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Veranstaltungsverzeichnis

Lehrveranstaltungen SoSe 2022

Global Education

Key Issues in Global Education / Learning to Live and Study Abroad (Outgoings)

Key Issues in Global Education/Learning to Live and Study Abroad (Outgoings)

VAKTitel der VeranstaltungDozentIn
10-78-6-C2a+C2b-1„Literatura y cine actual de España: Isaac Rosa, Eva Baltasar, Javier de Isusi, Marta Sanz, MIENTRAS DUERMES y CONTRATIEMPO”
spanisch

Seminar

Termine:
wöchentlich Di 14:00 - 15:30 GW2 A4020 (3 SWS)

Einzeltermine:
Do 30.06.22 10:00 - 20:30 Instituto Cervantes Bremen

Este año, España es el huésped de honor en la feria del libro de Frankfurt. Estoy organizando una gira de autores españoles que vendrán un día entero en junio a Bremen. En el seminario analizamos previamente sus obras para poder entrar en un diálogo fructífero con ellos. Los textos elegidos se encuentran en la UB, pero es preferible comprarlos de antemano.
Al final del curso analizamos dos películas españolas que trabajan con la narración perturbadora, concepto narrativo transmedial y principio narrativo que desarrollé en mi libro La narración perturbadora (2017).

El módulo requiere una constante participación activa, una ponencia oral y un trabajo escrito. Para obtener los créditos, los estudiantes del BA + MEd + Vertiefungsmodul TnL tienen que presentar una ponencia en clase y elaborarla después por escrito en español (12 páginas/ 25.000 caracteres). Los estudiantes
del Máster Romanistik International y del Máster TnL deben entregar asimismo un trabajo escrito (15 páginas), además de moderar una sesión y presentar una obra no tratada en clase de uno de los autores.
La fecha límite de entrega del trabajo escrito es el 31.08.2022.

El programa detallado se colocará previamente en Stud IP y se presentará, discutirá y modificará en la primera sesión; inscríbanse por favor previamente en Stud IP.

Lectura preparatoria:

Eva Baltasar: Permafrost

Javier de Isusi: He visto ballenas + Asylum

Isaac Rosa: El país del miedo

Marta Sanz: Clavícula

CONTRATIEMPO (2017), de Oriol Paulo

MIENTRAS DUERMES (2011), de Jaume Balagueró

Prof. Dr. Sabine Schlickers

Programmes for Exchange Students (Incomings)

Programmes for Exchange Students (Incomings)

VAKTitel der VeranstaltungDozentIn
10-76-4-D2/WD2-02Key Topics in Literature and Cultural History: Contemporary Crime Fiction (in englischer Sprache)

Seminar
ECTS: Depending on module choice

Termine:
wöchentlich Di 12:15 - 13:45 GW2 B3010 (Kleiner Studierraum)

This course welcomes students who wish to complete the following modules:
B.A. E-SC “Key Topics in Literature”- D2-c; WD-2a and WD-2b
B.A. E-SC “Key Topics in Cultural History” – D2-a
Academic Exchange students

Teaching method: We will meet in weekly face to face sessions on campus. You will need access to Stud.IP. and a laptop or tablet with sound and audio capabilities. Please make sure to attend our first session if you wish a placement in this class.

Crime Fiction is overwhelmingly popular and yet, much of the narrative literature that involves crime of some kind or another is often not regarded as ‘literature’ at all. This course is designed to familiarise students with the contemporary critical and theoretical arguments concerning popular fiction and genre studies, as well as to enable all participants of this course to relate to the genre’s wider social, historical and political contexts while discussing the individual narratives in terms of form, language and imagery.

Seeking to promote an analytical, creative and imaginative engagement with the complexities of literary and cultural discourses, we will focus on excerpts of both detective- or transgressor-centred narratives from the second half of the 20th Century onwards. These narratives include examples of the police novel (e.g. Ian Rankin); of female detectives and the feminist appropriations of the hard-boiled story (e.g. Sara Paretsky); of the psychothriller (e.g. Patricia Highsmith), of Afro-American crime fiction, here the examination of literary representations and other cultural manifestations of the Black Diaspora, discussing the relevance of this form of genre fiction to the Black experience of North American Life (e.g. Walter Mosley), of Indigenous crime fiction (e.g. Thomas King), of the postmodern mystery (e.g. Paul Auster), and of representations of disability in crime fiction (e.g. Jeffrey Deaver’s Lincoln Rhyme series).

Please register on Stud. IP and explore the sections “Information” and “Schedule” on Stud. IP. for further details.

Requirements:
• Interest in the topics discussed and ideally a regular attendance and informed participation in class discussion (not part of your formal assessment);
• in-depth knowledge of the selected reading material and course materials,
• final exam according to module choice.

Reading materials (we will read excerpts of these novels but you are welcome to read these novels in full especially when planning a research project):
Auster, Paul. The New York Trilogy, Faber and Faber, 1987.
Deaver, Jeffrey. The Bone Collector, Hodder and Stoughton, 1997.
Highsmith, Patricia. Strangers on a Train, Vintage, 1999, 1950.
King, Thomas. The Red Power Murders: A DreadfulWater Mystery, Harper Perennial, 2006.
Mosley, Walter. Devil in a Blue Dress, Serpent's Tail, 2001, 1991.
Paretsky, Sara. Blacklist: A V.I. Warshawski Novel, Signet Book, 2004.
Rankin, Ian. Knots & Crosses: Inspector Rebus Novel, Orion, 2005, 1998.

Copies of some but not all novels are available for purchase at the bookstore on our campus (Universitätsbuchhandlung Bremen: www.unibuch-bremen.de)

Dr. Jana Nittel
10-76-4-D2/WD2-03Key Topics in Literature: Women and Fiction – Virginia Woolf (in englischer Sprache)

Seminar
ECTS: Depending on module choice

Termine:
wöchentlich Di 10:15 - 11:45 GW2 B3010 (Kleiner Studierraum)

This course welcomes students who wish to complete the following modules:
B.A. E-SC D-2c; WD-2a und WD-2b
Academic Exchange Students

Teaching method: We will meet in weekly face to face sessions on campus. You will need access to Stud.IP. and a laptop or tablet with sound and audio capabilities. Please make sure to attend our first session if you wish a placement in this class.

According to Bonnie Kime Scott, modernist women “actively transformed the novel to reflect their unique perceptions of everyday life […] as critics and creative writers”. This course is designed to aesthetically appreciate and to critically explore selected works by the 20th-Century British female author and critic Virginia Woolf using text-centred and contextual approaches. We will explore the relation of women and fiction in the first three decades of the 20th century in Woolf’s feminist literary criticism, revisit modernist writing strategies and discuss several gender-related aspects of the novels, which have remained highly topical, then and now. Please register on Stud. IP and explore the sections “Information” and “Schedule” on Stud. IP. for further details.

Requirements:
• Interest in the topics discussed and ideally a regular attendance and informed participation in class discussion (not part of your formal assessment);
• in-depth knowledge of the selected reading material and course materials,
• final exam according to module choice.

Required reading materials (you need a copy of these publications for class):
Woolf, Virginia. Mrs. Dalloway: with a foreword by Maureen Howard (Italics). 1st Harvest/HBJ ed., Harcourt Brace Jovanovich, 1990.
Woolf, Virginia. Orlando. Introduction and notes by Merry M. Pawlowski (Italics), Wordsworth Classics, 2003.
Woolf, Virginia, and Morag Shiach. A Room of One's Own; Three guineas (Italics), Oxford University Press, 1992.
Copies can be purchased at the bookstore on our campus (Universitätsbuchhandlung Bremen: www.unibuch-bremen.de)

Dr. Jana Nittel
10-76-6-C-01Key Moments in the Linguistic History of the English-Speaking World (in englischer Sprache)

Seminar

Termine:
wöchentlich Do 14:15 - 15:45 NW2 A0242 (Stufenhörsaal)

In this course we will look at some key historical events that have impacted the historical development, global expansion and diversification of the English language around the world. The course aims to help you to understand and explain how the linguistic development of the English language is related to events in the political and social history of the British Isles and beyond, and, as a future teacher, how apparent irregularities in Present-Day English (PDE) which are, in many cases, remnants of earlier, regular patterns, can be explained historically. I the second part of the course we will examine the global expansion and diversification of English in various cultural contexts that has given rise to an enormous linguistic variation across English-speaking cultures around the world.

For an entertaining and insightful quick introduction see the series of short videos "The History of English in Ten Minutes" produced by the Open University: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLA03075BAD88B909E

Prof. Dr. Marcus Callies
10-76-6-C-02Key Moments in the Linguistic History of the English-Speaking World (in englischer Sprache)

Seminar

Termine:
wöchentlich Do 12:15 - 13:45 SFG 1030 GW2 B2890 GW2 A3390 (CIP-Labor FB 10)

In this seminar, students get an introduction to the history of English, i.e. Old English, Middle English and Early Modern English. This class includes weekly discussions and tasks. In the second half of the seminar, we continue to study the historical events, current status of major varieties and differences of world varieties from North America, Australia to Africa and Asia with a focus on their structural and phonological features. We will follow the debates about English as a cause of language death, and talk about the place of English in language policies and language planning.

Dr. Inke Du Bois
10-76-6-C-03Key Moments in the Linguistic History of the English-Speaking World (in englischer Sprache)

Seminar

Termine:
wöchentlich Do 10:15 - 11:45 NW1 S1260

IIn this seminar, students get an introduction to the history of English, i.e. Old English, Middle English and Early Modern English. This class includes weekly discussions and tasks. In the second half of the seminar, we continue to study the historical events, current status of major varieties and differences of world varieties from North America, Australia to Africa and Asia with a focus on their structural and phonological features. We will follow the debates about English as a cause of language death, and talk about the place of English in language policies and language planning.

Dr. Inke Du Bois
10-76-6-C-04Key Moments in the Linguistic History of the English-Speaking World (in englischer Sprache)

Seminar

Termine:
wöchentlich Di 10:15 - 11:45 GW2 B2890

In this seminar, students get an introduction to the history of English, i.e. Old English, Middle English and Early Modern English. This class includes weekly discussions and tasks. In the second half of the seminar, we continue to study the historical events, current status of major varieties and differences of world varieties from North America, Australia to Africa and Asia with a focus on their structural and phonological features. We will follow the debates about English as a cause of language death, and talk about the place of English in language policies and language planning.

Dr. Inke Du Bois