fred Kaplan. Oliver Twist (Italics), Norton, 1993.
Dickens, Charles, and Nicola Bradbury. Bleak House (Italics), Penguin, 2003.
Copies can be purchased at the bookstore on our campus (Universitätsbuchhandlung Bremen: www.unibuch-bremen.de)

Dr. Jana Nittel
10-76-3-D-1b/c-WD-1b/c-02Key Topics in Cultural History: Gender - Culture - Feminism (in English)

Lecture (Teaching)

Dates:
weekly (starts in week: 1) Wed. 16:00 - 18:00 GW2 B2900 (2 Credit hours)

This is course is a mixture between a lecture course and a regular class. Scholars and teachers both from FB 10 and from other universities will deliver lectures on various aspects of our general topic initiating a transdisciplinary discourse on "Gender - Culture - Feminism". In the sessions between the lectures we will discuss corresponding texts and resources to prepare ourselves for the diverse subject matters of the presentations and to critically reflect on their respective ideas and arguments.
Essential readings will be available for download on Stud-IP. You should also consult the 'Semesterapparat' (SuUB) for further readings.
Requirements:
• regular attendance and oral participation
• in-depth knowledge of the reading material
• oral presentation and handout
Please note that prior enrollment via Stud.IP is mandatory.

Dr. Karin Esders-Angermund
10-76-3-D-1c/b-WD-1c/b-03Key Topics in Cultural History: Analyzing Hollywood Cinema (in English)

Seminar (Teaching)

Dates:
weekly (starts in week: 1) Thu. 14:00 - 16:00 SuUB 4330 (Studio I Medienraum ) (2 Credit hours)

This course is designed to introduce students to critical scholarship on US-American film history and culture. Basic introductions to the analytical categories of race, class, gender, and sexuality will help students to analyze how films construct and limit representations of African-Americans, Native Americans, women and femininity, men and masculinity, sexuality, class struggle and class difference.
Our major textbook will be Benshoff and Griffin: America on film: Representing race, class, gender, and sexuality at the movies. (Purchase is is suggested.)
Essential readings from the textbook will be also available for download on Stud-IP. You should also consult the 'Semesterapparat' (SuUB) for further readings.
Requirements:
• regular attendance and oral participation
• in-depth knowledge of the reading material
• oral presentation and handout
Please note that prior enrollment via Stud.IP is mandatory.

Dr. Karin Esders-Angermund
10-76-4-D1-b-D1-c-01Key Topics in Cultural History: Royals and Rebels - British History on Film (in English)

Seminar (Teaching)
ECTS: 3

Dates:
weekly (starts in week: 1) Tue. 18:00 - 20:00 SuUB 4320 (Studio II Medienraum )
weekly (starts in week: 1) Wed. 14:00 - 16:00 IW3 0390 (2 Credit hours)

Investigating the uses that invocations of ‘British/English history’ are being put to seems particularly urgent at a time when the Brexit crisis is being fuelled by an upsurge of nationalist sentiments. In this seminar, we will analyse feature films that circulate images and narrativizations of British history and work to construct versions of social and national identity. We are going to explore how major historical events, figures and epochs are re-imagined, commemorated, and ideologically appropriated in a range of historical films, and discuss the ways in which cinematographic constructions of the nation’s past reflect and negotiate traditional symbolic meanings as well as present-day anxieties. Topics include Golden Ages and Darkest Hours, covering kings, queens and the monarchy, colonialism and slavery, feminism and class struggle, and commemorations of war.

This course is work-intensive: students are required to invest much time and dedication into week-to-week preparations that include not just the viewing of films before the seminar sessions but also a high amount of reading. A list of films will be agreed upon in the first session, and will be put on restricted loan in the Mediathek.
Reading material will be made available on Stud.IP.

Requirements:
# regular and active participation
# in-depth knowledge of the viewing and reading material
# portfolio of worksheets (graded in WD-1b)
# one oral team presentation
# for a grade in D-1b: an additional long term paper of 10-12 pp.

Prior enrolment via Stud.IP is mandatory.

Irmgard Maassen
10-76-5-P-02Key Topics in Cultural History: Colloquium Research and Writing

Seminar (Teaching)

Dates:
weekly (starts in week: 1) Tue. 16:00 - 18:00 UNICOM 3; 0. Ebene; Seminarraum 1 (2 Credit hours)

Diese Veranstaltung richtet sich besonders an Studierende, die in diesem Semester Hausarbeiten oder Abschlussarbeiten schreiben wollen. Die Studierenden werden in die Grundlagen des wissenschaftlichen Arbeitens eingeführt. Wir werden eine Bibliotheksschulung für fortgeschrittene Studierende bekommen und selbständig für eigene größere und kleinere Arbeiten bibliographieren, Thesen und Fragestellungen entwickeln, strukturierte Gliederungen entwerfen etc. Gemeinsam werden wir die Projekte diskutieren und voranbringen.

Dr. Karin Esders-Angermund
10-E76-3-FD-03Fun with Data - Research Methods in Language, Linguistics and Cultural Studies (in English Language) (in English)

Seminar (Teaching)

Additional dates:
Mon. 21.10.19 10:00 - 14:00 GW2 A3220
Mon. 04.11.19 10:00 - 14:00 GW2 A3220
Mon. 18.11.19 10:00 - 14:00 GW2 A3220
Mon. 02.12.19 10:00 - 14:00 GW2 A3220
Mon. 16.12.19 10:00 - 14:00 GW2 A3220
Mon. 06.01.20 10:00 - 14:00 GW2 A3220
Mon. 13.01.20 10:00 - 14:00 GW2 A3220

In the seminar, we will explore selected research approaches and analytic methods relevant for language, linguistics and cultural studies. On the one hand, the seminar aims to develop your skills in understanding and critically evaluating methodological aspects in the research literature. On the other hand, the seminar will prepare you for your own research projects and your BA or MA thesis: We will look at important steps for planning, design, data collection, analysis and presentation.
We will cover empirical and hermeneutical approaches, quantitative and qualitative analyses, mixed-methods designs, and instruments such as questionnaires, interviews and think-aloud approaches. Besides these, you are welcome to bring your own focus to the seminar. We will illustrate theoretical aspects with practical examples – you are very welcome to bring in your own ideas and projects.
At the end of the seminar, you will have developed a mock research proposal that you present in class. (You are welcome to turn this later into your “real BA or MA thesis proposal” with your supervisor.)
Learning outcomes
At the end of the seminar, students are familiar with:
  • a variety of field-relevant data collection methods,
  • techniques for processing data,
  • methods of data evaluation,
  • key components of a research proposal.
Students will develop:
  • an in-depth understanding and awareness of selected key themes and approaches in language, linguistics and cultural studies,
  • an advanced comprehension of sophisticated theories and methodologies,
  • the ability to apply theoretical approaches and methodologies to the reading and analysis of a range of primary sources.
Students’ skills include:
  • finding and formulating research questions,
  • justifying the choice of appropriate research methods and methods of data evaluation,
  • developing and structuring a research proposal.
Overview and dates
We meet on the following seven Mondays, in room GW2, A3220, from 10 am to 2pm.
This way we have enough space to engage in group work and discussions.
Preliminary semester plan:
21.10.2019 Introduction: research traditions, research designs, research questions, first steps in planning and structuring research
04.11.2019 Quantitative and qualitative approaches: data collection and analyses
18.11.2019 Key concepts of research quality, introduction to basic statistical terms; what do data sets look like; how do I handle my variables
02.12.2019 Interviews, think-aloud protocols, retrospective interviews: design, coding, analyses
16.12.2019 Surveys and questionnaires: Interviews: design, coding, analyses
06.01.2020 Mixed-methods approaches: design and analyses, how to handle data sets
13.01.2020 Presentation of proposals, feedback
Initial reading
Cohen, L., L. Mannion and K. Morrison. 2002. Research methods in education. Fifth edition. London and New York: Routledge Falmer.
Creswell, J. W. 2003. Research Design: Qualitative, Quantitative, and Mixed Methods Approaches. (2nd ed.) Thousand Oaks, CA: Sage.
Seminar 3 ECTS points (Studienleistung, unbenotet):
1. Regular and active participation in preparatory tasks, seminar groups, discussions, and teamwork.
2. Preparatory reading of the assigned texts and preparation of the tasks that will be published in advance on StudIP.
3. Development and presentation of a (mock) research proposal (which can be developed later into your real proposal with your supervisor).
For a total of 6 ECTS points and a grade, in addition to the above:
4. Final written assignment.
Further reading
Brown, J. D. & Rodgers, T. S. 2002. Doing Second Language Research. Oxford: Oxford University Press.
Dörnyei, Z. 2007. Research Methods in Applied Linguistics. Oxford: Oxford University Press.
Hua, Z. (ed.) 2016. Research Methods in Intercultural Communication: A Practical Guide. Chichester: Wiley-Blackwell.
Mackey, A. & Gass, S. M. 2012. Research Methods in Second Language Acquisition: A Practical Guide. Chichester: Wiley-Blackwell.
McDonough, J. & McDonough, S. 1997. Research Methods for English Language Teachers. London: Hodder.
Muijs, D. 2004. Doing Quantitative Research in Education with SPSS. London: Sage.
Nunan, D. 1992. Research Methods in Language Learning. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.
Saldana, J. 2009. The coding manual for qualitative researchers. London: Sage.
Research Examples that will be discussed in the seminar
Mixed-methods design:
Harsch, C., Ushioda, E. & Ladroue, C. 2017. Investigating the predictive validity of TOEFL iBT scores and their use in informing policy in a U.K. university setting (TOEFL iBT Research Report TOEFL iBT – 30, ETS Research Report RR – 17-41). Princeton, NJ: Educational Testing Service (peer-reviewed). Available online at http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1002/ets2.12167/full
Quantitative design:
Harsch, C. & Hartig, J. 2016. Comparing C-tests and Yes/No vocabulary size tests as predictors of receptive language skills. Language Testing 33, 555-575. https://journals.sagepub.com/doi/abs/10.../0265532215594642
Qualitative design:
Harsch, C. & Poehner, M. 2016. Enhancing student experience abroad: The potential of dynamic assessment to develop student interculturality. Language and Intercultural Communication 16(3), 470-490. https://www.tandfonline.com/doi/abs/.../14708477.2016.1168043

Prof. Dr. Claudia Harsch
10-GS-8-01Mentor'innen-Programm für mehr Freude und Erfolg im Studium
2SWS

Exercises (Teaching)
ECTS: 1-5

Additional dates:
Tue. 17.09.19 09:30 - 12:00 GW2 B3009 (Großer Studierraum)
Tue. 01.10.19 09:30 - 12:00 GW2 B1580

Können Sie sich noch an Ihre ersten Tage an der Uni erinnern? Vielleicht sind Sie zunächst verunsichert und allein über den Campus geirrt und hatten auf einmal ganz neue Fragen.
Wo ist die Mensa? Wie kann ich meinen Stundenplan erstellen? Für welche Prüfung muss ich mich anmelden? Was, wenn es mal nicht rund läuft? Bin ich hier richtig?

Um zukünftigen Studierenden den Einstieg an der Uni zu erleichtern, wurde das Mentor*innen-Programm ins Leben gerufen, an dem auch Sie mitwirken können.
Die Möglichkeiten, sich als Mentorin oder Mentor zu engagieren, sind dabei vielseitig.
Sie können zum Beispiel Ihre alte Schule besuchen und dort zukünftige Studieninteressierte informieren und motivieren. Sie können auch als Ansprechpartner*in an der Uni für Einzelgespräche zur Verfügung stehen. Sie können aber auch weitere Ideen entwickeln und umsetzen.

Zahlreiche Statistiken verweisen immer wieder auf das Problem, dass vor allem Studierende aus nicht-akademischen Familien sich oft kein Studium zutrauen, oder dass ihre Abbruchquote vergleichsweise hoch ist. Das Ziel dieses Programms besteht folglich darin, die Studiensituation vor allem für Studierende aus Arbeiterfamilien zu verbessern. Selbstverständlich ist das Mentor*innen-Programm aber offen für alle Interessierte.

Ein Einstieg ist jederzeit möglich, bei Interesse melden Sie sich bitte in Stud.IP für das Programm an und wenden sich an Dr. Anke Schulz für weitere Informationen. Die Teilnahme als Mentor*in wird mit CP für die General Studies angerechnet, je nach Arbeitsaufwand können das 1 bis 5 CP sein.

Dr. Anke Schulz
10-GS-9-01Vorbereitung und Durchführung einer wissenschaftlichen Abschlußarbeit

Exercises (Teaching)

Dates:
weekly (starts in week: 1) Tue. 12:15 - 13:45 GW2 A4020 (2 Credit hours)

In dieser Übung sollen die Studierenden mit den wichtigsten Techniken des wissenschaftlichen Arbeitens vertraut gemacht werden. Von der Themenfindung und dem Formulieren einer Forschungsfrage über die Literaturrecherche, -beschaffung und –auswertung bis hin zum Manuskript mit Schreibstil, Zitierregeln und Literaturverzeichnis werden alle relevanten Phasen beim Verfassen einer Abschlussarbeit beleuchtet.

Cornelia Stroh
10-M83-2/3-PRAII-1English Theater Workshop (in English)

Seminar (Teaching)
ECTS: 12 - 6 SWS

Dates:
weekly (starts in week: 1) Mon. 16:00 - 18:15 GW2 B3009 (Großer Studierraum)

Additional dates:
Mon. 24.02.20 - Tue. 25.02.20 (Mon., Tue.) 10:00 - 13:45 GW2 B3009 (Großer Studierraum)
Wed. 26.02.20 10:00 - 13:45 GW2 B2890
Thu. 27.02.20 10:00 - 13:45 GW2 B3009 (Großer Studierraum)
Fri. 28.02.20 10:00 - 13:45 GW2 B1216
Mon. 02.03.20 - Tue. 03.03.20 (Mon., Tue.) 10:00 - 14:30 GW2 B3009 (Großer Studierraum)
Wed. 04.03.20 - Fri. 06.03.20 (Wed., Thu., Fri.) 17:30 - 21:30 GW2 B3009 (Großer Studierraum)

In this workshop we will explore and experiment with contemporary methods of improvisational theater, which is the art of making up theatrical moments on the spot, without a script. It is one of the liveliest and most current forms of theater of today and ingrained in US popular culture. You will first learn the basic principles of improvisational theater and then apply them to improvised secenework. Later in the semester we will choose one or two forms that we will develop and rehearse in order to perform in front of an audience. We will also reflect on the impact of improvisational theater on popular culture and explore its practical approaches to comedic as well as dramatic narrative structures.

There will be a regular meeting on Monday 4 - 6.15pm during the lecture period and an intensive in the lecture-free period from Feb 24 to March 3. After that we will have performances from Wednesday March 4 to Friday March 6. There is no obligation to be part of the performances. You can decide in the course of the semester whether you want to perform.

Tobias Sailer
10-M83-2/3-PRAII-2Grammar Intensive
Blockseminar Februar 2020

Seminar (Teaching)

Additional dates:
Mon. 10.02.20 - Fri. 14.02.20 (Mon., Tue., Wed., Thu., Fri.) 10:00 - 16:00 GW2 B2880

This course is designed to refresh and extend the students' knowledge of grammatical phenomena. We will look at the essential structures (tenses, modal auxiliaries, passive voice etc.) and discuss their use in different contexts.

Requirements: Regular attendance, active participation, presentations, written assignments

Dr. Vanessa Herrmann
10-M83-2/3-PRAII-5Writing Academic Papers
Block Febr. 2020

Seminar (Teaching)

This course, taught in the English language, will focus on academic writing and is thus suitable for writers at all levels. Whether you need extra practice writing term papers or are working on your Bachelors' or Masters' thesis, and regardless of which stage of the process you are in, we will take a hands-on, feedback-centered approach to the writing process. Areas covered include conciseness and word choice, audience focus, structure and organization, as well as grammar.

Anne Kirkham, M.A.