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Veranstaltungsverzeichnis

Lehrveranstaltungen SoSe 2020

English-Speaking Cultures: Language, Text, Media, M. A.

Veranstaltungen anzeigen: alle | in englischer Sprache | für ältere Erwachsene

ExMo 1 - Extention Module 1 (9 CP)

In Extension Module 1, students develop the competence to deal with more complex theoretical, conceptual and methodological approaches within the three interrelated profile areas, i.e. language, text and media.
Read more... https://blogs.uni-bremen.de/maesc/modules/

Modulbeauftragter: Nobert Schaffeld
VAKTitel der VeranstaltungDozentIn
10-M80-2-ExMo1+2-01Shakespeare's Filmic Lives (in englischer Sprache)

Seminar

Termine:
wöchentlich Fr 14:00 - 16:00 (2 SWS)

Shakespeare's Filmic Lives

In the course of this seminar we shall analyse four contemporary films and TV productions which highlight diverse aspects of the (imagined) life of William Shakespeare (1564-1616). In Shakespeare in Love (1998), directed by John Madden, a specific biographical reading is offered that locates the phenomenon of greatness in progress in an intricate web of a romantic love narrative. Barbara Willis Sweete's TV-production Elizabeth Rex (2002), which foregrounds Elizabeth I and her Bard, features some lively debates about masculinities and femininities as well as about literary and royal power. Anonymous (2011), a film directed by Roland Emmerich, questions the authorship of William Shakespeare, while Kenneth Branagh's All is True (2018) focuses on Shakespeare's final days in his hometown Stratford.

The aim of this seminar is to have a close look at the way in which each film or TV production ventures on a biographical reconstruction of the playwright William Shakespeare. And it will be interesting to see how his image is being refashioned by means of the multimodal quality of the corpus under scrutiny.

requirements:
• active participation
• oral presentation (handout) or
• research in progress and final paper

Please note that this course is a cell phone, WhatsApp, and email free zone. Prior enrolment via Stud.IP is mandatory. The enrolment period ends on March 15. The number of participants is limited to 20 students.

Prof. Dr. Norbert Schaffeld
10-M80-2-ExMo1+2-02Key Topics in Literature: Literary London - London in Literature (in englischer Sprache)

Seminar

Termine:
wöchentlich Mo 16:15 - 17:45 (2 SWS)

Online course in the summer term 2020 – Due to the COVID 19 pandemic, we will not meet in class – please ignore the time slots listed above.

This course welcomes students who wish to complete the following modules:
M.A. E-SC ExMo 2 - Extension Module 2
M.A. TnL Profilmodul I: Literatur and M.A. TnL Vertiefungsmodul
B.A. E-SC “Key Topics in Literature”- D2-c; WD-2a and WD-2b
This course seeks to familiarise students with a number of selected authors, poets and writers, in general, who have held lifelong connections with London, may it be historic or contemporary. We will aim to discuss their continued engagement with the city by exploring a selections of excerpts clustered around six major topic choices: Queer London; Women Writers and London; London’s Imperial Past and Postcolonial Present; London Theatreland and the Shakespearean Stage; London and Crime, and London and the Long Eighteenth Century. By virtually tracing forgotten as well as prominent landmarks of the urban centre, we seek to connect the literary representations of the city with historical and cultural developments, present and past.
Please register on Stud. IP and explore the sections “Information” and “Schedule” on Stud. IP. for further details.
Requirements:
  • work through the weekly self-study units;
  • in-depth knowledge of the selected reading material and course materials,
  • final exam according to module choice.

Dr. Jana Nittel
10-M80-2-ExMo1+2-03Literature: How to Read a Postcolonial Novel (in englischer Sprache)

Seminar
ECTS: 6

Termine:
wöchentlich Mi 16:15 - 17:45 (2 SWS)

In this class we will first learn about approaches and tools to literary analysis before we look at how we read texts specifically from a postcolonial perspective. We will then read and discuss two postcolonial novels: 1. The Caribbean text Wide Sargasso Sea by Jean Rhys (here the Norton Critical Edition) and the Nigerian text Oil on Water by Helon Habila. Please purchase and read both texts, they are available at Thalia for just under 10 € (see links below). All other texts are provided via StudIP.
Class requirements are regular attendance and active class discussion (due to the Corona pandemic probably through an online platform) as well as in-depth knowledge of reading and viewing material. Reading the texts and watching the films is mandatory. Please note that prior enrollment through StudIP is mandatory. Maximum number of participants: 15.
(https://www.thalia.de/shop/home/artikeldetails/ID4281156.htmlhttps://www.thalia.de/shop/home/artikeldetails/ID29100962.html?ProvID=10907022&gclid=EAIaIQobChMI1_7Xuay66AIVioeyCh0JegMqEAAYASAAEgJHz_D_BwE)

Prof. Dr. Kerstin Knopf
10-M80-2-ExMo1+2-03Epistemic Critical Multimodal Discourse Analysis (in englischer Sprache)
Modultyp D im Studiengang Language Sciences, M.A.

Seminar

Termine:
wöchentlich Do 14:15 - 16:15 (2 SWS)
Ahmed Elsayed
10-M80-2-ExMo1+2-04Researching Foreign Language Learning in Higher Education (in englischer Sprache)

Blockveranstaltung

Einzeltermine:
Fr 17.04.20 12:00 - 16:00
Fr 24.04.20 12:15 - 14:45
Fr 08.05.20 12:15 - 14:45
Fr 15.05.20 12:15 - 14:45
Fr 22.05.20 12:15 - 14:45
Fr 29.05.20 12:00 - 18:00

Das Seminar kann auch als Modul FD3 Handlungskompetenzen angerechnet werden.

The aim of the seminar is to provide insights into foreign language acquisition at universities through research-based learning. We will first discuss different theoretical approaches to foreign language learning as well as aspects of learning theory (e.g. learner personality, affective factors) and specifics of language learning and teaching in adulthood/ higher education. Against the background of these theoretical basics, the participants develop research projects, carry them out at the Fremdsprachenzentrum Bremen (FZHB) and present their results in the seminar.

Christine Ringwald, M.A.
10-M80-2-ExMo1+2-04Literature: Morrison's Oeuvre Revisited (in englischer Sprache)

Blockveranstaltung

Einzeltermine:
Fr 17.04.20 14:00 - 16:00
Fr 08.05.20 10:00 - 17:00
Sa 09.05.20 10:00 - 16:00
Fr 05.06.20 10:00 - 17:00
Sa 06.06.20 10:00 - 16:00

This class will address some of the most important literary texts and intellectual interventions by Nobel prize winning author Toni Morrison who sadly passed away last fall. To honor her immensely important legacy, we will read the following texts:

THE BLUEST EYE
BELOVED
A MERCY
as well as
PLAYING IN THE DARK
THE SOURCE OF SELF-REGARD: ESSAYS, SPEECHES, MEDITATIONS (selected texts)

Prospective participants NEED to have all these texts in hand at the beginning of the semester. Please make sure you organize this IN TIME.

Additional secondary material will be announced or made available on stud-ip in due time. Please make sure you check in regularly.

Prof. Dr. Sabine Bröck
10-M80-2-ExMo1+2-05Contemporary Crime Fiction (in englischer Sprache)
(for B.A. E-SC “Key Topics in Literature”)

Seminar

Termine:
wöchentlich Di 16:15 - 17:45 (2 SWS)

Online course in the summer term 2020 – Due to the COVID 19 pandemic we will not meet in class – please ignore the time slot listed above.

This course welcomes students who wish to complete the following modules:
M.A. E-SC ExMo 2 - Extension Module 2
M.A. TnL Profilmodul I: Literatur and M.A. TnL Vertiefungsmodul
B.A. E-SC “Key Topics in Literature”- D2-c; WD-2a and WD-2b

Crime Fiction is overwhelmingly popular and yet, much of the narrative literature that involves crime of some kind or another is often not regarded as ‘literature’ at all. This course is designed to familiarise students with the contemporary critical and theoretical arguments concerning popular fiction and genre studies, as well as to enable all participants of this course to relate to the genre’s wider social, historical and political contexts while discussing the individual narratives in terms of form, language and imagery.
Seeking to promote an analytical, creative and imaginative engagement with the complexities of literary and cultural discourses, we will focus on excerpts of both detective- or transgressor-centred narratives from the second half of the 20th Century onwards. These narratives include examples of the police novel (e.g. Ian Rankin); of female detectives and the feminist appropriations of the hard-boiled story (e.g. Sara Paretsky); of the psychothriller (e.g. Patricia Highsmith), of Afro-American crime fiction, here the examination of literary representations and other cultural manifestations of the Black Diaspora, discussing the relevance of this form of genre fiction to the Black experience of American Life (e.g. Walter Mosley), of Indigenous crime fiction (e.g. Thomas King), of the postmodern mystery (e.g. Paul Auster), and of representations of disability in crime fiction (e.g. Jeffrey Deaver’s Lincoln Rhyme series).

Please register on Stud. IP and explore the sections “Information” and “Schedule” on Stud. IP. for further details.
Requirements:
  • work through the weekly self-study units;
  • in-depth knowledge of the selected reading material and course materials,
  • final exam according to module choice.

Reading materials (we will read excerpts of these novels but you are welcome to read these novels in full especially when planning a research project):
Auster, Paul. The New York Trilogy, Faber and Faber, 1987.
Deaver, Jeffrey. The Bone Collector, Hodder and Stoughton, 1997.
Highsmith, Patricia. Strangers on a Train, Vintage, 1999, 1950.
King, Thomas. The Red Power Murders: A DreadfulWater Mystery, Harper Perennial, 2006.
Mosley, Walter. Devil in a Blue Dress, Serpent's Tail, 2001, 1991.
Paretsky, Sara. Blacklist: A V.I. Warshawski Novel, Signet Book, 2004.
Rankin, Ian. Knots & Crosses: Inspector Rebus Novel, Orion, 2005, 1998.

Dr. Jana Nittel
10-M80-2-ExMo1+2-07Multimodal Markers of Irony (in englischer Sprache)

Seminar

Termine:
wöchentlich Di 14:15 - 15:45

Some people are naturals at understanding irony, while others have difficulties with "getting" it. Consider, for example, the following snippet from The Big Bang Theory:


Sheldon: I have to say, I slept splendidly. Granted, not long, but just deeply and well.
Leonard: I’m not surprised. A well known folk cure for insomnia is to break into your neighbour’s apartment and clean.
Sheldon: Sarcasm?
Leonard: You think?
Sheldon: Granted, my methods may have been somewhat unorthodox, but I think the end result will be a measurable enhancement of Penny’s quality of life.
Leonard: You know what, you’ve convinced me, maybe tonight we should sneak in and shampoo her carpet.
Sheldon: You don’t think that crosses a line?
Leonard: Yes! For God’s sake, Sheldon, do I have to hold up a sarcasm sign every time I open my mouth.
Sheldon: You have a sarcasm sign?
Leonard: No, I do not have a sarcasm sign.

The aim of this class is exactly this: we will try to figure out all sorts of markers (i.e. "sarcasm signs") that facilitate "getting" ironic remarks - not just for the Sheldons among us.
As a starter, though, we will define what irony actually is, i.e. we will define its differences from literal speech and from other kinds of non-literal speech. After that, we will address questions such as:
- Is there an ironic tone of voice?
- Are there facial expressions that indicate the speaker's intent (rolling eyes, blank face)?
- Are there differences between scripted and spontaneous dialogues?
- How is irony indicated in other forms of communication, e.g. in adverts, comics or video games?

Course requirements
3CPs: active participation
6CPs: active participation + research paper


Note: ‘active participation’ means that you do the weekly assignments I give you.

Dr. Claudia Lehmann
10-M80-2-Exmo1+2-08English in Africa

Seminar

Termine:
wöchentlich Fr 10:00 - 12:00

Einzeltermine:
Do 30.04.20 12:00 - 13:00 https://register.gotowebinar.com/register/560584209596635404?source=OEDpage

Bitte beachten: Modultyp A, B/C und D im Empirie- und Methodenmodul im Studiengang Language Sciences, M.A. Modultyp A, B/C für das Lektüremodul im Studiengang Language Sciences, M.A.


As a result of colonisation, English was transplanted to Africa and has spread over the entire African continent. It has become an official language in approximately one third of all African nations. The degree to which English is spoken as a first or second language variety in the various African countries depends mostly on the colonial history, linguistic situation, language policy and language planning programs of these countries.

In this seminar, we will investigate the historical and socio-political developments that have determined the formation of African varieties of English and we will also study the functions English serves in various African countries and speaker's attitudes towards this language.
Moreover, we will survey recent corpus-linguistic research on Africa Englishes that has provided detailed descriptions of the distinctive linguistic characteristics of particular varieties.

Depending on the assessment needed for their study program and module, students can opt for oral presentations based on extensive reading or corpus-based research projects on selected African Englishes.

Basic introductory reading:

Schneider, Edgar W. 2011. English around the World. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press. (chapters 5.2 and 6.1)

Van Rooy, Bertus. 2020. English in Africa. In Schreier, Daniel, Marianne Hundt & Edgar W. Schneider (eds.), The Cambridge Handbook of World Englishes. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 210-235.

Prof. Dr. Marcus Callies
10-M80-2-ExMo1+2-09Theoretical approaches to Cultural History (in englischer Sprache)

Seminar

Termine:
wöchentlich Do 10:15 - 11:45
Dr. Karin Esders-Angermund
10-M80-2-ExMo1+2-10Feminism, Fashion and Film (in englischer Sprache)

Seminar

Termine:
wöchentlich Mi 12:15 - 13:45
Dr. Karin Esders-Angermund
10-M80-2-ExMo1+2-11Literature: Insanity in Postcolonial Literature and Society (in englischer Sprache)

Seminar

Termine:
wöchentlich Do 16:15 - 17:45
Dr. Sukla Chatterjee
10-M80-2-ExMo1+2-12Creating and Annotating Your Own Corpus for Register-Specific Research (in englischer Sprache)

Seminar

Termine:
wöchentlich Do 12:15 - 13:45

Corpus linguistics has been an influential approach to studying language for well over 30 years. As a result, many different corpora are already available to the research community, from very large, general corpora, to highly specialized, smaller corpora. The interested scholar has a wide repository of language data at their disposal.

Researchers wishing to study new or previously understudied types of language data, however, may have difficulties finding a suitable corpus. These researchers may want to consider creating their own corpus.

This seminar introduces participants to the theoretical and practical issues involved in corpus creation. We will discuss the basic properties as well as different types of linguistic corpora. Based on this, we will learn to create our own corpora of specific English-language registers. In addition, we will learn how to annotate our corpora, enriching them with linguistic or non-linguistic information to facilitate our analyses. Among other things, we will learn how to compile small corpora of...

  • Twitter tweets
  • pop music lyrics
  • online newspaper articles
  • WhatsApp conversations
  • academic articles

For graded credit, participants will compile a small corpus of a register of their choice, and document the compilation process in writing. Participants are encouraged to think of registers that meet their own research interests, and we will work on a strategy to compile a suitable corpus.

Participants should have solid computer skills. Familiarity with corpus-linguistic software and tools (e.g. AntConc, UAM CorpusTool) is expected. Familiarity with the R programming environment is an advantage.
This seminar will take place in the CIP computer lab (and not in the room indicated on Stud.IP).

Steffen Schaub, M.A.
10-M80-2-ExMo1+2-14Multimodal Narratives, Genre and Ideology (in englischer Sprache)

Blockveranstaltung

Einzeltermine:
Fr 17.04.20 12:00 - 14:00
Sa 06.06.20 09:00 - 18:00
Sa 20.06.20 09:00 - 18:00
Sa 04.07.20 09:00 - 18:00

In the last decades, critical discourse analysis has moved from the verbal mode toward multimedia and multimodal artefacts. In this seminar we will cover the principal critical discourse approaches to textuality, addressing how these approaches can be extended to analyse narrative presented in visual and audiovisual text such as films, comics, graphic novels and interactive storytelling. After introducing the critical discourse methods, we will address how these methods can be used to construct systematic structures for reflecting media users’ prediction of narrative and genre. Moreover, we will employ the discourse approach to systematically unpack socio-political ideologies embedded in the multimodal texts. We will then explore how different media and genres achieve emotional, immersive and persuasive purposes of these ideologies in different ways drawing on the different media affordances and constraints.

Prof. John Arnold Bateman, Ph.D.
Dr. Chiao-I Tseng
10-M80-2-ExMo1+2-15Text, Learning and Digital Media

Seminar

Termine:
wöchentlich Fr 14:15 - 15:45 (2 SWS)

In this course we deal with several issues and debates with regard to using dynamic, interactive media and digital texts for teaching and learning. In particular, we will focus on how texts from different subjects of science and humanities benefit from multimedia materials in different and similar ways. We will start this course with the methods for analysing information representation. We will then examine the relations between information representation and interactive media such as book apps, interactive narratives, online audiovisual texts. We will particularly discuss to what degree media technologies influence the teaching and learning processes in different subjects, when these technologies are employed in the teaching materials. The participants are required to draft research questions on the issues with regard to texts and media, and then address the questions by employing the analytical methods introduced in this course.

Prof. John Arnold Bateman, Ph.D.
Dr. Chiao-I Tseng

SuStMo - Supplementary Studies Module (9 CP)

Students may opt for language courses offered both by Faculty 10 and the Foreign Language Centre (Fremdsprachenzentrum Bremen - FZHB), relevant courses and lecture series offered both by Faculty 10 and other faculties, or receive credit points for additional internships and academic exchange to Anglophone countries.
Read more... https://blogs.uni-bremen.de/maesc/modules/

Modulverantwortliche: Jana Wachsmuth
VAKTitel der VeranstaltungDozentIn
10-78-6-C3-5Taller de creación dramática con el INPUTS Artista en Residencia Recaredo Silebo Boturu de Guinea Ecuatorial/Theatre Workshop with INPUTS Artist in Residence Recaredo Silebo Boturu from Equatorial Guinea/Theater-Workshop mit dem INPUTS Artist in Residence
voraussichtlich auf das Sommersemester 2021 verlegt !!!!

Übung
ECTS: 2 oder mehr

En mayo y junio de 2020, el poeta, dramaturgo y actor guineoecuatoriano Recaredo Silebo Boturu estará en Bremen durante un periodo de 8 semanas como Artista en Residencia del Instituto de Estudios Poscoloniales y Transculturales (INPUTS) de la Universidad de Bremen. En este contexto dará un taller de creación dramática para estudiantes de la Universidad de Bremen que estén interesado/as en idear y realizar una obra de teatro. La clase será en español, no obstante, no es obligatorio tener conocimientos de español para poder participar. Está progamado contratar a un/a estudiante para que ayude como intérprete y los estudiantes se ayudarán entre si. Si están interesado/as, por favor, dirígense a Dr. Julia Borst (FB 10): borst@uni-bremen.de

Las fechas exactas serán anunciadas en enero de 2020. Pero apúntense ya por favor en StudIP en caso de interés puesto que nos facilitará la programación conocer de antemano el número de interesados.

Im Mai und Juni 2020 verweilt der äquatorialguineische Dichter, Theaterautor und Schauspieler aus Äquatorialguinea für 8 Wochen als Artist in Residence des Instituts für postkoloniale und transkulturelle Studien (INPUTS) an der Universität Bremen. In diesem Rahmen wird er einen Theater-Workshop als Blockseminar anbieten, der für Studierende der Universität Bremen geöffnet ist, die Lust darauf haben, selbst eine Performance zu konzipieren und dann auf die Bühne zu bringen. Boturu leitet den Kurs auf Spanisch, Spanischkenntnisse sind aber keine Teilnahmevoraussetzung. Voraussichtlich wird eine studentische Hilfskraft zum Übersetzen dabei sein und die Studierenden können sich gegenseitig bei Sprachproblemen helfen. Bei Interesse melden Sie sich bitte bei Dr. Julia Borst (FB 10): borst@uni-bremen.de
Die genauen Termine werden im Januar 2020 bekannt gegeben. Bitte melden Sie sich bei Interesse im Vorfeld über StudIP an, damit wir die Anzahl der Teilnehmer*innen abschätzen können.

Recaredo Silebo Boturu, the Equatorial Guinean poet, playwright, and artist will be in Bremen for 8 weeks, in May and June 2020, as the Artist in Residence of the Institute of Postcolonial and Transcultural Studies (INPUTS) at the University of Bremen. During this time, in collaboration with Boturu, we will organize a theatre workshop (compact course) for the students of the University of Bremen who are interested in conceptualizing and staging a theatre performance. The workshop will be conducted in Spanish, however, knowledge of Spanish is not mandatory for participation in the workshop. Provisions are there for a student assistant who will help with communication and interpretation, and students are expected to help each other out with communication issues. If you are interested, please contact Dr. Julia Borst (FB 10): borst@uni-bremen.de
Exact dates will be announced in January 2020. If interested, register for this workshop in StudIP so that we can estimate the number of participants.

Dr. Julia Borst
10-M80-2-Thea-1Theatre Workshop (in englischer Sprache)

Übung

Termine:
wöchentlich Mo 16:00 - 18:15 (3 SWS)
Tobias Sailer
10-M80-2-Thea-2Theatre Workshop - Presentation & Performance (in englischer Sprache)

Übung
Tobias Sailer

UEP Part 2 - Using English in the Professional World (3 CP)

The module provides the more practically-focused language, presentation and negotiation skills foundation for the other modules in the study programme.
Read more... https://blogs.uni-bremen.de/maesc/modules/

Modulbeauftragte: Dr. Vanessa Herrmann
VAKTitel der VeranstaltungDozentIn
10-M80-2-UEP2-1Using English in the Professional World 2 - Group 1 (in englischer Sprache)

Übung
ECTS: 3

Termine:
wöchentlich Mi 14:15 - 15:45
Anne Kirkham, M.A.
10-M80-2-UEP2-2Using English in the Professional World 2 - Group 2 (in englischer Sprache)

Übung
ECTS: 3

Termine:
wöchentlich Mo 10:15 - 11:45

This course will focus on communication and negotiation skills in professional English, both as communicator (speaker, writer) as well as recipient (audience, reader) within group contexts.
To that end we will be working (as needed) on various communication strategies, including but not limited to:
Listening, to presentations, feedback, discussions and negotiations
Speaking in a professional context; giving and recieving feedback; working on delivery, intonation, use of voice as well as non-verbal strategies both in formal presentations and less structured formal communication such as discussions and negotiations
Audience focus: identifying the target audience and their needs; planning for effective communication in different settings and contexts, dealing with disagreement, questions, discussions.
Language including formal versus informal register, and spoken versus written English as well as word choice, vocabulary, syntax, collocations.
Cultural awareness: direct versus indirect communication, appropriateness in different contexts, use of voice to communicate emotion and enthusiasm, asking questions in a professional/formal context, agreeing and disagreeing in various professional contexts and registers.

Anne Kirkham, M.A.

ExMo 2 - Extension Module 2 (9 CP)

In Extension Module 2, students analyse and discuss topical issues of the three interrelated profile areas, i.e. language, text and media.
Read more... https://blogs.uni-bremen.de/maesc/modules/

Modulverantwortliche: Jana Nittel
VAKTitel der VeranstaltungDozentIn
10-M80-2-ExMo1+2-01Shakespeare's Filmic Lives (in englischer Sprache)

Seminar

Termine:
wöchentlich Fr 14:00 - 16:00 (2 SWS)

Shakespeare's Filmic Lives

In the course of this seminar we shall analyse four contemporary films and TV productions which highlight diverse aspects of the (imagined) life of William Shakespeare (1564-1616). In Shakespeare in Love (1998), directed by John Madden, a specific biographical reading is offered that locates the phenomenon of greatness in progress in an intricate web of a romantic love narrative. Barbara Willis Sweete's TV-production Elizabeth Rex (2002), which foregrounds Elizabeth I and her Bard, features some lively debates about masculinities and femininities as well as about literary and royal power. Anonymous (2011), a film directed by Roland Emmerich, questions the authorship of William Shakespeare, while Kenneth Branagh's All is True (2018) focuses on Shakespeare's final days in his hometown Stratford.

The aim of this seminar is to have a close look at the way in which each film or TV production ventures on a biographical reconstruction of the playwright William Shakespeare. And it will be interesting to see how his image is being refashioned by means of the multimodal quality of the corpus under scrutiny.

requirements:
• active participation
• oral presentation (handout) or
• research in progress and final paper

Please note that this course is a cell phone, WhatsApp, and email free zone. Prior enrolment via Stud.IP is mandatory. The enrolment period ends on March 15. The number of participants is limited to 20 students.

Prof. Dr. Norbert Schaffeld
10-M80-2-ExMo1+2-02Key Topics in Literature: Literary London - London in Literature (in englischer Sprache)

Seminar

Termine:
wöchentlich Mo 16:15 - 17:45 (2 SWS)

Online course in the summer term 2020 – Due to the COVID 19 pandemic, we will not meet in class – please ignore the time slots listed above.

This course welcomes students who wish to complete the following modules:
M.A. E-SC ExMo 2 - Extension Module 2
M.A. TnL Profilmodul I: Literatur and M.A. TnL Vertiefungsmodul
B.A. E-SC “Key Topics in Literature”- D2-c; WD-2a and WD-2b
This course seeks to familiarise students with a number of selected authors, poets and writers, in general, who have held lifelong connections with London, may it be historic or contemporary. We will aim to discuss their continued engagement with the city by exploring a selections of excerpts clustered around six major topic choices: Queer London; Women Writers and London; London’s Imperial Past and Postcolonial Present; London Theatreland and the Shakespearean Stage; London and Crime, and London and the Long Eighteenth Century. By virtually tracing forgotten as well as prominent landmarks of the urban centre, we seek to connect the literary representations of the city with historical and cultural developments, present and past.
Please register on Stud. IP and explore the sections “Information” and “Schedule” on Stud. IP. for further details.
Requirements:
  • work through the weekly self-study units;
  • in-depth knowledge of the selected reading material and course materials,
  • final exam according to module choice.

Dr. Jana Nittel
10-M80-2-ExMo1+2-03Literature: How to Read a Postcolonial Novel (in englischer Sprache)

Seminar
ECTS: 6

Termine:
wöchentlich Mi 16:15 - 17:45 (2 SWS)

In this class we will first learn about approaches and tools to literary analysis before we look at how we read texts specifically from a postcolonial perspective. We will then read and discuss two postcolonial novels: 1. The Caribbean text Wide Sargasso Sea by Jean Rhys (here the Norton Critical Edition) and the Nigerian text Oil on Water by Helon Habila. Please purchase and read both texts, they are available at Thalia for just under 10 € (see links below). All other texts are provided via StudIP.
Class requirements are regular attendance and active class discussion (due to the Corona pandemic probably through an online platform) as well as in-depth knowledge of reading and viewing material. Reading the texts and watching the films is mandatory. Please note that prior enrollment through StudIP is mandatory. Maximum number of participants: 15.
(https://www.thalia.de/shop/home/artikeldetails/ID4281156.htmlhttps://www.thalia.de/shop/home/artikeldetails/ID29100962.html?ProvID=10907022&gclid=EAIaIQobChMI1_7Xuay66AIVioeyCh0JegMqEAAYASAAEgJHz_D_BwE)

Prof. Dr. Kerstin Knopf
10-M80-2-ExMo1+2-03Epistemic Critical Multimodal Discourse Analysis (in englischer Sprache)
Modultyp D im Studiengang Language Sciences, M.A.

Seminar

Termine:
wöchentlich Do 14:15 - 16:15 (2 SWS)
Ahmed Elsayed
10-M80-2-ExMo1+2-04Researching Foreign Language Learning in Higher Education (in englischer Sprache)

Blockveranstaltung

Einzeltermine:
Fr 17.04.20 12:00 - 16:00
Fr 24.04.20 12:15 - 14:45
Fr 08.05.20 12:15 - 14:45
Fr 15.05.20 12:15 - 14:45
Fr 22.05.20 12:15 - 14:45
Fr 29.05.20 12:00 - 18:00

Das Seminar kann auch als Modul FD3 Handlungskompetenzen angerechnet werden.

The aim of the seminar is to provide insights into foreign language acquisition at universities through research-based learning. We will first discuss different theoretical approaches to foreign language learning as well as aspects of learning theory (e.g. learner personality, affective factors) and specifics of language learning and teaching in adulthood/ higher education. Against the background of these theoretical basics, the participants develop research projects, carry them out at the Fremdsprachenzentrum Bremen (FZHB) and present their results in the seminar.

Christine Ringwald, M.A.
10-M80-2-ExMo1+2-04Literature: Morrison's Oeuvre Revisited (in englischer Sprache)

Blockveranstaltung

Einzeltermine:
Fr 17.04.20 14:00 - 16:00
Fr 08.05.20 10:00 - 17:00
Sa 09.05.20 10:00 - 16:00
Fr 05.06.20 10:00 - 17:00
Sa 06.06.20 10:00 - 16:00

This class will address some of the most important literary texts and intellectual interventions by Nobel prize winning author Toni Morrison who sadly passed away last fall. To honor her immensely important legacy, we will read the following texts:

THE BLUEST EYE
BELOVED
A MERCY
as well as
PLAYING IN THE DARK
THE SOURCE OF SELF-REGARD: ESSAYS, SPEECHES, MEDITATIONS (selected texts)

Prospective participants NEED to have all these texts in hand at the beginning of the semester. Please make sure you organize this IN TIME.

Additional secondary material will be announced or made available on stud-ip in due time. Please make sure you check in regularly.

Prof. Dr. Sabine Bröck
10-M80-2-ExMo1+2-05Contemporary Crime Fiction (in englischer Sprache)
(for B.A. E-SC “Key Topics in Literature”)

Seminar

Termine:
wöchentlich Di 16:15 - 17:45 (2 SWS)

Online course in the summer term 2020 – Due to the COVID 19 pandemic we will not meet in class – please ignore the time slot listed above.

This course welcomes students who wish to complete the following modules:
M.A. E-SC ExMo 2 - Extension Module 2
M.A. TnL Profilmodul I: Literatur and M.A. TnL Vertiefungsmodul
B.A. E-SC “Key Topics in Literature”- D2-c; WD-2a and WD-2b

Crime Fiction is overwhelmingly popular and yet, much of the narrative literature that involves crime of some kind or another is often not regarded as ‘literature’ at all. This course is designed to familiarise students with the contemporary critical and theoretical arguments concerning popular fiction and genre studies, as well as to enable all participants of this course to relate to the genre’s wider social, historical and political contexts while discussing the individual narratives in terms of form, language and imagery.
Seeking to promote an analytical, creative and imaginative engagement with the complexities of literary and cultural discourses, we will focus on excerpts of both detective- or transgressor-centred narratives from the second half of the 20th Century onwards. These narratives include examples of the police novel (e.g. Ian Rankin); of female detectives and the feminist appropriations of the hard-boiled story (e.g. Sara Paretsky); of the psychothriller (e.g. Patricia Highsmith), of Afro-American crime fiction, here the examination of literary representations and other cultural manifestations of the Black Diaspora, discussing the relevance of this form of genre fiction to the Black experience of American Life (e.g. Walter Mosley), of Indigenous crime fiction (e.g. Thomas King), of the postmodern mystery (e.g. Paul Auster), and of representations of disability in crime fiction (e.g. Jeffrey Deaver’s Lincoln Rhyme series).

Please register on Stud. IP and explore the sections “Information” and “Schedule” on Stud. IP. for further details.
Requirements:
  • work through the weekly self-study units;
  • in-depth knowledge of the selected reading material and course materials,
  • final exam according to module choice.

Reading materials (we will read excerpts of these novels but you are welcome to read these novels in full especially when planning a research project):
Auster, Paul. The New York Trilogy, Faber and Faber, 1987.
Deaver, Jeffrey. The Bone Collector, Hodder and Stoughton, 1997.
Highsmith, Patricia. Strangers on a Train, Vintage, 1999, 1950.
King, Thomas. The Red Power Murders: A DreadfulWater Mystery, Harper Perennial, 2006.
Mosley, Walter. Devil in a Blue Dress, Serpent's Tail, 2001, 1991.
Paretsky, Sara. Blacklist: A V.I. Warshawski Novel, Signet Book, 2004.
Rankin, Ian. Knots & Crosses: Inspector Rebus Novel, Orion, 2005, 1998.

Dr. Jana Nittel
10-M80-2-ExMo1+2-07Multimodal Markers of Irony (in englischer Sprache)

Seminar

Termine:
wöchentlich Di 14:15 - 15:45

Some people are naturals at understanding irony, while others have difficulties with "getting" it. Consider, for example, the following snippet from The Big Bang Theory:


Sheldon: I have to say, I slept splendidly. Granted, not long, but just deeply and well.
Leonard: I’m not surprised. A well known folk cure for insomnia is to break into your neighbour’s apartment and clean.
Sheldon: Sarcasm?
Leonard: You think?
Sheldon: Granted, my methods may have been somewhat unorthodox, but I think the end result will be a measurable enhancement of Penny’s quality of life.
Leonard: You know what, you’ve convinced me, maybe tonight we should sneak in and shampoo her carpet.
Sheldon: You don’t think that crosses a line?
Leonard: Yes! For God’s sake, Sheldon, do I have to hold up a sarcasm sign every time I open my mouth.
Sheldon: You have a sarcasm sign?
Leonard: No, I do not have a sarcasm sign.

The aim of this class is exactly this: we will try to figure out all sorts of markers (i.e. "sarcasm signs") that facilitate "getting" ironic remarks - not just for the Sheldons among us.
As a starter, though, we will define what irony actually is, i.e. we will define its differences from literal speech and from other kinds of non-literal speech. After that, we will address questions such as:
- Is there an ironic tone of voice?
- Are there facial expressions that indicate the speaker's intent (rolling eyes, blank face)?
- Are there differences between scripted and spontaneous dialogues?
- How is irony indicated in other forms of communication, e.g. in adverts, comics or video games?

Course requirements
3CPs: active participation
6CPs: active participation + research paper


Note: ‘active participation’ means that you do the weekly assignments I give you.

Dr. Claudia Lehmann
10-M80-2-Exmo1+2-08English in Africa

Seminar

Termine:
wöchentlich Fr 10:00 - 12:00

Einzeltermine:
Do 30.04.20 12:00 - 13:00 https://register.gotowebinar.com/register/560584209596635404?source=OEDpage

Bitte beachten: Modultyp A, B/C und D im Empirie- und Methodenmodul im Studiengang Language Sciences, M.A. Modultyp A, B/C für das Lektüremodul im Studiengang Language Sciences, M.A.


As a result of colonisation, English was transplanted to Africa and has spread over the entire African continent. It has become an official language in approximately one third of all African nations. The degree to which English is spoken as a first or second language variety in the various African countries depends mostly on the colonial history, linguistic situation, language policy and language planning programs of these countries.

In this seminar, we will investigate the historical and socio-political developments that have determined the formation of African varieties of English and we will also study the functions English serves in various African countries and speaker's attitudes towards this language.
Moreover, we will survey recent corpus-linguistic research on Africa Englishes that has provided detailed descriptions of the distinctive linguistic characteristics of particular varieties.

Depending on the assessment needed for their study program and module, students can opt for oral presentations based on extensive reading or corpus-based research projects on selected African Englishes.

Basic introductory reading:

Schneider, Edgar W. 2011. English around the World. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press. (chapters 5.2 and 6.1)

Van Rooy, Bertus. 2020. English in Africa. In Schreier, Daniel, Marianne Hundt & Edgar W. Schneider (eds.), The Cambridge Handbook of World Englishes. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 210-235.

Prof. Dr. Marcus Callies
10-M80-2-ExMo1+2-09Theoretical approaches to Cultural History (in englischer Sprache)

Seminar

Termine:
wöchentlich Do 10:15 - 11:45
Dr. Karin Esders-Angermund
10-M80-2-ExMo1+2-10Feminism, Fashion and Film (in englischer Sprache)

Seminar

Termine:
wöchentlich Mi 12:15 - 13:45
Dr. Karin Esders-Angermund
10-M80-2-ExMo1+2-11Literature: Insanity in Postcolonial Literature and Society (in englischer Sprache)

Seminar

Termine:
wöchentlich Do 16:15 - 17:45
Dr. Sukla Chatterjee
10-M80-2-ExMo1+2-12Creating and Annotating Your Own Corpus for Register-Specific Research (in englischer Sprache)

Seminar

Termine:
wöchentlich Do 12:15 - 13:45

Corpus linguistics has been an influential approach to studying language for well over 30 years. As a result, many different corpora are already available to the research community, from very large, general corpora, to highly specialized, smaller corpora. The interested scholar has a wide repository of language data at their disposal.

Researchers wishing to study new or previously understudied types of language data, however, may have difficulties finding a suitable corpus. These researchers may want to consider creating their own corpus.

This seminar introduces participants to the theoretical and practical issues involved in corpus creation. We will discuss the basic properties as well as different types of linguistic corpora. Based on this, we will learn to create our own corpora of specific English-language registers. In addition, we will learn how to annotate our corpora, enriching them with linguistic or non-linguistic information to facilitate our analyses. Among other things, we will learn how to compile small corpora of...

  • Twitter tweets
  • pop music lyrics
  • online newspaper articles
  • WhatsApp conversations
  • academic articles

For graded credit, participants will compile a small corpus of a register of their choice, and document the compilation process in writing. Participants are encouraged to think of registers that meet their own research interests, and we will work on a strategy to compile a suitable corpus.

Participants should have solid computer skills. Familiarity with corpus-linguistic software and tools (e.g. AntConc, UAM CorpusTool) is expected. Familiarity with the R programming environment is an advantage.
This seminar will take place in the CIP computer lab (and not in the room indicated on Stud.IP).

Steffen Schaub, M.A.
10-M80-2-ExMo1+2-14Multimodal Narratives, Genre and Ideology (in englischer Sprache)

Blockveranstaltung

Einzeltermine:
Fr 17.04.20 12:00 - 14:00
Sa 06.06.20 09:00 - 18:00
Sa 20.06.20 09:00 - 18:00
Sa 04.07.20 09:00 - 18:00

In the last decades, critical discourse analysis has moved from the verbal mode toward multimedia and multimodal artefacts. In this seminar we will cover the principal critical discourse approaches to textuality, addressing how these approaches can be extended to analyse narrative presented in visual and audiovisual text such as films, comics, graphic novels and interactive storytelling. After introducing the critical discourse methods, we will address how these methods can be used to construct systematic structures for reflecting media users’ prediction of narrative and genre. Moreover, we will employ the discourse approach to systematically unpack socio-political ideologies embedded in the multimodal texts. We will then explore how different media and genres achieve emotional, immersive and persuasive purposes of these ideologies in different ways drawing on the different media affordances and constraints.

Prof. John Arnold Bateman, Ph.D.
Dr. Chiao-I Tseng
10-M80-2-ExMo1+2-15Text, Learning and Digital Media

Seminar

Termine:
wöchentlich Fr 14:15 - 15:45 (2 SWS)

In this course we deal with several issues and debates with regard to using dynamic, interactive media and digital texts for teaching and learning. In particular, we will focus on how texts from different subjects of science and humanities benefit from multimedia materials in different and similar ways. We will start this course with the methods for analysing information representation. We will then examine the relations between information representation and interactive media such as book apps, interactive narratives, online audiovisual texts. We will particularly discuss to what degree media technologies influence the teaching and learning processes in different subjects, when these technologies are employed in the teaching materials. The participants are required to draft research questions on the issues with regard to texts and media, and then address the questions by employing the analytical methods introduced in this course.

Prof. John Arnold Bateman, Ph.D.
Dr. Chiao-I Tseng
10-M80-2-ExMo2-06Language Learning, Teaching and Assessment in the Context of Migration, Integration and Immigration (in englischer Sprache)

Blockveranstaltung
ECTS: 3 oder 6

Einzeltermine:
Mo 27.04.20 10:00 - 14:00
Mo 18.05.20 10:00 - 14:00
Mo 25.05.20 10:00 - 14:00
Mo 22.06.20 10:00 - 14:00
Mo 29.06.20 10:00 - 14:00
Mo 06.07.20 10:00 - 14:00
Mo 13.07.20 10:00 - 14:00

Content
In the current area of increasing migration, foreign language learning is gaining momentum, as acquir-ing the target language is widely understood as one means to enable newly arrived migrants integra-tion and participation. In the seminar, we will examine recent research and practical projects to en-hance our understanding of the role language proficiency can play in the process of integration. We will also explore “best practice” examples to understand the conditions under which languages in im-migration contexts can successfully be taught and acquired.
Within the realm of language teaching and learning, language tests are coming under scrutiny, as they are used and abused as gate keeping devices and as policy instruments to regulate entry and access. We will critically discuss ethical implications of different kinds of language test use. By reviewing recent research projects and studies, we will deepen our understanding of the purposes language tests could and should serve in integration and migration contexts in order to ensure fairness, justice and ethical values.
You will have the opportunity to become familiar with current research and teaching projects in my working group and at the languages centre. You will also have the chance to explore a relevant aspect of your choice in more depths and present your findings in the seminar.

Dates
We meet on the following seven Mondays, in room GW2, A3220, from 10:15am to 13:45pm.
This way we have enough space to engage in group work and discussions.
First session: 27.4.2020 18.5.2020 25.5.2020
22.6.2020 29.6.2020 6.7.2020 13.7.2020

Initial reading
McNamara, T. & Shoamy, E. 2008. Language tests and human rights. International Journal of Applied Linguistics. 18, 89-95.
Pulinx, R., Van Avermaet, P., & Extramiana, C.: Linguistic integration of adult migrants: policy and prac-tice. Final report on the 3rd Council of Europe survey. Council of Europe, 2014. Available online: https://rm.coe.int/16802fc1ce
UN (2018): Global Compact for Migration, available online https://www.un.org/pga/72/wp-content/uploads/sites/51/2018/07/migration.pdf

Prerequisites for a successful completion of the seminar
For 3 ECTS points (GS and MA ESC “unbenotete Studienleistung”, FD3 “benotete Prüfungsleistung”)
1. Regular and active participation in preparatory tasks, seminar groups, discussions, and team-work.
2. Preparatory reading of the assigned texts and preparation of the tasks that will be published in advance on StudIP.
3. Presentation of a project/issue/document on a relevant aspect of the seminar.
For 6 ECTS points (GS and MA ESC, “benotete Prfungsleistung”)
4. In addition, a 9-10 page written academic documentation of the project, incl. literature review, rationale and implications.
Further reading
Beacco, J., Krumm, H., Little, D. & Thalgott, P. (eds). 2017. The Linguistic Integration of Adult Migrants / L’intégration linguistique des migrants adultes. Some lessons from research / Les enseignements de la recherche. DE GRUYTER MOUTON. Available online: https://www.degruyter.com/viewbooktoc/product/472830
Council of Europe, Linguistic Integration of Adult Migrants: www.coe.int/de/web/lang-migrants
Council of Europe, Language Support for Adult Refugees: https://www.coe.int/en/web/language-support-for-adult-refugees
Harding, L., Brunfaut, T. & Unger, J. 2019. Language Testing in the ‘Hostile Environment’: The Discur-sive Construction of ‘Secure English Language Testing’ in the UK. Applied Linguistics, Online first doi:10.1093/applin/amz017, https://academic.oup.com/applij/advance-article-pdf/doi/10.1093/applin/amz017/28601704/amz017.pdf
Heckmann, F. (2008). Education and the integration of migrants: challenges for European education sys-tems arisingfrom immigration and strategies for the successful integration of migrant children in Europe-an schools and societies. (NESSE Analytical Report, 1). Bamberg: europäisches forum für migrationsstu-dien (efms) Institut an der UniversitätBamberg. https://nbn-resolving.org/urn:nbn:de:0168-ssoar-192500
Hogan-Brun, G., Mar-Molinero, C. & Stevenson, P. (eds) 2009. Discourses on Language and Integration: Critical Perspectives on Language Testing Regimes in Europe. John Benjamins Publishing Company.
McNamara, T. F., Khan, K. & Frost, K. 2015. Language tests for residency and citizenship and the con-ferring of individuality. In: Bernard Spolsky, Ofra Inbar-Lourie, Michal Tannenbaum (eds) Challenges for language education and policy: Making space for people, 11-22.
Pulinx, R., Van Avermaet, P. & Extramiana, C.: Linguistic integration of adult migrants: policy and prac-tice. Final report on the 3rd Council of Europe survey. Council of Europe, 2014. Available online: https://rm.coe.int/16802fc1ce
Roever, C. & McNamara, T. 2006. Language Testing: The Social Dimension. Blackwell Publishers.
Shohamy, E. 2001. The power of tests: A critical perspective of the uses of language tests. Harlow: Longman.
Shohamy, E. 2006. Language policy: Hidden agendas and new approaches. Routledge: London.
Shohamy, E. 2011. Assessing multilingual competencies: Adopting construct valid assessment policies. The Modern Language Journal 95(3), 418-429.
Shohamy, E. 2013. The discourse of language testing as a tool for shaping national, global, and trans-national identities. Language and intercultural communication (13)2, 1-12.
Shohamy, E. & McNamara, T. 2009. Language tests for citizenship, immigration, and asylum. Language Assessment Quarterly 6, 1–5.
Spolsky, B., Inbar-Lourie, O. & Tannenbaum, M. 2015. (eds.): Challenges for Language Education and Policy: Making Space for People. New York: Routledge.
UN: https://news.un.org/en/story/2018/12/1028041
UN Global compact on refugees: https://www.unhcr.org/towards-a-global-compact-on-refugees.html
Van Avermaet, P. 2009. Fortress Europe? Language policy regimes for immigration and citizenship. In: Hogan-Brun, Mar-Molinero & Stevenson (eds). s. above.

Prof. Dr. Claudia Harsch

AWE 1 - Academic Work Experience 1 (9CP)

In this module students will choose two seminars either from different profile areas or from only one profile area to specialise in the respective field of interest.
Read more... https://blogs.uni-bremen.de/maesc/modules/

Modulbeauftragter: Marcus Callies
VAKTitel der VeranstaltungDozentIn
10-M80-2-AWE1-03Unthinking the HUMANities: An International Symposium (in englischer Sprache)

Colloquium
ECTS: 1-2

Einzeltermine:
Fr 11.09.20 14:00 - 22:00 GW2 B3009 (Großer Studierraum)
Fr 11.09.20 14:00 - 22:00 GW2 B3010 (Kleiner Studierraum)
Sa 12.09.20 08:00 - 20:00 GW2 B3009 (Großer Studierraum)
Sa 12.09.20 08:00 - 20:00 GW2 B3010 (Kleiner Studierraum)

*PLEASE NOTE: Due to the current health crisis, we are postponing our international symposium to September 11 and 12, 2020. We hope that by time our guests from Germany, Europe and around the world will be able to travel to Bremen again safely and that larger gatherings like this will be again allowed and safe to conduct for all those involved. This postponement is of course subject to change and we reserve the right to cancel the event if necessary. We apologize for the inconvenience.*

Students of the Master program English-Speaking Cultures are invited to participate in the organization of the international symposium “Unthinking the HUMANities” organized by E-SC faculty Dr. Karin Esders, Samira Spatzek, and Paula von Gleich. Students will receive 1-2 CP for the module AWE1 for supporting the organization of the symposium and submitting a 1-2 page written report on their activities and experiences.
The symposium Unthinking the HUMANities will be held at the University of Bremen, September 11 and 12, 2020. It will bring together German and international experts and emerging scholars to (re-)evaluate ‘the Human’ and its self-possessed sociability as a category in the ‘Humanities’ from various (inter)disciplinary, theoretical, and methodological perspectives in American Studies, Atlantic Studies, Black Diaspora Studies, Gender and Queer Studies, Postcolonial Studies, Critical Race and Critical Whiteness Studies, and related fields. Such critical (re-)examination is urgent not only in the face of nationalist-populist and outright anti-feminist, anti-LGBTQIA, and racist political powers in North America and Europe but also under the auspices of their long dureé formations in anti-blackness, hetero-patriarchy, and (settler) colonialism across the Atlantic sphere and throughout various other borderlands (such as the US-Mexican border and the Mediterranean). Western modernity’s subject, whose freedoms are both generated by enslavist and gendered practices in the Atlantic world and bound by modernity’s regimes of private property, continues to renew its universalist reign in these contexts. The symposium’s location in the trade city of Bremen and its 1970s reform university seem more than apt for such an reassessment with the city’s neglected history of entanglement with and investments in transatlantic slave-trading economies and processes of colonization as well as the university’s roots in radical leftism in Germany and its current neoliberal restructuring into an explicitly European, international, and ‘diversity’-conscious place of research and learning.
We are particularly interested in opening up an interdisciplinary exchange about the Humanities as a field of various knowledge productions that urgently require epistemological scrutiny. Cultural forms of expression, such as music, literature, film, the visual and performative arts, as well as other historical archives, and their critical analyses play a crucial role in unthinking and destabilizing the field’s assumed ‘Human’ subject. Fugitivity, resistance, contradiction(s), and refusal as well as other forms and perspectives from social life deemed less or other than ‘Human’ take center stage in this context.
MA E-SC students enrolling in this module will support the organization of the symposium in various ways (e.g. registration of participants, organization of reception, lunch and coffee breaks, assisting presenters etc.). Students will also have the opportunity to attend the symposium’s keynotes and panels as audience members.
After enrolment, participants will manually be selected and are given additional information.
If you have any questions, please contact Paula von Gleich (paulavgleich@uni-bremen.de).

Dr. Karin Esders-Angermund
Paula von Gleich, M.A.
Samira Spatzek, M.A.

ReMo - Research Module (9 CP)

In this module, students prepare their MA thesis with regard to content and methodology.
Read more... https://blogs.uni-bremen.de/maesc/modules/

Modulbeauftragte: Claudia Harsch
VAKTitel der VeranstaltungDozentIn
10-76-6-GS-01Research Colloquium for Post-Docs, Doctoral Students and Advanced Students (in englischer Sprache)

Colloquium

Termine:
wöchentlich Mi 12:15 - 13:45 GW2 B1170 (2 SWS)

This course is designed as a colloquium for young researchers writing their MA, PhD or postdoctoral thesis. Depending on particpants and their research topics, we will read theoretical texts suggested by the participants. Participants are invited to present their research topic, proposal, table of contents and/or written chapters and get constructive feedback in plenum discussions.
Pls register online through StudIP. MAx number of participants: 15
Due to the corona pandemic, this course will propably take place as an online course.

Prof. Dr. Kerstin Knopf
10-M80-6-GS-02Research Colloquium for MA and PhD Students (in englischer Sprache)

Colloquium
ECTS: 9

Termine:
wöchentlich Do 09:00 - 11:00

This is a research colloquium for MA and PhD students who are planning on writing or are are currently working on their final theses in the fields of (applied) English linguistics, World Englishes or SLA.

Prof. Dr. Marcus Callies
10-M80-6-GS-03Research Colloquium for MA and PhD students (in englischer Sprache)

Colloquium

Termine:
wöchentlich Di 09:00 - 10:30

In the colloquium, we discuss research projects that PhD and MA students are currently pursuing.

Prof. Dr. Claudia Harsch

MaThe - Master Thesis (30 CP)

Upon completion of the module, students have written their master thesis and they are familiar with:
Read more... https://blogs.uni-bremen.de/maesc/modules/

Modulbeauftragte: Kerstin Knopf
VAKTitel der VeranstaltungDozentIn
10-76-6-AP-04Begleitveranstaltung Kulturgeschichte (in englischer Sprache)

Colloquium

Termine:
wöchentlich Di 16:15 - 17:45

This colloquium is designed for Bachelor students planning to write their BA-thesis in the field of cultural history. We will discuss theoretical and methodological approaches, develop outlines and structures as well as strong thesis statements in order to focus your search for information, to tackle your subject and to specify your argument. Students will be expected to present and discuss their project in various stages of progression both in class as well as in individual monitoring sessions.
We will follow the MLA Handbook for Writers of Research Papers, eighth edition.

Dr. Karin Esders-Angermund
10-76-6-AP-06Begleitveranstaltung Sprachwissenschaft: Text, Discourse and Multimodality: Methods and Topics (in englischer Sprache)

Seminar

Termine:
wöchentlich Do 16:15 - 17:45 (2 SWS)

This colloquium is designed for Bachelor, Masters and early doctoral students planning to write their thesis in the field of multimodal linguistics and its application to treatments of mixed media artefacts or performances: for example, film, comics, graphic novels, advertisements and so on. Particularly focused are areas where language (spoken or written) works together with visual representations of any kind or even where language takes a subordinate role. We will discuss theoretical and methodological approaches for characterising combinations of language and visual and other information, develop outlines and structures of the thesis, and consider how to construct strong thesis statements in order to focus your search for information, to tackle your subject and to construct your argument. Students will be expected to present and discuss their projects in various stages of progression both in class as well as in individual monitoring sessions as well as to give input to others. Standard styles of presenting work within linguistics will be discussed as well as ways of addressing and analysing data and showing that analyses are adequate.

Prof. John Arnold Bateman, Ph.D.
Dr. Chiao-I Tseng
10-76-6-AP-1Begleitmodul Literaturwissenschaft (in englischer Sprache)

Seminar

Termine:
wöchentlich Fr 10:00 - 12:00 (2 SWS)

This module is one of the colloquia designed for Bachelor and Master students writing their thesis in the field of literature or film studies. We shall look at a number of strategies for planning, structuring and producing longer pieces of work, and this programme will also include formal issues such as format and layout of the final assignment. At some point during the semester, you will be expected to present a structure of your thesis project and a selected part of it to the whole group.
In view of my expertise, I can offer to supervise BA- and MA-theses in the following areas:

British theatre and drama, including the work of William Shakespeare,
the literature of the 20th and 21st century,
and film.

Prior enrolment via Stud.IP is mandatory. Since no more than 10 students can participate in the final course, early registration is strongly recommended.


Requirements:
Regular attendance and oral participation
Oral presentation and handout

Please note that this course is a cell phone, WhatsApp and email free zone. Prior enrolment via Stud.IP is mandatory. The enrolment period ends on March 15. The number of participants is limited to 10 students.

Prof. Dr. Norbert Schaffeld
10-76-6-GS-01Research Colloquium for Post-Docs, Doctoral Students and Advanced Students (in englischer Sprache)

Colloquium

Termine:
wöchentlich Mi 12:15 - 13:45 GW2 B1170 (2 SWS)

This course is designed as a colloquium for young researchers writing their MA, PhD or postdoctoral thesis. Depending on particpants and their research topics, we will read theoretical texts suggested by the participants. Participants are invited to present their research topic, proposal, table of contents and/or written chapters and get constructive feedback in plenum discussions.
Pls register online through StudIP. MAx number of participants: 15
Due to the corona pandemic, this course will propably take place as an online course.

Prof. Dr. Kerstin Knopf
10-76-6-P-03Begleitveranstaltung Literaturwissenschaft - Research Colloquium in English Literatures (in englischer Sprache)
(B.A. and M.A. dissertations)

Colloquium

Termine:
wöchentlich Mi 16:15 - 17:45 (2 SWS)

Online course in the summer term 2020 – Due to the COVID 19 pandemic we will not meet in class – please ignore the time slot listed above.
This course is one of the specific colloquia designed for students planning their final dissertation either on undergraduate or graduate level in the field of literary studies (Module choices: Bachelor thesis module P or Master thesis module MA The). We shall look at a number of strategies for planning, structuring and writing longer pieces of work and this programme will also include formal issues such as format and layout of the final assignment. Please register on Stud. IP and explore the sections “Information” and “Schedule” on Stud. IP. for further details.
All students, who are planning to write their final dissertations in the field of literary studies, are welcome to join my course. In addition, I am happy to take on the role of a supervisor or co-supervisor for projects that correspond to my research and teaching focus, in other words, students who have a supervisor or co-supervisor that is not me are also welcome to join this course.

Dr. Jana Nittel
10-M80-6-GS-02Research Colloquium for MA and PhD Students (in englischer Sprache)

Colloquium
ECTS: 9

Termine:
wöchentlich Do 09:00 - 11:00

This is a research colloquium for MA and PhD students who are planning on writing or are are currently working on their final theses in the fields of (applied) English linguistics, World Englishes or SLA.

Prof. Dr. Marcus Callies
10-M80-6-GS-03Research Colloquium for MA and PhD students (in englischer Sprache)

Colloquium

Termine:
wöchentlich Di 09:00 - 10:30

In the colloquium, we discuss research projects that PhD and MA students are currently pursuing.

Prof. Dr. Claudia Harsch