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Course Catalog

Study Program WiSe 2021/2022

English-Speaking Cultures / Englisch, B.A.

LEHRVERANSTALTUNGEN DES 1. JAHRES (PO 2011)

Basismodul A: Englische Literaturwissenschaft (6 CP)

6 CP (3 CP + 3 CP)

Modulbeauftragte/r: Dr. Jana Nittel, jnittel@uni-bremen.de
Course numberTitle of eventLecturer
10-76-1-Basismodul A-01Introduction to English Literatures (Part I) (3CP) On Campus and ZOOM (in English)

Seminar (Teaching)
ECTS: 3

Dates:
weekly (starts in week: 1) Mon. 18:15 - 19:45 MZH 1380/1400

Lecturer and Module Coordinator: Dr Jana Nittel (jnittel@uni-bremen.de)
Tutor: Stina Novak (snovak@uni-bremen.de)

Teaching method: We will meet in weekly face to face sessions on campus. These sessions are also streamed via ZOOM and students will also have access to weekly self-study and online tutorial units, worksheets and opencast podcasts. You will need access to Stud.IP and a laptop or tablet with sound and audio capabilities.

This introductory course will offer students access to literary studies at university level and try to balance scholarly considerations with aesthetic enjoyment. It is the first part of a two-semester module, which will continue in the following Summer Term (Part II). In this first semester, we will look at the basic concepts not only of literature itself but also of literary criticism /Literaturwissenschaft. As we read our primary texts (short stories, one play and poems), we will be able to look at questions of literary genre (poetry, drama, narrative texts) and literary history (different periods and different national contexts). In addition, we will look at current theories of literature and of course, strategies of interpreting and analysing literary texts in a systematic, scholarly way, thus laying the theoretical and terminological groundwork to the study of literature, both from a methodological and a historical perspective.

All students are required to register on Stud.IP. Please explore the sections “Information” and “Schedule” on Stud. IP. for further details, such as requirements, weekly schedule, select bibliography, reference-only section in the library, modes of assessment and the exam schedule. Academic Exchange Students and Free Movers - please check requirements as outlined.

Strongly recommended, but not mandatory: Please sign up on Stud. IP for our weekly Zoom tutorial sessions offered by Stina Novak – “10-76-1-Basismodul A-02 Exercises: Tutorial: Introduction to English Literatures (Part I)” Fridays 10:15 a. m. – 11:45 a. m.

Module description: https://www.uni-bremen.de/fileadmin/user_upload/fachbereiche/fb10/fb10/pdf/e-sc/Module/A.pdf

Departmental extended reading list (Literatures in English): http://www.fb10.uni-bremen.de/anglistik/literaturwissenschaft/default.aspx

Required reading materials (you will need a copy of these books for class):
Nünning, Vera, and Ansgar Nünning. An Introduction to the Study of English and American Literature. 4. Auflage, Klett Lerntraining, 2018. (You may choose any available edition.)

Shakespeare, William, and Robert S. Miola. Hamlet. 1st ed., W.W. Norton & Co, 2011. (You may choose any available edition.)

Availability: Copies of the texts can be purchased at the bookstore on our campus (Universitätsbuchhandlung Bremen: www.unibuch-bremen.de). In addition, you will find copies in the reference-only section on the third floor of the library building.
Requirements:
• Interest in the topics discussed and ideally a regular attendance and informed participation in class discussion (not part of your formal assessment);
• in-depth knowledge of the selected reading material and course materials,
• final written test at Test Center (University Boulevard)

Dr. Jana Nittel
10-76-1-Basismodul A-02Tutorial: Introduction to English Literatures (Part I) ZOOM only (in English)

Exercises (Teaching)
ECTS: 3

Dates:
weekly (starts in week: 1) Fri. 10:15 - 11:45 Online
Dr. Jana Nittel
Stina Novak

Basismodul B: Englische Sprachwissenschaft (6 CP)

6 CP (3 CP + 3 CP)

Modulbeauftragte/r: Prof. Dr. John Bateman, bateman@uni-bremen.de
Course numberTitle of eventLecturer
10-76-1-Basismodul B-01Introduction to English Linguistics 1 (in English)

Seminar (Teaching)
ECTS: 3

Dates:
weekly (starts in week: 1) Tue. 10:15 - 11:45 SFG 2030

This class will be taught in class on campus as long as it is permitted.
Linguistics is the scientific study of language and communication. It deals with all aspects of how people use language and what they must know in order to do so. The purpose of this class is to give a systematic introduction to the variety of ways in which language can be examined scientifically. Students will be introduced to and equipped with the fundamental concepts, the adequate terminology and methodology for linguistic analysis. The class will thus provide an overview of the core areas of linguistics – phonetics and phonology (the study of speech sounds), morphology (the structure of words), syntax (the structure of sentences), semantics (the study of meaning) and pragmatics (the study of meaning and language use in context). Taking a contrastive German-English perspective whenever possible, this course will also cater to the needs and interests of students who want to become teachers of English.


RECOMMENDED LITERATURE (please buy this book):
Kortmann, Bernd (2005), English Linguistics: Essentials. Berlin: Cornelsen.

ASSESSMENT

• careful reading and preparation of assigned readings and exercises for each session
• final exam.

Dr. Inke Du Bois
10-76-1-Basismodul B-02Introduction to English Linguistics 1 (in English)

Seminar (Teaching)
ECTS: 3

Dates:
weekly (starts in week: 1) Thu. 10:00 - 12:00 GW2 B2900

This class will be taught in class on campus as long as it is permitted.
Linguistics is the scientific study of language and communication. It deals with all aspects of how people use language and what they must know in order to do so. The purpose of this class is to give a systematic introduction to the variety of ways in which language can be examined scientifically. Students will be introduced to and equipped with the fundamental concepts, the adequate terminology and methodology for linguistic analysis. The class will thus provide an overview of the core areas of linguistics – phonetics and phonology (the study of speech sounds), morphology (the structure of words), syntax (the structure of sentences), semantics (the study of meaning) and pragmatics (the study of meaning and language use in context). Taking a contrastive German-English perspective whenever possible, this course will also cater to the needs and interests of students who want to become teachers of English.


RECOMMENDED LITERATURE (please buy this book):
Kortmann, Bernd (2005), English Linguistics: Essentials. Berlin: Cornelsen.

ASSESSMENT

• careful reading and preparation of assigned readings and exercises for each session
• final exam.

Dr. Inke Du Bois
10-76-1-Basismodul B-03Introduction to English Linguistics 1 (in English)

Seminar (Teaching)
ECTS: 3

Dates:
weekly (starts in week: 1) Wed. 08:00 - 10:00 GW2 B3850

Linguistics is the scientific study of language and communication. It deals with all aspects of how people use language and what they must know in order to do so. The purpose of this class is to give a systematic introduction to the variety of ways in which language can be examined scientifically. Students will be introduced to and equipped with the fundamental concepts, the adequate terminology and methodology for linguistic analysis. The class will thus provide an overview of the core areas of linguistics – phonetics and phonology (the study of speech sounds), morphology (the structure of words), syntax (the structure of sentences), semantics (the study of meaning) and pragmatics (the study of meaning and language use in context). Taking a contrastive German-English perspective whenever possible, this course will also cater to the needs and interests of students who want to become teachers of English.

RECOMMENDED LITERATURE:
Kortmann, Bernd (2005), English Linguistics: Essentials. (1st edition). Berlin: Cornelsen.
Kortmann, Bernd (2020), English Linguistics: Essentials. (2nd edition). Stuttgart: J.B. Metzler. (available online at https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-476-05678-8).

ASSESSMENT
* regular and active participation
* careful reading and preparation of assigned readings and exercises
* final exam

Nicole Hober, M.A.
10-76-1-Basismodul B-04Introduction to English Linguistics 1 (in English)

Seminar (Teaching)

Dates:
weekly (starts in week: 1) Mon. 16:15 - 17:45 SFG 1020

Linguistics is the scientific study of language and communication. It deals with all aspects of how people use language and what they must know in order to do so. The purpose of this class is to give a systematic introduction to the variety of ways in which language can be examined scientifically. Students will be introduced to and equipped with the fundamental concepts, the adequate terminology and methodology for linguistic analysis. The class will thus provide an overview of the core areas of linguistics – phonetics and phonology (the study of speech sounds), morphology (the structure of words), syntax (the structure of sentences), semantics (the study of meaning) and pragmatics (the study of meaning and language use in context). Taking a contrastive German-English perspective whenever possible, this course will also cater to the needs and interests of students who want to become teachers of English.

RECOMMENDED LITERATURE:
Kortmann, Bernd (2005), English Linguistics: Essentials. (1st edition). Berlin: Cornelsen.
Kortmann, Bernd (2020), English Linguistics: Essentials. (2nd edition). Stuttgart: J.B. Metzler. (available online at https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-476-05678-8).

ASSESSMENT
* regular and active participation
* careful reading and preparation of assigned readings and exercises
* final exam

Dr. Claudia Lehmann

Basismodul C: Kultur- und Sprachgeschichte der englischsprachigen Welt (6 CP)

6 CP (3 CP + 3 CP)

Modulbeauftragte/r: Dr. Karin Esders, esders@uni-bremen.de und Dr. Inke Du Bois, dubois@uni-bremen.de
Course numberTitle of eventLecturer
10-76-1-Basismodul C-01A - Key Moments in the Cultural History of the English-Speaking World (in English)

Seminar (Teaching)
ECTS: 3

Dates:
weekly (starts in week: 1) Tue. 10:15 - 11:45 GW2 B1820 GW2 B1580

Additional dates:
Mon. 22.11.21 16:00 - 18:00 GW2 B1580

This course aims to introduce students to key moments in the social and cultural histories of English-speaking countries. In analyzing a range of case studies from colonial encounters to postcolonialism, we will pay particular attention to historical shifts and cultural encounters and their dynamics of difference and power. We will draw for our discussions on a wide variety of sources, such as scholarly and fictional texts, paintings, advertisements, moving pictures and photographs, and will apply a range of theoretical and analytical concepts.

Assignments/Requirements:
• Students must read the main readings every week.
• Every student must participate in a presentation group. The group will present main ideas from the texts on the syllabus for the specific seminar date. Each presentation is allowed up to 20 minutes of time.
• Each presentation must have a handout relevant to the text that they will share with the class. Included within the handout should be a summary of the text’s most important arguments and theses as well as quotation of key passages. A short background of the author and historical relevancies are also important.
• Each handout must have a preparation of four study questions. Three of these questions must be explicitly about the text itself. One question can be more open (e.g. relating the text to contemporary issues).
• The study questions must be sent to me two days before the session.
• Students must participate regularly in discussions.
• Every student must write two response papers for any of the texts we read in class, one page each. They must be uploaded on Stud.IP before the respective sessions in which the texts will be discussed.

Dr. Karin Esders-Angermund
10-76-1-Basismodul C-02B - Key Moments in the Cultural History of the English-Speaking World (in English)

Seminar (Teaching)
ECTS: 3

Dates:
weekly (starts in week: 1) Thu. 10:15 - 11:45 IW3 0390
Dr. Karin Esders-Angermund
10-76-1-Basismodul C-03Übung zum Basismodul: Key Moments in the Cultural History of the English-Speaking World (in English)

Exercises (Teaching)
ECTS: 3

Additional dates:
Tue. 02.11.21 18:00 - 20:00 GW2 B1820
Thu. 04.11.21 18:00 - 20:00 GW2 B1820
Tue. 09.11.21 18:00 - 20:00 GW2 B1820
Wed. 10.11.21 10:00 - 12:00 GW2 B3009 (Großer Studierraum)
Wed. 10.11.21 - Thu. 11.11.21 (Wed., Thu.) 18:00 - 20:00 GW2 B1820
Tue. 16.11.21 18:00 - 20:00 GW2 B1820
Wed. 17.11.21 10:00 - 12:00 GW2 B3009 (Großer Studierraum)
Wed. 17.11.21 - Thu. 18.11.21 (Wed., Thu.) 18:00 - 20:00 GW2 B1820
Mon. 22.11.21 16:00 - 18:00 GW 2B 1580
Tue. 23.11.21 18:00 - 20:00 GW2 B1820
Wed. 24.11.21 10:00 - 12:00 GW1 A0150
Thu. 25.11.21 18:00 - 20:00 GW2 B1820
Tue. 30.11.21 18:00 - 20:00 GW2 B1820
Thu. 02.12.21 18:00 - 20:00 GW2 B1820
Tue. 07.12.21 18:00 - 20:00 GW2 B1820
Thu. 09.12.21 18:00 - 20:00 GW2 B1820
Dr. Karin Esders-Angermund
10-76-1-Basismodul C-04C - Key Moments in the Cultural History of the English-Speaking World (in English)

Seminar (Teaching)
ECTS: 3

Dates:
weekly (starts in week: 1) Wed. 18:15 - 19:45 GW2 B2890

This course aims to introduce students to key moments in the social and cultural histories of English-speaking countries. In analyzing selected case studies from early colonial conquest to postcolonialism we will take special interest in cultural encounters and their dynamics of difference and power. A range of texts and artifacts such as scholarly and fictional works, paintings, advertisements, moving pictures, and photographs will be examined, employing a choice of influential theoretical and analytical concepts.

The course will run as three groups (A-B-C); students have to choose one of them. It is the first part of a two-semester module which will continue in the following summer semester as "Key Moments in the Linguistic History of the English-Speaking World". All primary and secondary texts will be made available for download in Stud. IP.

Please note: The course will take place in person, which might be subject to change with the ongoing pandemic and its effects.

Requirements include regular attendance and participation in class, in-depth knowledge of the reading material, and a group presentation. Prior enrollment via Stud. IP is mandatory.

Corina Wieser-Cox, M.A.

SP-1 Basismodul: Sprachpraxis/Practical Language Foundation Module (Part 1) (nur für das Wintersemester) (9 CP)

9 CP (3 CP + 6 CP)

Modulbeauftragte/r: Anne Kirkham, Kontakt: kirkham@uni-bremen.de
Course numberTitle of eventLecturer
10-76-1-SP1-02University Language Skills 1b (in English)

Exercises (Teaching)
ECTS: 3

Dates:
weekly (starts in week: 1) Wed. 12:15 - 13:45 Online

+ This class takes place online +

University Language Skills 1 (ULS 1) is the first half of the SP-1 module (“SP-1 Sprachpraxis Basismodul”) taken in the winter semester. It requires 90 hours of work and earns you 3 credit points. University Language Skills 2 (ULS 2) is the second half of this module and will be offered in the summer semester, requiring 180 hours of work and giving you 6 credit points.

The focus of this module is on academic writing in English at university level. The emphasis during ULS 1 is on planning and organising an academic essay in an academic context at university level. It emphasizes writing skills in three broad categories: paragraphing, structure, and argumentation. Not only will students practice structural elements (e.g. topic sentences, outlining strategies), but they will also be working on refining their English language skills, including word choice, grammar and syntax. In addition, they will discover the importance of cohesion and coherence as key skills in good writing.

Materials will be provided via StudIP.

Dr. Vanessa Herrmann
10-76-1-SP1-03University Language Skills 1c (in English)

Exercises (Teaching)
ECTS: 3

Dates:
weekly (starts in week: 1) Thu. 08:15 - 09:45 MZH 1460

University Language Skills 1 (ULS 1) is the first half of the SP-1 module (“SP-1 Sprachpraxis Basismodul”) taken in the winter semester. It requires 90 hours of work and earns you 3 credit points. University Language Skills 2 (ULS 2) is the second half of this module and will be offered in the summer semester, requiring 180 hours of work and giving you 6 credit points.

The focus of this module is on academic writing in English at university level. The emphasis during ULS 1 is on planning and organising an academic essay in an academic context at university level. It emphasizes writing skills in three broad categories: paragraphing, structure, and argumentation. Not only will students practice structural elements (e.g. topic sentences, outlining strategies), but they will also be working on refining their English language skills, including word choice, grammar and syntax. In addition, they will discover the importance of cohesion and coherence as key skills in good writing.

Materials will be provided via StudIP.

Dr. Vanessa Herrmann
10-76-1-SP1-04University Language Skills 1d (in English)

Exercises (Teaching)
ECTS: 3

Dates:
weekly (starts in week: 1) Mon. 08:15 - 09:45 MZH 1460

University Language Skills 1 (ULS 1) is the first half of the SP-1 module (“SP-1 Sprachpraxis Basismodul”) taken in the winter semester. It requires 90 hours of work and earns you 3 credit points. University Language Skills 2 (ULS 2) is the second half of this module and will be offered in the summer semester, requiring 180 hours of work and giving you 6 credit points.

The focus of this module is on academic writing in English at university level. The emphasis during ULS 1 is on planning and organising an academic essay in an academic context at university level. It emphasizes writing skills in three broad categories: paragraphing, structure, and argumentation. Not only will students practice structural elements (e.g. topic sentences, outlining strategies), but they will also be working on refining their English language skills, including word choice, grammar and syntax. In addition, they will discover the importance of cohesion and coherence as key skills in good writing.



Materials will be provided via StudIP.

Anne Kirkham, M.A.
10-76-1-SP1-05University Language Skills 1e (in English)

Exercises (Teaching)

Dates:
weekly (starts in week: 1) Mon. 10:15 - 11:45 MZH 1460

University Language Skills 1 (ULS 1) is the first half of the SP-1 module (“SP-1 Sprachpraxis Basismodul”) taken in the winter semester. It requires 90 hours of work and earns you 3 credit points. University Language Skills 2 (ULS 2) is the second half of this module and will be offered in the summer semester, requiring 180 hours of work and giving you 6 credit points.

The focus of this module is on academic writing in English at university level. The emphasis during ULS 1 is on planning and organising an academic essay in an academic context at university level. It emphasizes writing skills in three broad categories: paragraphing, structure, and argumentation. Not only will students practice structural elements (e.g. topic sentences, outlining strategies), but they will also be working on refining their English language skills, including word choice, grammar and syntax. In addition, they will discover the importance of cohesion and coherence as key skills in good writing.



Materials will be provided via StudIP.

Anne Kirkham, M.A.
10-76-1-SP1-06University Language Skills 1f (in English)

Exercises (Teaching)

Dates:
weekly (starts in week: 1) Mon. 12:15 - 13:45 MZH 1460

University Language Skills 1 (ULS 1) is the first half of the SP-1 module (“SP-1 Sprachpraxis Basismodul”) taken in the winter semester. It requires 90 hours of work and earns you 3 credit points. University Language Skills 2 (ULS 2) is the second half of this module and will be offered in the summer semester, requiring 180 hours of work and giving you 6 credit points.

The focus of this module is on academic writing in English at university level. The emphasis during ULS 1 is on planning and organising an academic essay in an academic context at university level. It emphasizes writing skills in three broad categories: paragraphing, structure, and argumentation. Not only will students practice structural elements (e.g. topic sentences, outlining strategies), but they will also be working on refining their English language skills, including word choice, grammar and syntax. In addition, they will discover the importance of cohesion and coherence as key skills in good writing.



Materials will be provided via StudIP.

Anne Kirkham, M.A.
10-76-1-SP1-07University Language Skills 1g/ ON CAMPUS (in English)

Exercises (Teaching)
ECTS: 3

Dates:
weekly (starts in week: 1) Tue. 14:15 - 15:45 SFG 2040

University Language Skills 1 (ULS 1) is the first half of the SP-1 module (“SP-1 Sprachpraxis Basismodul”) taken in the winter semester. It requires 90 hours of work and earns you 3 credit points. University Language Skills 2 (ULS 2) is the second half of this module and will be offered in the summer semester, requiring 180 hours of work and giving you 6 credit points.

The focus of this module is on academic writing in English at university level. The emphasis during ULS 1 is on planning and organising an academic essay in an academic context at university level. It emphasizes writing skills in three broad categories: paragraphing, structure, and argumentation. Not only will students practice structural elements (e.g. topic sentences, outlining strategies), but they will also be working on refining their English language skills, including word choice, grammar and syntax. In addition, they will discover the importance of cohesion and coherence as key skills in good writing.

Materials will be provided via StudIP

NB: Please register for ONE University Language Skills 1 course only.

Katja Müller, M.A.
10-76-1-SP1-08University Language Skills 1h / ON CAMPUS (in English)

Exercises (Teaching)
ECTS: 3

Dates:
weekly (starts in week: 1) Wed. 14:15 - 15:45 FVG M0160

University Language Skills 1 (ULS 1) is the first half of the SP-1 module (“SP-1 Sprachpraxis Basismodul”) taken in the winter semester. It requires 90 hours of work and earns you 3 credit points. University Language Skills 2 (ULS 2) is the second half of this module and will be offered in the summer semester, requiring 180 hours of work and giving you 6 credit points.

The focus of this module is on academic writing in English at university level. The emphasis during ULS 1 is on planning and organising an academic essay in an academic context at university level. It emphasizes writing skills in three broad categories: paragraphing, structure, and argumentation. Not only will students practice structural elements (e.g. topic sentences, outlining strategies), but they will also be working on refining their English language skills, including word choice, grammar and syntax. In addition, they will discover the importance of cohesion and coherence as key skills in good writing.

Materials will be provided via StudIP

NB: Please register for ONE University Language Skills 1 course only.

Katja Müller, M.A.
10-76-1-SP1-09University Language Skills 1i/ Kategorie A (in English)

Exercises (Teaching)
ECTS: 3

Dates:
weekly (starts in week: 1) Thu. 10:15 - 11:45 GW2 B1630

University Language Skills 1 (ULS 1) is the first half of the SP-1 module (“SP-1 Sprachpraxis Basismodul”) taken in the winter semester. It requires 90 hours of work and earns you 3 credit points. University Language Skills 2 (ULS 2) is the second half of this module and will be offered in the summer semester, requiring 180 hours of work and giving you 6 credit points.

The focus of this module is on academic writing in English at university level. The emphasis during ULS 1 is on planning and organising an academic essay in an academic context at university level. It emphasizes writing skills in three broad categories: paragraphing, structure, and argumentation. Not only will students practice structural elements (e.g. topic sentences, outlining strategies), but they will also be working on refining their English language skills, including word choice, grammar and syntax. In addition, they will discover the importance of cohesion and coherence as key skills in good writing.

Materials will be provided via StudIP

NB: Please register for ONE University Language Skills 1 course only.

Katja Müller, M.A.
10-76-1-SP1-10University Language Skills 1j (in English)

Exercises (Teaching)
ECTS: 3

Dates:
weekly (starts in week: 1) Fri. 10:15 - 11:45 Online

University Language Skills 1 (ULS 1) is the first half of the SP-1 module (“SP-1 Sprachpraxis Basismodul”) taken in the winter semester. It requires 90 hours of work and earns you 3 credit points. University Language Skills 2 (ULS 2) is the second half of this module and will be offered in the summer semester, requiring 180 hours of work and giving you 6 credit points.

The focus of this module is on academic writing in English at university level. The emphasis during ULS 1 is on planning and organising an academic essay in an academic context at university level. It emphasizes writing skills in three broad categories: paragraphing, structure, and argumentation. Not only will students practice structural elements (e.g. topic sentences, outlining strategies), but they will also be working on refining their English language skills, including word choice, grammar and syntax. In addition, they will discover the importance of cohesion and coherence as key skills in good writing.
Materials will be provided via StudIP.

Lisa Nehls, M.A.
10-76-1-SP1-11University Language Skills 1k (in English)

Exercises (Teaching)
ECTS: 3

Additional dates:
Mon. 14.02.22 - Fri. 18.02.22 (Mon., Tue., Wed., Thu., Fri.) 10:15 - 15:45 SH D1020

Note: This course takes place on campus.

University Language Skills 1 (ULS 1) is the first half of the SP-1 module (“SP-1 Sprachpraxis Basismodul”) taken in the winter semester. It requires 90 hours of work and earns you 3 credit points. University Language Skills 2 (ULS 2) is the second half of this module and will be offered in the summer semester, requiring 180 hours of work and giving you 6 credit points.

The focus of this module is on academic writing in English at university level. The emphasis during ULS 1 is on planning and organising an academic essay in an academic context at university level. It emphasizes writing skills in three broad categories: paragraphing, structure, and argumentation. Not only will students practice structural elements (e.g. topic sentences, outlining strategies), but they will also be working on refining their English language skills, including word choice, grammar and syntax. In addition, they will discover the importance of cohesion and coherence as key skills in good writing.

Materials will be provided via StudIP.

Dr. Vanessa Herrmann

LEHRVERANSTALTUNGEN DES 2. JAHRES (PO 2011)

D-1b: Aufbaumodul (6 CP) (nur für das Wintersemester)

Literatur- und Kulturgeschichte (3 CP + 3 CP) (1PL = Term paper/Hausarbeit)

Es gilt zu beachten: Laut SK-Beschluss (E-SC) vom 21.11.2012 ist die Pruefungsleistung im Bereich \"Key Topics in Cultural History\" zu erbringen = Schriftliche Hausarbeit/Term paper.

Modulbeauftragte/r: Dr. Jana Nittel, jnittel@uni-bremen.de
Course numberTitle of eventLecturer
10-76-3-D1/WD1-01Key Topics in Literature: The Victorian Novel - Charles Dickens and Wilkie Collins (On Zoom and on Campus) (in English)

Seminar (Teaching)

Dates:
weekly (starts in week: 1) Tue. 12:15 - 13:45 GW1 B0100

This course welcomes students who wish to complete the following modules:
B.A. E-SC D-1b and WD-1a, WD-1b
D1-a for students who wish to complete the second part of this module
Academic exchange students

This seminar focuses predominantly on novels exemplifying the predominance and generic diversity of fictional prose in the Victorian era. We will explore selected fictional writings by two English novelists and playwrights: Charles Dickens (1812 – 1870) and Wilkie Collins (1824 – 1889). Using text-centred and contextual approaches, this course wishes to enable students to explore language, form, genre, and style of the novels, as well as to engage critically with themes, issues, and key concerns of Dickens’s and Collins’s writing. Along with our weekly discussions of selected chapters - reader responses are strongly encouraged - we will also touch upon key developments in the history of nineteen-century novels as well as selected historical and literary contexts of the period.

We will meet in weekly seminar sessions on campus, but students will also have access to weekly self-study units, worksheets and opencast podcasts. Since some of the participants are required to submit a research-based term paper, we will use parts of our seminar discussions to the development of topics, the formulation of a thesis statement, as well as considerations about the methodological approaches of writing such a paper. A reader with selected secondary text materials will be made available for download on Stud. IP. You will need access to Stud.IP and a laptop or tablet with sound and audio capabilities.

You may wish to check the sections "Information" and "Schedule" further details such as requirements, weekly schedule, select bibliography and modes of assessment.

Requirements and Assessment
• Interest in the topic discussed and ideally a regular attendance and informed participation in class discussion (not part of your formal assessment);
• in-depth knowledge of the selected reading material,
• homework assignments,
• Portfolio presentation or research-based term paper.
The requirements as formulated above may vary depending on your module choices and your overall degree program.

Required primary reading materials (you may use any edition available to you):
Dickens, Charles, and Fred Kaplan. Oliver Twist (Italics). 1837-1839., Norton, 1993.
Collins, Wilkie. The Moonstone (Italics). 1868. OUP, 1999.

Dr. Jana Nittel
10-76-3-D1/WD1-02Key Topics in Literature and Cultural History: The Gothic in Eighteenth-Century Imagination (in English)

Seminar (Teaching)

Dates:
weekly (starts in week: 1) Tue. 12:15 - 13:45 GW2 B1400 NUR Mo. + Di.

Ever since its inception in Horace Walpole’s novel The Castle of Otranto (1764), the Gothic captured eighteenth-century imagination. With its fascination for the supernatural, the sublime, and the macabre, Gothic fiction stands diametrically opposed to classicist ideals of reason and order. Rather than looking for Enlightenment, the genre explores humanity’s darkest recesses: vice and corruption, violence and murder, as well as forbidden desires and excess.
This seminar will explore three novels that shocked their readers during the Golden Age of Gothicism: William Beckford’s Orientalist fancy Vathek (1786), Matthew Lewis’ sensationalist horror tale The Monk (1796) and Charlotte Dacre’s outrageous epic Zofloya, or The Moor (1806). This course will combine a thorough historical contextualization with close readings of the selected texts. Our main focus will lie on the novels’ preoccupation with boundary transgressions and on their representations of eighteenth-century discourses surrounding the complex intersections of race, class, and gender.

Primary texts:
Beckford, William. Vathek. Oxford University Press, 2013.
Dacre, Charlotte. Zofloya, or The Moor. Oxford University Press, 2008.
Lewis, Matthew. The Monk. Oxford University Press, 2016.

Please obtain a copy of these novels prior to the start of class. Try to get the exact editions listed above; if they are not available or you already have one of these titles at home, feel free to use another edition. I will inform the university book shop on campus to keep these books in store, as they usually offer excellent deals on English-language books. Support your local bookstore!

Requirements:
• Active participation in class
• In-depth knowledge of the reading materials
• Final assessment according to module choice

Please note that prior enrollment via Stud. IP is mandatory.

Katalina Kopka, M.A.
10-76-3-D1/WD1-03Key Topics in Literature and Cultural History: The History of Women in Science (in English)

Seminar (Teaching)

Dates:
weekly (starts in week: 1) Thu. 08:00 - 10:00 SFG 2030

The campus of the University of Bremen is lined with streets named after famous historical scientists. But instead of the usual male scientists one may quickly expect, it is women who are dominating these streets: Barbara McClintock, Mary Somerville, Emmy Noether, Lise Meitner, Caroline Herschel. Though their contributions to their respective fields were immense, their names are practically unknown to the wider public in comparison to their male colleagues. The whole world seems to know who Albert Einstein was – why do they not know of Lise Meitner? What was women’s contribution to science and why has it not been properly acknowledged? This is the focus of this seminar, which follows the history of women’s contribution in science and the difficulties they have faced and still face until present day. A detailed course plan as well as further reading material will be provided by the beginning of October.

Primary Text:
Brown, Carrie. The Stargazer's Sister. Anchor Books, 2016.

Please obtain a copy of the text before the start of the class. I will contact the university book shop to keep a couple of copies on hand for you to buy. Support your local bookstore!

Requirements:
• regular attendance
• active participation in class
• in-depth knowledge of the primary and secondary reading materials
• portfolio/oral presentation/term paper (depending on your module)

Please note that prior enrolment via StudIP is mandatory.

NOTE
As of July 2021, the University of Bremen is planning to implement face-to-face teaching in the winter semester 21/22 and this class is scheduled as such. This might be subject to change, depending on the development of the pandemic. Should this class need to revert to digital teaching, the course requirements and schedule may change. Please refer back to the “Announcement” section of this class for further updates as well as the regular “Corona Updates” provided via email by the University Executive Board (“Rektorat”).

Kim-Nicola Hofschröer, M.A.
10-76-3-D1/WD1-04Key Topics in Literature: Violence and female Bodies in Postcolonial Dystopian Literatures (in English)

Seminar (Teaching)

Dates:
weekly (starts in week: 1) Wed. 12:15 - 13:45 MZH 1460
Dr. Sukla Chatterjee
10-76-3-D1/WD1-05Key Topics in Literature and Cultural History: Shakespeare's Much Ado about Nothing (in English)

Seminar (Teaching)

Dates:
weekly (starts in week: 1) Wed. 16:00 - 18:00 SFG 2060 IW3 0200

The aim of this course is to introduce students to one of Shakespeare's most popular comedies, which probably premiered in 1598 or 1599. Set in Messina, on the island of Sicily, Much Ado about Nothing has become an Elizabethan key text in the debate about gender roles as well as about the dramatic representations of alleged infidelity and deceit.

This course is also designed to introduce students to the highly complex relationship between a literary text and its film version, both in terms of thematic as well as technical features. Our example will be Kenneth Branagh's successful film adaptation (1993) starring Emma Thompson, Branagh himself, Denzel Washington, and Keanu Reeves.

requirements:
• active participation
• in-depth knowledge of the reading material
• presentation and/or final paper

Please note that prior enrolment via Stud.IP is mandatory. The enrolment period ends on September 15.


text:
Shakespeare, William. Much Ado about Nothing. The Arden Shakespeare. London: Bloomsbury, 2016.

Prof. Dr. Norbert Schaffeld
10-76-3-D1/WD1-06Key Topics in Literature: US Latinx Writing (in English)

Seminar (Teaching)
ECTS: 3

Dates:
weekly (starts in week: 1) Thu. 08:00 - 10:00 GW2 B3010 (Kleiner Studierraum)

    • Please note that this class is fully booked as of 31 Aug. 2021. Students preliminarily registering after that date will secure a spot on the waiting list. - -
According to US Census estimates, people of Hispanic origin constituted 18.5% of the nation’s total population and formed its largest ethnic or racial minority in 2019. This class introduces students to the study of Latinx writing with an emphasis on the distinctions and similarities that have shaped the experiences and the cultural imagination of Latinxs/as/os. We will read and analyze a selection of texts, such as novels, poetry, memoirs, and theory by and about, for example, Mexican Americans, Puerto Ricans, Dominican Americans, or Cuban Americans in order to reflect on the histories and cultural expressions of these diverse communities in the United States with a special focus on the twentieth and twenty-first centuries. Students will explore the language, form, and style of Latinx writing, including the mixing of the English language with Spanish or Spanglish elements, as well as engage with some of the texts’ key concerns, such as racial, ethnic, or national identities, the role of the family and gender, cultural hybridity, and migration.
In accordance with current university guidelines (as of July 2021, subject to change), this class is planned as a weekly in-person seminar on Thursdays 8.15 to 9:45 am, while the majority of material and information will also be made available on Stud.IP. The class is open to ESC students studying the WD1-a, WD1-b, and the D1-b modules as well as international exchange students. Students wishing to complete their D1-a module may also be accommodated. Please note that prior enrolment via Stud.IP is mandatory and admission is limited to thirty students. Please check Stud.IP regularly for any updates, including the seminar format and a list of required primary and secondary readings.

Dr. Paula von Gleich
10-76-3-D1/WD1-07Key Topics in Cultural History: Shakespeare's London (On Campus and on Zoom) (in English)

Seminar (Teaching)
ECTS: 3

Dates:
weekly (starts in week: 1) Mon. 16:15 - 17:45 SFG 2040

This course welcomes students who wish to complete the following modules:
B.A. E-SC D-1b, D1-c and WD-1b, WD-1c
Academic exchange students

William Shakespeare’s London, and in this seminar, London in the Elizabethan Age as well as at his time in the city (c.1560 – 1616), was a rapidly growing and bustling metropolis. In the duration of this course, we will travel back in time seeking to explore the history and social geography of this largest city in England. Based on a research-based learning methodology, we will attempt to map out London’s key locations as the centre of government, the law and the church as well as being the focus of politics and culture during a time of intense political and religious upheaval. In addition, this course focuses on the following topics: Stage history, playhouses; the fundamental features of dramatic composition to issues such as political structures in Renaissance England, gender roles and relations, love and sexuality, constructions of nationhood, global expansion and their representation in Shakespeare’s plays.

We will meet in weekly seminar sessions on campus, but students will also have access to weekly self-study units, worksheets and opencast podcasts. Since some of the participants are required to submit a research-based term paper, we will use parts of our seminar discussions to the development of topics, the formulation of a thesis statement, as well as considerations about the methodological approaches of writing such a paper. A reader with selected secondary text materials will be made available for download on Stud. IP. You will need access to Stud.IP and a laptop or tablet with sound and audio capabilities.

You may wish to check the sections "Information" and "Schedule" further details such as requirements, weekly schedule, select bibliography and modes of assessment.

Requirements and Assessment
• Interest in the topic discussed and ideally a regular attendance and informed participation in class discussion (not part of your formal assessment);
• in-depth knowledge of the selected reading material,
• homework assignments,
• Portfolio presentation or research-based term paper.
The requirements as formulated above may vary depending on your module choices and your overall degree program.

Reading materials
MacGregor, Neil. Shakespeare's Restless World (Italics), Penguin Books, 2014.
Copies are available for purchase at the bookstore on our campus (Universitätsbuchhandlung Bremen: www.unibuch-bremen.de)

Dr. Jana Nittel

D-1c: Aufbaumodul (6 CP) (nur für das Wintersemester)

Sprachwissenschaft und Kulturgeschichte (3 CP + 3 CP) (1PL = Term paper/Hausarbeit)

Es gilt zu beachten: Laut SK-Beschluss (E-SC) vom 21.11.2012 ist die Pruefungsleistung im Bereich \"Key Topics in Linguistics\" zu erbringen = Schriftliche Hausarbeit/Term paper.

Modulbeauftragte/r: Dr. Jana Nittel, jnittel@uni-bremen.de
Course numberTitle of eventLecturer
10-76-3-D1-01Key Topics in Linguistics: Varieties of English and language contact (in English)

Seminar (Teaching)
ECTS: 3

Dates:
weekly (starts in week: 1) Tue. 12:15 - 13:45 MZH 1460

Throughout its history, the English language has come into contact with different languages. Crucially, since the spread of English beginning in the 17th century, new varieties of English have emerged all around the world. The lexicon and grammar of these varieties have been influenced and shaped by the languages they encountered. In this course, we will examine the similarities and difference between the various varieties of English while considering their socio-historical contexts at the same time.

This course provides students with a systematic introduction to World Englishes and language contact. Students are expected to carry out small-scale empirical research projects in which they examine selected aspects of World Englishes to gain hands-on experience working with linguistics data.

Nicole Hober, M.A.
10-76-3-D1-02Key Topics in Linguistics: Applied Linguistics (in English)

Seminar (Teaching)
ECTS: 3

Dates:
weekly (starts in week: 1) Tue. 08:00 - 10:00 MZH 1460

Kategorie C1+ Die digitale Lehre findet im Wesentlichen asynchron statt. PLUS bedeutet, an den bereitgestellten Materialien kann in Anwesenheit der Lektorin dienstags von 8:30-10:00 Uhr im Raum MZH 1460 gearbeitet werden. Sie können aber ebenso gut zu einer anderen Zeit an einem anderen Ort das Material bearbeiten. Es gibt keinerlei Anwesenheitspflicht. Die Lehrveranstaltung kann auch bei einer erneuten Schließung der Universität problemlos digital weitergeführt werden.
Content of this class: Applied linguistics involves „the theoretical and empirical investigation of real-world problems in which language is a central issue“ (Brumfit 1995: 27). In this class, we start with an overview of fields of applied linguistics, and then focus on three of these fields: critical applied linguistics, where we study gossip and teacher talk; the usefulness (or not) of corpora in language teaching; and finally forensic linguistics, the use of language by criminals, in police investigations and in court.
You will get to know the basic theoretical concepts of (critical) applied linguistics. You will test different methods for analyzing language, e.g. manual and automatic analyses of small or large amounts of text. Finally, you will practice your skills as researchers by conducting a study of your own favourite real-world language problem.
Assessment:
BA ESC D1a Studienleistung Portfolio: collection of three assignments (pass / fail): literature list, abstract, summary of one article
BA ESC D1c Prüfungsleistung Portfolio of two assignments (literature list, abstract) plus a term paper of 10 pages (grade for the module D1c)
Erasmus: active participation 3 CP, one assignment adds 1 CP (max 6 CP for 3 assignments, see D1a Studienleistung)

Please note that this class CANNOT be taken as ‘Ersatzleistung für das Auslandssemester’. Please choose from the WD classes for the ‘Ersatzleistung’.

Literature
Friedrich, Patricia. 2019. Applied Linguistics in the Real World. Routledge.

Dr. Anke Schulz
10-76-3-D1-03Key Topics in Linguistics: Grammatically-based text analysis (in English)
synchronous and asynchronous digital sessions and face-to-face as allowed and wished

Seminar (Teaching)

Dates:
weekly (starts in week: 1) Mon. 14:15 - 15:45

In this course participants will be introduced to how grammatical analysis can be embedded into social critical analyses of texts, moving from detailed grammatical analysis to methods for performing discourse critical and sociocultural critical interpretations of the texts analysed. Several important kinds of grammatical analysis will be introduced and practised, including transitivity, interpersonal appraisal and evaluation, and textual organisation. Transitivity is the part of grammar that encodes the speaker or writer's view of reality--literally the 'who did what' part of grammar; the interpersonal concerns the social roles that we are enacting in texts; and the textual concerns how texts are organised as effective messages. We will explore a wide range of English texts in order to practice recognising the basic types of socially-culturally significant grammatical patterns in English. The main emphasis will be on doing, so that all successful course participants will become proficient in analysing texts according to their grammatical organisation.

Information will be available online and the entire course may be studied online. Face-to-face meetings may be held to the extent that circumstances allow and are wanted by participants and we can find rooms.

Prof. John Arnold Bateman, Ph.D.
10-76-3-D1-04Key Topics in Linguistics: Language and society in North America (in English)

Seminar (Teaching)
ECTS: 3

Dates:
weekly (starts in week: 1) Mon. 10:15 - 11:45 GW2 A3390 (CIP-Labor FB 10)

In this course, we will explore the relationship between language and society in North America.
We will discuss current social, cultural, and political issues with relation to language by looking at a range of topics, such as language variation and identity construction, the relationship between English and other languages, language and (digital) media, language and gender, and multilingualism.
The course will end with an online student conference, where students present a mini research project and get the opportunity to engage with students from U.S. universities.

Dr. Ramona Kreis
10-76-3-D1/WD1-07Key Topics in Cultural History: Shakespeare's London (On Campus and on Zoom) (in English)

Seminar (Teaching)
ECTS: 3

Dates:
weekly (starts in week: 1) Mon. 16:15 - 17:45 SFG 2040

This course welcomes students who wish to complete the following modules:
B.A. E-SC D-1b, D1-c and WD-1b, WD-1c
Academic exchange students

William Shakespeare’s London, and in this seminar, London in the Elizabethan Age as well as at his time in the city (c.1560 – 1616), was a rapidly growing and bustling metropolis. In the duration of this course, we will travel back in time seeking to explore the history and social geography of this largest city in England. Based on a research-based learning methodology, we will attempt to map out London’s key locations as the centre of government, the law and the church as well as being the focus of politics and culture during a time of intense political and religious upheaval. In addition, this course focuses on the following topics: Stage history, playhouses; the fundamental features of dramatic composition to issues such as political structures in Renaissance England, gender roles and relations, love and sexuality, constructions of nationhood, global expansion and their representation in Shakespeare’s plays.

We will meet in weekly seminar sessions on campus, but students will also have access to weekly self-study units, worksheets and opencast podcasts. Since some of the participants are required to submit a research-based term paper, we will use parts of our seminar discussions to the development of topics, the formulation of a thesis statement, as well as considerations about the methodological approaches of writing such a paper. A reader with selected secondary text materials will be made available for download on Stud. IP. You will need access to Stud.IP and a laptop or tablet with sound and audio capabilities.

You may wish to check the sections "Information" and "Schedule" further details such as requirements, weekly schedule, select bibliography and modes of assessment.

Requirements and Assessment
• Interest in the topic discussed and ideally a regular attendance and informed participation in class discussion (not part of your formal assessment);
• in-depth knowledge of the selected reading material,
• homework assignments,
• Portfolio presentation or research-based term paper.
The requirements as formulated above may vary depending on your module choices and your overall degree program.

Reading materials
MacGregor, Neil. Shakespeare's Restless World (Italics), Penguin Books, 2014.
Copies are available for purchase at the bookstore on our campus (Universitätsbuchhandlung Bremen: www.unibuch-bremen.de)

Dr. Jana Nittel
10-76-3-D1/WD1-08Key Topics in Cultural History: Hollywood Cinema (in English)

Seminar (Teaching)

Dates:
weekly (starts in week: 1) Tue. 14:15 - 15:45 SFG 0150
Dr. Karin Esders-Angermund
10-76-3-D1/WD1-09Key Topics in Cultural History: Gender - Culture - Feminism (in English)

Seminar (Teaching)

Dates:
weekly (starts in week: 1) Wed. 10:15 - 11:45 GW1 A0010 IW3 0200
Dr. Karin Esders-Angermund
10-76-3-D1/WD1-10Key Topics in Cultural History: Scientists at Risk in Contemporary Biopics (in English)

Seminar (Teaching)

Dates:
weekly (starts in week: 1) Mon. 12:15 - 13:45 GW1 B0100

Scientists have traditionally been mainly the cause of risk to humanity. However, recent scholarly
investigations have revealed how scientists are themselves often at risk in contemporary depictions
in film, TV, and literature. Which risk applies to whom is determined by a multitude of factors – and
what is nowadays less of a risk, might have been a significant hazard a hundred years ago.

In this seminar, we will analyse the lives of three scientists as they are depicted in recent biopics:

[1] “The Man Who Knew Infinity” (2015) is a British biographical drama film about the Indian
mathematician Srinivasa Ramanujan (portrayed by Dev Patel). As an Indian who moves to
Cambridge during World War I, Ramanujan’s life becomes hazardous indeed.

[2] “The Imitation Game” (2014) is an American historical drama about the life of the gay
cryptanalyst Alan Turing (portrayed by Benedict Cumberbatch) during World War II. Even though
Turing is the main character, his colleague Joan Clarke (portrayed by Keira Knightley) also faces
significant challenges as a woman in science.

Overall, the aim of this course is to familiarise students with both the genre of biopics and the
basics of film analysis, as well as the thematic matters of risk and science/ scientists in fiction. In
order to attend the class, prior enrolment via Stud.IP is mandatory. Students are expected to either
purchase both films or view them online.

Class requirements further include:

• Active participation
• In-depth knowledge of the reading materials and films
• A presentation and/or term paper (depending on your module)

Final Note: at this moment in time, the course is designed to take place as an in-person seminar on
campus. Please note that this may be subject to change, depending on the further development of
the pandemic.

Cora Övermann ((LB))
10-76-3-D1/WD1-11Key Topics in Cultural History: Detecting Cultural History with Sherlock Holmes (in English)

Seminar (Teaching)

Dates:
weekly (starts in week: 1) Fri. 10:15 - 11:45 IW3 0330

Sherlock Holmes! What can the world’s only consulting detective tell us about cultural theory?
In this course we will investigate the period of the Victorian Era through the looking glass of the Sherlock Holmes stories by Sir Arthur Conan Doyle. We will take a close look at victorian notions of criminality, gender, class, Englishness and Empire, to determine how they are portrayed within the stories. Furthermore, we will take a look at the modern TV series Sherlock.

Students will gain an understanding of this complex time period, as well as an overview over several cultural theories and the stories by Sir Arthur Conan Doyle.

Please buy the Bantam Classics edition of the Complete Sherlock Holmes Novels and Stories (both volume I&II)!

Final Note: at the moment, the course will take place as an in-person seminar on
campus. Please note that this may be subject to change. I will update you if any change occurs!

Nina Voigt ((LB))

SP-2 Aufbaumodul: Sprachpraxis/ Practical-Language Proficiency Module (Part 1) (6 CP) (nur für das Wintersemester)

6 CP (3 CP+ 3 CP)

Modulbeauftragte: Dr. Vanessa Herrmann, vanessa.herrmann@uni-bremen.de
Course numberTitle of eventLecturer
10-76-3-SP2-01Content-Based Integrated Skills a (in English)

Exercises (Teaching)
ECTS: 3

Dates:
weekly (starts in week: 1) Tue. 14:15 - 15:45 GW2 A4330

Content-Based Integrated Skills (CBIS) is the first part of the SP-2 module (“SP-2 Sprachpraxis Aufbaumodul”) to be taken in the winter semester. Culture & Communication (C&C) is taken as the second part of the module in the summer semester. The aim of both parts of the module is to prepare you final oral exam which you can take once you have completed SP-2.

Content-Based Integrated Skills (CBIS) permits students to implement all four core language skills (speaking, writing, listening, reading) while turning a theoretical challenge into a practical success. This course is designed to give you an insight into academic research, to develop the skill of critical thinking as well as providing you with the opportunity to work on your language skills. The course content revolves around English-speaking countries and cultures. Students will learn about politics, traditions, accents and histories of the countries connected to the English language or/and the Commonwealth. Each country will be critically analysed with the goal of expanding their knowledge about an “English-speaking Culture.” Students will have the opportunity to make decisions, solve problems, and at the end of the course, present the fruits of your labours as you put your own unique ideas into practice.

Dr. Vanessa Herrmann
10-76-3-SP2-02Content-Based Integrated Skills b (in English)

Exercises (Teaching)
ECTS: 3

Dates:
weekly (starts in week: 1) Thu. 10:15 - 11:45 SFG 1020

Content-Based Integrated Skills (CBIS) is the first part of the SP-2 module (“SP-2 Sprachpraxis Aufbaumodul”) to be taken in the winter semester. Culture & Communication (C&C) is taken as the second part of the module in the summer semester. The aim of both parts of the module is to prepare you final oral exam which you can take once you have completed SP-2.

Content-Based Integrated Skills (CBIS) permits students to implement all four core language skills (speaking, writing, listening, reading) while turning a theoretical challenge into a practical success. This course is designed to give you an insight into academic research, to develop the skill of critical thinking as well as providing you with the opportunity to work on your language skills. The course content revolves around English-speaking countries and cultures. Students will learn about politics, traditions, accents and histories of the countries connected to the English language or/and the Commonwealth. Each country will be critically analysed with the goal of expanding their knowledge about an “English-speaking Culture.” Students will have the opportunity to make decisions, solve problems, and at the end of the course, present the fruits of your labours as you put your own unique ideas into practice.

Dr. Vanessa Herrmann
10-76-3-SP2-03Content-Based Integrated Skills c (in English)

Exercises (Teaching)
ECTS: 3

Dates:
weekly (starts in week: 1) Tue. 14:15 - 15:45 GW1-HS H0070

Content-Based Integrated Skills (CBIS) is the first part of the SP-2 module (“SP-2 Sprachpraxis Aufbaumodul”) to be taken in the winter semester. Culture & Communication (C&C) is taken as the second part of the module in the summer semester. The aim of both parts of the module is to prepare you final oral exam which you can take once you have completed SP-2.

Content-Based Integrated Skills (CBIS) permits students to implement all four core language skills (speaking, writing, listening, reading) while turning a theoretical challenge into a practical success. This course is designed to give you an insight into academic research, to develop the skill of critical thinking as well as providing you with the opportunity to work on your language skills. The course content revolves around English-speaking countries and cultures. Students will learn about politics, traditions, accents and histories of the countries connected to the English language or/and the Commonwealth. Each country will be critically analysed with the goal of expanding their knowledge about an “English-speaking Culture.” Students will have the opportunity to make decisions, solve problems, and at the end of the course, present the fruits of your labours as you put your own unique ideas into practice.

Materials will be provided via StudIP

Anne Kirkham, M.A.
10-76-3-SP2-04Content-Based Integrated Skills d (in English)

Exercises (Teaching)
ECTS: 3

Dates:
weekly (starts in week: 1) Wed. 12:15 - 13:45 Online
Anne Kirkham, M.A.
10-76-3-SP2-05Content-Based Integrated Skills e (in English)

Exercises (Teaching)
ECTS: 3

Dates:
weekly (starts in week: 1) Fri. 12:15 - 13:45 Online

Content-Based Integrated Skills (CBIS) is the first part of the SP-2 module (“SP-2 Sprachpraxis Aufbaumodul”) to be taken in the winter semester. Culture & Communication (C&C) is taken as the second part of the module in the summer semester. The aim of both parts of the module is to prepare you final oral exam which you can take once you have completed SP-2.

Content-Based Integrated Skills (CBIS) permits students to implement all four core language skills (speaking, writing, listening, reading) while turning a theoretical challenge into a practical success. This course is designed to give you an insight into academic research, to develop the skill of critical thinking as well as providing you with the opportunity to work on your language skills. The course content revolves around English-speaking countries and cultures. Students will learn about politics, traditions, accents and histories of the countries connected to the English language or/and the Commonwealth. Each country will be critically analysed with the goal of expanding their knowledge about an “English-speaking Culture.” Students will have the opportunity to make decisions, solve problems, and at the end of the course, present the fruits of your labours as you put your own unique ideas into practice.

Lisa Nehls, M.A.
10-76-3-SP2-06Content-Based Integrated Skills f/ ON CAMPUS (in English)

Exercises (Teaching)
ECTS: 3

Dates:
weekly (starts in week: 1) Tue. 10:15 - 11:45 GW2 A4020

Content-Based Integrated Skills (CBIS) is the first part of the SP-2 module (“SP-2 Sprachpraxis Aufbaumodul”) to be taken in the winter semester. Culture & Communication (C&C) is taken as the second part of the module in the summer semester. The aim of both parts of the module is to prepare your final oral exam which you can take once you have completed SP-2.

Content-Based Integrated Skills (CBIS) permits students to implement all four core language skills (speaking, writing, listening, reading) while turning a theoretical challenge into a practical success. This course is designed to give you an insight into academic research, to develop the skill of critical thinking as well as providing you with the opportunity to work on your language skills. The course content revolves around English-speaking countries and cultures. Students will learn about politics, traditions, accents and histories of the countries connected to the English language or/and the Commonwealth. Each country will be critically analysed with the goal of expanding their knowledge about an “English-speaking Culture.” Students will have the opportunity to make decisions, solve problems, and at the end of the course, present the fruits of your labours as you put your own unique ideas into practice.

NB: Please register for ONE Content-Based Integrated Skills course only.

Katja Müller, M.A.
10-76-3-SP2-07Content-Based Integrated Skills g/Kategorie A (in English)

Exercises (Teaching)
ECTS: 3

Dates:
weekly (starts in week: 1) Thu. 14:15 - 15:45 GW1 B0080

Content-Based Integrated Skills (CBIS) is the first part of the SP-2 module (“SP-2 Sprachpraxis Aufbaumodul”) to be taken in the winter semester. Culture & Communication (C&C) is taken as the second part of the module in the summer semester. The aim of both parts of the module is to prepare your final oral exam which you can take once you have completed SP-2.

Content-Based Integrated Skills (CBIS) permits students to implement all four core language skills (speaking, writing, listening, reading) while turning a theoretical challenge into a practical success. This course is designed to give you an insight into academic research, to develop the skill of critical thinking as well as providing you with the opportunity to work on your language skills. The course content revolves around English-speaking countries and cultures. Students will learn about politics, traditions, accents and histories of the countries connected to the English language or/and the Commonwealth. Each country will be critically analysed with the goal of expanding students' knowledge about an “English-speaking Culture.” Students will have the opportunity to make decisions, solve problems, and at the end of the course, present the fruits of your labours as you put your own unique ideas into practice.

NB: Please register for ONE Content-Based Integrated Skills course only.

Katja Müller, M.A.
10-76-3-SP2-08Culture & Communication: Exam Prep (in English)

Exercises (Teaching)

Dates:
weekly (starts in week: 1) Wed. 14:15 - 15:45 Online

+ This class takes place online +

This class is designed for students who did not pass / did not do the oral exam in SoSe 2021. You may have felt that you were not able to practice speaking English sufficiently during the online semester and did not have the confidence you needed to pass the exam. You will now have the opportunity to gain fluency in your specialised area by expanding your ideas and conducting further research if necessary. The other members of the group will encourage you to express your concepts and develop your skills both in terms of language and content while you do the same for them. Exchanging ideas with one another on your own topic and that of other group members, and any further subjects that capture our interest, will help to increase your fluency and confidence for the next attempt at the exam.

Dr. Vanessa Herrmann

WD-1a: Aufbaumodul: Literatur- und Sprachwissenschaft (Wahlpflichtmodul 6 CP) (nur für das Wintersemester)

(3 CP + 3 CP)

Es gilt zu beachten: Laut SK-Beschluss (E-SC) vom 21.11.2012 ist die Pruefungsleistung im Bereich "Key Topics in Literature" zu erbringen = Klausur/Written test oder benotete Präsentationsleistung/presentation.

Modulbeauftragte/r: Dr. Jana Nittel, jnittel@uni-bremen.de
Course numberTitle of eventLecturer
10-76-3-D1/WD1-01Key Topics in Literature: The Victorian Novel - Charles Dickens and Wilkie Collins (On Zoom and on Campus) (in English)

Seminar (Teaching)

Dates:
weekly (starts in week: 1) Tue. 12:15 - 13:45 GW1 B0100

This course welcomes students who wish to complete the following modules:
B.A. E-SC D-1b and WD-1a, WD-1b
D1-a for students who wish to complete the second part of this module
Academic exchange students

This seminar focuses predominantly on novels exemplifying the predominance and generic diversity of fictional prose in the Victorian era. We will explore selected fictional writings by two English novelists and playwrights: Charles Dickens (1812 – 1870) and Wilkie Collins (1824 – 1889). Using text-centred and contextual approaches, this course wishes to enable students to explore language, form, genre, and style of the novels, as well as to engage critically with themes, issues, and key concerns of Dickens’s and Collins’s writing. Along with our weekly discussions of selected chapters - reader responses are strongly encouraged - we will also touch upon key developments in the history of nineteen-century novels as well as selected historical and literary contexts of the period.

We will meet in weekly seminar sessions on campus, but students will also have access to weekly self-study units, worksheets and opencast podcasts. Since some of the participants are required to submit a research-based term paper, we will use parts of our seminar discussions to the development of topics, the formulation of a thesis statement, as well as considerations about the methodological approaches of writing such a paper. A reader with selected secondary text materials will be made available for download on Stud. IP. You will need access to Stud.IP and a laptop or tablet with sound and audio capabilities.

You may wish to check the sections "Information" and "Schedule" further details such as requirements, weekly schedule, select bibliography and modes of assessment.

Requirements and Assessment
• Interest in the topic discussed and ideally a regular attendance and informed participation in class discussion (not part of your formal assessment);
• in-depth knowledge of the selected reading material,
• homework assignments,
• Portfolio presentation or research-based term paper.
The requirements as formulated above may vary depending on your module choices and your overall degree program.

Required primary reading materials (you may use any edition available to you):
Dickens, Charles, and Fred Kaplan. Oliver Twist (Italics). 1837-1839., Norton, 1993.
Collins, Wilkie. The Moonstone (Italics). 1868. OUP, 1999.

Dr. Jana Nittel
10-76-3-D1/WD1-02Key Topics in Literature and Cultural History: The Gothic in Eighteenth-Century Imagination (in English)

Seminar (Teaching)

Dates:
weekly (starts in week: 1) Tue. 12:15 - 13:45 GW2 B1400 NUR Mo. + Di.

Ever since its inception in Horace Walpole’s novel The Castle of Otranto (1764), the Gothic captured eighteenth-century imagination. With its fascination for the supernatural, the sublime, and the macabre, Gothic fiction stands diametrically opposed to classicist ideals of reason and order. Rather than looking for Enlightenment, the genre explores humanity’s darkest recesses: vice and corruption, violence and murder, as well as forbidden desires and excess.
This seminar will explore three novels that shocked their readers during the Golden Age of Gothicism: William Beckford’s Orientalist fancy Vathek (1786), Matthew Lewis’ sensationalist horror tale The Monk (1796) and Charlotte Dacre’s outrageous epic Zofloya, or The Moor (1806). This course will combine a thorough historical contextualization with close readings of the selected texts. Our main focus will lie on the novels’ preoccupation with boundary transgressions and on their representations of eighteenth-century discourses surrounding the complex intersections of race, class, and gender.

Primary texts:
Beckford, William. Vathek. Oxford University Press, 2013.
Dacre, Charlotte. Zofloya, or The Moor. Oxford University Press, 2008.
Lewis, Matthew. The Monk. Oxford University Press, 2016.

Please obtain a copy of these novels prior to the start of class. Try to get the exact editions listed above; if they are not available or you already have one of these titles at home, feel free to use another edition. I will inform the university book shop on campus to keep these books in store, as they usually offer excellent deals on English-language books. Support your local bookstore!

Requirements:
• Active participation in class
• In-depth knowledge of the reading materials
• Final assessment according to module choice

Please note that prior enrollment via Stud. IP is mandatory.

Katalina Kopka, M.A.
10-76-3-D1/WD1-03Key Topics in Literature and Cultural History: The History of Women in Science (in English)

Seminar (Teaching)

Dates:
weekly (starts in week: 1) Thu. 08:00 - 10:00 SFG 2030

The campus of the University of Bremen is lined with streets named after famous historical scientists. But instead of the usual male scientists one may quickly expect, it is women who are dominating these streets: Barbara McClintock, Mary Somerville, Emmy Noether, Lise Meitner, Caroline Herschel. Though their contributions to their respective fields were immense, their names are practically unknown to the wider public in comparison to their male colleagues. The whole world seems to know who Albert Einstein was – why do they not know of Lise Meitner? What was women’s contribution to science and why has it not been properly acknowledged? This is the focus of this seminar, which follows the history of women’s contribution in science and the difficulties they have faced and still face until present day. A detailed course plan as well as further reading material will be provided by the beginning of October.

Primary Text:
Brown, Carrie. The Stargazer's Sister. Anchor Books, 2016.

Please obtain a copy of the text before the start of the class. I will contact the university book shop to keep a couple of copies on hand for you to buy. Support your local bookstore!

Requirements:
• regular attendance
• active participation in class
• in-depth knowledge of the primary and secondary reading materials
• portfolio/oral presentation/term paper (depending on your module)

Please note that prior enrolment via StudIP is mandatory.

NOTE
As of July 2021, the University of Bremen is planning to implement face-to-face teaching in the winter semester 21/22 and this class is scheduled as such. This might be subject to change, depending on the development of the pandemic. Should this class need to revert to digital teaching, the course requirements and schedule may change. Please refer back to the “Announcement” section of this class for further updates as well as the regular “Corona Updates” provided via email by the University Executive Board (“Rektorat”).

Kim-Nicola Hofschröer, M.A.
10-76-3-D1/WD1-04Key Topics in Literature: Violence and female Bodies in Postcolonial Dystopian Literatures (in English)

Seminar (Teaching)

Dates:
weekly (starts in week: 1) Wed. 12:15 - 13:45 MZH 1460
Dr. Sukla Chatterjee
10-76-3-D1/WD1-05Key Topics in Literature and Cultural History: Shakespeare's Much Ado about Nothing (in English)

Seminar (Teaching)

Dates:
weekly (starts in week: 1) Wed. 16:00 - 18:00 SFG 2060 IW3 0200

The aim of this course is to introduce students to one of Shakespeare's most popular comedies, which probably premiered in 1598 or 1599. Set in Messina, on the island of Sicily, Much Ado about Nothing has become an Elizabethan key text in the debate about gender roles as well as about the dramatic representations of alleged infidelity and deceit.

This course is also designed to introduce students to the highly complex relationship between a literary text and its film version, both in terms of thematic as well as technical features. Our example will be Kenneth Branagh's successful film adaptation (1993) starring Emma Thompson, Branagh himself, Denzel Washington, and Keanu Reeves.

requirements:
• active participation
• in-depth knowledge of the reading material
• presentation and/or final paper

Please note that prior enrolment via Stud.IP is mandatory. The enrolment period ends on September 15.


text:
Shakespeare, William. Much Ado about Nothing. The Arden Shakespeare. London: Bloomsbury, 2016.

Prof. Dr. Norbert Schaffeld
10-76-3-D1/WD1-06Key Topics in Literature: US Latinx Writing (in English)

Seminar (Teaching)
ECTS: 3

Dates:
weekly (starts in week: 1) Thu. 08:00 - 10:00 GW2 B3010 (Kleiner Studierraum)

    • Please note that this class is fully booked as of 31 Aug. 2021. Students preliminarily registering after that date will secure a spot on the waiting list. - -
According to US Census estimates, people of Hispanic origin constituted 18.5% of the nation’s total population and formed its largest ethnic or racial minority in 2019. This class introduces students to the study of Latinx writing with an emphasis on the distinctions and similarities that have shaped the experiences and the cultural imagination of Latinxs/as/os. We will read and analyze a selection of texts, such as novels, poetry, memoirs, and theory by and about, for example, Mexican Americans, Puerto Ricans, Dominican Americans, or Cuban Americans in order to reflect on the histories and cultural expressions of these diverse communities in the United States with a special focus on the twentieth and twenty-first centuries. Students will explore the language, form, and style of Latinx writing, including the mixing of the English language with Spanish or Spanglish elements, as well as engage with some of the texts’ key concerns, such as racial, ethnic, or national identities, the role of the family and gender, cultural hybridity, and migration.
In accordance with current university guidelines (as of July 2021, subject to change), this class is planned as a weekly in-person seminar on Thursdays 8.15 to 9:45 am, while the majority of material and information will also be made available on Stud.IP. The class is open to ESC students studying the WD1-a, WD1-b, and the D1-b modules as well as international exchange students. Students wishing to complete their D1-a module may also be accommodated. Please note that prior enrolment via Stud.IP is mandatory and admission is limited to thirty students. Please check Stud.IP regularly for any updates, including the seminar format and a list of required primary and secondary readings.

Dr. Paula von Gleich
10-76-3-WD1-01Key Topics in Linguistics: Multimodal humor in Covid‐19 memes (in English)

Seminar (Teaching)
ECTS: 3

Dates:
weekly (starts in week: 1) Tue. 14:15 - 15:45

This class is a project oriented online class. We read recent texts about humor as a coping mechanism and Covid 19 communication. In the next step, we will use Maxqda Software to analyse and code multimodal data. You will give a zoom group presentation about a self selected research project regarding Covid 19 and humor using your Maxqda data analyses.
Abdel-Raheem, A. (2018). Multimodal humour: Integrating blending model, relevance theory, and incongruity theory. Multimodal Communication, 7(1).
Bülow, L., Marie-Luis Merten, & Johann, M. (2018). Internet-memes als zugang zu multimodalen konstruktionen. Zeitschrift Für Angewandte Linguistik, 2018(69), 1-32. doi:http://dx.doi.org/10.1515/zfal-2018-0015

Dean, R. A. K., & Gregory, D. M. (2005). More than trivial: strategies for using humor in palliative care. Cancer nursing, 28(4), 292-300.

Dynel, M. (2020). Language, creativity and humour online. Language in Society, 49(1), 149-152. doi:http://dx.doi.org/10.1017/S0047404519000836
Harvey, L., & Palese, E. (2018). #NeverthelessMemesPersisted: Building critical memetic literacy in the classroom. Journal of Adolescent & Adult Literacy, 62(3), 259-270. doi:http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/jaal.898

Yang, S. (2017). An analysis of factors influencing transmission of internet memes of english-speaking origin in chinese online communities. Journal of Language Teaching and Research, 8(5), 969-977. doi:http://dx.doi.org/10.17507/jltr.0805.19

Dr. Inke Du Bois
10-76-3-WD1-02Key Topics in Linguistics: New approaches to Intercultural Pragmatics (in English)

Seminar (Teaching)
ECTS: 3

Dates:
weekly (starts in week: 1) Thu. 12:15 - 13:45 GW2 B1632 SFG 2020

Pragmatics in International Contexts

Language in context has traditionally been studied within the context of one culture such as British or US-American English. Speech Act Theory, Politeness Theory, Conversation Analysis principles meanwhile have been applied to global speech communities and a previously ethnocentric perspective has made way for research that demonstrates different communicative strategies in different cultures. On this background, we will move on to multimodal interaction and take non-verbal discourse strategies into account. Hence, we expand the traditional concepts and analyze how they are realized multimodally. First, students will learn the major analytical frameworks that are applied in pragmatics. Second, we will look at the state of art in multimodal research in intercultural communication.

Learning Outcomes
• You will be familiar with the major methodological frameworks in Pragmatics (CA; DA; CDA, MMI)
• You will be able to defend different methodological standpoints in Interactional Linguistics
• You will conduct research projects, choose a transcription method and a develop a relevant research question
• You will acquire expert knowledge and relate different perspectives and theories to each other
• You will be able to relate intercultural pragmatic communication conventions to each other

Dr. Inke Du Bois
10-76-3-WD1-03Key Topics in Linguistics: The language of computer‐mediated communication (in English)

Seminar (Teaching)
ECTS: 3

Dates:
weekly (starts in week: 1) Tue. 10:15 - 11:45 GW2 A3390 (CIP-Labor FB 10)

In this course we will explore different genres of computer-mediated communication, including social networking sites, (micro-)blogs, online comments and online reviews. We will investigate concepts such as identity construction, intertextuality, anonymity and privacy, multimodality, and multilingual practices, to name a few.
Students will work on small assignments throughout the semester (portfolio) to get hands-on experience with researching digital discourse and social practices online.

Dr. Ramona Kreis
10-76-3-WD1-04Key Topics in Linguistics: Linguistic Landscapes (in English)

Seminar (Teaching)
ECTS: 3

Dates:
weekly (starts in week: 1) Thu. 08:15 - 09:45 GW2 A4020

The ensemble of linguistic and semiotic traces in public space forms a caleidoskop of cultural and social diversity in a given territory, as well as it shows a representation of social dynamics with regard to linguistic developments and repertoires, negotiations of social identity, and other subjects of social change in multilingual contexts.
The investigation of languages in public space is the objective of the emerging research field of linguistic landscapes. In line with 'expanding the linguistic landscape', the course aims to explore 'linguistic diversity, multimodality and the use of space as a semiotic resource' (Pütz & Mundt, 2018).
In light of the interdisciplinary character of the field, we will work together on groundbreaking studies as well as innovative approaches in order to become acquainted with specific methods of data collection and analysis, their benefits and their limitations, respectively. In addition to discussing origins of the field, methodologies and their underlying research paradigms, students will gain practical experience in ethnographic research by discovering and analyzing linguistic landscapes in their own environments.

Pütz, M. & Mundt, N. (2018). Expanding the Linguistic Landscape. Bristol, Blue Ridge Summit: Multilingual Matters. https://doi.org/10.21832/9781788922166

Henning Vahlenkamp
10-76-3-WD1-05Key Topics in Linguistics: Gender, Power and Ideology in Film and TV Series (in English)

Seminar (Teaching)
ECTS: 3

Dates:
weekly (starts in week: 1) Thu. 12:15 - 13:45 SFG 0150
Tamara Drummond

WD-1b Aufbaumodul: Literaturwissenschaft und Kulturgeschichte (Wahlpflichtmodul 6 CP) - (nur für das Wintersemester)

(3 CP + 3 CP)

Es gilt zu beachten: Laut SK-Beschluss (E-SC) vom 21.11.2012 ist die Pruefungsleistung im Bereich "Key Topics in Cultural History" zu erbringen = Klausur/Written test oder benotete Präsentationsleistung/presentation.

Modulbeauftragte/r: Dr. Jana Nittel, jnittel@uni-bremen.de
Course numberTitle of eventLecturer
10-76-3-D1/WD1-01Key Topics in Literature: The Victorian Novel - Charles Dickens and Wilkie Collins (On Zoom and on Campus) (in English)

Seminar (Teaching)

Dates:
weekly (starts in week: 1) Tue. 12:15 - 13:45 GW1 B0100

This course welcomes students who wish to complete the following modules:
B.A. E-SC D-1b and WD-1a, WD-1b
D1-a for students who wish to complete the second part of this module
Academic exchange students

This seminar focuses predominantly on novels exemplifying the predominance and generic diversity of fictional prose in the Victorian era. We will explore selected fictional writings by two English novelists and playwrights: Charles Dickens (1812 – 1870) and Wilkie Collins (1824 – 1889). Using text-centred and contextual approaches, this course wishes to enable students to explore language, form, genre, and style of the novels, as well as to engage critically with themes, issues, and key concerns of Dickens’s and Collins’s writing. Along with our weekly discussions of selected chapters - reader responses are strongly encouraged - we will also touch upon key developments in the history of nineteen-century novels as well as selected historical and literary contexts of the period.

We will meet in weekly seminar sessions on campus, but students will also have access to weekly self-study units, worksheets and opencast podcasts. Since some of the participants are required to submit a research-based term paper, we will use parts of our seminar discussions to the development of topics, the formulation of a thesis statement, as well as considerations about the methodological approaches of writing such a paper. A reader with selected secondary text materials will be made available for download on Stud. IP. You will need access to Stud.IP and a laptop or tablet with sound and audio capabilities.

You may wish to check the sections "Information" and "Schedule" further details such as requirements, weekly schedule, select bibliography and modes of assessment.

Requirements and Assessment
• Interest in the topic discussed and ideally a regular attendance and informed participation in class discussion (not part of your formal assessment);
• in-depth knowledge of the selected reading material,
• homework assignments,
• Portfolio presentation or research-based term paper.
The requirements as formulated above may vary depending on your module choices and your overall degree program.

Required primary reading materials (you may use any edition available to you):
Dickens, Charles, and Fred Kaplan. Oliver Twist (Italics). 1837-1839., Norton, 1993.
Collins, Wilkie. The Moonstone (Italics). 1868. OUP, 1999.

Dr. Jana Nittel
10-76-3-D1/WD1-02Key Topics in Literature and Cultural History: The Gothic in Eighteenth-Century Imagination (in English)

Seminar (Teaching)

Dates:
weekly (starts in week: 1) Tue. 12:15 - 13:45 GW2 B1400 NUR Mo. + Di.

Ever since its inception in Horace Walpole’s novel The Castle of Otranto (1764), the Gothic captured eighteenth-century imagination. With its fascination for the supernatural, the sublime, and the macabre, Gothic fiction stands diametrically opposed to classicist ideals of reason and order. Rather than looking for Enlightenment, the genre explores humanity’s darkest recesses: vice and corruption, violence and murder, as well as forbidden desires and excess.
This seminar will explore three novels that shocked their readers during the Golden Age of Gothicism: William Beckford’s Orientalist fancy Vathek (1786), Matthew Lewis’ sensationalist horror tale The Monk (1796) and Charlotte Dacre’s outrageous epic Zofloya, or The Moor (1806). This course will combine a thorough historical contextualization with close readings of the selected texts. Our main focus will lie on the novels’ preoccupation with boundary transgressions and on their representations of eighteenth-century discourses surrounding the complex intersections of race, class, and gender.

Primary texts:
Beckford, William. Vathek. Oxford University Press, 2013.
Dacre, Charlotte. Zofloya, or The Moor. Oxford University Press, 2008.
Lewis, Matthew. The Monk. Oxford University Press, 2016.

Please obtain a copy of these novels prior to the start of class. Try to get the exact editions listed above; if they are not available or you already have one of these titles at home, feel free to use another edition. I will inform the university book shop on campus to keep these books in store, as they usually offer excellent deals on English-language books. Support your local bookstore!

Requirements:
• Active participation in class
• In-depth knowledge of the reading materials
• Final assessment according to module choice

Please note that prior enrollment via Stud. IP is mandatory.

Katalina Kopka, M.A.
10-76-3-D1/WD1-03Key Topics in Literature and Cultural History: The History of Women in Science (in English)

Seminar (Teaching)

Dates:
weekly (starts in week: 1) Thu. 08:00 - 10:00 SFG 2030

The campus of the University of Bremen is lined with streets named after famous historical scientists. But instead of the usual male scientists one may quickly expect, it is women who are dominating these streets: Barbara McClintock, Mary Somerville, Emmy Noether, Lise Meitner, Caroline Herschel. Though their contributions to their respective fields were immense, their names are practically unknown to the wider public in comparison to their male colleagues. The whole world seems to know who Albert Einstein was – why do they not know of Lise Meitner? What was women’s contribution to science and why has it not been properly acknowledged? This is the focus of this seminar, which follows the history of women’s contribution in science and the difficulties they have faced and still face until present day. A detailed course plan as well as further reading material will be provided by the beginning of October.

Primary Text:
Brown, Carrie. The Stargazer's Sister. Anchor Books, 2016.

Please obtain a copy of the text before the start of the class. I will contact the university book shop to keep a couple of copies on hand for you to buy. Support your local bookstore!

Requirements:
• regular attendance
• active participation in class
• in-depth knowledge of the primary and secondary reading materials
• portfolio/oral presentation/term paper (depending on your module)

Please note that prior enrolment via StudIP is mandatory.

NOTE
As of July 2021, the University of Bremen is planning to implement face-to-face teaching in the winter semester 21/22 and this class is scheduled as such. This might be subject to change, depending on the development of the pandemic. Should this class need to revert to digital teaching, the course requirements and schedule may change. Please refer back to the “Announcement” section of this class for further updates as well as the regular “Corona Updates” provided via email by the University Executive Board (“Rektorat”).

Kim-Nicola Hofschröer, M.A.
10-76-3-D1/WD1-04Key Topics in Literature: Violence and female Bodies in Postcolonial Dystopian Literatures (in English)

Seminar (Teaching)

Dates:
weekly (starts in week: 1) Wed. 12:15 - 13:45 MZH 1460
Dr. Sukla Chatterjee
10-76-3-D1/WD1-05Key Topics in Literature and Cultural History: Shakespeare's Much Ado about Nothing (in English)

Seminar (Teaching)

Dates:
weekly (starts in week: 1) Wed. 16:00 - 18:00 SFG 2060 IW3 0200

The aim of this course is to introduce students to one of Shakespeare's most popular comedies, which probably premiered in 1598 or 1599. Set in Messina, on the island of Sicily, Much Ado about Nothing has become an Elizabethan key text in the debate about gender roles as well as about the dramatic representations of alleged infidelity and deceit.

This course is also designed to introduce students to the highly complex relationship between a literary text and its film version, both in terms of thematic as well as technical features. Our example will be Kenneth Branagh's successful film adaptation (1993) starring Emma Thompson, Branagh himself, Denzel Washington, and Keanu Reeves.

requirements:
• active participation
• in-depth knowledge of the reading material
• presentation and/or final paper

Please note that prior enrolment via Stud.IP is mandatory. The enrolment period ends on September 15.


text:
Shakespeare, William. Much Ado about Nothing. The Arden Shakespeare. London: Bloomsbury, 2016.

Prof. Dr. Norbert Schaffeld
10-76-3-D1/WD1-06Key Topics in Literature: US Latinx Writing (in English)

Seminar (Teaching)
ECTS: 3

Dates:
weekly (starts in week: 1) Thu. 08:00 - 10:00 GW2 B3010 (Kleiner Studierraum)

    • Please note that this class is fully booked as of 31 Aug. 2021. Students preliminarily registering after that date will secure a spot on the waiting list. - -
According to US Census estimates, people of Hispanic origin constituted 18.5% of the nation’s total population and formed its largest ethnic or racial minority in 2019. This class introduces students to the study of Latinx writing with an emphasis on the distinctions and similarities that have shaped the experiences and the cultural imagination of Latinxs/as/os. We will read and analyze a selection of texts, such as novels, poetry, memoirs, and theory by and about, for example, Mexican Americans, Puerto Ricans, Dominican Americans, or Cuban Americans in order to reflect on the histories and cultural expressions of these diverse communities in the United States with a special focus on the twentieth and twenty-first centuries. Students will explore the language, form, and style of Latinx writing, including the mixing of the English language with Spanish or Spanglish elements, as well as engage with some of the texts’ key concerns, such as racial, ethnic, or national identities, the role of the family and gender, cultural hybridity, and migration.
In accordance with current university guidelines (as of July 2021, subject to change), this class is planned as a weekly in-person seminar on Thursdays 8.15 to 9:45 am, while the majority of material and information will also be made available on Stud.IP. The class is open to ESC students studying the WD1-a, WD1-b, and the D1-b modules as well as international exchange students. Students wishing to complete their D1-a module may also be accommodated. Please note that prior enrolment via Stud.IP is mandatory and admission is limited to thirty students. Please check Stud.IP regularly for any updates, including the seminar format and a list of required primary and secondary readings.

Dr. Paula von Gleich
10-76-3-D1/WD1-07Key Topics in Cultural History: Shakespeare's London (On Campus and on Zoom) (in English)

Seminar (Teaching)
ECTS: 3

Dates:
weekly (starts in week: 1) Mon. 16:15 - 17:45 SFG 2040

This course welcomes students who wish to complete the following modules:
B.A. E-SC D-1b, D1-c and WD-1b, WD-1c
Academic exchange students

William Shakespeare’s London, and in this seminar, London in the Elizabethan Age as well as at his time in the city (c.1560 – 1616), was a rapidly growing and bustling metropolis. In the duration of this course, we will travel back in time seeking to explore the history and social geography of this largest city in England. Based on a research-based learning methodology, we will attempt to map out London’s key locations as the centre of government, the law and the church as well as being the focus of politics and culture during a time of intense political and religious upheaval. In addition, this course focuses on the following topics: Stage history, playhouses; the fundamental features of dramatic composition to issues such as political structures in Renaissance England, gender roles and relations, love and sexuality, constructions of nationhood, global expansion and their representation in Shakespeare’s plays.

We will meet in weekly seminar sessions on campus, but students will also have access to weekly self-study units, worksheets and opencast podcasts. Since some of the participants are required to submit a research-based term paper, we will use parts of our seminar discussions to the development of topics, the formulation of a thesis statement, as well as considerations about the methodological approaches of writing such a paper. A reader with selected secondary text materials will be made available for download on Stud. IP. You will need access to Stud.IP and a laptop or tablet with sound and audio capabilities.

You may wish to check the sections "Information" and "Schedule" further details such as requirements, weekly schedule, select bibliography and modes of assessment.

Requirements and Assessment
• Interest in the topic discussed and ideally a regular attendance and informed participation in class discussion (not part of your formal assessment);
• in-depth knowledge of the selected reading material,
• homework assignments,
• Portfolio presentation or research-based term paper.
The requirements as formulated above may vary depending on your module choices and your overall degree program.

Reading materials
MacGregor, Neil. Shakespeare's Restless World (Italics), Penguin Books, 2014.
Copies are available for purchase at the bookstore on our campus (Universitätsbuchhandlung Bremen: www.unibuch-bremen.de)

Dr. Jana Nittel
10-76-3-D1/WD1-09Key Topics in Cultural History: Gender - Culture - Feminism (in English)

Seminar (Teaching)

Dates:
weekly (starts in week: 1) Wed. 10:15 - 11:45 GW1 A0010 IW3 0200
Dr. Karin Esders-Angermund

WD-1c: Aufbaumodul: Sprachwissenschaft und Kulturgeschichte (Wahlpflichtmodul 6 CP) - (nur für das Wintersemester)

(3 CP + 3 CP)

Es gilt zu beachten: Laut SK-Beschluss (E-SC) vom 21.11.2012 ist die Pruefungsleistung im Bereich "Key Topics in Linguistics" zu erbringen = Klausur/Written test oder benotete Praesentationsleistung/Presentation.

Modulbeauftragte/r: Dr. Jana Nittel, jnittel@uni-bremen.de
Course numberTitle of eventLecturer
10-76-3-D1/WD1-07Key Topics in Cultural History: Shakespeare's London (On Campus and on Zoom) (in English)

Seminar (Teaching)
ECTS: 3

Dates:
weekly (starts in week: 1) Mon. 16:15 - 17:45 SFG 2040

This course welcomes students who wish to complete the following modules:
B.A. E-SC D-1b, D1-c and WD-1b, WD-1c
Academic exchange students

William Shakespeare’s London, and in this seminar, London in the Elizabethan Age as well as at his time in the city (c.1560 – 1616), was a rapidly growing and bustling metropolis. In the duration of this course, we will travel back in time seeking to explore the history and social geography of this largest city in England. Based on a research-based learning methodology, we will attempt to map out London’s key locations as the centre of government, the law and the church as well as being the focus of politics and culture during a time of intense political and religious upheaval. In addition, this course focuses on the following topics: Stage history, playhouses; the fundamental features of dramatic composition to issues such as political structures in Renaissance England, gender roles and relations, love and sexuality, constructions of nationhood, global expansion and their representation in Shakespeare’s plays.

We will meet in weekly seminar sessions on campus, but students will also have access to weekly self-study units, worksheets and opencast podcasts. Since some of the participants are required to submit a research-based term paper, we will use parts of our seminar discussions to the development of topics, the formulation of a thesis statement, as well as considerations about the methodological approaches of writing such a paper. A reader with selected secondary text materials will be made available for download on Stud. IP. You will need access to Stud.IP and a laptop or tablet with sound and audio capabilities.

You may wish to check the sections "Information" and "Schedule" further details such as requirements, weekly schedule, select bibliography and modes of assessment.

Requirements and Assessment
• Interest in the topic discussed and ideally a regular attendance and informed participation in class discussion (not part of your formal assessment);
• in-depth knowledge of the selected reading material,
• homework assignments,
• Portfolio presentation or research-based term paper.
The requirements as formulated above may vary depending on your module choices and your overall degree program.

Reading materials
MacGregor, Neil. Shakespeare's Restless World (Italics), Penguin Books, 2014.
Copies are available for purchase at the bookstore on our campus (Universitätsbuchhandlung Bremen: www.unibuch-bremen.de)

Dr. Jana Nittel
10-76-3-D1/WD1-09Key Topics in Cultural History: Gender - Culture - Feminism (in English)

Seminar (Teaching)

Dates:
weekly (starts in week: 1) Wed. 10:15 - 11:45 GW1 A0010 IW3 0200
Dr. Karin Esders-Angermund
10-76-3-WD1-01Key Topics in Linguistics: Multimodal humor in Covid‐19 memes (in English)

Seminar (Teaching)
ECTS: 3

Dates:
weekly (starts in week: 1) Tue. 14:15 - 15:45

This class is a project oriented online class. We read recent texts about humor as a coping mechanism and Covid 19 communication. In the next step, we will use Maxqda Software to analyse and code multimodal data. You will give a zoom group presentation about a self selected research project regarding Covid 19 and humor using your Maxqda data analyses.
Abdel-Raheem, A. (2018). Multimodal humour: Integrating blending model, relevance theory, and incongruity theory. Multimodal Communication, 7(1).
Bülow, L., Marie-Luis Merten, & Johann, M. (2018). Internet-memes als zugang zu multimodalen konstruktionen. Zeitschrift Für Angewandte Linguistik, 2018(69), 1-32. doi:http://dx.doi.org/10.1515/zfal-2018-0015

Dean, R. A. K., & Gregory, D. M. (2005). More than trivial: strategies for using humor in palliative care. Cancer nursing, 28(4), 292-300.

Dynel, M. (2020). Language, creativity and humour online. Language in Society, 49(1), 149-152. doi:http://dx.doi.org/10.1017/S0047404519000836
Harvey, L., & Palese, E. (2018). #NeverthelessMemesPersisted: Building critical memetic literacy in the classroom. Journal of Adolescent & Adult Literacy, 62(3), 259-270. doi:http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/jaal.898

Yang, S. (2017). An analysis of factors influencing transmission of internet memes of english-speaking origin in chinese online communities. Journal of Language Teaching and Research, 8(5), 969-977. doi:http://dx.doi.org/10.17507/jltr.0805.19

Dr. Inke Du Bois
10-76-3-WD1-02Key Topics in Linguistics: New approaches to Intercultural Pragmatics (in English)

Seminar (Teaching)
ECTS: 3

Dates:
weekly (starts in week: 1) Thu. 12:15 - 13:45 GW2 B1632 SFG 2020

Pragmatics in International Contexts

Language in context has traditionally been studied within the context of one culture such as British or US-American English. Speech Act Theory, Politeness Theory, Conversation Analysis principles meanwhile have been applied to global speech communities and a previously ethnocentric perspective has made way for research that demonstrates different communicative strategies in different cultures. On this background, we will move on to multimodal interaction and take non-verbal discourse strategies into account. Hence, we expand the traditional concepts and analyze how they are realized multimodally. First, students will learn the major analytical frameworks that are applied in pragmatics. Second, we will look at the state of art in multimodal research in intercultural communication.

Learning Outcomes
• You will be familiar with the major methodological frameworks in Pragmatics (CA; DA; CDA, MMI)
• You will be able to defend different methodological standpoints in Interactional Linguistics
• You will conduct research projects, choose a transcription method and a develop a relevant research question
• You will acquire expert knowledge and relate different perspectives and theories to each other
• You will be able to relate intercultural pragmatic communication conventions to each other

Dr. Inke Du Bois
10-76-3-WD1-03Key Topics in Linguistics: The language of computer‐mediated communication (in English)

Seminar (Teaching)
ECTS: 3

Dates:
weekly (starts in week: 1) Tue. 10:15 - 11:45 GW2 A3390 (CIP-Labor FB 10)

In this course we will explore different genres of computer-mediated communication, including social networking sites, (micro-)blogs, online comments and online reviews. We will investigate concepts such as identity construction, intertextuality, anonymity and privacy, multimodality, and multilingual practices, to name a few.
Students will work on small assignments throughout the semester (portfolio) to get hands-on experience with researching digital discourse and social practices online.

Dr. Ramona Kreis
10-76-3-WD1-04Key Topics in Linguistics: Linguistic Landscapes (in English)

Seminar (Teaching)
ECTS: 3

Dates:
weekly (starts in week: 1) Thu. 08:15 - 09:45 GW2 A4020

The ensemble of linguistic and semiotic traces in public space forms a caleidoskop of cultural and social diversity in a given territory, as well as it shows a representation of social dynamics with regard to linguistic developments and repertoires, negotiations of social identity, and other subjects of social change in multilingual contexts.
The investigation of languages in public space is the objective of the emerging research field of linguistic landscapes. In line with 'expanding the linguistic landscape', the course aims to explore 'linguistic diversity, multimodality and the use of space as a semiotic resource' (Pütz & Mundt, 2018).
In light of the interdisciplinary character of the field, we will work together on groundbreaking studies as well as innovative approaches in order to become acquainted with specific methods of data collection and analysis, their benefits and their limitations, respectively. In addition to discussing origins of the field, methodologies and their underlying research paradigms, students will gain practical experience in ethnographic research by discovering and analyzing linguistic landscapes in their own environments.

Pütz, M. & Mundt, N. (2018). Expanding the Linguistic Landscape. Bristol, Blue Ridge Summit: Multilingual Matters. https://doi.org/10.21832/9781788922166

Henning Vahlenkamp
10-76-3-WD1-05Key Topics in Linguistics: Gender, Power and Ideology in Film and TV Series (in English)

Seminar (Teaching)
ECTS: 3

Dates:
weekly (starts in week: 1) Thu. 12:15 - 13:45 SFG 0150
Tamara Drummond

FD 1 - Basismodul Fachdidaktik 10-76-3-204 (nur für das Wintersemester)

Pflichtmodul: Gy, BIPEB
ECTS: 6

Modulbeauftragte/r: Tim Giesler, giesler@uni-bremen.de
Course numberTitle of eventLecturer
10-76-3-FD1-01Introduction to English Language Education (BiPEB/Gy)

Seminar (Teaching)

Dates:
weekly (starts in week: 1) Thu. 10:15 - 11:45 MZH 1460 (2 Credit hours)

This introductory course will provide an insight into important aspects and theoretical foundations of English Language Teaching (ELT) which is an indispensable part of every teacher's knowledge base. Participants will get an overview of theoretical as well as practical issues. Starting from a look at the history of ELT we will then move on to Foreign Language Politics in Germany and Europe before we begin to discuss more practical concerns, for example:
  • In how far do the different varieties of English in the world take an effect on ELT?
  • How can teachers foster the development of the students' language skills?

Apart from that, we will be looking at special forms of ELT, for example English in Primary Schools and Content and Language Integrated Learning (CLIL), and also the role of course books and literature in the classroom will be investigated. It is most important that participants actively engage with these topics, as it is crucial for teacher trainees to form an opinion about their future way of teaching.

Dr. Tim Giesler
10-76-3-FD1-02Introduction to English Language Education (Gy) (in English)

Seminar (Teaching)

Dates:
weekly (starts in week: 1) Tue. 08:00 - 10:00 SFG 2060

This introductory course will provide an insight into important aspects and theoretical foundations of English Language Teaching (ELT) which is an indispensable part of every teacher's knowledge base. Participants will get an overview of theoretical as well as practical issues. Starting from a look at the history of ELT we will move all the way to Foreign Language Politics in Germany and Europe.
We will discuss questions of practical concerns, such as:
  • To what extent do the different varieties of English in the world impact ELT?
  • How can teachers foster the development of the students' language skills?

Apart from that, we will be looking at special forms of ELT, for example, English in Primary Schools and teaching in inclusive contexts. We will also consider the role of course books and literature in the classroom. It is important that participants actively engage with these topics, as it is crucial for teacher trainees to form an opinion about their future teaching actions.

Ana Carolina Fernandes Pires Rovai
10-76-3-FD1-03Introduction to English Language Education (Gy/BiPEB) (in English)

Seminar (Teaching)

Dates:
weekly (starts in week: 1) Thu. 12:15 - 13:45 GW1 B0100
Irina Pavlovic
Dr. Tim Giesler
10-76-3-FD1-04Introduction to English Language Teaching Practice (BiPEB) (in English)
Blockveranstaltung im Frühjahr 2022 - Termine folgen

Seminar (Teaching)

Begleitseminar in Verbindung mit den Praxisorientierten Elementen im Fach Englisch.

Bitte melden Sie sich über das Zentrum für Lehrerbildung (Startseite stud.IP: Schulpraktika) für die Praxisorientierten Elemente an. Sie werden dann nach der Schulzuweisung automatisch einem der Begleitseminare zugewiesen.

N. N.
10-76-3-FD1-05Introduction to English Language Teaching Practice (Gy/Bili) (in English)
Blockveranstaltung im Frühjahr 2022 - Termine folgen

Seminar (Teaching)

Begleitseminar in Verbindung mit den Praxisorientierten Elementen im Fach Englisch.

Bitte melden Sie sich über das Zentrum für Lehrerbildung (Startseite stud.IP: Schulpraktika) für die Praxisorientierten Elemente an. Sie werden dann nach der Schulzuweisung automatisch einem der Begleitseminare zugewiesen.

Matthias Myrczek
10-76-3-FD1-06Introduction to English Language Teaching Practice (Gy/IP) (in English)
Blockveranstaltung im Frühjahr 2022 - Termine folgen

Seminar (Teaching)

Additional dates:
Sat. 05.02.22 09:00 - 15:00 GW2 B1216
Sat. 19.02.22 09:00 - 15:00 GW2 B1216
Sat. 05.03.22 09:00 - 15:00 GW2 B1216

Begleitseminar in Verbindung mit den Praxisorientierten Elementen im Fach Englisch.

Bitte melden Sie sich über das Zentrum für Lehrerbildung (Startseite stud.IP: Schulpraktika) für die Praxisorientierten Elemente an. Sie werden dann nach der Schulzuweisung automatisch einem der Begleitseminare zugewiesen.

Dr. Tim Giesler
10-76-3-FD1-07Introduction to English Language Teaching Practice (Gy) (in English)
Blockveranstaltung im Frühjahr 2022 - Termine folgen

Seminar (Teaching)

Additional dates:
Sat. 19.02.22 09:00 - 13:00 GW2 B1580
Fri. 04.03.22 13:30 - 17:30 GW2 B1580
Sat. 19.03.22 09:00 - 13:00 GW2 B1580
Fri. 25.03.22 13:30 - 17:30 GW2 B1580

Begleitseminar in Verbindung mit den Praxisorientierten Elementen im Fach Englisch.

Bitte melden Sie sich über das Zentrum für Lehrerbildung (Startseite stud.IP: Schulpraktika) für die Praxisorientierten Elemente an. Sie werden dann nach der Schulzuweisung automatisch einem der Begleitseminare zugewiesen.

Jan Eric Ströh ((LIS))
10-76-3-FD1-08Introduction to English Language Teaching Practice (Gy) (in English)
Blockveranstaltung im Frühjahr 2022 - Termine folgen

Seminar (Teaching)

Begleitseminar in Verbindung mit den Praxisorientierten Elementen im Fach Englisch.

Bitte melden Sie sich über das Zentrum für Lehrerbildung (Startseite stud.IP: Schulpraktika) für die Praxisorientierten Elemente an. Sie werden dann nach der Schulzuweisung automatisch einem der Begleitseminare zugewiesen.

Tobias Peter Carus ((LIS))
10-76-3-FD1-09Introduction to English Language Teaching Practice (Gy) (in English)
Blockveranstaltung im Frühjahr 2022 - Termine folgen

Seminar (Teaching)

Begleitseminar in Verbindung mit den Praxisorientierten Elementen im Fach Englisch.

Bitte melden Sie sich über das Zentrum für Lehrerbildung (Startseite stud.IP: Schulpraktika) für die Praxisorientierten Elemente an. Sie werden dann nach der Schulzuweisung automatisch einem der Begleitseminare zugewiesen.

N. N.

Zusatzqualifikation Bilinguales Lehren und Lernen

Interessenten an der Zusatzqualifikation belegen im Wintersemester die unten stehende Einführungsveranstaltung.
Nähere Informationen erhalten Sie unter giesler@uni-bremen.de
Course numberTitle of eventLecturer
10-76-3-Zbil-01Grundbegriffe der Didaktik des bilingualen Sachfachunterrichts

Seminar (Teaching)

Dates:
weekly (starts in week: 1) Fri. 10:15 - 11:45 MZH 1460

Einführungsveranstaltung für die Zusatzqualifikation "Bilinguales Lernen und Lehren".

Das Angebot richtet sich an Lehramtsstudierende des Studiengangs English-Speaking Cultures, die ein Sachfach als Zeitfach studieren. Diese Zusatzqualifikation ist ein zusätzliches Angebot und erstreckt sich über das gesamte BA und MEd-Studium. Nähere Informationen erhalten Sie unter giesler@uni-bremen.de

Bei ausreichend freien Plätzen können auch weitere interessierte Studierende aufgenommen werden.

Matthias Myrczek

LEHRVERANSTALTUNGEN DES 3. JAHRES:

P Abschlussmodul Profilfach (15 CP) "Sprachwissenschaft" oder "Literaturwissenschaft" oder "Kulturgeschichte"

Modulbeauftragte/r: Prof. Dr. John Bateman, bateman@uni-bremen.de

Laut PO des BA ESC von 2011 (§6;1 werden die 3 CP des Begleitseminars (im Profilfach obligatorisch) im Bereich General Studies angerechnet; die Studierenden, die bestanden haben, sind daher Irmgard Maassen (maassen@uni-bremen.de), der Modulbeauftragten für General Studies, zu melden.
Course numberTitle of eventLecturer
10-M80-3-ReMo-02Researching Postcolonial Literatures and Cultures (in English)

Seminar (Teaching)

Dates:
weekly (starts in week: 1) Wed. 16:15 - 17:45 External location: online

This class will be completely taught online and is open to MA students from the E-SC Master Program at U Bremen, who plan to write their MA Thesis in the Summer Semester 2022. As well it is open to a limited number of BA students who plan to write tehir thesis in the Summer Semester 2022. All reading and information material will be made available through the U Bremen teaching and learning platform Stud.IP; hence prior enrollment via Stud.IP is mandatory.

In this class students will learn how to develop a research topic, collect bibliographical material, develop a theoretical background and formulate research questions. They will then individually develop the research topic for their master’s or bachelor's thesis. Finally students will write research proposals and individually present these in class for peer-review.
Class requirements are regular attendance, developing theoretical and historical backgrounds of topic, reading secondary sources at home, and active class participation.

Prof. Dr. Kerstin Knopf

Abschlussmodul L - Lehramt (12 CP) - 10-76-6-314 (nur für das Sommersemester)

Modulbeauftragte/r: Tim Giesler, giesler@uni-bremen.de
Course numberTitle of eventLecturer
10-M80-3-ReMo-02Researching Postcolonial Literatures and Cultures (in English)

Seminar (Teaching)

Dates:
weekly (starts in week: 1) Wed. 16:15 - 17:45 External location: online

This class will be completely taught online and is open to MA students from the E-SC Master Program at U Bremen, who plan to write their MA Thesis in the Summer Semester 2022. As well it is open to a limited number of BA students who plan to write tehir thesis in the Summer Semester 2022. All reading and information material will be made available through the U Bremen teaching and learning platform Stud.IP; hence prior enrollment via Stud.IP is mandatory.

In this class students will learn how to develop a research topic, collect bibliographical material, develop a theoretical background and formulate research questions. They will then individually develop the research topic for their master’s or bachelor's thesis. Finally students will write research proposals and individually present these in class for peer-review.
Class requirements are regular attendance, developing theoretical and historical backgrounds of topic, reading secondary sources at home, and active class participation.

Prof. Dr. Kerstin Knopf

GENERAL STUDIES - siehe auch die Veranstaltungen von General Studies - Sprach- und Literaturwissenschaften

Modulbeauftragte/r: Dr. Anke Schulz, anke.schulz@uni-bremen.de
Course numberTitle of eventLecturer
10-76-1-Basismodul A-02Tutorial: Introduction to English Literatures (Part I) ZOOM only (in English)

Exercises (Teaching)
ECTS: 3

Dates:
weekly (starts in week: 1) Fri. 10:15 - 11:45 Online
Dr. Jana Nittel
Stina Novak
10-76-5-GS-01Writing about Film

Exercises (Teaching)
ECTS: 3

Dates:
weekly (starts in week: 1) Thu. 12:00 - 14:00 SFG 2040

+ This course takes place on campus

Generally speaking, this course deals with the practical side of film enthusiasm. Students will not only watch the films, but they will also learn how to write about the films. In order to so, the following text types are analysed and reproduced: review, summary and blog entry. The goal of the course is to put together a film blog with texts about a broad range of films.

Students are graded on 2 written assignments. All materials are provided via StudIP.

Dr. Vanessa Herrmann
10-76-5-GS-02Wrinting Academic Papers

Exercises (Teaching)

Dates:
weekly (starts in week: 1) Wed. 14:00 - 16:00 GW1 A0010
weekly (starts in week: 1) Wed. 14:15 - 15:45 Online

In this course, we will look at writing academic essays and paragraphs, from the pre-writing process to editing and peer feedback. The course will focus on participants' concrete needs, whether working on a specific project or more generally

Anne Kirkham, M.A.
10-76-5-GS-03Giving Presentations/Kategorie A

Exercises (Teaching)
ECTS: 3

Dates:
weekly (starts in week: 1) Fri. 12:15 - 13:45 SFG 1020

Course description
“My topic is, um, let me think, well, right here, on my paper ... it says that my topic is ...”

Notes, structure, projector, hand-out, posture, eye-contact, gestures, lay-out, language accuracy, register, pronunciation, time and of course CONTENT… are far too many things to attend to in just ONE presentation? An enigma?

A few hands-on sessions while practising effective presentation strategies might unravel the Gordian knot. We will look at all aspects of planning, structuring, and giving a presentation – while at the same time boosting your self-confidence through hands-on practice in a relaxed atmosphere. Be prepared to discuss all aspects of your topic to become an expert in your field, while profiting from your audience's questions. Explore, delve, probe, analyse, evaluate, compare, give reasons, offer solutions …

ERASMUS and other exchange students welcome.

Katja Müller, M.A.
10-76-5-GS-04English Theatre Workshop (in English)

Exercises (Teaching)

Dates:
weekly (starts in week: 1) Wed. 09:45 - 12:00 GW2 B1630 (3 Credit hours)

In this workshop we will explore and experiment with contemporary methods of improvisational theater, which is the art of making up theatrical moments on the spot, without a script. It is one of the liveliest and most current forms of theater of today and ingrained in US popular culture. You will first learn the basic principles of improvisational theater and then apply them to improvised scenework. We will also reflect on the impact of improvisational theater on popular culture, its applications e.g. in teaching and explore its practical approaches to comedic as well as dramatic narrative structures.

There will be a regular meeting on Wednesday 9.45am-12am during the semester, in which we will cover the basics of improvisational theater, followed by an intensive in the lecture-free period, in which we will work on a specific form and prepare for a performance. If you only want to participate in the intensive you need to have some experience, either from this or a previous semester. There is no obligation to be part of the performances.

Tobias Sailer
10-76-5-GS-05English Theatre Workshop - Presentation & Performance (in English)

Exercises (Teaching)

Additional dates:
Mon. 28.02.22 - Fri. 04.03.22 (Mon., Tue., Wed., Thu., Fri.) 10:00 - 13:00 SFG 1020
Mon. 07.03.22 - Fri. 11.03.22 (Mon., Tue., Wed., Thu., Fri.) 10:00 - 13:00 SFG 1020

This part of the theatre workshop is based on our introductory work during the semester. Requirement is previous participation in the theatre workshop or some experience with long form improvisational theatre. If you have any questions, please don't hesitate to contact me.

Tobias Sailer
10-M80-1-SuStMo-01Vocabulary & Pronunciation (Part1)/ ON CAMPUS

Exercises (Teaching)
ECTS: 3

Dates:
weekly (starts in week: 1) Wed. 16:15 - 17:45 GW2 A4020

This course offeres blended learning and will combine synchronous on-campus meetings and asynchronous tutored self-study units (vocabulary and pronunciation practice).

This course is highly recommendable for first-semester students, students preparing for oral presentations, students who wish to expand their academic vocabulary, and any students who after the last rather difficult semester wish to catch up on aspects of pronunciation and vocabulary.

Mind the Gap!
The course is designed to give you further insight into pronunication and vocabulary work. For pronunciation we will look into different aspects of pronunciation and intonation. This includes pronunciation of individual sounds and words, and intonation of chunks and whole sentences with special attention to connected speech. For vocabulary we will refresh our knowledge of typical 'confusables' ('economic' or 'economical'?), academic vocabulary, and useful phrases for specific language functions such as linking, adding, comparing, summarising, concluding. You will be introduced to diverse aspects of pronunciation and vocabulary, and will be asked to evaluate your own status quo.
You will be asked to work with dictionaries (electronic/digital/online) and pronunciation and vocabulary material (print and digital). You will also provide me with recordings (mp3/mp4/ogg or another suitable format) of your pronunciation work.

Technical prerequisites
Computer/laptop/tablet + (functioning) headset (headphones and microphone)
You will be asked to work with dictionaries (electronic/digital/online) and pronunciation and vocabulary material (print and digital). You will also provide me with recordings (mp3/mp4/ogg or another suitable format) of your pronunciation work.

You can earn 3 CPs for 90 hours of work (of which you will spend only 28 hours in class (online). The rest of the time is dedicated to completing self-study units as homework.

Materials for this course will be provided.

Recommended material

Vocabulary
Cornell, Alan & Geoff Parkes What’s the Difference? A Guide to Tricky Vocabulary Areas in English, Englang Books.
McCarthy, Michael & Felicity O’Dell English Collocations in Use, Intermediate/Advanced edition. Self-study edition with key. Cambridge University Press/Klett.
McCarthy, Michael & Felicity O’Dell. English Vocabulary in Use, upper-intermediate & advanced. Cambridge UP.
McCarthy, Michael & Felicity O’Dell. Academic Vocabulary in Use, Cambridge UP/Klett. 2nd Ed. 2016

Pronunciation
Hollingsworth, Keith and Laura Park
The Englang Pronunciation Course(BE)
Hewings, Martin, English pronunciation in use : self-study and classroom use (Book, advanced), Cambridge Univ. Press, 2007
Hewings, Martin, English pronunciation in use : self-study and classroom use (advanced, CDs, now also available as mp3 download!), Cambridge Univ. Press
Hancock, Mark, English pronunciation in use: self-study and classroom use (Book, intermediate), Cambridge Univ. Press, 2006,
Hancock, Mark, English pronunciation in use: self-study and classroom use (CDs, intermediate), Cambridge Univ. Press, 2006

Katja Müller, M.A.
10-M80-3-SpecMo-01Fun with Data - Research Methods in Language, Linguistics and Cultural Studies (in English Language) (in English)

Seminar (Teaching)

Dates:
fortnightly (starts in week: 2) Mon. 10:15 - 13:45 Online
Prof. Dr. Claudia Harsch