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Veranstaltungsverzeichnis

Lehrveranstaltungen SoSe 2022

English-Speaking Cultures / Englisch, B.A.

LEHRVERANSTALTUNGEN DES 1. JAHRES (PO 2011)

Basismodul A: Englische Literaturwissenschaft (6 CP)

6 CP (3 CP + 3 CP)

Modulbeauftragte/r: Dr. Jana Nittel, jnittel@uni-bremen.de
VAKTitel der VeranstaltungDozentIn
10-76-2-Basismodul A-01Introduction to English Literatures (Part II) (3 CP) Englischsprachig (in englischer Sprache)

Seminar
ECTS: 3

Termine:
wöchentlich Mo 14:15 - 15:45 MZH 1380/1400

Teaching method: We will meet in weekly face to face sessions on campus. You will need access to Stud.IP. and a laptop or tablet with sound and audio capabilities.

This introductory course will attempt to offer students access to literary studies in English at university level and try to balance scholarly considerations with aesthetic enjoyment. As this is a continuation of the foundation module course “Introduction to English Literatures, Part I”, students will review the methodology of poetry, drama and narrative analysis. Having gathered historical and textual skills in dealing with various genres, this course will explore a considerable range of theoretical key concepts in literary and cultural studies.

Please register on Stud. IP and explore the sections “Information” and “Schedule” on Stud. IP. for further details. Strongly recommended, but not mandatory: Please sign up on Stud. IP. for our weekly Zoom tutorial sessions offered by a tutor “10-76-2-Basismodul A-02 Exercises: Tutorial: Introduction to English Literatures (Part II)” Friday 10:15 a. m. – 11:45 a. m. - https://elearning.uni-bremen.de/dispatch.php/course/details?sem_id=3bea7a5a10d859695e1b005e9016ed62
Requirements:
• Interest in the topics discussed and ideally a regular attendance and informed participation in class discussion (not part of your formal assessment);
• in-depth knowledge of the selected reading material and course materials,
• final written test at Test Center (University Boulevard)

Dr. Jana Nittel
10-76-2-Basismodul A-02Tutorial: Introduction to English Literatures (Part II) Englischsprachig (Zoom Only) (in englischer Sprache)

Übung
ECTS: 3

Termine:
wöchentlich Fr 10:15 - 11:45 Externer Ort: online

These tutorial sessions correspond to the weekly study units of the course "Foundation Module A: Introduction to English Literature (Part 2) and will provide participants with the opportunity to ask questions regarding the weekly theoretical explorations and cultural movements, complete excercises and quizz sessions as exam preparation.
Students may gain credit points for General Studies.

Dr. Jana Nittel
Merle Marie Meyer ((TT))

Basismodul B: Englische Sprachwissenschaft (6 CP)

6 CP (3 CP + 3 CP)

Modulbeauftragte/r: Prof. Dr. John Bateman, bateman@uni-bremen.de
VAKTitel der VeranstaltungDozentIn
10-76-4-B-01Introduction to English Linguistics 2 - Research Methods (in englischer Sprache)

Seminar

Termine:
wöchentlich Mi 10:15 - 11:45 SFG 1020

This course continues the general introduction to English Linguistics from last semester, focusing on how to do empirical work in linguistics. Students will be introduced to the different ways, methods and tools to obtain, process and analyze linguistic data. The following topics will be covered: research methodology and design, types of data collection, experiments, corpus linguistics, online dictionaries, transcription, and quantitative approaches to data analysis.

Coursework and assessment

You are expected to read and prepare selected texts for each session. The coursework will focus on real-life linguistic data and exercises which are designed to help you apply selected methods and tools and critically discuss their usefulness. You are required to submit a portfolio comprising different data-based tasks ("worksheets") and other assignments that will be worked on in the course of the semester.


Basic introductory textbooks

Sealey, A. (2010), Researching English Language. A resource book for students. London: Routledge.
Wray, A. & A. Bloomer (2012), Projects in Linguistics and Language Studies. 3rd edition. London: Hodder Education.
E-book at http://lib.myilibrary.com/Open.aspx?id=368803

Nicole Hober, M.A.
10-76-4-B-03Introduction to English Linguistics 2 - Research Methods (in englischer Sprache)

Seminar

Termine:
wöchentlich Mi 14:15 - 15:45 GW2 B2890

This course continues the Introduction to English Linguistics 1 from last semester, focusing on how to do empirical work in linguistics. We will look at the basic requirement to do empirical studies, and different ways to collect linguistic data. We will investigate existing sources like corpora and dictionaries, and learn how to analyze and interpret language data.

In the course of the semester, there will be reading assignments and databased tasks in the form of worksheets that address a certain empirical problem and that you need to tackle by making use of one of the research methods that we have introduced and worked with in class. You will choose two out of three reading assignments and three worksheets ⇐ five pieces) to work on and complete throughout the semester.
Should we not be able to meet for classes on campus, then this class will be category C1 Asynchronous online learning, meaning no video meetings at any time. You work on the tasks in your own pace and place.

Literature
Wray, Alison & Aileen Bloomer. 2012. Projects in Linguistics and Language Studies: A Practical Guide to Researching Language. 3rd ed. Hodder Education. Available as e-book from the library.

Dr. Anke Schulz
10-76-4-B-04Introduction to English Linguistics 2 - Research Methods (in englischer Sprache)

Seminar

Termine:
wöchentlich Di 10:15 - 11:45 GW2 B1400 NUR Mo. + Di.

This course continues the general introduction to English Linguistics from last semester, focusing on how to do empirical research in linguistics. You will be introduced to research methodology and design, different types of data collection and preparation, and approaches to data analysis. You are expected to read and prepare selected texts for each session. The coursework will focus on real-life linguistic data and exercises which are designed to help you apply selected methods and tools and critically discuss their usefulness. Throughout the semester, you will work on different data-based tasks which you will submit in the form of a portfolio.

Basic introductory textbooks:
Sealey, A. (2010). Researching English Language. A resource book for students. Routledge.
Voelkel, S., & Kretzschmar, F. (Eds.) (2021). Introducing Linguistic Research. Cambridge University Press. E-book available at https://doi.org/10.1017/9781316884485
Wray, A., & Bloomer, A. (2012). Projects in Linguistics and Language Studies (3rd ed.). Hodder Education. E-book at http://lib.myilibrary.com/Open.aspx?id=368803

Dr. Ramona Kreis

Basismodul C: Kultur- und Sprachgeschichte der englischsprachigen Welt (6 CP)

6 CP (3 CP + 3 CP)

Modulbeauftragte/r: Dr. Karin Esders, esders@uni-bremen.de und Dr. Inke Du Bois, dubois@uni-bremen.de
VAKTitel der VeranstaltungDozentIn
10-76-6-C-01Key Moments in the Linguistic History of the English-Speaking World (in englischer Sprache)

Seminar

Termine:
wöchentlich Do 14:15 - 15:45 NW2 A0242 (Stufenhörsaal)

In this course we will look at some key historical events that have impacted the historical development, global expansion and diversification of the English language around the world. The course aims to help you to understand and explain how the linguistic development of the English language is related to events in the political and social history of the British Isles and beyond, and, as a future teacher, how apparent irregularities in Present-Day English (PDE) which are, in many cases, remnants of earlier, regular patterns, can be explained historically. I the second part of the course we will examine the global expansion and diversification of English in various cultural contexts that has given rise to an enormous linguistic variation across English-speaking cultures around the world.

For an entertaining and insightful quick introduction see the series of short videos "The History of English in Ten Minutes" produced by the Open University: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLA03075BAD88B909E

Prof. Dr. Marcus Callies
10-76-6-C-02Key Moments in the Linguistic History of the English-Speaking World (in englischer Sprache)

Seminar

Termine:
wöchentlich Do 12:15 - 13:45 SFG 1030 GW2 A3390 (CIP-Labor FB 10) GW2 B2890

In this seminar, students get an introduction to the history of English, i.e. Old English, Middle English and Early Modern English. This class includes weekly discussions and tasks. In the second half of the seminar, we continue to study the historical events, current status of major varieties and differences of world varieties from North America, Australia to Africa and Asia with a focus on their structural and phonological features. We will follow the debates about English as a cause of language death, and talk about the place of English in language policies and language planning.

Dr. Inke Du Bois
10-76-6-C-03Key Moments in the Linguistic History of the English-Speaking World (in englischer Sprache)

Seminar

Termine:
wöchentlich Do 10:15 - 11:45 NW1 S1260

IIn this seminar, students get an introduction to the history of English, i.e. Old English, Middle English and Early Modern English. This class includes weekly discussions and tasks. In the second half of the seminar, we continue to study the historical events, current status of major varieties and differences of world varieties from North America, Australia to Africa and Asia with a focus on their structural and phonological features. We will follow the debates about English as a cause of language death, and talk about the place of English in language policies and language planning.

Dr. Inke Du Bois
10-76-6-C-04Key Moments in the Linguistic History of the English-Speaking World (in englischer Sprache)

Seminar

Termine:
wöchentlich Di 10:15 - 11:45 GW2 B2890

In this seminar, students get an introduction to the history of English, i.e. Old English, Middle English and Early Modern English. This class includes weekly discussions and tasks. In the second half of the seminar, we continue to study the historical events, current status of major varieties and differences of world varieties from North America, Australia to Africa and Asia with a focus on their structural and phonological features. We will follow the debates about English as a cause of language death, and talk about the place of English in language policies and language planning.

Dr. Inke Du Bois

SP-1 Basismodul: Sprachpraxis/Practical Language Foundation Module (Part 2) (6 CP) (nur für das Sommersemester)

6 CP (3 CP + 3 CP)

Modulbeauftragte/: Anne Kirkham, kirkham@uni-bremen.de

Core ULS2 language classes for BA „E-SC“ - 1st year, Semester 2 („Basismodul Sprachpraxis“ SP-1 BAPO 2011, Part 2)
N.B. This class has TWO parts; you MUST attend BOTH the a AND the b part of the SAME class (i.e. 2-1a + 2-1b OR 2-2a + 2-2b OR 2-3a + 2-3b etc.)
VAKTitel der VeranstaltungDozentIn
10-76-2-SP1-01University Language Skills 2-1

Übung

Termine:
wöchentlich Di 08:15 - 11:45 GW1 B1070

University Language Skills 2 (ULS 2) is a four-hour class. You have to attend the entire class. ULS 2 is the second half of the SP-1 module. As such it builds on the basic knowledge of academic writing established in ULS 1.

While the focus during the winter semester is on the basic structure of an academic essay, during the summer semester you will be introduced to key rhetorical strategies. These strategies include essays of argumentation, cause & effect as well as comparison & contrast. Furthermore, grammatical structures needed for writing (e.g. syntax, passive voice, conditionals) will be part of the course’s syllabus.

Requirements:
• Regular and active participation
• Thorough preparation of each session
• Written assignments (approx. 2000 words)

Materials are provided via StudIP

Dr. Vanessa Herrmann
10-76-2-SP1-02University Language Skills 2-2

Übung

Termine:
wöchentlich Mi 12:15 - 15:45 Externer Ort: online

NOTE: This course takes place online (Zoom).

University Language Skills 2 (ULS 2) is a four-hour class. You have to attend the entire class. ULS 2 is the second half of the SP-1 module. As such it builds on the basic knowledge of academic writing established in ULS 1.

While the focus during the winter semester is on the basic structure of an academic essay, during the summer semester you will be introduced to key rhetorical strategies. These strategies include essays of argumentation, cause & effect as well as comparison & contrast. Furthermore, grammatical structures needed for writing (e.g. syntax, passive voice, conditionals) will be part of the course’s syllabus.

Requirements:
• Regular and active participation
• Thorough preparation of each session
• Written assignments (approx. 2000 words)

Materials are provided via StudIP

Dr. Vanessa Herrmann
10-76-2-SP1-03University Language Skills 2-3

Übung

Termine:
wöchentlich Do 08:15 - 11:45 GW1 B0080 GW2 B1170

University Language Skills 2 (ULS 2) is a four-hour class. You have to attend the entire class. ULS 2 is the second half of the SP-1 module. As such it builds on the basic knowledge of academic writing established in ULS 1.

While the focus during the winter semester is on the basic structure of an academic essay, during the summer semester you will be introduced to key rhetorical strategies. These strategies include essays of argumentation, cause & effect as well as comparison & contrast. Furthermore, grammatical structures needed for writing (e.g. syntax, passive voice, conditionals) will be part of the course’s syllabus.

Requirements:
• Regular and active participation
• Thorough preparation of each session
• Written assignments (approx. 2000 words)

Materials are provided via StudIP

Dr. Vanessa Herrmann
10-76-2-SP1-04University Language Skills 2-4

Übung
ECTS: 6

Termine:
wöchentlich Mi 08:00 - 10:00 GW2 B3010 (Kleiner Studierraum)
wöchentlich Mi 16:00 - 18:00 Externer Ort: Online

Einzeltermine:
Mi 18.05.22 08:00 - 09:45 GW2 B3010 (Kleiner Studierraum)

University Language Skills 2 is the second part of the SP1 module and will earn you a total of 6CPs. It is a four-hour class with two consecutive time slots, both of which MUST be attended.
The following seminar will build on skills acquired in ULS1. We will review and further develop writing skills regarding the different phases in writing, essay structure and good writing style. In addition, we will explore and develop more complex writing strategies including problem/solution, argumentation, cause/effect, and comparison/contrast.
Emphasis will be placed on the ability to recognize individual errors and work on challenging aspects of language. You will therefore continue to work on grammar and lexis at an individual, needs-based level and will be able to access self-study material to work on independently according to your own requirements outside of the classroom. This is essential in developing an autonomous learning style which will subsequently enable you to critically assess and correct your own work.
Students will be required to hand in TWO assignments based on TWO different writing strategies dealt with during the semester. These assignments will be graded and constitute the grade for the SP1 module. In addition, you will be expected to attend class regularly and actively participate in group discussions and activities. Task assigned to be completed between sessions must also be completed on time.
This class is planned to take place on campus.

Lisa Nehls, M.A.
10-76-2-SP1-05University Language Skills 2-5

Übung
ECTS: 6

Termine:
wöchentlich Fr 10:15 - 13:45 GW2 B2890

University Language Skills 2 is the second part of the SP1 module and will earn you a total of 6CPs. It is a four-hour class with two consecutive time slots, both of which MUST be attended.
The following seminar will build on skills acquired in ULS1. We will review and further develop writing skills regarding the different phases in writing, essay structure and good writing style. In addition, we will explore and develop more complex writing strategies including problem/solution, argumentation, cause/effect, and comparison/contrast.
Emphasis will be placed on the ability to recognize individual errors and work on challenging aspects of language. You will therefore continue to work on grammar and lexis at an individual, needs-based level and will be able to access self-study material to work on independently according to your own requirements outside of the classroom. This is essential in developing an autonomous learning style which will subsequently enable you to critically assess and correct your own work.
Students will be required to hand in TWO assignments based on TWO different writing strategies dealt with during the semester. These assignments will be graded and constitute the grade for the SP1 module. In addition, you will be expected to attend class regularly and actively participate in group discussions and activities. Task assigned to be completed between sessions must also be completed on time.
This class is planned to take place on campus.

Lisa Nehls, M.A.
10-76-2-SP1-06University Language Skills 2-6

Übung
ECTS: 6

Termine:
wöchentlich Di 10:15 - 13:45 GW1 B2130 GW1 B0080

Course description
University Language Skills 2 ⇐ ULS 2) forms the second part of the 'SP-1 Basismodul Sprachpraxis'
It is a FOUR-hour class (4 SWS; 6 CP for ULS 2 - 8ab) with TWO consecutive time slots each week. This ULS 2 class is taught as a four-hour block, while others might be offered with two separate two-hour time slots.

Coursework
Having practiced the planning and structuring of academic essays in “ULS 1” last semester, you will now be moving on to explore different key writing strategies. Starting with the yet familiar descriptive writing, you will then familiarise yourself with other strategies, for example problem/solution, cause & effect, comparison & contrast and argumentation. Analysing a wide variety of texts will improve your reading skills, while applying the key strategies as well as aspects of cohesion and coherence to your own texts will help you practice and develop your own academic style in writing.
Additionally, mini-group peer review will give you (and your readers) the opportunity to evaluate and improve your reading and listening skills in terms of audience-focus and reader-friendliness.

Course requirements
  • regular attendance and active participation in class
  • active participation in discussions
  • thorough preparation of each class session
  • completion of homework tasks and self-study work
  • a portfolio comprised of two written assignments based on two different writing strategies (all in all ca. 1500-2000 words). These assignments will be graded and constitute the grade for the SP1 module.

Required Literature
Meyers, Alan Longman. Academic Writing Series (level 5) - Essays to Research Papers. Pearson: 2014 (or the newer edition). Print and E-Reader edition available (print copy available in the library for reference). Discount code negotiable (see StudiP).
Additional hand-out material provided via StudIP.

Further recommended material for language work
McCarthy, Michael & Felicity O’Dell. Academic Vocabulary in Use
Cornell, Alan & Geoff Parkes. What’s the Difference? Englang Books (online quizzes available)
Langenscheidt/Longman Dictionary of Contemporary English OR the Cornelsen/Oxford University Press, Advanced Learner’s Dictionary, including the electronic version (CD or DVD as appropriate) or a comparable learner's dictionary.

To earn credit for the SP-1 MODULE (9 CP in total), you are required
  • to have completed University Language Skills 1 (portfolio comprising of written assignments of 800-1000 words; 3 CP)
  • to earn 60% or more on written assignments given in ULS 2 (1500-2000 words; 6 CP).

NB: To have the graded course requirements (Prüfungsleistung) for the SP-1 module recognised, you are required to register on PABO in the semester in which you intend to successfully complete the module (usually the summer semester).

Katja Müller, M.A.
10-76-2-SP1-07University Language Skills 2-7

Übung
ECTS: 6

Termine:
wöchentlich Fr 10:15 - 13:45 GW1 A1260 GW1 A0010

Course description
University Language Skills 2 ⇐ ULS 2) forms the second part of the 'SP-1 Basismodul Sprachpraxis'
It is a FOUR-hour class (4 SWS; 6 CP for ULS 2 - 8ab) with TWO consecutive time slots each week. This ULS 2 class is taught as a four-hour block, while others might be offered with two separate two-hour time slots.

Coursework
Having practiced the planning and structuring of academic essays in “ULS 1” last semester, you will now be moving on to explore different key writing strategies. Starting with the yet familiar descriptive writing, you will then familiarise yourself with other strategies, for example problem/solution, cause & effect, comparison & contrast and argumentation. Analysing a wide variety of texts will improve your reading skills, while applying the key strategies as well as aspects of cohesion and coherence to your own texts will help you practice and develop your own academic style in writing.
Additionally, mini-group peer review will give you (and your readers) the opportunity to evaluate and improve your reading and listening skills in terms of audience-focus and reader-friendliness.

Course requirements
  • regular attendance and active participation in class
  • active participation in discussions
  • thorough preparation of each class session
  • completion of homework tasks and self-study work
  • a portfolio comprised of two written assignments based on two different writing strategies (all in all ca. 1500-2000 words). These assignments will be graded and constitute the grade for the SP1 module.

Required Literature
Meyers, Alan Longman. Academic Writing Series (level 5) - Essays to Research Papers. Pearson: 2014 (or the newer edition). Print and E-Reader edition available (print copy available in the library for reference). Discount code negotiable (see StudiP).
Additional hand-out material provided via StudIP.

Further recommended material for language work
McCarthy, Michael & Felicity O’Dell. Academic Vocabulary in Use
Cornell, Alan & Geoff Parkes. What’s the Difference? Englang Books (online quizzes available)
Langenscheidt/Longman Dictionary of Contemporary English OR the Cornelsen/Oxford University Press, Advanced Learner’s Dictionary, including the electronic version (CD or DVD as appropriate) or a comparable learner's dictionary.

To earn credit for the SP-1 MODULE (9 CP in total), you are required
  • to have completed University Language Skills 1 (portfolio comprising of written assignments of 800-1000 words; 3 CP)
  • to earn 60% or more on written assignments given in ULS 2 (1500-2000 words; 6 CP).

NB: To have the graded course requirements (Prüfungsleistung) for the SP-1 module recognised, you are required to register on PABO in the semester in which you intend to successfully complete the module (usually the summer semester).

The module description for the SP-1 module (BA 2011/15) is available for download here: https://www.uni-bremen.de/fb-10/studium/english-speaking-cultures/ba-e-sc/module

Katja Müller, M.A.
10-76-2-SP1-08University Language Skills 2-8

Übung
ECTS: 3

Termine:
wöchentlich Do 10:15 - 13:45 Externer Ort: Online

University Language Skills 2 is the second part of the SP1 module and will earn you a total of 6CPs. It is a four-hour class with two consecutive time slots, both of which MUST be attended.
The following seminar will build on skills acquired in ULS1. We will review and further develop writing skills regarding the different phases in writing, essay structure and good writing style. In addition, we will explore and develop more complex writing strategies including problem/solution, argumentation, cause/effect, and comparison/contrast.
Emphasis will be placed on the ability to recognize individual errors and work on challenging aspects of language. You will therefore continue to work on grammar and lexis at an individual, needs-based level and will be able to access self-study material to work on independently according to your own requirements outside of the classroom. This is essential in developing an autonomous learning style which will subsequently enable you to critically assess and correct your own work.
Students will be required to hand in TWO assignments based on TWO different writing strategies dealt with during the semester. These assignments will be graded and constitute the grade for the SP1 module. In addition, you will be expected to attend class regularly and actively participate in group discussions and activities. Task assigned to be completed between sessions must also be completed on time.
This class is planned to take place online

Lisa Nehls, M.A.

LEHRVERANSTALTUNGEN DES 2. JAHRES (PO 2011)

D2-a Aufbaumodul: Kulturgeschichte (6 CP) (nur für das Sommersemester)

6 CP (3 CP + 3 CP)

1 PL = Term paper/Hausarbeit

Modulbeautragte/r: Dr. Jana Nittel, jnittel@uni-bremen.de
VAKTitel der VeranstaltungDozentIn
10-76-4-D2/WD2-02Key Topics in Literature and Cultural History: Contemporary Crime Fiction (in englischer Sprache)

Seminar
ECTS: Depending on module choice

Termine:
wöchentlich Di 12:15 - 13:45 GW2 B3010 (Kleiner Studierraum)

This course welcomes students who wish to complete the following modules:
B.A. E-SC “Key Topics in Literature”- D2-c; WD-2a and WD-2b
B.A. E-SC “Key Topics in Cultural History” – D2-a
Academic Exchange students

Teaching method: We will meet in weekly face to face sessions on campus. You will need access to Stud.IP. and a laptop or tablet with sound and audio capabilities. Please make sure to attend our first session if you wish a placement in this class.

Crime Fiction is overwhelmingly popular and yet, much of the narrative literature that involves crime of some kind or another is often not regarded as ‘literature’ at all. This course is designed to familiarise students with the contemporary critical and theoretical arguments concerning popular fiction and genre studies, as well as to enable all participants of this course to relate to the genre’s wider social, historical and political contexts while discussing the individual narratives in terms of form, language and imagery.

Seeking to promote an analytical, creative and imaginative engagement with the complexities of literary and cultural discourses, we will focus on excerpts of both detective- or transgressor-centred narratives from the second half of the 20th Century onwards. These narratives include examples of the police novel (e.g. Ian Rankin); of female detectives and the feminist appropriations of the hard-boiled story (e.g. Sara Paretsky); of the psychothriller (e.g. Patricia Highsmith), of Afro-American crime fiction, here the examination of literary representations and other cultural manifestations of the Black Diaspora, discussing the relevance of this form of genre fiction to the Black experience of North American Life (e.g. Walter Mosley), of Indigenous crime fiction (e.g. Thomas King), of the postmodern mystery (e.g. Paul Auster), and of representations of disability in crime fiction (e.g. Jeffrey Deaver’s Lincoln Rhyme series).

Please register on Stud. IP and explore the sections “Information” and “Schedule” on Stud. IP. for further details.

Requirements:
• Interest in the topics discussed and ideally a regular attendance and informed participation in class discussion (not part of your formal assessment);
• in-depth knowledge of the selected reading material and course materials,
• final exam according to module choice.

Reading materials (we will read excerpts of these novels but you are welcome to read these novels in full especially when planning a research project):
Auster, Paul. The New York Trilogy, Faber and Faber, 1987.
Deaver, Jeffrey. The Bone Collector, Hodder and Stoughton, 1997.
Highsmith, Patricia. Strangers on a Train, Vintage, 1999, 1950.
King, Thomas. The Red Power Murders: A DreadfulWater Mystery, Harper Perennial, 2006.
Mosley, Walter. Devil in a Blue Dress, Serpent's Tail, 2001, 1991.
Paretsky, Sara. Blacklist: A V.I. Warshawski Novel, Signet Book, 2004.
Rankin, Ian. Knots & Crosses: Inspector Rebus Novel, Orion, 2005, 1998.

Copies of some but not all novels are available for purchase at the bookstore on our campus (Universitätsbuchhandlung Bremen: www.unibuch-bremen.de)

Dr. Jana Nittel
10-76-4-D2/WD2-04Key Topics in Literature: The Voice of Nostalgia in Anglophone Arab Literature and Films (in englischer Sprache)

Seminar
ECTS: Depending on module choice

Termine:
wöchentlich Di 14:15 - 15:45 GW2 B3010 (Kleiner Studierraum)

The course explores the resurgence and reception of modern Arab novels in English in a post-9/11 world. Majorly focusing on diasporic Arab writers, the course aims to chart the trajectory of Arab literature from the tragedy of 9/11 to the power and promises of the Arab Spring. Students will read two novels as well as critically look at the historical and theoretical frameworks that help understand the voices that accompany the development of anglophone Arab literature. The aim of the course is to propel students to further explore the newly emerging anglophone literatures and cultures. The course is paired with the Postcolonial Movie Nights, hosted every Tuesday from 6pm to 8pm where the students will watch five highly acclaimed films by notable Arab directors.

Dr. Sukla Chatterjee
10-76-4-D2/WD2-07Key Topics in Literature and Cultural History: The Robot on Film (in englischer Sprache)

Seminar

Termine:
wöchentlich Di 14:15 - 15:45 SFG 2070

Robots have been omnipresent in science fiction for nearly a century: popular films ranging from Fritz Lang’s Metropolis (1927) to Miguel Sapochnik’s Finch (2021) attest that cinema-goers love a good robot yarn. Hollywood cinema, in particular, imagines apocalyptic action spectacles in which humans battle machines as well as introspective dramas about the impact of machines on everyday life. In these fictional technofutures, robots appear as soldiers, servants, companions, carers, and lovers. This sheer ubiquity of mechanical people indicates that deeper cultural forces are at play. As a powerful cipher for human fears and desires, the robot presents a mirror image of humanity’s best and worst features. Robot films, thus, serve as a cultural arena in which to debate anxieties about ontological boundaries and Otherness.

This seminar will explore a variety of films to examine how representations of the robot have developed over time. In doing so, we will develop a critical vocabulary to discuss the intersections of culture, society, and technoscience. In addition, we will investigate how science fiction helps negotiate fundamental ethical debates about technology and responsibility, anthropocentrism and automation bias, superintelligence and moral consideration. Ultimately, a closer look at the posthuman also allows us to examine the human condition in the digital age.

A list of the seminar’s primary texts will be announced soon.

Requirements:
• Regular attendance
• Active participation in class
• In-depth knowledge of the reading materials
• Final assessment according to module choice

Please note that prior enrollment via Stud. IP is mandatory.

Katalina Kopka, M.A.
10-76-4-D2/WD2-08Key Topics in Literature and Cultural History: Staging the Historical Scientist (in englischer Sprache)

Seminar

Termine:
wöchentlich Di 14:15 - 15:45 GW2 B1630

The struggles that scientists go through has been a topic for playwrights for centuries, from Doctor Faustus by Christopher Marlowe to Arcadia by Tom Stoppard. What is especially fascinating to read about is the work of historical scientists, characters larger than life that now appear on the contemporary stage. In this seminar, we will take a look at the lives of self-taught theoretical mathematician Srinivasa Ramanujan and long-overlooked X-ray crystallographer Rosalind Franklin in contemporary dramatic texts. A detailed course plan as well as further reading material will be provided by the beginning of April.

Primary texts:
Ziegler, Anna. Photograph 51. Oberon Books, 2015.
Hauptman, Ira. Partition. Playscript Inc., 2006.


Please obtain copies of these two texts prior to the start of the class. Both will also be available in a Semesterapparat alongside selected secondary sources on the first floor of the SuUB, see here for more information: https://suche.suub.uni-bremen.de/opac.php?Kurs=p03+Hofschroeer

Requirements:
• regular attendance (not mandatory)
• active participation in class
• in-depth knowledge of the primary and secondary reading materials
• oral presentation and/or term paper (depending on your module)

Please note that prior enrolment via Stud. IP is mandatory.

NOTE
As of January 2022, the University of Bremen is planning to implement face-to-face teaching in the summer semester 2022 and this class is scheduled as such. This might be subject to change, depending on the development of the pandemic. Should this class need to be moved offline, the course requirements and schedule may change. Please refer back to the regular “Corona Updates” provided via email by the University Executive Board (Rektorat).

Kim-Nicola Hofschröer, M.A.
10-76-4-D2/WD2-09Key Topics in Literature and Cultural History: The Postcolonial World in Literature and Film: the USA (in englischer Sprache)

Seminar

Termine:
wöchentlich Do 10:15 - 11:45 MZH 1460

This class will introduce students to the USA from a postcolonial perspective. We will look at and read films and texts about Indigenous, Asian, Hispanic, and African American cultures. Please purchase the following books at the university book store (on Universitätsboulevard): Linda Hogan People of the Whale (16 €), Sandra Cisneros House on Mango Street (11 €) and Imbolo Mbue Behold the Dreamers (10,50 €). All other texts (short stories and secondary texts) are provided via StudIP.
Class requirements are regular attendance and active class discussion as well as in-depth knowledge of reading and viewing material. Reading the texts and watching the films is mandatory. Make time for watching films Tuesday evenings 6-8 pm. Please note that prior enrollment through StudIP is mandatory. Maximum number of participants: 35.

Prof. Dr. Kerstin Knopf
10-76-4-D2/WD2-10Key Topics Cultural History: Cultural Resistance. Art and Social Movements (in englischer Sprache)

Seminar
ECTS: 3

Termine:
wöchentlich Di 10:15 - 11:45 GW1 B0080 GW1 B2130

Art has transformative power. Social movements use art to protest against inequality and oppression, to raise awareness and to stimulate activism. Thus, art may contribute to an aesthetics of change. We will examine posters, fliers, murals, graffiti, photography, paintings, installations, mixed media works, and digital art in order to understand the role of visual art in resistance cultures. Possible topics include feminism, anti-racism, environmentalism, gay and queer interventions, labor movements, First Nations etc. Students will work in groups and present their findings in class sessions. Exploring the cultural expressions and aesthetics of resistance movements may give new insights into the interaction of cultural, aesthetic, political, economic and social forces.

Requirements:
• regular attendance and oral participation
• in-depth knowledge of the reading material
• oral presentation and handout
• final paper (Prüfungsleistung)

Dr. Karin Esders-Angermund
10-76-4-D2/WD2-11Key Topics Cultural History: Approaches to Contemporary Cultures (in englischer Sprache)

Seminar

Termine:
wöchentlich Mi 10:15 - 11:45 SFG 2070

This course will offer a range of conceptual frameworks that can help us to better understand and analyze contemporary cultures. In looking at theoretical approaches, empirical examples, and analytical practices we will address issues of representation, difference, and power.

Essential readings will be available for download on Stud-IP.
Requirements:
• Regular attendance and oral participation
• In-depth knowledge of the reading material
• In-depth knowledge of the films to be discussed
• Oral presentation and handout
• For a graded Prüfungsleistung (PL): Final paper

Dr. Karin Esders-Angermund
10-76-4-D2/WD2-12Key Topics Cultural History: Intersectional Perspectives on Inequality and Power (in englischer Sprache)

Seminar

Termine:
wöchentlich Mi 14:15 - 15:45 SFG 2070

Intersectionality strives to transcend traditional single-axis horizons of thinking. It calls attention to political and structural inequalities and exposes overlapping structures of subordination that make certain groups specifically vulnerable. Intersectionality challenges the assumption that gender stratification affects everyone in the same way; race and class matter, and so do religion and origin and other factors. We will look at various fields of “doing intersectionality” in order to develop a critical lens and strengthen the bridge between research and analysis.

Essential readings will be available for download on Stud-IP.
Requirements:
• Regular attendance and oral participation
• In-depth knowledge of the reading material
• In-depth knowledge of the films to be discussed
• Oral presentation and handout
• For a graded Prüfungsleistung (PL): Final paper

Dr. Karin Esders-Angermund
10-76-4-D2/WD2-13Key Topics Cultural History: Critical Perspectives on US-American Film (in englischer Sprache)

Seminar

Termine:
wöchentlich Do 08:00 - 12:00 GW2 B2880

Einzeltermine:
Do 21.04.22 10:00 - 12:00 GW2 B2890

Cinema as a dominant cultural institution participates in an ongoing “struggle over meaning”. Frequently, however, social and cultural contradictions are not directly displayed in the movies but remain unexpressed or denied. This course will analyze the subtle and often not so subtle ways in which American movies deal with social conflicts and predicaments.

Essential readings will be available for download on Stud-IP.
Check out Kanopy at https://unibremen.kanopy.com/ and start watching independent films.

Requirements:
• Regular attendance and oral participation
• In-depth knowledge of the reading material
• In-depth knowledge of the films to be discussed
• Oral presentation and handout
• For a graded Prüfungsleistung (PL): Final paper

Dr. Karin Esders-Angermund

D2-b Aufbaumodul: Sprachwissenschaft (6 CP) (nur für das Sommersemester)

6 CP (3 CP + 3 CP)

1 PL = Term paper/Hausarbeit

Modulbeautragte/r: Dr. Jana Nittel, jnittel@uni-bremen.de
VAKTitel der VeranstaltungDozentIn
10-76-6-D2b-02Key Topics in Linguistics: Language and social justice (in englischer Sprache)

Seminar

Termine:
wöchentlich Di 12:15 - 13:45 MZH 1460

This class deals with the ways that linguistic diversity might be related to linguistic discrimination. We will begin with the studies on 'linguistic profiling' based on experimental studies of housing discrimination, and expand upon those findings to promote equity in education, employment, medicine and the law. This class deals with these studies, devoted to the advancement of equality and justice globally.

Dr. Inke Du Bois
10-76-6-D2b-03Key Topics in Linguistics: Discourse Approaches to gender and language (in englischer Sprache)

Seminar

Termine:
wöchentlich Mi 12:15 - 13:45 GW2 B1580 GW2 A4020

This course will deal with the principles underlying language use, with a specific focus on differences and the construction of gender and sexual orientation. We will learn that gender is seen as a dichotomy in some research such as sociolinguistics and that other research claims that gender interactional patterns are not a reflection of the individual’s nature but rather of some performance that the individual is accomplishing. According to this view, "gender is doing, not being." But also there is more to know about the different research methodologies of language, sex and gender categories. These include Sociolinguistics, Conversation analysis, Corpus linguistics, Critical discourse analysis, Discursive Psychology, Feminist Post-Structuralist Discourse Analysis and Queer Theory. Subsequently, students will be required to develop a project of their own, analysing the language used by people of different gender, sex or sexual orientation in a particular communication situation of their own choice.

Dr. Inke Du Bois
10-76-6-D2b-04Key Topics in Linguistics: Introduction to Multilingualism (in englischer Sprache)

Seminar

Termine:
wöchentlich Di 16:15 - 17:45 GW1 A0010

Multilingualism is a normal condition for most of the people in this world. Monolingual people, in turn, are the minority. This seminar will examine different aspects of multilingualism. We will look at individual multilingualism such as bilingual language acquisition, language learning, and different forms of multilingual speech (code-switching, translanguaging, …). Moreover, we will cover aspects of multilingualism in education as well as in the society.
The class work will consist of input, discussions, and group work. The aim of the seminar is to develop and conduct your own research project in the area of multilingualism.

For the ungraded “Seminarleistung” (SL = 3 CP) you will be required to
(1) write an abstract of your research project, and
(2) present your findings at the 3rd Bremen Student Conference in English Linguistics (Monday, 25.07.2022).
For the graded “Prüfungsleistung” (PL = 6 CP) you will—additionally to the abstract and presentation—write a short term paper of your research project.

Stephanie Bergmann, M.A.
10-76-6-D2b-05Key Topics in Linguistics: Second Language Acquisition (in englischer Sprache)

Seminar

Termine:
wöchentlich Do 16:15 - 17:45 GW2 B2890

Einzeltermine:
Mo 13.06.22 10:15 - 11:15 GW2 A3390 (CIP Labor)
Di 14.06.22 10:15 - 11:15 GW2 B1400
Mo 25.07.22 09:00 - 17:00 SFG

What does it mean to learn a second language? This course will dive into this question while focusing on key concepts, theoretical approaches, and psychological and social factors driving second language acquisition (SLA). By the end of the course, you will be able to analyze the processes and principles of language learning and discuss the relationship between SLA research and your own L2 teaching/learning practices.

Format: We will meet face-to-face in April and once per month in May, June, and July. The other sessions will be asynchronous.

Suggested Literature:
Gass, S. M., Behney, J., & Plonsky, L. (2020). Second Language Acquisition: An Introductory Course (5th ed.). Routledge.

Hummel, K. M. (2021). Introducing Second Language Acquisition: Perspectives and Practices, 2nd Edition. John Wiley & Sons, Indianapolis, IN.

Dr. Ramona Kreis
10-82-2-LS1-2Key topics in Linguistics: The linguistics of text and discourse (in englischer Sprache)

Seminar

Termine:
wöchentlich Mo 14:00 - 16:00 MZH 1460 (2 SWS)

In the last decades, linguistics has ‘jumped the border’ of the sentence and moved towards larger units of description such as text and discourse. In this seminar we will cover some principal linguistic approaches to text, addressing frameworks such as cohesion, rhetorical structure theory and introductory segmented discourse representation theory. Class work will consist of overviews of the theoretical approaches (supported by readings) followed by group-based analysis and discussion of example texts. Final credit for the module can be obtained by carrying out a more detailed analysis of a collection of short texts (possibly in groups) and motivating the decisions made. Considerations of corpus linguistic approaches to discourse structure and organisation will also be addressed and some particular tools for supporting such analyses introduced. Successful participation in the course should enable the analysis and critical discussion of texts in general, as well as raising awareness of current open topics and issues in linguistic discourse research.

Prof. John Arnold Bateman, Ph.D.

D2-c Aufbaumodul: Literaturwissenschaft (nur für das Sommersemester) (6 CP)

6 CP (3 CP + 3 CP)

1 PL = Term paper/Hausarbeit

Modulbeautragte/r: Dr. Jana Nittel, jnittel@uni-bremen.de
VAKTitel der VeranstaltungDozentIn
10-76-4-D2/WD2-01Key Topics in Literature: Literary London – London in Literature (in englischer Sprache)

Seminar
ECTS: Depending on module choice

Termine:
wöchentlich Mo 16:15 - 17:45 GW2 B3010 (Kleiner Studierraum)

This course welcomes students who wish to complete the following modules:
M.A. E_SC ExMo 1 – Extension Module 1
M.A. E-SC ExMo 2 - Extension Module 2
M.A. TnL Vertiefungsmodul
M.A. TnL Profilmodul I: Literatur
B.A. E-SC “Key Topics in Literature”- D2-c; WD-2a and WD-2b
Academic Exchange Students

Teaching method: We will meet in weekly face to face sessions on campus. You will need access to Stud.IP. and a laptop or tablet with sound and audio capabilities. Please make sure to attend our first session if you wish a placement in this class.

This course seeks to familiarise students with a number of selected authors, poets and writers, in general, who have held lifelong connections with London, may it be historic or contemporary. We will aim to discuss their continued engagement with the city by exploring a selections of excerpts clustered around five major topic choices: Queer London; Women Writers and London; London’s Imperial Past and Postcolonial Present; London Theatreland and the Shakespearean Stage; London and Crime, and London and the Long Eighteen Century. By virtually tracing forgotten as well as prominent landmarks of the urban centre, we seek to connect the literary representations of the city with historical and cultural developments, present and past. A reader with primary and secondary reading materials will be available for download on Stud.IP.

Please register on Stud. IP and explore the sections “Information” and “Schedule” on Stud. IP. for further details.

Requirements:
• Interest in the topics discussed and ideally a regular attendance and informed participation in class discussion (not part of your formal assessment);
• in-depth knowledge of the selected reading material and course materials,
• final exam according to module choice.

Dr. Jana Nittel
10-76-4-D2/WD2-02Key Topics in Literature and Cultural History: Contemporary Crime Fiction (in englischer Sprache)

Seminar
ECTS: Depending on module choice

Termine:
wöchentlich Di 12:15 - 13:45 GW2 B3010 (Kleiner Studierraum)

This course welcomes students who wish to complete the following modules:
B.A. E-SC “Key Topics in Literature”- D2-c; WD-2a and WD-2b
B.A. E-SC “Key Topics in Cultural History” – D2-a
Academic Exchange students

Teaching method: We will meet in weekly face to face sessions on campus. You will need access to Stud.IP. and a laptop or tablet with sound and audio capabilities. Please make sure to attend our first session if you wish a placement in this class.

Crime Fiction is overwhelmingly popular and yet, much of the narrative literature that involves crime of some kind or another is often not regarded as ‘literature’ at all. This course is designed to familiarise students with the contemporary critical and theoretical arguments concerning popular fiction and genre studies, as well as to enable all participants of this course to relate to the genre’s wider social, historical and political contexts while discussing the individual narratives in terms of form, language and imagery.

Seeking to promote an analytical, creative and imaginative engagement with the complexities of literary and cultural discourses, we will focus on excerpts of both detective- or transgressor-centred narratives from the second half of the 20th Century onwards. These narratives include examples of the police novel (e.g. Ian Rankin); of female detectives and the feminist appropriations of the hard-boiled story (e.g. Sara Paretsky); of the psychothriller (e.g. Patricia Highsmith), of Afro-American crime fiction, here the examination of literary representations and other cultural manifestations of the Black Diaspora, discussing the relevance of this form of genre fiction to the Black experience of North American Life (e.g. Walter Mosley), of Indigenous crime fiction (e.g. Thomas King), of the postmodern mystery (e.g. Paul Auster), and of representations of disability in crime fiction (e.g. Jeffrey Deaver’s Lincoln Rhyme series).

Please register on Stud. IP and explore the sections “Information” and “Schedule” on Stud. IP. for further details.

Requirements:
• Interest in the topics discussed and ideally a regular attendance and informed participation in class discussion (not part of your formal assessment);
• in-depth knowledge of the selected reading material and course materials,
• final exam according to module choice.

Reading materials (we will read excerpts of these novels but you are welcome to read these novels in full especially when planning a research project):
Auster, Paul. The New York Trilogy, Faber and Faber, 1987.
Deaver, Jeffrey. The Bone Collector, Hodder and Stoughton, 1997.
Highsmith, Patricia. Strangers on a Train, Vintage, 1999, 1950.
King, Thomas. The Red Power Murders: A DreadfulWater Mystery, Harper Perennial, 2006.
Mosley, Walter. Devil in a Blue Dress, Serpent's Tail, 2001, 1991.
Paretsky, Sara. Blacklist: A V.I. Warshawski Novel, Signet Book, 2004.
Rankin, Ian. Knots & Crosses: Inspector Rebus Novel, Orion, 2005, 1998.

Copies of some but not all novels are available for purchase at the bookstore on our campus (Universitätsbuchhandlung Bremen: www.unibuch-bremen.de)

Dr. Jana Nittel
10-76-4-D2/WD2-03Key Topics in Literature: Women and Fiction – Virginia Woolf (in englischer Sprache)

Seminar
ECTS: Depending on module choice

Termine:
wöchentlich Di 10:15 - 11:45 GW2 B3010 (Kleiner Studierraum)

This course welcomes students who wish to complete the following modules:
B.A. E-SC D-2c; WD-2a und WD-2b
Academic Exchange Students

Teaching method: We will meet in weekly face to face sessions on campus. You will need access to Stud.IP. and a laptop or tablet with sound and audio capabilities. Please make sure to attend our first session if you wish a placement in this class.

According to Bonnie Kime Scott, modernist women “actively transformed the novel to reflect their unique perceptions of everyday life […] as critics and creative writers”. This course is designed to aesthetically appreciate and to critically explore selected works by the 20th-Century British female author and critic Virginia Woolf using text-centred and contextual approaches. We will explore the relation of women and fiction in the first three decades of the 20th century in Woolf’s feminist literary criticism, revisit modernist writing strategies and discuss several gender-related aspects of the novels, which have remained highly topical, then and now. Please register on Stud. IP and explore the sections “Information” and “Schedule” on Stud. IP. for further details.

Requirements:
• Interest in the topics discussed and ideally a regular attendance and informed participation in class discussion (not part of your formal assessment);
• in-depth knowledge of the selected reading material and course materials,
• final exam according to module choice.

Required reading materials (you need a copy of these publications for class):
Woolf, Virginia. Mrs. Dalloway: with a foreword by Maureen Howard (Italics). 1st Harvest/HBJ ed., Harcourt Brace Jovanovich, 1990.
Woolf, Virginia. Orlando. Introduction and notes by Merry M. Pawlowski (Italics), Wordsworth Classics, 2003.
Woolf, Virginia, and Morag Shiach. A Room of One's Own; Three guineas (Italics), Oxford University Press, 1992.
Copies can be purchased at the bookstore on our campus (Universitätsbuchhandlung Bremen: www.unibuch-bremen.de)

Dr. Jana Nittel
10-76-4-D2/WD2-04Key Topics in Literature: The Voice of Nostalgia in Anglophone Arab Literature and Films (in englischer Sprache)

Seminar
ECTS: Depending on module choice

Termine:
wöchentlich Di 14:15 - 15:45 GW2 B3010 (Kleiner Studierraum)

The course explores the resurgence and reception of modern Arab novels in English in a post-9/11 world. Majorly focusing on diasporic Arab writers, the course aims to chart the trajectory of Arab literature from the tragedy of 9/11 to the power and promises of the Arab Spring. Students will read two novels as well as critically look at the historical and theoretical frameworks that help understand the voices that accompany the development of anglophone Arab literature. The aim of the course is to propel students to further explore the newly emerging anglophone literatures and cultures. The course is paired with the Postcolonial Movie Nights, hosted every Tuesday from 6pm to 8pm where the students will watch five highly acclaimed films by notable Arab directors.

Dr. Sukla Chatterjee
10-76-4-D2/WD2-05Key Topics in Literature: West African Women’s Literature (in englischer Sprache)

Seminar

Termine:
wöchentlich Do 12:15 - 13:45 GW2 B1820

This course is designed to introduce students to women's literary productions in West Africa. It will focus on the contributions of West African women in the literary sphere from the last half of the 20th century to the present. We will examine a variety of literary genres from different geographical areas and cultural contexts of West Africa. In these selected literatures, we will explore how these writings offer distinctive insights, or engage with specific historical, social, cultural, political and economic contexts within which their writings are situated, and wherein their consciousness and experiences are shaped. To do this meticulously, we will start by engaging with theoretical priorities and contextual contributions that have been developed within this vantage point and social positionality. Discussion of selected literary texts will focus on the representation of gender as a crucial organising variable under colonial patriarchy, and shared positionality in relation to gendered experiences. Course objective is to assist students in developing an understanding of the theoretical priorities that motivate West African women's literary expressions, and introduce students to the abundance of unique preoccupations that can be found in this literary space.

Okanmiyinoluwa Oluwadunni Talabi, M.A.
10-76-4-D2/WD2-06Key Topics in Literature: The Roots and Routes of Irish America (in englischer Sprache)

Seminar
ECTS: 3

Termine:
wöchentlich Do 14:15 - 15:45 GW2 B3010 (Kleiner Studierraum)

30.4 million people or about 9.2 percent of Americans claim Irish ancestry in the United States today. Big annual St. Patrick’s Day celebrations pay tribute to traditions of the Irish diaspora in America. But can we really speak of an ‘Irish America’ today, and if so, what is its literary and cultural history? This class wants to explore these and related questions by introducing students to the study of Irish American literature and culture. We will read and analyze a selection of texts, such as novels, poetry, memoirs, and theory (in full and/or excerpt form) that address or have emerged from Irish American experiences. In doing so, we will reflect on the histories and cultural forms of expression of an ever-changing community of immigrants and their descendants who were central to the shaping of the United States, especially from the mid-nineteenth to the early twentieth century but now may seem more elusive or even a thing of the past. Using a combination of text-centered and contextual approaches, students will study secondary material, explore the form and style of literary and cultural texts in the broad area of Irish America, and reflect on some key concerns, such as the construction of ethnic, religious, or national affiliation and belonging as well as migration and diaspora.

This class is planned in the form of weekly in-person sessions, subject to change. An online guest lecture is tentatively planned. The majority of material and information will be made available on Stud.IP. Prior enrolment via Stud.IP is mandatory and admission is limited to a maximum of thirty students. The class is open to ESC students studying the WD2-a, WD2-b, and the D2-c modules as well as international exchange students. Please check Stud.IP regularly for updates, including any preparatory primary or secondary readings.

Requirements
• active participation in class and/or online (esp. Stud.IP and Zoom)
• in-depth knowledge of the reading material,
• graded or ungraded assignment in accordance with the respective module requirements.

Dr. Paula von Gleich
10-76-4-D2/WD2-07Key Topics in Literature and Cultural History: The Robot on Film (in englischer Sprache)

Seminar

Termine:
wöchentlich Di 14:15 - 15:45 SFG 2070

Robots have been omnipresent in science fiction for nearly a century: popular films ranging from Fritz Lang’s Metropolis (1927) to Miguel Sapochnik’s Finch (2021) attest that cinema-goers love a good robot yarn. Hollywood cinema, in particular, imagines apocalyptic action spectacles in which humans battle machines as well as introspective dramas about the impact of machines on everyday life. In these fictional technofutures, robots appear as soldiers, servants, companions, carers, and lovers. This sheer ubiquity of mechanical people indicates that deeper cultural forces are at play. As a powerful cipher for human fears and desires, the robot presents a mirror image of humanity’s best and worst features. Robot films, thus, serve as a cultural arena in which to debate anxieties about ontological boundaries and Otherness.

This seminar will explore a variety of films to examine how representations of the robot have developed over time. In doing so, we will develop a critical vocabulary to discuss the intersections of culture, society, and technoscience. In addition, we will investigate how science fiction helps negotiate fundamental ethical debates about technology and responsibility, anthropocentrism and automation bias, superintelligence and moral consideration. Ultimately, a closer look at the posthuman also allows us to examine the human condition in the digital age.

A list of the seminar’s primary texts will be announced soon.

Requirements:
• Regular attendance
• Active participation in class
• In-depth knowledge of the reading materials
• Final assessment according to module choice

Please note that prior enrollment via Stud. IP is mandatory.

Katalina Kopka, M.A.
10-76-4-D2/WD2-08Key Topics in Literature and Cultural History: Staging the Historical Scientist (in englischer Sprache)

Seminar

Termine:
wöchentlich Di 14:15 - 15:45 GW2 B1630

The struggles that scientists go through has been a topic for playwrights for centuries, from Doctor Faustus by Christopher Marlowe to Arcadia by Tom Stoppard. What is especially fascinating to read about is the work of historical scientists, characters larger than life that now appear on the contemporary stage. In this seminar, we will take a look at the lives of self-taught theoretical mathematician Srinivasa Ramanujan and long-overlooked X-ray crystallographer Rosalind Franklin in contemporary dramatic texts. A detailed course plan as well as further reading material will be provided by the beginning of April.

Primary texts:
Ziegler, Anna. Photograph 51. Oberon Books, 2015.
Hauptman, Ira. Partition. Playscript Inc., 2006.


Please obtain copies of these two texts prior to the start of the class. Both will also be available in a Semesterapparat alongside selected secondary sources on the first floor of the SuUB, see here for more information: https://suche.suub.uni-bremen.de/opac.php?Kurs=p03+Hofschroeer

Requirements:
• regular attendance (not mandatory)
• active participation in class
• in-depth knowledge of the primary and secondary reading materials
• oral presentation and/or term paper (depending on your module)

Please note that prior enrolment via Stud. IP is mandatory.

NOTE
As of January 2022, the University of Bremen is planning to implement face-to-face teaching in the summer semester 2022 and this class is scheduled as such. This might be subject to change, depending on the development of the pandemic. Should this class need to be moved offline, the course requirements and schedule may change. Please refer back to the regular “Corona Updates” provided via email by the University Executive Board (Rektorat).

Kim-Nicola Hofschröer, M.A.
10-76-4-D2/WD2-09Key Topics in Literature and Cultural History: The Postcolonial World in Literature and Film: the USA (in englischer Sprache)

Seminar

Termine:
wöchentlich Do 10:15 - 11:45 MZH 1460

This class will introduce students to the USA from a postcolonial perspective. We will look at and read films and texts about Indigenous, Asian, Hispanic, and African American cultures. Please purchase the following books at the university book store (on Universitätsboulevard): Linda Hogan People of the Whale (16 €), Sandra Cisneros House on Mango Street (11 €) and Imbolo Mbue Behold the Dreamers (10,50 €). All other texts (short stories and secondary texts) are provided via StudIP.
Class requirements are regular attendance and active class discussion as well as in-depth knowledge of reading and viewing material. Reading the texts and watching the films is mandatory. Make time for watching films Tuesday evenings 6-8 pm. Please note that prior enrollment through StudIP is mandatory. Maximum number of participants: 35.

Prof. Dr. Kerstin Knopf

SP-2 Aufbaumodul: Sprachpraxis/ Practical-Language Proficiency Module (Part 2) (6 CP) (nur für das Sommersemester)

6 CP (3 CP+ 3 CP)

Modulbeauftragte: Dr. Vanessa Herrmann, vanessa.herrmann@uni-bremen.de

Core language classes for BA „E-SC“ - 2nd year, Semester 4 („Aufbaumodul“ SP-2 BAPO 2011, Part 2)
VAKTitel der VeranstaltungDozentIn
10-76-4-SP2-01Culture and Communication a (in englischer Sprache)

Übung

Termine:
wöchentlich Mo 12:15 - 13:45 GW2 A4020

The aim of the Culture & Communication classes is to help you to prepare for the final SP-2 module oral exam taken when you have completed the SP-2 module. This particular class will look at different moments which have greatly influenced events within the English-speaking world. We will investigate the processes which led to a particular event, define the event itself and explore the long-term and short-term implications that came about as a consequence. You will be required to think critically and research a topic of your own choice in detail in order to prepare for the Proficiency Interview ⇐ oral exam) at the end of the semester during which you will explain how this moment has been defining. You will also work on presentation skills and familiarise yourselves with the situation of speaking in front of others.

Materials are provided via StudIP.

Dr. Vanessa Herrmann
10-76-4-SP2-02Culture and Communication b (in englischer Sprache)

Übung

Termine:
wöchentlich Di 14:15 - 15:45 GW2 B1170

The aim of the Culture & Communication classes is to help you to prepare for the final SP-2 module oral exam taken when you have completed the SP-2 module.

This particular class will look at different moments which have greatly influenced events within the English-speaking world. We will investigate the processes which led to a particular event, define the event itself and explore the long-term and short-term implications that came about as a consequence. You will be required to think critically and research a topic of your own choice in detail in order to prepare for the Proficiency Interview ⇐ oral exam) at the end of the semester during which you will explain how this moment has been defining. You will also work on presentation skills and familiarise yourselves with the situation of speaking in front of others.

Materials are provided via StudIP.

Dr. Vanessa Herrmann
10-76-4-SP2-04Culture and Communication d (in englischer Sprache)

Übung

Termine:
wöchentlich Di 12:15 - 13:45 GW2 B2890
Anne Kirkham, M.A.
10-76-4-SP2-05Culture and Communication e (in englischer Sprache)

Übung

Termine:
wöchentlich Mi 14:15 - 15:45 NW2 A0242 (Stufenhörsaal)
Anne Kirkham, M.A.
10-76-4-SP2-06Culture and Communication f (in englischer Sprache)

Übung
ECTS: 3

Termine:
wöchentlich Mi 14:15 - 15:45 NW1 H 1 - H0020

Critical Thinking – and Defining Moments in History
(This class is planned to take place on campus.)

The main focus of this Culture & Communication course is to prepare you for your 15-minute SP-2 'Sprachpraxis Aufbaumodul' module proficiency exam. We will start by going back-to-the-basics regarding pronunciation, intonation, and transition signals.

In addition to these language skills, you will also expand your speaking skills for the exam with regard to audience-focus. You will then apply your skills to several mini-group presentations on given topics before delivering your own chosen topic. You are required to critically analyse your topic, to shed light on the breadth and depth of your topic and to demonstrate accuracy, precision, and cautious language in your fifteen-minute exam.

The topic you choose will focus on one defining moment in the history of the English-speaking world. You are invited to explore historical, social, cultural or other reasons for why a specific event happend to turn into his/her/ourstory. You may wish to compare, exemplify, list, critically analyse discourse or classify the information you can compile by researching your topic.


General information
This class is open for ERASMUS/exchange students with a level of English ranging B2 - C1 (GER, CEFR). ERASMUS students on a level below C1 but above B2 wishing to attend this class need to contact the lecturer before joining this class. Send an email to (kamueller(at)uni-bremen.de). Please replace (at) by @.

Katja Müller, M.A.
10-76-4-SP2-07Culture and Communication g (in englischer Sprache)

Übung
ECTS: 3

Termine:
wöchentlich Mi 12:15 - 13:45 GW2 B2890

Critical Thinking – and Defining Moments in History
(This class is planned to take place on campus.)

The main focus of this Culture & Communication course is to prepare you for your 15-minute SP-2 'Sprachpraxis Aufbaumodul' module proficiency exam. We will start by going back-to-the-basics regarding pronunciation, intonation, and transition signals.

In addition to these language skills, you will also expand your speaking skills for the exam with regard to audience-focus. You will then apply your skills to several mini-group presentations on given topics before delivering your own chosen topic. You are required to critically analyse your topic, to shed light on the breadth and depth of your topic and to demonstrate accuracy, precision, and cautious language in your fifteen-minute exam.

The topic you choose will focus on one defining moment in the history of the English-speaking world. You are invited to explore historical, social, cultural or other reasons for why a specific event happend to turn into his/her/ourstory. You may wish to compare, exemplify, list, critically analyse discourse or classify the information you can compile by researching your topic.


General information
This class is open for ERASMUS/exchange students with a level of English ranging B2 - C1 (GER, CEFR). ERASMUS students on a level below C1 but above B2 wishing to attend this class need to contact the lecturer before joining this class. Send an email to (kamueller(at)uni-bremen.de). Please replace (at) by @.

Katja Müller, M.A.
10-76-4-SP2-08Culture and Communication h (in englischer Sprache)

Übung
ECTS: 3

Termine:
wöchentlich Mo 10:15 - 11:45 GW2 B3010 (Kleiner Studierraum)

The aim of the Culture and Communication class is to help you prepare for the final SP2 module oral exam taken when you have completed the SP2 module. This class will deal with two different areas from which you will be able to develop ONE research project as the basis for your oral exam.
You will be looking at defining moments which have greatly influenced events within the English-speaking world. Your task will be to investigate the processes which led to a particular event, define the event itself and explore the long-term and short-term consequences. A critical analytic approach be will necessary as you explore the causes and implications of the topic of your choice.
In addition, we will work on improving important aspects of grammar, pronunciation, intonation as well as developing the confidence and fluency needed to successfully pass the exam. Whereas CBIS was more about collaboration and teamwork, Culture and Communication allows you to build upon the research skills developed last semester as you move forward with your own project.

Lisa Nehls, M.A.
10-76-4-SP2-09Culture and Communication i (in englischer Sprache)

Übung
ECTS: 3

Termine:
wöchentlich Mi 12:15 - 13:45 SFG 2040 SFG 2020

The aim of the Culture and Communication class is to help you prepare for the final SP2 module oral exam taken when you have completed the SP2 module. This class will deal with two different areas from which you will be able to develop ONE research project as the basis for your oral exam.
You will be looking at defining moments which have greatly influenced events within the English-speaking world. Your task will be to investigate the processes which led to a particular event, define the event itself and explore the long-term and short-term consequences. A critical analytic approach be will necessary as you explore the causes and implications of the topic of your choice.
In addition, we will work on improving important aspects of grammar, pronunciation, intonation as well as developing the confidence and fluency needed to successfully pass the exam. Whereas CBIS was more about collaboration and teamwork, Culture and Communication allows you to build upon the research skills developed last semester as you move forward with your own project.

Lisa Nehls, M.A.

FD-2 Aufbaumodul Fachdidaktik 10-76-4-204 (nur für das Sommersemester)

Pflichtmodul: Gy, BIPEB

6 CP

Modulbeauftragte/r: Tim Giesler, Link-extern giesler@uni-bremen.de
VAKTitel der VeranstaltungDozentIn
10-76-6-FD2-01Historical and Theoretical Foundations of Second Language Acquisition (BiPEB/Gy) (in englischer Sprache)

Seminar
ECTS: 3

Termine:
wöchentlich Di 10:15 - 11:45 MZH 1460

This course has a closer look at how first and second languages are learned in order for future English Language Teachers to evaluate the effectiveness of their own language teaching. We will deal with the following questions:
• In which way has English Language Teaching developed in history?
• How do children acquire a first language?
• To what extent can theories of first language acquisition be applied to second language learning?
• Can individual learner characteristics affect success in second language learning?
• How do learners learn a foreign language at school - and what are the consequences for teaching them?
There will be a special emphasis on primary education in some sessions in this class.

Matthias Myrczek
10-76-6-FD2-02Historical and Theoretical Foundations of Second Language Acquisition (Gy/BiPEB) (in englischer Sprache)

Seminar
ECTS: 3

Termine:
wöchentlich Do 10:15 - 11:45 GW2 B3010 (Kleiner Studierraum)

This course has a closer look at how first and second languages are learned in order for future English Language Teachers to evaluate the effectiveness of their own language teaching. We will deal with the following questions:
• In which way has English Language Teaching developed in history?
• How do children acquire a first language?
• To what extent can theories of first language acquisition be applied to second language learning?
• Can individual learner characteristics affect success in second language learning?
• How do learners learn a foreign language at school - and what are the consequences for teaching them?
There will be a special emphasis on primary education in some sessions in this class.

Dr. Tim Giesler
10-76-6-FD2-03Historical and Theoretical Foundations of Second Language Acquisition (Gy) (in englischer Sprache)

Seminar
ECTS: 3

Termine:
wöchentlich Fr 10:15 - 11:45 GW1 B0080 (2 SWS)

This course has a closer look at how first and second languages are learned in order for future English Language Teachers to evaluate the effectiveness of their own language teaching. We will deal with the following questions:
• In which way has English Language Teaching developed in history?
• How do children acquire a first language?
• To what extent can theories of first language acquisition be applied to second language learning?
• Can individual learner characteristics affect success in second language learning?
• How do learners learn a foreign language at school - and what are the consequences for teaching them?

Dr. Tim Giesler
10-76-6-FD2-04ELT: Primary Activities, Resources and Materials (BIPEB) (in englischer Sprache)

Seminar
ECTS: 3

Termine:
wöchentlich Di 14:15 - 15:45
wöchentlich Fr 14:15 - 15:45 GW1 A1260 GW1 A0010 GW1 B0080 (2 SWS)

When teaching a foreign language class, teachers have to decide which materials, resources and activities to use in a specific context, i.e. within a specific school, with specific students, within a specific class dynamic etc. They need to be able to act autonomously in that regard as they should be the expert for their respective context. In this class we will first take a look at available teaching materials, analyze them, and discuss their structure and layout. Second, we are striving to evaluate these materials when put into practice in how well they served their in-tended purpose within a specific classroom (e.g. with regard to fostering speaking skills). For that reason, we are also going to look at action research studies and methodologies which might be used as starting points for students' own projects. All this is designed to help students become reflective and autonomous practitioners.

Dr. Tim Giesler
10-76-6-FD2-05ELT: CLIL Activities, Resources and Materials (Gy) (in englischer Sprache)

Seminar
ECTS: 3

Termine:
wöchentlich Di 14:15 - 15:45 SFG 1010

When teaching a foreign language class, teachers have to decide which materials, resources and activities to use in a specific context, i.e. within a specific school, with specific students, within a specific class dynamic etc. They need to be able to act autonomously in that regard as they should be the expert for their respective context. In this class we will first take a look at available teaching materials, analyze them, and discuss their structure and layout. Second, we are striving to evaluate these materials when put into practice in how well they served their in-tended purpose within a specific classroom (e.g. with regard to fostering speaking skills). For that reason, we are also going to look at action research studies and methodologies which might be used as starting points for students' own projects. All this is designed to help students become reflective and autonomous practitioners.

Matthias Myrczek
10-76-6-FD2-06ELT: Activities, Resources and Materials (Gy) (in englischer Sprache)

Seminar
ECTS: 3

Termine:
wöchentlich Di 16:15 - 17:45 GW2 B2890

Einzeltermine:
Fr 08.07.22 15:00 - 18:15 GW1 A1260

When teaching a foreign language class, teachers have to decide which materials, resources and activities to use in a specific context, i.e. within a specific school, with specific students, within a specific class dynamic etc. They need to be able to act autonomously in that regard as they should be the expert for their respective context. In this class we will first take a look at available teaching materials, analyze them, and discuss their structure and layout. Second, we are striving to evaluate these materials when put into practice in how well they served their in-tended purpose within a specific classroom (e.g. with regard to fostering speaking skills). For that reason, we are also going to look at action research studies and methodologies which might be used as starting points for students' own projects. All this is designed to help students become reflective and autonomous practitioners.

Heather Haase

WD-2a Aufbaumodul: Literatur- und Sprachwissenschaft (6 CP) (Wahlpflichtmodul) (nur für das Sommersemester)

(6 CP = 3 CP und 3 CP)

Es gilt zu beachten: Laut SK-Beschluss (E-SC) vom 21.12.2012 ist die Prüfungsleistung im Bereich "Key Topics in Literature" zu erbringen =
Klausur/Written Test oder benotete Präsentationsleistung/Presentation

Modulbeauftragte/r: Dr. Inke du Bois, dubois@uni-bremen.de und Prof. Dr. Marcus Callies, callies@uni-bremen.de
VAKTitel der VeranstaltungDozentIn
10-76-4-D2/WD2-01Key Topics in Literature: Literary London – London in Literature (in englischer Sprache)

Seminar
ECTS: Depending on module choice

Termine:
wöchentlich Mo 16:15 - 17:45 GW2 B3010 (Kleiner Studierraum)

This course welcomes students who wish to complete the following modules:
M.A. E_SC ExMo 1 – Extension Module 1
M.A. E-SC ExMo 2 - Extension Module 2
M.A. TnL Vertiefungsmodul
M.A. TnL Profilmodul I: Literatur
B.A. E-SC “Key Topics in Literature”- D2-c; WD-2a and WD-2b
Academic Exchange Students

Teaching method: We will meet in weekly face to face sessions on campus. You will need access to Stud.IP. and a laptop or tablet with sound and audio capabilities. Please make sure to attend our first session if you wish a placement in this class.

This course seeks to familiarise students with a number of selected authors, poets and writers, in general, who have held lifelong connections with London, may it be historic or contemporary. We will aim to discuss their continued engagement with the city by exploring a selections of excerpts clustered around five major topic choices: Queer London; Women Writers and London; London’s Imperial Past and Postcolonial Present; London Theatreland and the Shakespearean Stage; London and Crime, and London and the Long Eighteen Century. By virtually tracing forgotten as well as prominent landmarks of the urban centre, we seek to connect the literary representations of the city with historical and cultural developments, present and past. A reader with primary and secondary reading materials will be available for download on Stud.IP.

Please register on Stud. IP and explore the sections “Information” and “Schedule” on Stud. IP. for further details.

Requirements:
• Interest in the topics discussed and ideally a regular attendance and informed participation in class discussion (not part of your formal assessment);
• in-depth knowledge of the selected reading material and course materials,
• final exam according to module choice.

Dr. Jana Nittel
10-76-4-D2/WD2-02Key Topics in Literature and Cultural History: Contemporary Crime Fiction (in englischer Sprache)

Seminar
ECTS: Depending on module choice

Termine:
wöchentlich Di 12:15 - 13:45 GW2 B3010 (Kleiner Studierraum)

This course welcomes students who wish to complete the following modules:
B.A. E-SC “Key Topics in Literature”- D2-c; WD-2a and WD-2b
B.A. E-SC “Key Topics in Cultural History” – D2-a
Academic Exchange students

Teaching method: We will meet in weekly face to face sessions on campus. You will need access to Stud.IP. and a laptop or tablet with sound and audio capabilities. Please make sure to attend our first session if you wish a placement in this class.

Crime Fiction is overwhelmingly popular and yet, much of the narrative literature that involves crime of some kind or another is often not regarded as ‘literature’ at all. This course is designed to familiarise students with the contemporary critical and theoretical arguments concerning popular fiction and genre studies, as well as to enable all participants of this course to relate to the genre’s wider social, historical and political contexts while discussing the individual narratives in terms of form, language and imagery.

Seeking to promote an analytical, creative and imaginative engagement with the complexities of literary and cultural discourses, we will focus on excerpts of both detective- or transgressor-centred narratives from the second half of the 20th Century onwards. These narratives include examples of the police novel (e.g. Ian Rankin); of female detectives and the feminist appropriations of the hard-boiled story (e.g. Sara Paretsky); of the psychothriller (e.g. Patricia Highsmith), of Afro-American crime fiction, here the examination of literary representations and other cultural manifestations of the Black Diaspora, discussing the relevance of this form of genre fiction to the Black experience of North American Life (e.g. Walter Mosley), of Indigenous crime fiction (e.g. Thomas King), of the postmodern mystery (e.g. Paul Auster), and of representations of disability in crime fiction (e.g. Jeffrey Deaver’s Lincoln Rhyme series).

Please register on Stud. IP and explore the sections “Information” and “Schedule” on Stud. IP. for further details.

Requirements:
• Interest in the topics discussed and ideally a regular attendance and informed participation in class discussion (not part of your formal assessment);
• in-depth knowledge of the selected reading material and course materials,
• final exam according to module choice.

Reading materials (we will read excerpts of these novels but you are welcome to read these novels in full especially when planning a research project):
Auster, Paul. The New York Trilogy, Faber and Faber, 1987.
Deaver, Jeffrey. The Bone Collector, Hodder and Stoughton, 1997.
Highsmith, Patricia. Strangers on a Train, Vintage, 1999, 1950.
King, Thomas. The Red Power Murders: A DreadfulWater Mystery, Harper Perennial, 2006.
Mosley, Walter. Devil in a Blue Dress, Serpent's Tail, 2001, 1991.
Paretsky, Sara. Blacklist: A V.I. Warshawski Novel, Signet Book, 2004.
Rankin, Ian. Knots & Crosses: Inspector Rebus Novel, Orion, 2005, 1998.

Copies of some but not all novels are available for purchase at the bookstore on our campus (Universitätsbuchhandlung Bremen: www.unibuch-bremen.de)

Dr. Jana Nittel
10-76-4-D2/WD2-03Key Topics in Literature: Women and Fiction – Virginia Woolf (in englischer Sprache)

Seminar
ECTS: Depending on module choice

Termine:
wöchentlich Di 10:15 - 11:45 GW2 B3010 (Kleiner Studierraum)

This course welcomes students who wish to complete the following modules:
B.A. E-SC D-2c; WD-2a und WD-2b
Academic Exchange Students

Teaching method: We will meet in weekly face to face sessions on campus. You will need access to Stud.IP. and a laptop or tablet with sound and audio capabilities. Please make sure to attend our first session if you wish a placement in this class.

According to Bonnie Kime Scott, modernist women “actively transformed the novel to reflect their unique perceptions of everyday life […] as critics and creative writers”. This course is designed to aesthetically appreciate and to critically explore selected works by the 20th-Century British female author and critic Virginia Woolf using text-centred and contextual approaches. We will explore the relation of women and fiction in the first three decades of the 20th century in Woolf’s feminist literary criticism, revisit modernist writing strategies and discuss several gender-related aspects of the novels, which have remained highly topical, then and now. Please register on Stud. IP and explore the sections “Information” and “Schedule” on Stud. IP. for further details.

Requirements:
• Interest in the topics discussed and ideally a regular attendance and informed participation in class discussion (not part of your formal assessment);
• in-depth knowledge of the selected reading material and course materials,
• final exam according to module choice.

Required reading materials (you need a copy of these publications for class):
Woolf, Virginia. Mrs. Dalloway: with a foreword by Maureen Howard (Italics). 1st Harvest/HBJ ed., Harcourt Brace Jovanovich, 1990.
Woolf, Virginia. Orlando. Introduction and notes by Merry M. Pawlowski (Italics), Wordsworth Classics, 2003.
Woolf, Virginia, and Morag Shiach. A Room of One's Own; Three guineas (Italics), Oxford University Press, 1992.
Copies can be purchased at the bookstore on our campus (Universitätsbuchhandlung Bremen: www.unibuch-bremen.de)

Dr. Jana Nittel
10-76-4-D2/WD2-05Key Topics in Literature: West African Women’s Literature (in englischer Sprache)

Seminar

Termine:
wöchentlich Do 12:15 - 13:45 GW2 B1820

This course is designed to introduce students to women's literary productions in West Africa. It will focus on the contributions of West African women in the literary sphere from the last half of the 20th century to the present. We will examine a variety of literary genres from different geographical areas and cultural contexts of West Africa. In these selected literatures, we will explore how these writings offer distinctive insights, or engage with specific historical, social, cultural, political and economic contexts within which their writings are situated, and wherein their consciousness and experiences are shaped. To do this meticulously, we will start by engaging with theoretical priorities and contextual contributions that have been developed within this vantage point and social positionality. Discussion of selected literary texts will focus on the representation of gender as a crucial organising variable under colonial patriarchy, and shared positionality in relation to gendered experiences. Course objective is to assist students in developing an understanding of the theoretical priorities that motivate West African women's literary expressions, and introduce students to the abundance of unique preoccupations that can be found in this literary space.

Okanmiyinoluwa Oluwadunni Talabi, M.A.
10-76-4-D2/WD2-06Key Topics in Literature: The Roots and Routes of Irish America (in englischer Sprache)

Seminar
ECTS: 3

Termine:
wöchentlich Do 14:15 - 15:45 GW2 B3010 (Kleiner Studierraum)

30.4 million people or about 9.2 percent of Americans claim Irish ancestry in the United States today. Big annual St. Patrick’s Day celebrations pay tribute to traditions of the Irish diaspora in America. But can we really speak of an ‘Irish America’ today, and if so, what is its literary and cultural history? This class wants to explore these and related questions by introducing students to the study of Irish American literature and culture. We will read and analyze a selection of texts, such as novels, poetry, memoirs, and theory (in full and/or excerpt form) that address or have emerged from Irish American experiences. In doing so, we will reflect on the histories and cultural forms of expression of an ever-changing community of immigrants and their descendants who were central to the shaping of the United States, especially from the mid-nineteenth to the early twentieth century but now may seem more elusive or even a thing of the past. Using a combination of text-centered and contextual approaches, students will study secondary material, explore the form and style of literary and cultural texts in the broad area of Irish America, and reflect on some key concerns, such as the construction of ethnic, religious, or national affiliation and belonging as well as migration and diaspora.

This class is planned in the form of weekly in-person sessions, subject to change. An online guest lecture is tentatively planned. The majority of material and information will be made available on Stud.IP. Prior enrolment via Stud.IP is mandatory and admission is limited to a maximum of thirty students. The class is open to ESC students studying the WD2-a, WD2-b, and the D2-c modules as well as international exchange students. Please check Stud.IP regularly for updates, including any preparatory primary or secondary readings.

Requirements
• active participation in class and/or online (esp. Stud.IP and Zoom)
• in-depth knowledge of the reading material,
• graded or ungraded assignment in accordance with the respective module requirements.

Dr. Paula von Gleich
10-76-4-D2/WD2-07Key Topics in Literature and Cultural History: The Robot on Film (in englischer Sprache)

Seminar

Termine:
wöchentlich Di 14:15 - 15:45 SFG 2070

Robots have been omnipresent in science fiction for nearly a century: popular films ranging from Fritz Lang’s Metropolis (1927) to Miguel Sapochnik’s Finch (2021) attest that cinema-goers love a good robot yarn. Hollywood cinema, in particular, imagines apocalyptic action spectacles in which humans battle machines as well as introspective dramas about the impact of machines on everyday life. In these fictional technofutures, robots appear as soldiers, servants, companions, carers, and lovers. This sheer ubiquity of mechanical people indicates that deeper cultural forces are at play. As a powerful cipher for human fears and desires, the robot presents a mirror image of humanity’s best and worst features. Robot films, thus, serve as a cultural arena in which to debate anxieties about ontological boundaries and Otherness.

This seminar will explore a variety of films to examine how representations of the robot have developed over time. In doing so, we will develop a critical vocabulary to discuss the intersections of culture, society, and technoscience. In addition, we will investigate how science fiction helps negotiate fundamental ethical debates about technology and responsibility, anthropocentrism and automation bias, superintelligence and moral consideration. Ultimately, a closer look at the posthuman also allows us to examine the human condition in the digital age.

A list of the seminar’s primary texts will be announced soon.

Requirements:
• Regular attendance
• Active participation in class
• In-depth knowledge of the reading materials
• Final assessment according to module choice

Please note that prior enrollment via Stud. IP is mandatory.

Katalina Kopka, M.A.
10-76-4-D2/WD2-08Key Topics in Literature and Cultural History: Staging the Historical Scientist (in englischer Sprache)

Seminar

Termine:
wöchentlich Di 14:15 - 15:45 GW2 B1630

The struggles that scientists go through has been a topic for playwrights for centuries, from Doctor Faustus by Christopher Marlowe to Arcadia by Tom Stoppard. What is especially fascinating to read about is the work of historical scientists, characters larger than life that now appear on the contemporary stage. In this seminar, we will take a look at the lives of self-taught theoretical mathematician Srinivasa Ramanujan and long-overlooked X-ray crystallographer Rosalind Franklin in contemporary dramatic texts. A detailed course plan as well as further reading material will be provided by the beginning of April.

Primary texts:
Ziegler, Anna. Photograph 51. Oberon Books, 2015.
Hauptman, Ira. Partition. Playscript Inc., 2006.


Please obtain copies of these two texts prior to the start of the class. Both will also be available in a Semesterapparat alongside selected secondary sources on the first floor of the SuUB, see here for more information: https://suche.suub.uni-bremen.de/opac.php?Kurs=p03+Hofschroeer

Requirements:
• regular attendance (not mandatory)
• active participation in class
• in-depth knowledge of the primary and secondary reading materials
• oral presentation and/or term paper (depending on your module)

Please note that prior enrolment via Stud. IP is mandatory.

NOTE
As of January 2022, the University of Bremen is planning to implement face-to-face teaching in the summer semester 2022 and this class is scheduled as such. This might be subject to change, depending on the development of the pandemic. Should this class need to be moved offline, the course requirements and schedule may change. Please refer back to the regular “Corona Updates” provided via email by the University Executive Board (Rektorat).

Kim-Nicola Hofschröer, M.A.
10-76-4-D2/WD2-09Key Topics in Literature and Cultural History: The Postcolonial World in Literature and Film: the USA (in englischer Sprache)

Seminar

Termine:
wöchentlich Do 10:15 - 11:45 MZH 1460

This class will introduce students to the USA from a postcolonial perspective. We will look at and read films and texts about Indigenous, Asian, Hispanic, and African American cultures. Please purchase the following books at the university book store (on Universitätsboulevard): Linda Hogan People of the Whale (16 €), Sandra Cisneros House on Mango Street (11 €) and Imbolo Mbue Behold the Dreamers (10,50 €). All other texts (short stories and secondary texts) are provided via StudIP.
Class requirements are regular attendance and active class discussion as well as in-depth knowledge of reading and viewing material. Reading the texts and watching the films is mandatory. Make time for watching films Tuesday evenings 6-8 pm. Please note that prior enrollment through StudIP is mandatory. Maximum number of participants: 35.

Prof. Dr. Kerstin Knopf
10-76-6-WD2-01Key Topics in Linguistics: Contrastive Linguistics (in englischer Sprache)

Seminar

Termine:
wöchentlich Do 08:00 - 10:00 GW2 B3850

Why is English English, and what makes German German? How are, for example, case and tense realized in these languages? How is the word order different? Why does one language have words that the other does not have, and how do speakers deal with that fact?
In this class, we start with a revision of basic grammatical concepts. We can then investigate several grammatical and lexical differences. In addition, we will study practical applications of our findings, e.g. in translation equivalence or for language teaching.

Should we not be able to meet for classes on campus, then this class will be category C1 Asynchronous online learning, meaning no video meetings at any time. You work on the tasks in your own pace and place.

Form of assessment:
BA ESC module WD2a: Studienleistung, not graded: Portfolio consisting of two written assignments
BA ESC module WD2c: Prüfungsleistung, graded: Portfolio consisting of three written assignments
MaEd LING module: Portfolio consisting of three written assignments, with a focus on benefits of constrastive linguistics to language teaching.
Erasmus students can gain between 3 CP and 6 CP, depending on the workload we agree on.

Please be aware that you can NOT take this class for the BA ESC D2 module. Furthermore, it is NOT possible to choose this class as “Ersatzleistung für das Auslandssemester”.

Dr. Anke Schulz
10-76-6-WD2-02Key Topics in Linguistics: Discourse Analysis (in englischer Sprache)

Seminar

Termine:
wöchentlich Mo 10:15 - 11:45 GW1 A0150

Einzeltermine:
Di 14.06.22 10:15 - 11:15 GW2 B1400

This course introduces you to Discourse Analysis (DA) and offers an overview of several of the major approaches to DA, including conversation analysis, critical discourse analysis, multimodal discourse analysis, and pragmatics-based approaches. We will analyze the nature and construction of meaning and how meaning is conveyed through verbal and written communication, including digital communication. We will also explore how language varies according to communicative purpose and speaker roles and identities, discuss discourse practices across social, cultural, and educational contexts, and critically evaluate texts of various genres and purposes. Throughout the semester, you will apply various methods and approaches to the analysis of authentic materials.
All materials will be available via Stud.IP.

Dr. Ramona Kreis
10-76-6-WD2-03Key Topics in Linguistics: Lexical creativity in World Englishes (in englischer Sprache)

Seminar

Termine:
wöchentlich Di 10:15 - 11:45 Externer Ort: GW2 A3390

‎“Although we may not all be as creative as the poets, each of us is a poet in his or her own right – ‎that is, we are all capable of exploiting the language system creatively” (Munat 2015: 92).‎

Since the beginning of the 17th century, new varieties of English have emerged all around the ‎world. The lexicon of these varieties has been influenced and shaped by the languages that they ‎have come into contact with and by the speakers who use them. This course explores the different ‎word-formation processes that speakers exploit creatively to coin and manipulate lexical items and ‎expressions to adapt, expand, and change the lexicon of the different varieties of English. ‎

Students will carry out corpus-based empirical research projects in which they examine selected ‎aspects of lexical creativity in World Englishes.‎

Basic introductory textbooks
Bauer, Laurie (2021). An Introduction to English Lexicology. Edinburgh: Edinburgh University Press. ‎
Plag, Ingo (2003). Word-formation in English. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.‎

Nicole Hober, M.A.
10-76-6-WD2-04Key Topics in Linguistics: Linguistic Landscapes (in englischer Sprache)

Seminar
ECTS: 3/6

Termine:
wöchentlich Do 08:15 - 09:45 MZH 1460

The ensemble of linguistic and semiotic traces in public space forms a caleidoskop of cultural and social diversity in a given territory, as well as it shows a representation of social dynamics with regard to linguistic developments and repertoires, negotiations of social identity, and other subjects of social change in multilingual contexts. The investigation of languages in public space is the objective of the emerging research field of linguistic landscapes. In line with 'expanding the linguistic landscape', the course aims to explore 'linguistic diversity, multimodality and the use of space as a semiotic resource' (Pütz & Mundt, 2018).

In light of the interdisciplinary character of the field, we will work together on groundbreaking studies as well as innovative approaches in order to become acquainted with specific methods of data collection and analysis, their benefits and their limitations, respectively. In addition to discussing origins of the field, methodologies and their underlying research paradigms, students will gain practical experience in empirical research by discovering and analyzing linguistic landscapes in their own environments.

In order to fullfil the requirements for the course, a participation at this year's Bremen Student Conference in English Linguistics (July 2022) is obligatory (further information see tab "performance record")

Take a look at the following resources in order to get a first idea of LL study:

a) Linguistic Landscape: https://benjamins.com/catalog/ll (a peer-reviewed international journal, various articles are publicly available);

b) Elena Shohamy's introductory chapter in Pütz & Mundt (2018):
Shohamy, Elana. "1. Linguistic Landscape after a Decade: An Overview of Themes, Debates and Future Directions" (https://doi.org/10.21832/9781788922166-004) (cf. title, available via library)

Reference:
Pütz, M. & Mundt, N. (2018). Expanding the Linguistic Landscape: Linguistic Diversity, Multimodality and the Use of Space as a Semiotic Resource. Bristol, Blue Ridge Summit: Multilingual Matters.

Henning Vahlenkamp

WD-2b Aufbaumodul: Literaturwissenschaft und Kulturgeschichte (6 CP) (Wahlpflichtmodul) - (nur für das Sommersemester)

(6 CP = 3 CP und 3 CP)

Es gilt zu beachten: Laut SK-Beschluss (E-SC) vom 21.12.2012 ist die Prüfungsleistung im Bereich "Key Topics in Cultural History" zu erbringen =
Klausur/Written Test oder benotete Praesentationsleistung/Presentation

Modulbeauftragte/r: Dr. Inke du Bois, dubois@uni-bremen.de und Prof. Dr. Marcus Callies, callies@uni-bremen.de
VAKTitel der VeranstaltungDozentIn
10-76-4-D2/WD2-01Key Topics in Literature: Literary London – London in Literature (in englischer Sprache)

Seminar
ECTS: Depending on module choice

Termine:
wöchentlich Mo 16:15 - 17:45 GW2 B3010 (Kleiner Studierraum)

This course welcomes students who wish to complete the following modules:
M.A. E_SC ExMo 1 – Extension Module 1
M.A. E-SC ExMo 2 - Extension Module 2
M.A. TnL Vertiefungsmodul
M.A. TnL Profilmodul I: Literatur
B.A. E-SC “Key Topics in Literature”- D2-c; WD-2a and WD-2b
Academic Exchange Students

Teaching method: We will meet in weekly face to face sessions on campus. You will need access to Stud.IP. and a laptop or tablet with sound and audio capabilities. Please make sure to attend our first session if you wish a placement in this class.

This course seeks to familiarise students with a number of selected authors, poets and writers, in general, who have held lifelong connections with London, may it be historic or contemporary. We will aim to discuss their continued engagement with the city by exploring a selections of excerpts clustered around five major topic choices: Queer London; Women Writers and London; London’s Imperial Past and Postcolonial Present; London Theatreland and the Shakespearean Stage; London and Crime, and London and the Long Eighteen Century. By virtually tracing forgotten as well as prominent landmarks of the urban centre, we seek to connect the literary representations of the city with historical and cultural developments, present and past. A reader with primary and secondary reading materials will be available for download on Stud.IP.

Please register on Stud. IP and explore the sections “Information” and “Schedule” on Stud. IP. for further details.

Requirements:
• Interest in the topics discussed and ideally a regular attendance and informed participation in class discussion (not part of your formal assessment);
• in-depth knowledge of the selected reading material and course materials,
• final exam according to module choice.

Dr. Jana Nittel
10-76-4-D2/WD2-02Key Topics in Literature and Cultural History: Contemporary Crime Fiction (in englischer Sprache)

Seminar
ECTS: Depending on module choice

Termine:
wöchentlich Di 12:15 - 13:45 GW2 B3010 (Kleiner Studierraum)

This course welcomes students who wish to complete the following modules:
B.A. E-SC “Key Topics in Literature”- D2-c; WD-2a and WD-2b
B.A. E-SC “Key Topics in Cultural History” – D2-a
Academic Exchange students

Teaching method: We will meet in weekly face to face sessions on campus. You will need access to Stud.IP. and a laptop or tablet with sound and audio capabilities. Please make sure to attend our first session if you wish a placement in this class.

Crime Fiction is overwhelmingly popular and yet, much of the narrative literature that involves crime of some kind or another is often not regarded as ‘literature’ at all. This course is designed to familiarise students with the contemporary critical and theoretical arguments concerning popular fiction and genre studies, as well as to enable all participants of this course to relate to the genre’s wider social, historical and political contexts while discussing the individual narratives in terms of form, language and imagery.

Seeking to promote an analytical, creative and imaginative engagement with the complexities of literary and cultural discourses, we will focus on excerpts of both detective- or transgressor-centred narratives from the second half of the 20th Century onwards. These narratives include examples of the police novel (e.g. Ian Rankin); of female detectives and the feminist appropriations of the hard-boiled story (e.g. Sara Paretsky); of the psychothriller (e.g. Patricia Highsmith), of Afro-American crime fiction, here the examination of literary representations and other cultural manifestations of the Black Diaspora, discussing the relevance of this form of genre fiction to the Black experience of North American Life (e.g. Walter Mosley), of Indigenous crime fiction (e.g. Thomas King), of the postmodern mystery (e.g. Paul Auster), and of representations of disability in crime fiction (e.g. Jeffrey Deaver’s Lincoln Rhyme series).

Please register on Stud. IP and explore the sections “Information” and “Schedule” on Stud. IP. for further details.

Requirements:
• Interest in the topics discussed and ideally a regular attendance and informed participation in class discussion (not part of your formal assessment);
• in-depth knowledge of the selected reading material and course materials,
• final exam according to module choice.

Reading materials (we will read excerpts of these novels but you are welcome to read these novels in full especially when planning a research project):
Auster, Paul. The New York Trilogy, Faber and Faber, 1987.
Deaver, Jeffrey. The Bone Collector, Hodder and Stoughton, 1997.
Highsmith, Patricia. Strangers on a Train, Vintage, 1999, 1950.
King, Thomas. The Red Power Murders: A DreadfulWater Mystery, Harper Perennial, 2006.
Mosley, Walter. Devil in a Blue Dress, Serpent's Tail, 2001, 1991.
Paretsky, Sara. Blacklist: A V.I. Warshawski Novel, Signet Book, 2004.
Rankin, Ian. Knots & Crosses: Inspector Rebus Novel, Orion, 2005, 1998.

Copies of some but not all novels are available for purchase at the bookstore on our campus (Universitätsbuchhandlung Bremen: www.unibuch-bremen.de)

Dr. Jana Nittel
10-76-4-D2/WD2-03Key Topics in Literature: Women and Fiction – Virginia Woolf (in englischer Sprache)

Seminar
ECTS: Depending on module choice

Termine:
wöchentlich Di 10:15 - 11:45 GW2 B3010 (Kleiner Studierraum)

This course welcomes students who wish to complete the following modules:
B.A. E-SC D-2c; WD-2a und WD-2b
Academic Exchange Students

Teaching method: We will meet in weekly face to face sessions on campus. You will need access to Stud.IP. and a laptop or tablet with sound and audio capabilities. Please make sure to attend our first session if you wish a placement in this class.

According to Bonnie Kime Scott, modernist women “actively transformed the novel to reflect their unique perceptions of everyday life […] as critics and creative writers”. This course is designed to aesthetically appreciate and to critically explore selected works by the 20th-Century British female author and critic Virginia Woolf using text-centred and contextual approaches. We will explore the relation of women and fiction in the first three decades of the 20th century in Woolf’s feminist literary criticism, revisit modernist writing strategies and discuss several gender-related aspects of the novels, which have remained highly topical, then and now. Please register on Stud. IP and explore the sections “Information” and “Schedule” on Stud. IP. for further details.

Requirements:
• Interest in the topics discussed and ideally a regular attendance and informed participation in class discussion (not part of your formal assessment);
• in-depth knowledge of the selected reading material and course materials,
• final exam according to module choice.

Required reading materials (you need a copy of these publications for class):
Woolf, Virginia. Mrs. Dalloway: with a foreword by Maureen Howard (Italics). 1st Harvest/HBJ ed., Harcourt Brace Jovanovich, 1990.
Woolf, Virginia. Orlando. Introduction and notes by Merry M. Pawlowski (Italics), Wordsworth Classics, 2003.
Woolf, Virginia, and Morag Shiach. A Room of One's Own; Three guineas (Italics), Oxford University Press, 1992.
Copies can be purchased at the bookstore on our campus (Universitätsbuchhandlung Bremen: www.unibuch-bremen.de)

Dr. Jana Nittel
10-76-4-D2/WD2-05Key Topics in Literature: West African Women’s Literature (in englischer Sprache)

Seminar

Termine:
wöchentlich Do 12:15 - 13:45 GW2 B1820

This course is designed to introduce students to women's literary productions in West Africa. It will focus on the contributions of West African women in the literary sphere from the last half of the 20th century to the present. We will examine a variety of literary genres from different geographical areas and cultural contexts of West Africa. In these selected literatures, we will explore how these writings offer distinctive insights, or engage with specific historical, social, cultural, political and economic contexts within which their writings are situated, and wherein their consciousness and experiences are shaped. To do this meticulously, we will start by engaging with theoretical priorities and contextual contributions that have been developed within this vantage point and social positionality. Discussion of selected literary texts will focus on the representation of gender as a crucial organising variable under colonial patriarchy, and shared positionality in relation to gendered experiences. Course objective is to assist students in developing an understanding of the theoretical priorities that motivate West African women's literary expressions, and introduce students to the abundance of unique preoccupations that can be found in this literary space.

Okanmiyinoluwa Oluwadunni Talabi, M.A.
10-76-4-D2/WD2-06Key Topics in Literature: The Roots and Routes of Irish America (in englischer Sprache)

Seminar
ECTS: 3

Termine:
wöchentlich Do 14:15 - 15:45 GW2 B3010 (Kleiner Studierraum)

30.4 million people or about 9.2 percent of Americans claim Irish ancestry in the United States today. Big annual St. Patrick’s Day celebrations pay tribute to traditions of the Irish diaspora in America. But can we really speak of an ‘Irish America’ today, and if so, what is its literary and cultural history? This class wants to explore these and related questions by introducing students to the study of Irish American literature and culture. We will read and analyze a selection of texts, such as novels, poetry, memoirs, and theory (in full and/or excerpt form) that address or have emerged from Irish American experiences. In doing so, we will reflect on the histories and cultural forms of expression of an ever-changing community of immigrants and their descendants who were central to the shaping of the United States, especially from the mid-nineteenth to the early twentieth century but now may seem more elusive or even a thing of the past. Using a combination of text-centered and contextual approaches, students will study secondary material, explore the form and style of literary and cultural texts in the broad area of Irish America, and reflect on some key concerns, such as the construction of ethnic, religious, or national affiliation and belonging as well as migration and diaspora.

This class is planned in the form of weekly in-person sessions, subject to change. An online guest lecture is tentatively planned. The majority of material and information will be made available on Stud.IP. Prior enrolment via Stud.IP is mandatory and admission is limited to a maximum of thirty students. The class is open to ESC students studying the WD2-a, WD2-b, and the D2-c modules as well as international exchange students. Please check Stud.IP regularly for updates, including any preparatory primary or secondary readings.

Requirements
• active participation in class and/or online (esp. Stud.IP and Zoom)
• in-depth knowledge of the reading material,
• graded or ungraded assignment in accordance with the respective module requirements.

Dr. Paula von Gleich
10-76-4-D2/WD2-07Key Topics in Literature and Cultural History: The Robot on Film (in englischer Sprache)

Seminar

Termine:
wöchentlich Di 14:15 - 15:45 SFG 2070

Robots have been omnipresent in science fiction for nearly a century: popular films ranging from Fritz Lang’s Metropolis (1927) to Miguel Sapochnik’s Finch (2021) attest that cinema-goers love a good robot yarn. Hollywood cinema, in particular, imagines apocalyptic action spectacles in which humans battle machines as well as introspective dramas about the impact of machines on everyday life. In these fictional technofutures, robots appear as soldiers, servants, companions, carers, and lovers. This sheer ubiquity of mechanical people indicates that deeper cultural forces are at play. As a powerful cipher for human fears and desires, the robot presents a mirror image of humanity’s best and worst features. Robot films, thus, serve as a cultural arena in which to debate anxieties about ontological boundaries and Otherness.

This seminar will explore a variety of films to examine how representations of the robot have developed over time. In doing so, we will develop a critical vocabulary to discuss the intersections of culture, society, and technoscience. In addition, we will investigate how science fiction helps negotiate fundamental ethical debates about technology and responsibility, anthropocentrism and automation bias, superintelligence and moral consideration. Ultimately, a closer look at the posthuman also allows us to examine the human condition in the digital age.

A list of the seminar’s primary texts will be announced soon.

Requirements:
• Regular attendance
• Active participation in class
• In-depth knowledge of the reading materials
• Final assessment according to module choice

Please note that prior enrollment via Stud. IP is mandatory.

Katalina Kopka, M.A.
10-76-4-D2/WD2-08Key Topics in Literature and Cultural History: Staging the Historical Scientist (in englischer Sprache)

Seminar

Termine:
wöchentlich Di 14:15 - 15:45 GW2 B1630

The struggles that scientists go through has been a topic for playwrights for centuries, from Doctor Faustus by Christopher Marlowe to Arcadia by Tom Stoppard. What is especially fascinating to read about is the work of historical scientists, characters larger than life that now appear on the contemporary stage. In this seminar, we will take a look at the lives of self-taught theoretical mathematician Srinivasa Ramanujan and long-overlooked X-ray crystallographer Rosalind Franklin in contemporary dramatic texts. A detailed course plan as well as further reading material will be provided by the beginning of April.

Primary texts:
Ziegler, Anna. Photograph 51. Oberon Books, 2015.
Hauptman, Ira. Partition. Playscript Inc., 2006.


Please obtain copies of these two texts prior to the start of the class. Both will also be available in a Semesterapparat alongside selected secondary sources on the first floor of the SuUB, see here for more information: https://suche.suub.uni-bremen.de/opac.php?Kurs=p03+Hofschroeer

Requirements:
• regular attendance (not mandatory)
• active participation in class
• in-depth knowledge of the primary and secondary reading materials
• oral presentation and/or term paper (depending on your module)

Please note that prior enrolment via Stud. IP is mandatory.

NOTE
As of January 2022, the University of Bremen is planning to implement face-to-face teaching in the summer semester 2022 and this class is scheduled as such. This might be subject to change, depending on the development of the pandemic. Should this class need to be moved offline, the course requirements and schedule may change. Please refer back to the regular “Corona Updates” provided via email by the University Executive Board (Rektorat).

Kim-Nicola Hofschröer, M.A.
10-76-4-D2/WD2-09Key Topics in Literature and Cultural History: The Postcolonial World in Literature and Film: the USA (in englischer Sprache)

Seminar

Termine:
wöchentlich Do 10:15 - 11:45 MZH 1460

This class will introduce students to the USA from a postcolonial perspective. We will look at and read films and texts about Indigenous, Asian, Hispanic, and African American cultures. Please purchase the following books at the university book store (on Universitätsboulevard): Linda Hogan People of the Whale (16 €), Sandra Cisneros House on Mango Street (11 €) and Imbolo Mbue Behold the Dreamers (10,50 €). All other texts (short stories and secondary texts) are provided via StudIP.
Class requirements are regular attendance and active class discussion as well as in-depth knowledge of reading and viewing material. Reading the texts and watching the films is mandatory. Make time for watching films Tuesday evenings 6-8 pm. Please note that prior enrollment through StudIP is mandatory. Maximum number of participants: 35.

Prof. Dr. Kerstin Knopf
10-76-4-D2/WD2-10Key Topics Cultural History: Cultural Resistance. Art and Social Movements (in englischer Sprache)

Seminar
ECTS: 3

Termine:
wöchentlich Di 10:15 - 11:45 GW1 B0080 GW1 B2130

Art has transformative power. Social movements use art to protest against inequality and oppression, to raise awareness and to stimulate activism. Thus, art may contribute to an aesthetics of change. We will examine posters, fliers, murals, graffiti, photography, paintings, installations, mixed media works, and digital art in order to understand the role of visual art in resistance cultures. Possible topics include feminism, anti-racism, environmentalism, gay and queer interventions, labor movements, First Nations etc. Students will work in groups and present their findings in class sessions. Exploring the cultural expressions and aesthetics of resistance movements may give new insights into the interaction of cultural, aesthetic, political, economic and social forces.

Requirements:
• regular attendance and oral participation
• in-depth knowledge of the reading material
• oral presentation and handout
• final paper (Prüfungsleistung)

Dr. Karin Esders-Angermund
10-76-4-D2/WD2-11Key Topics Cultural History: Approaches to Contemporary Cultures (in englischer Sprache)

Seminar

Termine:
wöchentlich Mi 10:15 - 11:45 SFG 2070

This course will offer a range of conceptual frameworks that can help us to better understand and analyze contemporary cultures. In looking at theoretical approaches, empirical examples, and analytical practices we will address issues of representation, difference, and power.

Essential readings will be available for download on Stud-IP.
Requirements:
• Regular attendance and oral participation
• In-depth knowledge of the reading material
• In-depth knowledge of the films to be discussed
• Oral presentation and handout
• For a graded Prüfungsleistung (PL): Final paper

Dr. Karin Esders-Angermund
10-76-4-D2/WD2-12Key Topics Cultural History: Intersectional Perspectives on Inequality and Power (in englischer Sprache)

Seminar

Termine:
wöchentlich Mi 14:15 - 15:45 SFG 2070

Intersectionality strives to transcend traditional single-axis horizons of thinking. It calls attention to political and structural inequalities and exposes overlapping structures of subordination that make certain groups specifically vulnerable. Intersectionality challenges the assumption that gender stratification affects everyone in the same way; race and class matter, and so do religion and origin and other factors. We will look at various fields of “doing intersectionality” in order to develop a critical lens and strengthen the bridge between research and analysis.

Essential readings will be available for download on Stud-IP.
Requirements:
• Regular attendance and oral participation
• In-depth knowledge of the reading material
• In-depth knowledge of the films to be discussed
• Oral presentation and handout
• For a graded Prüfungsleistung (PL): Final paper

Dr. Karin Esders-Angermund
10-76-4-D2/WD2-13Key Topics Cultural History: Critical Perspectives on US-American Film (in englischer Sprache)

Seminar

Termine:
wöchentlich Do 08:00 - 12:00 GW2 B2880

Einzeltermine:
Do 21.04.22 10:00 - 12:00 GW2 B2890

Cinema as a dominant cultural institution participates in an ongoing “struggle over meaning”. Frequently, however, social and cultural contradictions are not directly displayed in the movies but remain unexpressed or denied. This course will analyze the subtle and often not so subtle ways in which American movies deal with social conflicts and predicaments.

Essential readings will be available for download on Stud-IP.
Check out Kanopy at https://unibremen.kanopy.com/ and start watching independent films.

Requirements:
• Regular attendance and oral participation
• In-depth knowledge of the reading material
• In-depth knowledge of the films to be discussed
• Oral presentation and handout
• For a graded Prüfungsleistung (PL): Final paper

Dr. Karin Esders-Angermund

WD-2c Aufbaumodul: Sprachwissenschaft und Kulturgeschichte (Wahlpflichtmodul) (6 CP)- (nur für das Sommersemester)

(6 CP = 3 CP und 3 CP)

Es gilt zu beachten: Laut SK-Beschluss (E-SC) vom 21.12.2012 ist die Prüfungsleistung im Bereich "Key Topics in Linguistics" zu erbringen =
Klausur/Written Test oder benotete Präsentationsleistung/Presentation

Modulbeauftragte/r: Dr. Inke du Bois, dubois@uni-bremen.de und Prof. Dr. Marcus Callies, callies@uni-bremen.de
VAKTitel der VeranstaltungDozentIn
10-76-4-D2/WD2-02Key Topics in Literature and Cultural History: Contemporary Crime Fiction (in englischer Sprache)

Seminar
ECTS: Depending on module choice

Termine:
wöchentlich Di 12:15 - 13:45 GW2 B3010 (Kleiner Studierraum)

This course welcomes students who wish to complete the following modules:
B.A. E-SC “Key Topics in Literature”- D2-c; WD-2a and WD-2b
B.A. E-SC “Key Topics in Cultural History” – D2-a
Academic Exchange students

Teaching method: We will meet in weekly face to face sessions on campus. You will need access to Stud.IP. and a laptop or tablet with sound and audio capabilities. Please make sure to attend our first session if you wish a placement in this class.

Crime Fiction is overwhelmingly popular and yet, much of the narrative literature that involves crime of some kind or another is often not regarded as ‘literature’ at all. This course is designed to familiarise students with the contemporary critical and theoretical arguments concerning popular fiction and genre studies, as well as to enable all participants of this course to relate to the genre’s wider social, historical and political contexts while discussing the individual narratives in terms of form, language and imagery.

Seeking to promote an analytical, creative and imaginative engagement with the complexities of literary and cultural discourses, we will focus on excerpts of both detective- or transgressor-centred narratives from the second half of the 20th Century onwards. These narratives include examples of the police novel (e.g. Ian Rankin); of female detectives and the feminist appropriations of the hard-boiled story (e.g. Sara Paretsky); of the psychothriller (e.g. Patricia Highsmith), of Afro-American crime fiction, here the examination of literary representations and other cultural manifestations of the Black Diaspora, discussing the relevance of this form of genre fiction to the Black experience of North American Life (e.g. Walter Mosley), of Indigenous crime fiction (e.g. Thomas King), of the postmodern mystery (e.g. Paul Auster), and of representations of disability in crime fiction (e.g. Jeffrey Deaver’s Lincoln Rhyme series).

Please register on Stud. IP and explore the sections “Information” and “Schedule” on Stud. IP. for further details.

Requirements:
• Interest in the topics discussed and ideally a regular attendance and informed participation in class discussion (not part of your formal assessment);
• in-depth knowledge of the selected reading material and course materials,
• final exam according to module choice.

Reading materials (we will read excerpts of these novels but you are welcome to read these novels in full especially when planning a research project):
Auster, Paul. The New York Trilogy, Faber and Faber, 1987.
Deaver, Jeffrey. The Bone Collector, Hodder and Stoughton, 1997.
Highsmith, Patricia. Strangers on a Train, Vintage, 1999, 1950.
King, Thomas. The Red Power Murders: A DreadfulWater Mystery, Harper Perennial, 2006.
Mosley, Walter. Devil in a Blue Dress, Serpent's Tail, 2001, 1991.
Paretsky, Sara. Blacklist: A V.I. Warshawski Novel, Signet Book, 2004.
Rankin, Ian. Knots & Crosses: Inspector Rebus Novel, Orion, 2005, 1998.

Copies of some but not all novels are available for purchase at the bookstore on our campus (Universitätsbuchhandlung Bremen: www.unibuch-bremen.de)

Dr. Jana Nittel
10-76-4-D2/WD2-07Key Topics in Literature and Cultural History: The Robot on Film (in englischer Sprache)

Seminar

Termine:
wöchentlich Di 14:15 - 15:45 SFG 2070

Robots have been omnipresent in science fiction for nearly a century: popular films ranging from Fritz Lang’s Metropolis (1927) to Miguel Sapochnik’s Finch (2021) attest that cinema-goers love a good robot yarn. Hollywood cinema, in particular, imagines apocalyptic action spectacles in which humans battle machines as well as introspective dramas about the impact of machines on everyday life. In these fictional technofutures, robots appear as soldiers, servants, companions, carers, and lovers. This sheer ubiquity of mechanical people indicates that deeper cultural forces are at play. As a powerful cipher for human fears and desires, the robot presents a mirror image of humanity’s best and worst features. Robot films, thus, serve as a cultural arena in which to debate anxieties about ontological boundaries and Otherness.

This seminar will explore a variety of films to examine how representations of the robot have developed over time. In doing so, we will develop a critical vocabulary to discuss the intersections of culture, society, and technoscience. In addition, we will investigate how science fiction helps negotiate fundamental ethical debates about technology and responsibility, anthropocentrism and automation bias, superintelligence and moral consideration. Ultimately, a closer look at the posthuman also allows us to examine the human condition in the digital age.

A list of the seminar’s primary texts will be announced soon.

Requirements:
• Regular attendance
• Active participation in class
• In-depth knowledge of the reading materials
• Final assessment according to module choice

Please note that prior enrollment via Stud. IP is mandatory.

Katalina Kopka, M.A.
10-76-4-D2/WD2-08Key Topics in Literature and Cultural History: Staging the Historical Scientist (in englischer Sprache)

Seminar

Termine:
wöchentlich Di 14:15 - 15:45 GW2 B1630

The struggles that scientists go through has been a topic for playwrights for centuries, from Doctor Faustus by Christopher Marlowe to Arcadia by Tom Stoppard. What is especially fascinating to read about is the work of historical scientists, characters larger than life that now appear on the contemporary stage. In this seminar, we will take a look at the lives of self-taught theoretical mathematician Srinivasa Ramanujan and long-overlooked X-ray crystallographer Rosalind Franklin in contemporary dramatic texts. A detailed course plan as well as further reading material will be provided by the beginning of April.

Primary texts:
Ziegler, Anna. Photograph 51. Oberon Books, 2015.
Hauptman, Ira. Partition. Playscript Inc., 2006.


Please obtain copies of these two texts prior to the start of the class. Both will also be available in a Semesterapparat alongside selected secondary sources on the first floor of the SuUB, see here for more information: https://suche.suub.uni-bremen.de/opac.php?Kurs=p03+Hofschroeer

Requirements:
• regular attendance (not mandatory)
• active participation in class
• in-depth knowledge of the primary and secondary reading materials
• oral presentation and/or term paper (depending on your module)

Please note that prior enrolment via Stud. IP is mandatory.

NOTE
As of January 2022, the University of Bremen is planning to implement face-to-face teaching in the summer semester 2022 and this class is scheduled as such. This might be subject to change, depending on the development of the pandemic. Should this class need to be moved offline, the course requirements and schedule may change. Please refer back to the regular “Corona Updates” provided via email by the University Executive Board (Rektorat).

Kim-Nicola Hofschröer, M.A.
10-76-4-D2/WD2-09Key Topics in Literature and Cultural History: The Postcolonial World in Literature and Film: the USA (in englischer Sprache)

Seminar

Termine:
wöchentlich Do 10:15 - 11:45 MZH 1460

This class will introduce students to the USA from a postcolonial perspective. We will look at and read films and texts about Indigenous, Asian, Hispanic, and African American cultures. Please purchase the following books at the university book store (on Universitätsboulevard): Linda Hogan People of the Whale (16 €), Sandra Cisneros House on Mango Street (11 €) and Imbolo Mbue Behold the Dreamers (10,50 €). All other texts (short stories and secondary texts) are provided via StudIP.
Class requirements are regular attendance and active class discussion as well as in-depth knowledge of reading and viewing material. Reading the texts and watching the films is mandatory. Make time for watching films Tuesday evenings 6-8 pm. Please note that prior enrollment through StudIP is mandatory. Maximum number of participants: 35.

Prof. Dr. Kerstin Knopf
10-76-4-D2/WD2-10Key Topics Cultural History: Cultural Resistance. Art and Social Movements (in englischer Sprache)

Seminar
ECTS: 3

Termine:
wöchentlich Di 10:15 - 11:45 GW1 B0080 GW1 B2130

Art has transformative power. Social movements use art to protest against inequality and oppression, to raise awareness and to stimulate activism. Thus, art may contribute to an aesthetics of change. We will examine posters, fliers, murals, graffiti, photography, paintings, installations, mixed media works, and digital art in order to understand the role of visual art in resistance cultures. Possible topics include feminism, anti-racism, environmentalism, gay and queer interventions, labor movements, First Nations etc. Students will work in groups and present their findings in class sessions. Exploring the cultural expressions and aesthetics of resistance movements may give new insights into the interaction of cultural, aesthetic, political, economic and social forces.

Requirements:
• regular attendance and oral participation
• in-depth knowledge of the reading material
• oral presentation and handout
• final paper (Prüfungsleistung)

Dr. Karin Esders-Angermund
10-76-4-D2/WD2-11Key Topics Cultural History: Approaches to Contemporary Cultures (in englischer Sprache)

Seminar

Termine:
wöchentlich Mi 10:15 - 11:45 SFG 2070

This course will offer a range of conceptual frameworks that can help us to better understand and analyze contemporary cultures. In looking at theoretical approaches, empirical examples, and analytical practices we will address issues of representation, difference, and power.

Essential readings will be available for download on Stud-IP.
Requirements:
• Regular attendance and oral participation
• In-depth knowledge of the reading material
• In-depth knowledge of the films to be discussed
• Oral presentation and handout
• For a graded Prüfungsleistung (PL): Final paper

Dr. Karin Esders-Angermund
10-76-4-D2/WD2-12Key Topics Cultural History: Intersectional Perspectives on Inequality and Power (in englischer Sprache)

Seminar

Termine:
wöchentlich Mi 14:15 - 15:45 SFG 2070

Intersectionality strives to transcend traditional single-axis horizons of thinking. It calls attention to political and structural inequalities and exposes overlapping structures of subordination that make certain groups specifically vulnerable. Intersectionality challenges the assumption that gender stratification affects everyone in the same way; race and class matter, and so do religion and origin and other factors. We will look at various fields of “doing intersectionality” in order to develop a critical lens and strengthen the bridge between research and analysis.

Essential readings will be available for download on Stud-IP.
Requirements:
• Regular attendance and oral participation
• In-depth knowledge of the reading material
• In-depth knowledge of the films to be discussed
• Oral presentation and handout
• For a graded Prüfungsleistung (PL): Final paper

Dr. Karin Esders-Angermund
10-76-4-D2/WD2-13Key Topics Cultural History: Critical Perspectives on US-American Film (in englischer Sprache)

Seminar

Termine:
wöchentlich Do 08:00 - 12:00 GW2 B2880

Einzeltermine:
Do 21.04.22 10:00 - 12:00 GW2 B2890

Cinema as a dominant cultural institution participates in an ongoing “struggle over meaning”. Frequently, however, social and cultural contradictions are not directly displayed in the movies but remain unexpressed or denied. This course will analyze the subtle and often not so subtle ways in which American movies deal with social conflicts and predicaments.

Essential readings will be available for download on Stud-IP.
Check out Kanopy at https://unibremen.kanopy.com/ and start watching independent films.

Requirements:
• Regular attendance and oral participation
• In-depth knowledge of the reading material
• In-depth knowledge of the films to be discussed
• Oral presentation and handout
• For a graded Prüfungsleistung (PL): Final paper

Dr. Karin Esders-Angermund
10-76-6-WD2-01Key Topics in Linguistics: Contrastive Linguistics (in englischer Sprache)

Seminar

Termine:
wöchentlich Do 08:00 - 10:00 GW2 B3850

Why is English English, and what makes German German? How are, for example, case and tense realized in these languages? How is the word order different? Why does one language have words that the other does not have, and how do speakers deal with that fact?
In this class, we start with a revision of basic grammatical concepts. We can then investigate several grammatical and lexical differences. In addition, we will study practical applications of our findings, e.g. in translation equivalence or for language teaching.

Should we not be able to meet for classes on campus, then this class will be category C1 Asynchronous online learning, meaning no video meetings at any time. You work on the tasks in your own pace and place.

Form of assessment:
BA ESC module WD2a: Studienleistung, not graded: Portfolio consisting of two written assignments
BA ESC module WD2c: Prüfungsleistung, graded: Portfolio consisting of three written assignments
MaEd LING module: Portfolio consisting of three written assignments, with a focus on benefits of constrastive linguistics to language teaching.
Erasmus students can gain between 3 CP and 6 CP, depending on the workload we agree on.

Please be aware that you can NOT take this class for the BA ESC D2 module. Furthermore, it is NOT possible to choose this class as “Ersatzleistung für das Auslandssemester”.

Dr. Anke Schulz
10-76-6-WD2-02Key Topics in Linguistics: Discourse Analysis (in englischer Sprache)

Seminar

Termine:
wöchentlich Mo 10:15 - 11:45 GW1 A0150

Einzeltermine:
Di 14.06.22 10:15 - 11:15 GW2 B1400

This course introduces you to Discourse Analysis (DA) and offers an overview of several of the major approaches to DA, including conversation analysis, critical discourse analysis, multimodal discourse analysis, and pragmatics-based approaches. We will analyze the nature and construction of meaning and how meaning is conveyed through verbal and written communication, including digital communication. We will also explore how language varies according to communicative purpose and speaker roles and identities, discuss discourse practices across social, cultural, and educational contexts, and critically evaluate texts of various genres and purposes. Throughout the semester, you will apply various methods and approaches to the analysis of authentic materials.
All materials will be available via Stud.IP.

Dr. Ramona Kreis
10-76-6-WD2-03Key Topics in Linguistics: Lexical creativity in World Englishes (in englischer Sprache)

Seminar

Termine:
wöchentlich Di 10:15 - 11:45 Externer Ort: GW2 A3390

‎“Although we may not all be as creative as the poets, each of us is a poet in his or her own right – ‎that is, we are all capable of exploiting the language system creatively” (Munat 2015: 92).‎

Since the beginning of the 17th century, new varieties of English have emerged all around the ‎world. The lexicon of these varieties has been influenced and shaped by the languages that they ‎have come into contact with and by the speakers who use them. This course explores the different ‎word-formation processes that speakers exploit creatively to coin and manipulate lexical items and ‎expressions to adapt, expand, and change the lexicon of the different varieties of English. ‎

Students will carry out corpus-based empirical research projects in which they examine selected ‎aspects of lexical creativity in World Englishes.‎

Basic introductory textbooks
Bauer, Laurie (2021). An Introduction to English Lexicology. Edinburgh: Edinburgh University Press. ‎
Plag, Ingo (2003). Word-formation in English. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.‎

Nicole Hober, M.A.
10-76-6-WD2-04Key Topics in Linguistics: Linguistic Landscapes (in englischer Sprache)

Seminar
ECTS: 3/6

Termine:
wöchentlich Do 08:15 - 09:45 MZH 1460

The ensemble of linguistic and semiotic traces in public space forms a caleidoskop of cultural and social diversity in a given territory, as well as it shows a representation of social dynamics with regard to linguistic developments and repertoires, negotiations of social identity, and other subjects of social change in multilingual contexts. The investigation of languages in public space is the objective of the emerging research field of linguistic landscapes. In line with 'expanding the linguistic landscape', the course aims to explore 'linguistic diversity, multimodality and the use of space as a semiotic resource' (Pütz & Mundt, 2018).

In light of the interdisciplinary character of the field, we will work together on groundbreaking studies as well as innovative approaches in order to become acquainted with specific methods of data collection and analysis, their benefits and their limitations, respectively. In addition to discussing origins of the field, methodologies and their underlying research paradigms, students will gain practical experience in empirical research by discovering and analyzing linguistic landscapes in their own environments.

In order to fullfil the requirements for the course, a participation at this year's Bremen Student Conference in English Linguistics (July 2022) is obligatory (further information see tab "performance record")

Take a look at the following resources in order to get a first idea of LL study:

a) Linguistic Landscape: https://benjamins.com/catalog/ll (a peer-reviewed international journal, various articles are publicly available);

b) Elena Shohamy's introductory chapter in Pütz & Mundt (2018):
Shohamy, Elana. "1. Linguistic Landscape after a Decade: An Overview of Themes, Debates and Future Directions" (https://doi.org/10.21832/9781788922166-004) (cf. title, available via library)

Reference:
Pütz, M. & Mundt, N. (2018). Expanding the Linguistic Landscape: Linguistic Diversity, Multimodality and the Use of Space as a Semiotic Resource. Bristol, Blue Ridge Summit: Multilingual Matters.

Henning Vahlenkamp

SP-K Basismodul: Sprachpraxis/Practical-Language Foundation (BIPEP Klein) (3 CP)

Modulbeauftragte/r

Modulbeauftragte/r: Katja Müller, kamueller@uni-bremen
VAKTitel der VeranstaltungDozentIn
10-76-4-SP-G-01Classroom Discourse for BIPeB

Übung
ECTS: 3

Termine:
wöchentlich Do 10:15 - 11:45 SFG 2060

This class is planned to take place on campus.

Registration for Classroom Discourse: SEE BELOW

Participation
1) This class is open to students studying under the BiPEb 'Großes Fach' regulations, 4th semester
BiPEb 'Großes Fach' will also have to take "University Language Skills 1 (BiPEb)", offered this semester.
2) BiPEb 'Kleines Fach', GTW and FaBiWi students interested in taking an additional class with focus on teaching language are very welcome to join in.
3) This class is not recommended for Erasmus or other exchange students, unless they have an English language level ranging from B2 - C1/C2 (GER, CEFR) AND are studying English to become a teacher. Any exchange student with a level below C1 but above B2 wishing to attend Classroom Discourse needs to contact Katja Müller before joining a class. (kamueller(at)uni-bremen.de).

This class is designed to foster your communicative skills in the classroom - here at university and in any school you might be teaching, now or in the future. The focus will be on how to communicate effectively. On the one hand you will be working on expanding your own knowledge of the English language, working on sentence construction, grammar in general, or improving your vocabulary; on the other hand you will be planning to speak and teach "simple" English in class. For future teachers in a primary school this could mean to paraphrase a difficult word, give synonyms to improve the pupils' vocabulary, or to show/draw/mimic situations/actions/people or animals.
Trying out games is also part of the plan, introducing a fun factor to the classroom while at the same time testing the pupils' listening and speaking skills, ensuring that pupils understand instructions, and can communicate appropiately in English themselves, for example when exchanging information or ideas.

REGISTRATION
Online registration is manadatory. ERASMUS or other exchange students please send me an email to register for this class (kamueller@uni-bremen.de). Please replace (at) by @.

Katja Müller, M.A.
10-76-4-SP-K-01ULS1 for BiPeB

Übung
ECTS: 3

Termine:
wöchentlich Do 12:15 - 13:45 MZH 1460

This class is planned to take place on campus.

Participation
1) This class is usually open to students studying under the BiPEb 'Großes Fach' regulations, 4th semester and BiPEb 'Kleines Fach' students in their 2nd semester.
2) ERASMUS or other exchange students can participate in this class if they can provide me with proof of a C1 level (GER, CEFR) in English. Exchange students wishing to participate who have a level below C1, but above B2 need to contact Katja Müller before joining a class. (kamueller(at)uni-bremen.de).Please replace (at) by @.

BiPEb 'Großes Fach' will also have to take 'Classroom discourse', offered this semester.

COURSEWORK
This (BiPEb) 'University Language Skills 1' class offers you the opportunity to analyse and evaluate your own language skills in English to enable you to choose areas in which you see room for improvement. Starting from there, we will move on to cover some basic and, nonetheless, grammatically challenging areas, to introduce you to different rhetorical writing strategies and essay planning structures. Last but not least, we will focus on sentence structure and try out several strategies to further improve your writing style.

REGISTRATION
Online registration is manadatory.
ERASMUS or other exchange students please send me an email to register for this class (kamueller(at)uni-bremen.de). Please replace (at) by @.

Katja Müller, M.A.

SP-G Basismodul: Sprachpraxis/Practical-Language Foundation (BIPEP Groß) (6 CP)

6 CP (3 CP + 3 CP)

Modulbeauftragte/r

Modulbeauftragte/r: Katja Müller, kamueller@uni-bremen
VAKTitel der VeranstaltungDozentIn
10-76-4-SP-G-01Classroom Discourse for BIPeB

Übung
ECTS: 3

Termine:
wöchentlich Do 10:15 - 11:45 SFG 2060

This class is planned to take place on campus.

Registration for Classroom Discourse: SEE BELOW

Participation
1) This class is open to students studying under the BiPEb 'Großes Fach' regulations, 4th semester
BiPEb 'Großes Fach' will also have to take "University Language Skills 1 (BiPEb)", offered this semester.
2) BiPEb 'Kleines Fach', GTW and FaBiWi students interested in taking an additional class with focus on teaching language are very welcome to join in.
3) This class is not recommended for Erasmus or other exchange students, unless they have an English language level ranging from B2 - C1/C2 (GER, CEFR) AND are studying English to become a teacher. Any exchange student with a level below C1 but above B2 wishing to attend Classroom Discourse needs to contact Katja Müller before joining a class. (kamueller(at)uni-bremen.de).

This class is designed to foster your communicative skills in the classroom - here at university and in any school you might be teaching, now or in the future. The focus will be on how to communicate effectively. On the one hand you will be working on expanding your own knowledge of the English language, working on sentence construction, grammar in general, or improving your vocabulary; on the other hand you will be planning to speak and teach "simple" English in class. For future teachers in a primary school this could mean to paraphrase a difficult word, give synonyms to improve the pupils' vocabulary, or to show/draw/mimic situations/actions/people or animals.
Trying out games is also part of the plan, introducing a fun factor to the classroom while at the same time testing the pupils' listening and speaking skills, ensuring that pupils understand instructions, and can communicate appropiately in English themselves, for example when exchanging information or ideas.

REGISTRATION
Online registration is manadatory. ERASMUS or other exchange students please send me an email to register for this class (kamueller@uni-bremen.de). Please replace (at) by @.

Katja Müller, M.A.
10-76-4-SP-K-01ULS1 for BiPeB

Übung
ECTS: 3

Termine:
wöchentlich Do 12:15 - 13:45 MZH 1460

This class is planned to take place on campus.

Participation
1) This class is usually open to students studying under the BiPEb 'Großes Fach' regulations, 4th semester and BiPEb 'Kleines Fach' students in their 2nd semester.
2) ERASMUS or other exchange students can participate in this class if they can provide me with proof of a C1 level (GER, CEFR) in English. Exchange students wishing to participate who have a level below C1, but above B2 need to contact Katja Müller before joining a class. (kamueller(at)uni-bremen.de).Please replace (at) by @.

BiPEb 'Großes Fach' will also have to take 'Classroom discourse', offered this semester.

COURSEWORK
This (BiPEb) 'University Language Skills 1' class offers you the opportunity to analyse and evaluate your own language skills in English to enable you to choose areas in which you see room for improvement. Starting from there, we will move on to cover some basic and, nonetheless, grammatically challenging areas, to introduce you to different rhetorical writing strategies and essay planning structures. Last but not least, we will focus on sentence structure and try out several strategies to further improve your writing style.

REGISTRATION
Online registration is manadatory.
ERASMUS or other exchange students please send me an email to register for this class (kamueller(at)uni-bremen.de). Please replace (at) by @.

Katja Müller, M.A.

LEHRVERANSTALTUNGEN DES 3. JAHRES:

P Abschlussmodul Profilfach (15 CP) "Sprachwissenschaft" oder "Literaturwissenschaft" oder "Kulturgeschichte"

Modulbeauftragte/r: Prof. Dr. John Bateman, bateman@uni-bremen.de

Laut PO des BA ESC von 2011 (§6;1 werden die 3 CP des Begleitseminars (im Profilfach obligatorisch) im Bereich General Studies angerechnet; die Studierenden, die bestanden haben, sind daher Irmgard Maassen (maassen@uni-bremen.de), der Modulbeauftragten für General Studies, zu melden.
VAKTitel der VeranstaltungDozentIn
10-76-6-AP-01Begleitveranstaltung Literaturwissenschaft - Research Colloquium in English Literatures (Zoom only) (in englischer Sprache)

Colloquium
ECTS: 3

Termine:
wöchentlich Do 12:15 - 13:45 Externer Ort: online

Teaching method: We will meet in weekly Zoom sessions.

This course is one of the specific colloquia designed for students planning their final dissertation either on undergraduate or graduate level in the field of literary studies (Module choices: Bachelor thesis module P or Master thesis module MA The). We shall look at a number of strategies for planning, structuring and writing longer pieces of work and this course will include formal issues such as format and layout of the final assignment. Please register on Stud. IP and explore the sections “Information” and “Schedule” on Stud. IP. for further details. List of potential supervisors and co-supervisors in the area Literary and Cultural Studies in English: https://www.uni-bremen.de/fb-10/studium/english-speaking-cultures/literatur-und-kulturwissenschaften/research-foci-supervision

All students, who are planning to write their final dissertations in the field of literary studies, are welcome to join my course. In addition, I am happy to take on the role of a supervisor or co-supervisor for projects that correspond to my research and teaching foci, in other words, students who have a supervisor or co-supervisor that is not me are also welcome to join this course.

Dr. Jana Nittel
10-76-6-AP-02Begleitveranstaltung Literaturwissenschaft - Research Colloquium in English Literatures (in englischer Sprache)

Colloquium

Termine:
wöchentlich Fr 10:15 - 11:45 GW2 B3010 (Kleiner Studierraum)

This module is one of the specific colloquia designed for Bachelor students writing their BA-thesis in the field of literature or film studies. We shall look at a number of strategies for planning, structuring and producing longer pieces of work, and this programme will also include formal issues such as format and layout of the final thesis.

Prior enrolment via Stud.IP is mandatory. Since no more than 15 students can participate in the final course, early registration is strongly recommended.

Prof. Dr. Norbert Schaffeld
10-76-6-AP-03Current Research in Cultural History (in englischer Sprache)

Colloquium

Termine:
wöchentlich Do 14:15 - 15:45 GW2 B1630

This colloquium is designed for Bachelor students planning to write their BA-thesis in the field of cultural history. We will discuss theoretical and methodological approaches, develop outlines and structures as well as strong thesis statements in order to focus your search for information, to tackle your subject and to specify your argument. Students will be expected to present and discuss their project in various stages of progression both in class as well as in individual monitoring sessions.
We will follow the MLA Handbook for Writers of Research Papers, eighth edition.

Dr. Karin Esders-Angermund
10-76-6-AP-04Begleitveranstaltung Sprachwissenschaft (in englischer Sprache)

Colloquium

Termine:
wöchentlich Do 10:15 - 11:45 Externer Ort: GW2 A3340 Externer Ort: Asynchronous Externer Ort: GW 2, A 3.610 (individual consultations)

Einzeltermine:
Mo 25.07.22 09:00 - 17:00 SFG

This colloquium is for students who plan to write their BA thesis in English Linguistics. The focus of the course is to help students develop, organize, and carry out empirical research projects. The following topics will be covered: Finding a topic, searching for and reviewing relevant literature, formulating research questions, choosing appropriate data collection and analysis procedures, collecting data, processing and analyzing data, structuring and writing a research paper.

Recommended literature:
Callies, M. (2012). Data collection techniques. In B. Kortmann (Ed.), Theories and Methods in Linguistics (Wörterbücher zur Sprach-und Kommunikationswissenschaft [WSK] Online, Band 11). de Gruyter Mouton. http://www.degruyter.com/view/db/wsk
Cottrell, S. (2013). The Study Skills Handbook (4th ed.). Palgrave Macmillan.
Frank, A., Haacke, S., & Lahm, S. (2013). Schlüsselkompetenzen: Schreiben in Studium und Beruf (2nd ed.). Metzler.
Rothstein, B. (2011). Wissenschaftliches Arbeiten für Linguisten. Narr.
Siepmann, D., Gallagher, J. D., Hannay, M., & Mackenzie, J. L. (2011). Writing in English: A Guide for Advanced Learners (2nd ed.) Francke.
Wallwork, A. (2011). English for Writing Research Papers. Springer.
Wei, L., & Moyer, M. G. (2008). Project ideas. In L. Wei & M. G. Moyer (Eds.), The Blackwell Guide to Research Methods in Bilingualism and Multilingualism (pp. 345-353). Blackwell.
Wray, A., & Bloomer, A. (2012). Projects in Linguistics and Language Studies (3rd ed.). Hodder Education. E-book available at http://lib.myilibrary.com/Open.aspx?id=368803

Dr. Ramona Kreis
10-M80-4-MaThe-05Research colloquium for MA and PhD students (in englischer Sprache)

Seminar

Termine:
wöchentlich Mo 10:15 - 11:45 GW1 B1070

This colloquium is designed for all students planning to write their thesis in the fields of (i) multimodal linguistics and its application to treatments of mixed media artefacts or performances and (ii) for critical discourse analysis, particularly empirically based studies. Examples of media that might be targetted include: film, comics, graphic novels, advertisements and so on. Particularly of interest will be areas where language (spoken or written) works together with visual representations of any kind. We will discuss theoretical and methodological approaches for characterising combinations of language and visual information, consider practical methods for corpus work (particularly involving mixed media, but not only), develop outlines and structures of the thesis, and consider how to construct strong thesis statements in order to focus your search for information, to tackle your subject and to construct your argument. Students will be expected to present and discuss their project in various stages of progression both in class as well as in individual monitoring sessions as well as to give input to others. Standard styles of presenting work within linguistics will be discussed as well as ways of addressing and analysing data and showing that analyses are adequate.

Prof. John Arnold Bateman, Ph.D.

Abschlussmodul L - Lehramt (12 CP) - 10-76-6-314 (nur für das Sommersemester)

Modulbeauftragte/r: Tim Giesler, giesler@uni-bremen.de
VAKTitel der VeranstaltungDozentIn
10-76-6-AL-01Begleitveranstaltung: Fachdidaktik

Seminar

Termine:
wöchentlich Mi 14:15 - 15:45 SFG 1020

In diesem Modul erarbeiten die Studierenden spezifische Inhalte der Fremdsprachendidaktik, sowohl unter unterrichtsbezogenen Gesichtspunkten als auch unter forschungsbezogenen Aspekten mit Fokus auf gegenwärtige Entwicklungen und zukünftige Perspektiven. Die Inhalte des Kolloquiums fokussieren unterschiedliche schul- bzw. unterrichtsrelevante Themenbereiche. Bei Wahl der B.A.-Thesis in der Fachdidaktik Englisch können hier auch themenspezifische Fragestellungen erörtert werden.
Die Studierenden sollen in diesem Modul neben den fachlichen Inhalten ihre grundlegenden Vermittlungs- und Reflexionskompetenzen vertiefen und spezifizieren. Im Rahmen dieser Kompetenzen sollen die Studierenden insbesondere ihre bisherigen Praxiserfahrungen einbringen, kritisch reflektieren und themenspezifisch modifizieren.

Bachelorarbeiten (B.A.-Theses) in der Fremdsprachendidaktik Englisch können nur bei Besuch dieses Kolloquiums betreut werden. BA-Themen sollten möglichst frühzeitig im Rahmen einer Sprechstunde vorbesprochen werden. Bitte beachten Sie folgende Informationen: http://www.fb10.uni-bremen.de/anglistik/ba2/bachelorarbeit.aspx

Dr. Joanna Pfingsthorn
10-76-6-AP-01Begleitveranstaltung Literaturwissenschaft - Research Colloquium in English Literatures (Zoom only) (in englischer Sprache)

Colloquium
ECTS: 3

Termine:
wöchentlich Do 12:15 - 13:45 Externer Ort: online

Teaching method: We will meet in weekly Zoom sessions.

This course is one of the specific colloquia designed for students planning their final dissertation either on undergraduate or graduate level in the field of literary studies (Module choices: Bachelor thesis module P or Master thesis module MA The). We shall look at a number of strategies for planning, structuring and writing longer pieces of work and this course will include formal issues such as format and layout of the final assignment. Please register on Stud. IP and explore the sections “Information” and “Schedule” on Stud. IP. for further details. List of potential supervisors and co-supervisors in the area Literary and Cultural Studies in English: https://www.uni-bremen.de/fb-10/studium/english-speaking-cultures/literatur-und-kulturwissenschaften/research-foci-supervision

All students, who are planning to write their final dissertations in the field of literary studies, are welcome to join my course. In addition, I am happy to take on the role of a supervisor or co-supervisor for projects that correspond to my research and teaching foci, in other words, students who have a supervisor or co-supervisor that is not me are also welcome to join this course.

Dr. Jana Nittel
10-76-6-AP-02Begleitveranstaltung Literaturwissenschaft - Research Colloquium in English Literatures (in englischer Sprache)

Colloquium

Termine:
wöchentlich Fr 10:15 - 11:45 GW2 B3010 (Kleiner Studierraum)

This module is one of the specific colloquia designed for Bachelor students writing their BA-thesis in the field of literature or film studies. We shall look at a number of strategies for planning, structuring and producing longer pieces of work, and this programme will also include formal issues such as format and layout of the final thesis.

Prior enrolment via Stud.IP is mandatory. Since no more than 15 students can participate in the final course, early registration is strongly recommended.

Prof. Dr. Norbert Schaffeld
10-76-6-AP-03Current Research in Cultural History (in englischer Sprache)

Colloquium

Termine:
wöchentlich Do 14:15 - 15:45 GW2 B1630

This colloquium is designed for Bachelor students planning to write their BA-thesis in the field of cultural history. We will discuss theoretical and methodological approaches, develop outlines and structures as well as strong thesis statements in order to focus your search for information, to tackle your subject and to specify your argument. Students will be expected to present and discuss their project in various stages of progression both in class as well as in individual monitoring sessions.
We will follow the MLA Handbook for Writers of Research Papers, eighth edition.

Dr. Karin Esders-Angermund

GENERAL STUDIES - siehe auch die Veranstaltungen von General Studies - Sprach- und Literaturwissenschaften

Modulbeauftragte/r: Dr. Anke Schulz, anke.schulz@uni-bremen.de
VAKTitel der VeranstaltungDozentIn
10-76-2-Basismodul A-02Tutorial: Introduction to English Literatures (Part II) Englischsprachig (Zoom Only) (in englischer Sprache)

Übung
ECTS: 3

Termine:
wöchentlich Fr 10:15 - 11:45 Externer Ort: online

These tutorial sessions correspond to the weekly study units of the course "Foundation Module A: Introduction to English Literature (Part 2) and will provide participants with the opportunity to ask questions regarding the weekly theoretical explorations and cultural movements, complete excercises and quizz sessions as exam preparation.
Students may gain credit points for General Studies.

Dr. Jana Nittel
Merle Marie Meyer ((TT))
10-76-4-D2/WD2-04Key Topics in Literature: The Voice of Nostalgia in Anglophone Arab Literature and Films (in englischer Sprache)

Seminar
ECTS: Depending on module choice

Termine:
wöchentlich Di 14:15 - 15:45 GW2 B3010 (Kleiner Studierraum)

The course explores the resurgence and reception of modern Arab novels in English in a post-9/11 world. Majorly focusing on diasporic Arab writers, the course aims to chart the trajectory of Arab literature from the tragedy of 9/11 to the power and promises of the Arab Spring. Students will read two novels as well as critically look at the historical and theoretical frameworks that help understand the voices that accompany the development of anglophone Arab literature. The aim of the course is to propel students to further explore the newly emerging anglophone literatures and cultures. The course is paired with the Postcolonial Movie Nights, hosted every Tuesday from 6pm to 8pm where the students will watch five highly acclaimed films by notable Arab directors.

Dr. Sukla Chatterjee
10-76-6-AP-01Begleitveranstaltung Literaturwissenschaft - Research Colloquium in English Literatures (Zoom only) (in englischer Sprache)

Colloquium
ECTS: 3

Termine:
wöchentlich Do 12:15 - 13:45 Externer Ort: online

Teaching method: We will meet in weekly Zoom sessions.

This course is one of the specific colloquia designed for students planning their final dissertation either on undergraduate or graduate level in the field of literary studies (Module choices: Bachelor thesis module P or Master thesis module MA The). We shall look at a number of strategies for planning, structuring and writing longer pieces of work and this course will include formal issues such as format and layout of the final assignment. Please register on Stud. IP and explore the sections “Information” and “Schedule” on Stud. IP. for further details. List of potential supervisors and co-supervisors in the area Literary and Cultural Studies in English: https://www.uni-bremen.de/fb-10/studium/english-speaking-cultures/literatur-und-kulturwissenschaften/research-foci-supervision

All students, who are planning to write their final dissertations in the field of literary studies, are welcome to join my course. In addition, I am happy to take on the role of a supervisor or co-supervisor for projects that correspond to my research and teaching foci, in other words, students who have a supervisor or co-supervisor that is not me are also welcome to join this course.

Dr. Jana Nittel
10-76-6-AP-02Begleitveranstaltung Literaturwissenschaft - Research Colloquium in English Literatures (in englischer Sprache)

Colloquium

Termine:
wöchentlich Fr 10:15 - 11:45 GW2 B3010 (Kleiner Studierraum)

This module is one of the specific colloquia designed for Bachelor students writing their BA-thesis in the field of literature or film studies. We shall look at a number of strategies for planning, structuring and producing longer pieces of work, and this programme will also include formal issues such as format and layout of the final thesis.

Prior enrolment via Stud.IP is mandatory. Since no more than 15 students can participate in the final course, early registration is strongly recommended.

Prof. Dr. Norbert Schaffeld
10-76-6-AP-03Current Research in Cultural History (in englischer Sprache)

Colloquium

Termine:
wöchentlich Do 14:15 - 15:45 GW2 B1630

This colloquium is designed for Bachelor students planning to write their BA-thesis in the field of cultural history. We will discuss theoretical and methodological approaches, develop outlines and structures as well as strong thesis statements in order to focus your search for information, to tackle your subject and to specify your argument. Students will be expected to present and discuss their project in various stages of progression both in class as well as in individual monitoring sessions.
We will follow the MLA Handbook for Writers of Research Papers, eighth edition.

Dr. Karin Esders-Angermund
10-76-6-GS-01English Theatre Workshop (in englischer Sprache)

Übung

Termine:
wöchentlich Mi 09:45 - 12:00 GW1-HS H1000 (3 SWS)

In this workshop we will explore and experiment with contemporary methods of improvisational theater, which is the art of making up theatrical moments on the spot, without a script. It is one of the liveliest and most current forms of theater of today and ingrained in US popular culture. You will first learn the basic principles of improvisational theater and then apply them to improvised scenework. We will also reflect on the impact of improvisational theater on popular culture, its applications e.g. in teaching, explore its practical approaches to comedic as well as dramatic narrative structures and draw comparisons between communication in improvised dialogue and other types of communication.

There will be a regular meeting on Wednesdays 9.45 - 12.00 during the semester, in which we will cover the basics of improvisational theater, followed by an intensive in the lecture-free period, in which we will work on a specific form and prepare for a performance. If you only want to participate in the intensive you need to have some experience, either from this or a previous semester. There is no obligation to be part of the performances. You can also support the performances by helping with the organization and marketing.

Tobias Sailer
10-76-6-GS-02English Theatre Workshop - Presentation & Performance (in englischer Sprache)

Übung

Einzeltermine:
Di 23.08.22 - Mi 24.08.22 (Di, Mi) 10:00 - 13:00 GW2 B2890
Mo 12.09.22 - Fr 16.09.22 (Mo, Di, Mi, Do, Fr) 10:00 - 13:30 GW2 B2890
Mo 26.09.22 - Fr 30.09.22 (Mo, Di, Mi, Do, Fr) 10:00 - 13:30 GW2 B2890
Tobias Sailer
10-76-6-GS-03Film - Language - Genre

Übung
ECTS: 3

Termine:
wöchentlich Do 14:15 - 15:45 GW1 A0160

This course is designed to give an insight into various film genres, their history, and their use of cinematic language as well as provide students with the skills to write and speak proficiently about these topics. In order to do so, we will cover both academic and non-academic text types.

The genres discussed during the course include, but are not limited to: Epic Film, Film Noir, RomCom, and Fantasy.

Students are expected to submit 2 assignments. Further information will be given in the first session of the course.

Dr. Vanessa Herrmann
10-GS-8-01ESC Role Playing Club (in englischer Sprache)
E-SC Pen & Paper Club

Übung
ECTS: 2-3

Termine:
zweiwöchentlich (Startwoche: 2) Fr 10:15 - 13:45 GW2 B1580 SFG 1010 (2 SWS)

Einzeltermine:
Fr 22.04.22 10:15 - 13:45 GW1 B0100

Roll the dice! E-SC welcomes newcomers and veterans alike, to its first role playing-club ever!
From beloved games like Dungeons&Dragons, to lesser known tabletop-games like the AlienRPG or The Last Airbender - we invite everyone to follow along these exciting journeys with us!
No need to bring any prior experience, nor equipment - we’ve got you covered! And if you’re already a pro, all the better. Attending the on-campus sessions, playing along, and keeping the group’s journal up to date (among one or two other required assignments) will grant you up to 3 CP - while stepping forward to lead a group as a DM (dungeon-master) through your own journey, will get you 3 CP as well!
Please register in StudIP and if you have any questions, get in touch with the tutor: Jan-Niklas Bohlen

Dr. Anke Schulz
10-GS-8-05ESC Filmclub On Campus (in englischer Sprache)

Übung
ECTS: 1-2

Termine:
zweiwöchentlich (Startwoche: 2) Fr 14:15 - 15:45 SFG 1010 GW2 B1170 (1 SWS)

Einzeltermine:
Fr 22.04.22 14:15 - 15:45 GW2 B1170

Ever wanted to just talk about your favourite movies? E-SC presents to you our very first filmclub! Be it critically acclaimed prize-contenders, trashy B-movies, or superhero flicks - we want to offer you a place to critically discuss pictures. The course does, however, come with a tiny prerequisite: you need to be able to watch movies on either Netflix, Prime, etc.
For questions please reach out to the tutors: Jan-Niklas Bohlen, Jan Lasse Gunnemann

The Filmclub meetings will take place on campus (room TBA) on the following dates: 22.04 (Introduction), 29.04, 13.05, 27.05, 10.06, 24.06, 08.07, 22.07.
Friday 2-4 pm
For questions please reach out to the tutors: Jan-Niklas Bohlen, Jan Lasse Gunnemann

Dr. Anke Schulz
10-GS-8-06ESC Filmclub Online (in englischer Sprache)

Übung
ECTS: 1-2

Termine:
zweiwöchentlich (Startwoche: 2) Fr 14:15 - 15:45 (1 SWS)

Einzeltermine:
Fr 22.04.22 14:15 - 15:45 online

Ever wanted to just talk about your favourite movies? E-SC presents to you our very first filmclub! Be it critically acclaimed prize-contenders, trashy B-movies, or superhero flicks - we want to offer you a place to critically discuss pictures. The course does, however, come with a tiny prerequisite: you need to be able to watch movies on either Netflix, Prime, etc.
For questions please reach out to the tutors: Carolin Lehmann, Amanda Ludes

The Filmclub meetings will take place on Zoom on the following dates: 22.04 (Introduction), 29.04, 13.05, 27.05, 10.06, 24.06, 08.07, 22.07.
Friday 2-4 pm

Dr. Anke Schulz
10-GS-8-07ESC Bookclub on Thursday (in englischer Sprache)

Übung
ECTS: 1-2

Termine:
zweiwöchentlich (Startwoche: 2) Do 16:15 - 17:45 GW2 B1630 (1 SWS)

Einzeltermine:
Do 21.04.22 16:15 - 17:45 GW2 B1630

Do you like books and reading? If you do, the English-Speaking Cultures Bookclub is what you are looking for. Each month we will read a book in English, dealing with a specific topic (example: Black History Month). Those monthly choices are entirely up to you as long as they fit the theme. Once a semester we also do a Bookclub Buddy Read. You can gain up to two credit points by actively participating in group discussions and presenting your monthly read. Whether your favourite genre is fantasy, crime fiction or something else, all readers are welcome. The theme for April will be “Childhood Treasure”.
Please register for the book club (one time slot) on Stud.IP and get in touch with one of the organisers/tutors if you require more information: Christin Radtke, Merle Meyer, Carolin Lehmann.

-

During SoSe 2022, we will offer two different time slots. Book Club meetings will take place in person (on-campus rooms TBA). Classes will be offered on either
Tuesdays 4-6 pm on 26.04.22, 10.05.22, 24.05.22, 07.06.22, 21.06.22, 05.07.22, 19.07.22.
or Thursdays 4-6 pm on 28.04.22, 12.05.22, 26.05.22, 09.06.22, 23.06.22, 07.07.22, 21.07.22.

Dr. Anke Schulz
10-GS-8-08ESC Bookclub on Tuesday (in englischer Sprache)

Übung
ECTS: 1-2

Termine:
zweiwöchentlich (Startwoche: 2) Di 16:15 - 17:45 GW2 B1630 (1 SWS)

Einzeltermine:
Di 19.04.22 16:15 - 17:45 GW2 B1630

Do you like books and reading? If you do, the English-Speaking Cultures Bookclub is what you are looking for. Each month we will read a book in English, dealing with a specific topic (example: Black History Month). Those monthly choices are entirely up to you as long as they fit the theme. Once a semester we also do a Bookclub Buddy Read. You can gain up to two credit points by actively participating in group discussions and presenting your monthly read. Whether your favourite genre is fantasy, crime fiction or something else, all readers are welcome. The theme for April will be “Childhood Treasure”.
Please register for the book club (one time slot) on Stud.IP and get in touch with one of the organisers/tutors if you require more information: Christin Radtke, Merle Meyer, Carolin Lehmann.

-

During SoSe 2022, we will offer two different time slots. Book Club meetings will take place in person (on-campus rooms TBA). Classes will be offered on either
Tuesdays 4-6 pm on 26.04.22, 10.05.22, 24.05.22, 07.06.22, 21.06.22, 05.07.22, 19.07.22.
or Thursdays 4-6 pm on 28.04.22, 12.05.22, 26.05.22, 09.06.22, 23.06.22, 07.07.22, 21.07.22.

Dr. Anke Schulz
10-GS-8-09Praxisclub – Eine linguistische Methodenwerkstatt

Übung
ECTS: 2-3

Termine:
wöchentlich Do 18:00 - 20:00 GW2 B2880 GW2 B3010 (Kleiner Studierraum)

In dieser praxisorientierten Methodenwerkstatt wollen wir uns damit beschäftigen, wie man methodisch an eine linguistische Fragestellung herangehen kann. Es werden nicht nur unterschiedliche Forschungsmethoden vorgestellt, diese werden auch ausprobiert.

Der Praxisclub soll mehr oder weniger abwechselnd eine Inputsitzung und eine Anwendungssitzung haben. In der Anwendungssitzung bearbeiten wir zusammen eine für uns interessante Frage mit einer der Methoden, z.B. qualitative oder quantitative Analyse, Korpusstudie, Experiment, Interviews und Umfragen oder linguistische Feldforschung. Am Ende wollen wir die Ergebnisse unserer Versuche in einer Handreichung zusammenfassen, damit jede und jeder sie für eigene linguistische Projekte nutzen kann.
Es sind alle herzlich eingeladen, die schon immer mal wissen wollten, was Linguist:innen eigentlich den ganzen Tag machen. Wer weiß, womöglich steckt in Ihnen auch eine?

Dr. Anke Schulz
10-GS-9-03Das Wundern lernen - Schreiben für Kinder

Seminar
ECTS: 3

Einzeltermine:
Mo 04.04.22 - Di 05.04.22 (Mo, Di) 10:00 - 16:00 SFG 2070
Do 07.04.22 - Fr 08.04.22 (Do, Fr) 10:00 - 16:00 SFG 2070

Ein Kinderbuch oder einen Kinderfilm zu schreiben ist eine sehr lohnende Aufgabe, sie hält aber auch einige Stolpersteine bereit. Wir werden uns Gedanken darüber machen, was das Kinderbuch vom Erwachsenenbuch unterscheidet, welche Rolle die genaue Zielgruppe dabei spielt und wie man diese festlegt.
Weiterhin beschäftigen wir uns in diesem Workshop mit der angemessenen Sprache in Kinderbüchern, mit dem Aufbau der Welten und der Charaktere, und damit, unsere jungen Leser:innen weder zu unter- noch zu überfordern. Welche Rolle spielt Pädagogik beim Schreiben von Kinderbüchern? Was bedeutet es, Kinder ernst zu nehmen? Am Beispiel der Märchen denken wir darüber nach, wie viel Horror für Kinder verträglich ist und warum.
Wir lernen kleine Kniffe und Tricks, die uns beim Schreiben für Kinder und beim Schreiben im Allgemeinen helfen können. Mit vielen praktischen Übungen entwickeln wir Ideen und nähern uns der eigenen Geschichte. In diesem Kurs ist es möglich, sowohl an einem Kinderbuch oder Kindergeschichten zu arbeiten, als auch an einem Drehbuch für einen Kinderfilm.
Um das „First come, first serve“ der Seminar-Anmeldungen zu vermeiden, wird jede:r Interessierte gebeten, neben der Anmeldung auf StudIP eine Seite zu einer Grund-Idee für Kinder zu verfassen und bis spätestens 4.3.2022 an co_ge@uni-bremen.de zu schicken. Die bis zu 20 Teilnehmenden erhalten bis zum 14.3. Bescheid über die endgültige Teilnahme.

Corinna Alexa Gerhards
10-GS-9-07Academic Vocabulary (in englischer Sprache)
Intensive class Sep 22

Übung
ECTS: 3

Einzeltermine:
Mo 26.09.22 - Sa 01.10.22 (Mo, Di, Mi, Do, Fr, Sa) 09:00 - 13:00 GW2 A3390 (CIP-Labor FB 10)

Get it done in a week! A one-week intensive course with a focus on academic vocabulary.

Mon 26th Sep 2022 till Sat 1st Oct 2022
Time: 9am till 1pm + research and self-study time in the afternoon.
ROOM: GW2 A3.390 (FB10 CIP-Labor, big room)

This course is a hands-on, research based course combined with good ol’ vocabulary exercises. You will explore aspects of vocabulary-learning techniques, vocabulary formation, (academic) word choice, and avoiding some “pit-falls”.
The results of your research will be presented in class and will be discussed. You will work individually as well as in mini groups. Depending on whether you need a numerical grade or merely a Pass/Fail grade, you will be graded on your work.

CP: 3

Open for:
BA English-Speaking Cultures (General Studies)
MA English-Speaking Cultures: Language, Text, Media
MA TnL, Transnationale Literaturwissenschaften

See you in class.

Katja Müller, M.A.
10-GS-9-08Academic Writing (in englischer Sprache)
Intensive class Sep 22

Übung
ECTS: 3

Einzeltermine:
Mo 26.09.22 - Sa 01.10.22 (Mo, Di, Mi, Do, Fr, Sa) 14:00 - 18:00 GW2 A3390 (CIP-Labor FB 10)

Get it done in a week! A one-week intensive course with a focus on skills required for academic writing.
Mon 26th Sep 2022 till Sat 1st Oct 2022
Time: 2pm till 6pm + research and self-study time in the morning.
Room: GW2 A3.390 (FB10 CIP-Labor, big room)

This course is a research based course in which you will explore aspects of academic writing techniques when paraphrasing or quoting text, style, formatting, and punctuation.
The results of your research will be presented in class and will be discussed. You will work individually as well as in mini groups. Depending on whether you need a numerical grade or merely a Pass/Fail grade, you will be graded on your work.
CP: 3
Open for:
BA English-Speaking Cultures (General Studies)
MA English-Speaking Cultures: Language, Text, Media
MA TnL, Transnationale Literaturwissenschaften

See you in class.

Katja Müller, M.A.