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Course Catalog

Study Program SoSe 2021

English-Speaking Cultures / Englisch, B.A.

LEHRVERANSTALTUNGEN DES 1. JAHRES (PO 2011)

Basismodul A: Englische Literaturwissenschaft (6 CP)

6 CP (3 CP + 3 CP)

Modulbeauftragte/r: Dr. Jana Nittel, jnittel@uni-bremen.de
Course numberTitle of eventLecturer
10-76-4-Basismodul A-01Introduction to English Literatures (Part II) C3 (in English)

Seminar (Teaching)
ECTS: 3

Dates:
weekly (starts in week: 1) Mon. 14:15 - 15:45 External location: online (2 Credit hours) Gruppe A (Dr. Nittel)
weekly (starts in week: 1) Tue. 10:15 - 11:45 External location: online (2 Credit hours) Gruppe B (Dr. Nittel)
weekly (starts in week: 1) Wed. 12:15 - 13:45 External location: online (2 Credit hours) Gruppe C (Katalina Kopka)

Online course in the summer term 2021 – Due to the COVID 19 pandemic we will not meet in class, but continue with our weekly ZOOM meetings and thematic podcasts. This introductory course will attempt to offer students access to literary studies at university level and try to balance scholarly considerations with aesthetic enjoyment. As this is a continuation of the foundation module course “Introduction to English Literatures, Part I”, students will review the methodology of poetry, drama and narrative analysis. Having developed historical and textual skills in dealing with various genres, students will explore in this course a considerable range of theoretical key concepts in literary and cultural studies.
Please register on Stud. IP and explore the sections “Information” and “Schedule” on Stud. IP. for further details. The course will run in three groups. All students are required to register on Stud.IP for one of these three groups A, B, and C by selecting the option “Participants/ TeilnehmerInnen” on Stud.IP, followed by “Functions/Groups”. Once you have been accepted to the course on Stud. IP you will be able to select one group.
Requirements:
  • work through the weekly study units via ZOOM meetings and podcast recordings (please remember that a regular attendance will considerably enhance your student success)
  • in-depth knowledge of the selected reading materials and course materials as provided on Stud. IP
  • final exam at the test center

Dr. Jana Nittel
Katalina Kopka, M.A.

Basismodul B: Englische Sprachwissenschaft (6 CP)

6 CP (3 CP + 3 CP)

Modulbeauftragte/r: Prof. Dr. John Bateman, bateman@uni-bremen.de
Course numberTitle of eventLecturer
10-76-4-B-01Introduction to English Linguistics 2 - Research Methods / C3 (in English)

Seminar (Teaching)

Dates:
weekly (starts in week: 1) Tue. 12:15 - 13:45 External location: Online (Zoom) External location: Online (Opencast) External location: Online (2 Credit hours)

This course continues the general introduction to English Linguistics from last semester, focusing on how to do empirical work in linguistics. Students will be introduced to the different ways, methods and tools to obtain, process and analyze linguistic data. The following topics will be covered: research methodology and design, types of data collection, experiments, corpus linguistics, online dictionaries, transcription, and quantitative approaches to data analysis.

Coursework and assessment

You are expected to read and prepare selected texts for each session. The coursework will focus on real-life linguistic data and exercises which are designed to help you apply selected methods and tools and critically discuss their usefulness. You are required to submit a portfolio comprising different data-based tasks ("worksheets") and other assignments that will be worked on in the course of the semester.


Basic introductory textbooks

Sealey, A. (2010), Researching English Language. A resource book for students. London: Routledge.
Wray, A. & A. Bloomer (2012), Projects in Linguistics and Language Studies. 3rd edition. London: Hodder Education.
E-book at http://lib.myilibrary.com/Open.aspx?id=368803

Nicole Hober, M.A.
10-76-4-B-02Introduction to English Linguistics 2 - Research Methods / C (in English)

Seminar (Teaching)

Dates:
weekly (starts in week: 1) Wed. 14:15 - 15:45

This course continues the general introduction to English Linguistics from last semester, focusing on how to do empirical work in linguistics. Students will be introduced to the different ways, methods and tools to obtain, process and analyze linguistic data. The following topics will be covered: research methodology and design, types of data collection, experiments, corpus linguistics, online dictionaries, transcription, and basic statistics.

Coursework and assessment:
You are expected to read and prepare selected texts for each session. The coursework will focus on real-life linguistic data and exercises which are designed to help you apply the methods and tools and critically discuss their usefulness. Participants are required to submit a portfolio comprising different data-based tasks ("worksheets") and other assignments that will be worked on in the course of the semester.

Basic introductory textbooks
Sealey, A. (2010), Researching English Language. A resource book for students. London: Routledge.
Wray, A. & A. Bloomer (2012), Projects in Linguistics and Language Studies. 3rd edition. London: Hodder Education.

Dr. Inke Du Bois
10-76-4-B-03Introduction to English Linguistics 2 - Research Methods C1 (in English)
C1 Digitale Lehre, asynchron

Seminar (Teaching)

Dates:
weekly (starts in week: 1) Fri. 10:15 - 11:45 External location: online (2 Credit hours)

This course continues the Introduction to English Linguistics 1 from last semester, focusing on how to do empirical work in linguistics. We will look at the basic requirement to do empirical studies, and different ways to collect linguistic data. We will investigate existing sources like corpora and dictionaries, and learn how to analyze and interpret language data.

In the course of the semester, there will be assignments and databased tasks in the form of worksheets that address a certain empirical problem and that you need to tackle by making use of one of the research methods that we have introduced and worked with in class. You need to choose two out of three assignments and three worksheets ⇐ five pieces) to work on and complete throughout the semester.

Literature
Wray, Alison & Aileen Bloomer. 2012. Projects in Linguistics and Language Studies: A Practical Guide to Researching Language. 3rd ed. Hodder Education. Available as e-book from the library.

Dr. Anke Schulz
10-76-4-B-04Introduction to English Linguistics 2 - Research Methods (in English)

Seminar (Teaching)

Dates:
weekly (starts in week: 1) Tue. 10:15 - 11:45 External location: Zoom External location: Asynchronous External location: online (2 Credit hours)

This course continues the general introduction to English Linguistics from last semester, focusing on how to do empirical work in linguistics. Students will be introduced to the different ways, methods and tools to obtain, process and analyze linguistic data. The following topics will be covered: research methodology and design, types of data collection, experiments, corpus linguistics, online dictionaries, transcription, and quantitative approaches to data analysis.

You are expected to read and prepare selected texts for each session. The coursework will focus on real-life linguistic data and exercises which are designed to help you apply selected methods and tools and critically discuss their usefulness. You are required to submit a portfolio comprising different data-based tasks and other assignments that will be worked on in the course of the semester.

The course will take place online and combine synchronous and asynchronous elements.

Basic introductory textbooks:
Sealey, A. (2010). Researching English Language. A resource book for students. London: Routledge.
Wray, A., & Bloomer, A. (2012). Projects in Linguistics and Language Studies (3rd ed.). London: Hodder Education. E-book at http://lib.myilibrary.com/Open.aspx?id=368803

Dr. Ramona Kreis

Basismodul C: Kultur- und Sprachgeschichte der englischsprachigen Welt (6 CP)

6 CP (3 CP + 3 CP)

Modulbeauftragte/r: Dr. Karin Esders, esders@uni-bremen.de und Dr. Inke Du Bois, dubois@uni-bremen.de
Course numberTitle of eventLecturer
10-76-6-C-01Key Moments in the Linguistic History of the English-Speaking World (in English)

Seminar (Teaching)

Dates:
weekly (starts in week: 1) Wed. 14:15 - 15:45 External location: online (2 Credit hours)

In this seminar, students get an introduction to the history of English, i.e. Old English, Middle English and Early Modern English. The course combines synchronous and asynchronous elements. In the second half of the seminar, we will study the major varieties of British and North American English as well as other world varieties with a focus on their structural and phonological features. We will follow the debates about English as a cause of language death, and talk about the place of English in language policies and language planning.

Dr. Ramona Kreis
10-76-6-C-02Key Moments in the Linguistic History of the English-Speaking World / C (in English)

Seminar (Teaching)

Dates:
weekly (starts in week: 1) Tue. 10:15 - 11:45 External location: online (2 Credit hours)

In this seminar, students get an introduction to the history of English, i.e. Old English, Middle English and Early Modern English. This class is taught via podcasts and weekly discussions and tasks. In the second half of the seminar, we study the major varieties of British and North American English as well as other world varieties with a focus on their structural and phonological features. We will follow the debates about English as a cause of language death, and talk about the place of English in language policies and language planning.

Dr. Inke Du Bois
10-76-6-C-03Key Moments in the Linguistic History of the English-Speaking World / C (in English)

Seminar (Teaching)

Dates:
weekly (starts in week: 1) Thu. 10:15 - 11:45 External location: online (2 Credit hours)

In this seminar, students get an introduction to the history of English, i.e. Old English, Middle English and Early Modern English. This class is taught via podcasts and weekly discussions and tasks. In the second half of the seminar, we study the major varieties of British and North American English as well as other world varieties with a focus on their structural and phonological features. We will follow the debates about English as a cause of language death, and talk about the place of English in language policies and language planning.

Dr. Inke Du Bois
10-76-6-C-04Key Moments in the Linguistic History of the English-Speaking World / C (in English)

Seminar (Teaching)

Dates:
weekly (starts in week: 1) Thu. 12:15 - 13:45 External location: online (2 Credit hours)

In this seminar, students get an introduction to the history of English, i.e. Old English, Middle English and Early Modern English. This class is taught via podcasts and weekly discussions and tasks. In the second half of the seminar, we study the major varieties of British and North American English as well as other world varieties with a focus on their structural and phonological features. We will follow the debates about English as a cause of language death, and talk about the place of English in language policies and language planning.

Dr. Inke Du Bois

SP-1 Basismodul: Sprachpraxis/Practical Language Foundation Module (Part 2) (6 CP) (nur für das Sommersemester)

6 CP (3 CP + 3 CP)

Modulbeauftragte/: Anne Kirkham, kirkham@uni-bremen.de

Core ULS2 language classes for BA „E-SC“ - 1st year, Semester 2 („Basismodul Sprachpraxis“ SP-1 BAPO 2011, Part 2)
N.B. This class has TWO parts; you MUST attend BOTH the a AND the b part of the SAME class (i.e. 2-1a + 2-1b OR 2-2a + 2-2b OR 2-3a + 2-3b etc.)
Course numberTitle of eventLecturer
10-76-6-SP1-01University Language Skills 2-1ab / B/C3 (in English)

Exercises (Teaching)

Dates:
weekly (starts in week: 1) Tue. 08:15 - 11:45 GW2 B3009 (Großer Studierraum) Online (4 Credit hours)

NOTE: This course takes place both online and on campus ("Präsenzlehre"); the on-site sessions are in synch with the scheduled times, whereas the online part is asynchronous.

University Language Skills 2 (ULS 2) is a four-hour class with TWO parts. You have to attend both parts (a and b). It is the second half of the SP-1 module. As such it builds on the basic knowledge of academic writing established in ULS 1.

While the focus during the winter semester is on the basic structure of an academic essay, during the summer semester you will be introduced to key rhetorical strategies. These strategies include essays of argumentation, exemplification, cause & effect as well as comparison & contrast. Furthermore, grammatical structures need for writing (e.g. syntax, passive voice, conditionals) will be part of the course’s syllabus.

Requirements:
• Regular and active participation
• Thorough preparation of each session
• Written assignments (approx. 2000 words)

Materials are provided via StudIP

Dr. Vanessa Herrmann
10-76-6-SP1-03University Language Skills 2-2ab / C3 (in English)

Exercises (Teaching)

Dates:
weekly (starts in week: 1) Wed. 12:15 - 15:45 External location: online (4 Credit hours)

This course only takes place online; it combines elements which are in synch with the scheduled times and elements which are asynchronous.

University Language Skills 2 (ULS 2) is a four-hour class with TWO parts. You have to attend both parts (a and b). It is the second half of the SP-1 module. As such it builds on the basic knowledge of academic writing established in ULS 1.

While the focus during the winter semester is on the basic structure of an academic essay, during the summer semester you will be introduced to key rhetorical strategies. These strategies include essays of argumentation, exemplification, cause & effect as well as comparison & contrast. Furthermore, grammatical structures need for writing (e.g. syntax, passive voice, conditionals) will be part of the course’s syllabus.

Requirements:
• Regular and active participation
• Thorough preparation of each session
• Written assignments (approx. 2000 words)

Materials are provided via StudIP.

Dr. Vanessa Herrmann
10-76-6-SP1-05University Language Skills 2-3ab / C3 (in English)

Exercises (Teaching)

Dates:
weekly (starts in week: 1) Thu. 08:15 - 11:45 External location: online (4 Credit hours)

This course only takes place online; it combines elements which are in synch with the scheduled times and elements which are asynchronous.

University Language Skills 2 (ULS 2) is a four-hour class with TWO parts. You have to attend both parts (a and b). It is the second half of the SP-1 module. As such it builds on the basic knowledge of academic writing established in ULS 1.

While the focus during the winter semester is on the basic structure of an academic essay, during the summer semester you will be introduced to key rhetorical strategies. These strategies include essays of argumentation, exemplification, cause & effect as well as comparison & contrast. Furthermore, grammatical structures need for writing (e.g. syntax, passive voice, conditionals) will be part of the course’s syllabus.

Requirements:
• Regular and active participation
• Thorough preparation of each session
• Written assignments (approx. 2000 words)

Materials are provided via StudIP.

Dr. Vanessa Herrmann
10-76-6-SP1-07University Language Skills 2-4ab B/C1 (in English)

Exercises (Teaching)
ECTS: 6

Dates:
weekly (starts in week: 1) Wed. 14:15 - 17:45 GW2 B3010 (Kleiner Studierraum) (4 Credit hours)

University Language Skills 2 is the second part of the SP1 module. Our class will meet once a week and will earn you a total of 6CPs. It is a four-hour class with two consecutive time slots, both of which MUST be attended.
Course description
The following seminar will build on skills acquired in ULS1. We will review and further develop writing skills regarding the different phases in writing, essay structure and good writing style. In addition, we will explore and develop more complex writing strategies including problem/solution, argumentation, cause/effect, and comparison/contrast.
Emphasis will be placed on the ability to recognize individual errors, self-correct and work on personally challenging aspects of language. You will therefore continue to work on grammar and lexis at an individual, needs-based level and will be able to access self-study material to work on independently according to your own requirements outside of the classroom. This is essential in developing an autonomous learning style which will subsequently enable you to critically assess and correct your own work.
Reader focus and readability will be of central importance when writing and planning your written texts. Further work will be done on syntax as well as cohesion and coherence to improve fluency and reader focus.
Assessment requirements
Students will be required to hand in TWO assignments based on TWO different writing strategies dealt with during the semester. These assignments will be graded and constitute the grade for the SP1 module. In addition, you will be expected to attend class regularly and actively participate in group discussions and activities. Task assigned to be completed between sessions must also be completed on time.
Please note that students must have also successfully completed ULS1 for the grade to be entered into PABO.

Lisa Nehls, M.A.
10-76-6-SP1-09University Language Skills 2-5ab B/C1 (in English)

Exercises (Teaching)
ECTS: 6

Dates:
weekly (starts in week: 1) Fri. 10:15 - 13:45 GW2 B3010 (Kleiner Studierraum) (4 Credit hours)

University Language Skills 2 is the second part of the SP1 module. Our class will meet once a week and will earn you a total of 6CPs. It is a four-hour class with two consecutive time slots, both of which MUST be attended.
Course description
The following seminar will build on skills acquired in ULS1. We will review and further develop writing skills regarding the different phases in writing, essay structure and good writing style. In addition, we will explore and develop more complex writing strategies including problem/solution, argumentation, cause/effect, and comparison/contrast.
Emphasis will be placed on the ability to recognize individual errors, self-correct and work on personally challenging aspects of language. You will therefore continue to work on grammar and lexis at an individual, needs-based level and will be able to access self-study material to work on independently according to your own requirements outside of the classroom. This is essential in developing an autonomous learning style which will subsequently enable you to critically assess and correct your own work.
Reader focus and readability will be of central importance when writing and planning your written texts. Further work will be done on syntax as well as cohesion and coherence to improve fluency and reader focus.
Assessment requirements
Students will be required to hand in TWO assignments based on TWO different writing strategies dealt with during the semester. These assignments will be graded and constitute the grade for the SP1 module. In addition, you will be expected to attend class regularly and actively participate in group discussions and activities. Task assigned to be completed between sessions must also be completed on time.
Please note that students must have also successfully completed ULS1 for the grade to be entered into PABO.

Lisa Nehls, M.A.
10-76-6-SP1-11University Language Skills 2-6a (in English)
B/C3 Synchrone/ Asynchrone Lehre

Exercises (Teaching)
ECTS: 6

Dates:
weekly (starts in week: 1) Mon. 08:15 - 09:45 External location: online (2 Credit hours)

Online with synchronous and asynchronous elements; this class is 6CPs/4SWS

Anne Kirkham, M.A.
10-76-6-SP1-12University Language Skills 2-6b (in English)
B/C3

Exercises (Teaching)

Dates:
weekly (starts in week: 1) Wed. 08:15 - 09:45 External location: online (2 Credit hours)
Anne Kirkham, M.A.
10-76-6-SP1-13University Language Skills 2-7a (in English)
B/C3 Synchrone/ Asynchrone Lehre

Exercises (Teaching)
ECTS: 6

Dates:
weekly (starts in week: 1) Mon. 12:15 - 13:45 External location: online (2 Credit hours)

Online with synchronous and asynchronous elements; 6CPs /4 SWS

Anne Kirkham, M.A.
10-76-6-SP1-14University Language Skills 2-7b (in English)

Exercises (Teaching)

Dates:
weekly (starts in week: 1) Wed. 12:15 - 13:45 Online (2 Credit hours)
Anne Kirkham, M.A.
10-76-6-SP1-15University Language Skills 2-8ab / A (in English)
Kategorie A = on-campus teaching (only if the situation allows it)

Exercises (Teaching)
ECTS: 6

Dates:
weekly (starts in week: 1) Tue. 10:15 - 13:45 SH D1020 (4 Credit hours)

Course description
University Language Skills 2 ⇐ ULS 2) forms the second part of the 'SP-1 Basismodul Sprachpraxis'
It is a FOUR-hour class (4 SWS; 6 CP for ULS 2 - 8ab) with TWO consecutive time slots each week. This ULS 2 class is taught as a four-hour block, while others might be offered with two separate two-hour time slots.

Coursework
Having practiced the planning and structuring of academic essays in “ULS 1” last semester, you will now be moving on to explore different key writing strategies. Starting with the yet familiar descriptive writing, you will then familiarise yourself with other strategies, for example problem/solution, cause & effect, comparison & contrast and argumentation. Analysing a wide variety of texts will improve your reading skills, while applying the key strategies as well as aspects of cohesion and coherence to your own texts will help you practice and develop your own academic style in writing.
Additionally, mini-group peer review will give you (and your readers) the opportunity to evaluate and improve your reading and listening skills in terms of audience-focus and reader-friendliness.

Course requirements
  • regular attendance and active participation in class (The course programme will provide more info re online teaching and participation)
  • active participation in (online) discussions
  • thorough preparation of each class session
  • completion of homework tasks and self-study work
  • a portfolio comprised of two written assignments based on two different writing strategies (all in all ca. 1500-2000 words). These assignments will be graded and constitute the grade for the SP1 module.

Required Literature
Meyers, Alan Longman.Academic Writing Series (level 5) - Essays to Research Papers. Pearson: 2014. Print and E-Reader edition available (print copy available in the library for reference)
Additional hand-out material provided via StudIP.

Further recommended material for language work
McCarthy, Michael & Felicity O’Dell. Academic Vocabulary in Use
Cornell, Alan & Geoff Parkes. What’s the Difference? Englang Books (online quizzes available)
Langenscheidt/Longman Dictionary of Contemporary English OR the Cornelsen/Oxford University Press Advanced Learner’s Dictionary, including the electronic version (CD or DVD as appropriate) or a comparable learner's dictionary.


To earn credit for the SP-1 MODULE (9 CP in total), you are required
  • to have completed University Language Skills 1 (portfolio comprising of written assignments of 800-1000 words; 3 CP)
  • to earn 60% or more on written assignments given in ULS 2 (1500-2000 words; 6 CP).

NB: To have the graded course requirements (Prüfungsleistung) for the SP-1 module recognised, you are required to register on PABO in the semester in which you intend to successfully complete the module (usually the summer semester).

The module description for the SP-1 module (BA 2011/15) is available for download here: https://www.uni-bremen.de/fb-10/studium/english-speaking-cultures/ba-e-sc/module

Katja Müller, M.A.
10-76-6-SP1-17University Language Skills 2-9ab / A (in English)
Kategorie A = on-campus teaching (only if the situation allows it)

Exercises (Teaching)
ECTS: 3

Dates:
weekly (starts in week: 1) Fri. 10:15 - 13:45 SH D1020 (4 Credit hours)

Course description
University Language Skills 2 ⇐ ULS 2) forms the second part of the 'SP-1 Basismodul Sprachpraxis'
It is a FOUR-hour class (4 SWS; 6 CP for ULS 2 - 8ab) with TWO consecutive time slots each week. This ULS 2 class is taught as a four-hour block, while others might be offered with two separate two-hour time slots.

Coursework
Having practiced the planning and structuring of academic essays in “ULS 1” last semester, you will now be moving on to explore different key writing strategies. Starting with the yet familiar descriptive writing, you will then familiarise yourself with other strategies, for example problem/solution, cause & effect, comparison & contrast and argumentation. Analysing a wide variety of texts will improve your reading skills, while applying the key strategies as well as aspects of cohesion and coherence to your own texts will help you practice and develop your own academic style in writing.
Additionally, mini-group peer review will give you (and your readers) the opportunity to evaluate and improve your reading and listening skills in terms of audience-focus and reader-friendliness.


Course requirements
  • regular attendance and active participation in class (The course programme will provide more info re online teaching and participation)
  • active participation in (online) discussions
  • thorough preparation of each class session
  • completion of homework tasks and self-study work
  • a portfolio comprised of two written assignments based on two different writing strategies (all in all ca. 1500-2000 words). These assignments will be graded and constitute the grade for the SP1 module.

Required Literature
Meyers, Alan Longman.Academic Writing Series (level 5) - Essays to Research Papers. Pearson: 2014. Print and E-Reader edition available (print copy available in the library for reference)
Additional hand-out material provided via StudIP.
Further recommended material for language work
McCarthy, Michael & Felicity O’Dell. Academic Vocabulary in Use
Cornell, Alan & Geoff Parkes. What’s the Difference? Englang Books (online quizzes available)
Langenscheidt/Longman Dictionary of Contemporary English OR the Cornelsen/Oxford University Press Advanced Learner’s Dictionary, including the electronic version (CD or DVD as appropriate) or a comparable learner's dictionary.

To earn credit for the SP-1 MODULE (9 CP in total), you are required
  • to have completed University Language Skills 1 (portfolio comprising of written assignments of 800-1000 words; 3 CP)
  • to earn 60% or more on written assignments given in ULS 2 (1500-2000 words; 6 CP).

NB: To have the graded course requirements (Prüfungsleistung) for the SP-1 module recognised, you are required to register on PABO in the semester in which you intend to successfully complete the module (usually the summer semester).

The module description for the SP-1 module (BA 2011/15) is available for download here: https://www.uni-bremen.de/fb-10/studium/english-speaking-cultures/ba-e-sc/module

Katja Müller, M.A.

LEHRVERANSTALTUNGEN DES 2. JAHRES (PO 2011)

D2-a Aufbaumodul: Kulturgeschichte (6 CP) (nur für das Sommersemester)

6 CP (3 CP + 3 CP)

1 PL = Term paper/Hausarbeit

Modulbeautragte/r: Dr. Jana Nittel, jnittel@uni-bremen.de
Course numberTitle of eventLecturer
10-76-4-D2-01Key Topics in Cultural History - Reframing Hollywood / C3 (in English)

Seminar (Teaching)
ECTS: 3

Dates:
weekly (starts in week: 1) Wed. 10:15 - 11:45 External location: online (2 Credit hours)
Dr. Karin Esders-Angermund
10-76-4-D2/WD2-01Key Topics in Cultural History: Female Scientists on Screen / C1 (in English)

Seminar (Teaching)

Dates:
weekly (starts in week: 1) Tue. 14:15 - 15:45 External location: Thema: Key Topics in Cultural History: Female Scientists on Screen Uhrzeit: 13.Juli.2021 02:00 PM Amsterdam, Berlin, Rom, Stockholm, Wien Zoom-Meeting beitreten https://uni-bremen.zoom.us/j/920 (2 Credit hours)

The aim of this course is to familiarise students with the larger issues surrounding historical female
scientists and their representation on film today. Focusing on two recent films, Radioactive (2018)
and Hidden Figures (2016), the lives and challenges of Marie Curie as well Katherine Johnson,
Dorothy Vaughan and Mary Jackson will be analysed. Matters of gender discrimination, scientist
stereotypes, social responsibility, funding and increasing scientific competition will be discussed
after the basic theoretical framework of film analysis has been established.

Please note: This course will take place in the form of asynchronic, weekly study assignments and
Stud.IP forum discussions. Synchronic meetings will only be held in the first and last session via
Zoom, affording students a flexible working schedule. Prior enrolment via Stud.IP is mandatory.
Students are expected to either purchase both films or view them online.

Requirements:
• Regular assignments and participation in Stud.IP forum discussions
• In-depth knowledge of the reading materials and films
• Portfolio (Studienleistung) or portfolio and a short paper (Prüfungsleistung)

Cora Övermann ((LB))
10-76-4-D2/WD2-03Key Topics in Literature and Cultural History: Contemporary Crime Fiction/ C3 (in English)

Seminar (Teaching)

Dates:
weekly (starts in week: 1) Tue. 14:15 - 15:45 External location: online (2 Credit hours)

This course welcomes students who wish to complete the following modules:
B.A. E-SC “Key Topics in Literature”- D2-c; WD-2a and WD-2b
B.A. E-SC “Key Topics in Cultural History” – D2-a
Erasmus students and General Studies
Online course in the summer term 2021 – Due to the COVID 19 pandemic we will meet in weekly ZOOM sessions. Crime Fiction is overwhelmingly popular and yet, much of the narrative literature that involves crime of some kind or another is often not regarded as ‘literature’ at all. This course is designed to familiarise students with the contemporary critical and theoretical arguments concerning popular fiction and genre studies, as well as to enable all participants of this course to relate to the genre’s wider social, historical and political contexts while discussing the individual narratives in terms of form, language and imagery. Seeking to promote an analytical, creative and imaginative engagement with the complexities of literary and cultural discourses, we will focus on excerpts of both detective- or transgressor-centred narratives from the second half of the 20th Century onwards. These narratives include examples of the police novel (e.g. Ian Rankin); of female detectives and the feminist appropriations of the hard-boiled story (e.g. Sara Paretsky); of the psychothriller (e.g. Patricia Highsmith), of Afro-American crime fiction, here the examination of literary representations and other cultural manifestations of the Black Diaspora, discussing the relevance of this form of genre fiction to the Black experience of American Life (e.g. Walter Mosley), of Indigenous crime fiction (e.g. Thomas King), of the postmodern mystery (e.g. Paul Auster), and of representations of disability in crime fiction (e.g. Jeffrey Deaver’s Lincoln Rhyme series).

Please register on Stud. IP and explore the sections “Information” and “Schedule” on Stud. IP. for further details.
Requirements:
  • work through the weekly study units (ZOOM and podacsts);
  • in-depth knowledge of the selected reading material and course materials,
  • final exam according to module choice.

Reading materials (we will read excerpts of these novels but you are welcome to read these novels in full especially when planning a research project):
Auster, Paul. The New York Trilogy, Faber and Faber, 1987.
Deaver, Jeffrey. The Bone Collector, Hodder and Stoughton, 1997.
Highsmith, Patricia. Strangers on a Train, Vintage, 1999, 1950.
King, Thomas. The Red Power Murders: A DreadfulWater Mystery, Harper Perennial, 2006.
Mosley, Walter. Devil in a Blue Dress, Serpent's Tail, 2001, 1991.
Paretsky, Sara. Blacklist: A V.I. Warshawski Novel, Signet Book, 2004.
Rankin, Ian. Knots & Crosses: Inspector Rebus Novel, Orion, 2005, 1998.

Dr. Jana Nittel
10-76-4-D2/WD2-05Key Concepts in Postcolonial Studies: Histories and Concepts / C2 (in English)

Seminar (Teaching)

Dates:
weekly (starts in week: 1) Tue. 12:15 - 13:45 External location: online (2 Credit hours)
Dr. Sukla Chatterjee
10-76-4-D2/WD2-07Key Topics in Cultural History - Critical Race Studies / C3 (in English)

Seminar (Teaching)
ECTS: 3

Dates:
weekly (starts in week: 1) Tue. 10:15 - 11:45 External location: online (2 Credit hours)
Dr. Karin Esders-Angermund
10-76-4-D2/WD2-08Key Topics in Cultural History - US American Art as Cultural Practice / C3 (in English)

Seminar (Teaching)
ECTS: 3

Dates:
weekly (starts in week: 1) Thu. 10:15 - 11:45 External location: online (2 Credit hours)

This course will introduce students to a broad range of US-American visual art with a specific focus on the 20th century. We will develop a critical understanding of art and of the writing and debates surrounding it. Positioning artists and art-making firmly within cultural history we will discuss works of art both as material artifacts and cultural practices. Since the subject field itself is so broad, we will select representative works to be studied carefully.
Students are recommended to consult Bjelajac’s and Pohl’s surveys on American art in order to discover their own interests and preferences well before the beginning of the course. Selected chapters can be found on Stud.IP

Bjelajac, David. American art: a cultural history. Upper Saddle River: Prentice Hall, 2005
Pohl, Frances K. Framing America: A social history of American Art. London: Thames and Hudson, 2002.

Dr. Karin Esders-Angermund
10-76-4-D2/WD2-09Key Topics in Cultural History: Black Rights Struggle from Abolition to Black Lives Matter (in English)

Seminar (Teaching)

Dates:
weekly (starts in week: 1) Mon. 10:15 - 11:45

Departing from the Black Lives Matter Movement and the mass demonstrations for racial justice in the U.S. and beyond in the summer of 2020, this course considers the historical trajectories of Black rights struggles from the beginning of the U.S. to the current moment. It traces the struggles of Black people in the U.S. for emancipation, for civil rights, for equality, for liberation through the histories of enslavement and abolition, reconstruction and Jim Crow, white terror in the South and segregation, Civil Rights movement and Black Power, to Mass Incarceration and the Movement for Black Lives. We will investigate these moments in an ongoing struggle for racial justice through key thinkers and activists such as Frederick Douglass, Harriet Jacobs, W.E.B. DuBois, Martin Luther King, Malcolm X, the Combahee River Collective, Michelle Alexander, and Keenga Yamahtta Taylor. A key objective of the class is to discuss how these examined histories resonate in the current moment and how the present moment can be better understood as part of this long history of Black rights struggles.

Class requirements are regular attendance, in-depth knowledge of reading material, and active class discussion. Reading the assigned texts is mandatory.

This class will be completely taught online synchronously and is open to students who participate in exchange programs. All reading and information material will be made available through the U Bremen teaching and learning platform Stud.IP; hence prior enrollment via Stud.IP is mandatory.

Dr. René Dietrich
10-76-4-D2/WD2-10Key Topics in Cultural History: North American Borderlands / C3 (in English)

Seminar (Teaching)
ECTS: 3

Dates:
weekly (starts in week: 1) Thu. 10:15 - 11:45 External location: online (2 Credit hours)

    • Please note that this class is already fully booked.--
Borders and Borderlands have significantly shaped the North American continent and its diverse history and culture since the early colonial period. This class will familiarize students with key border concepts and the cultures and histories they are associated with in North America. Concepts of borders and borderlands represent key entry points into Latinx, Indigenous, and migratory North American histories and cultures in which issues of race, ethnicity, class, origin, gender, sexuality, and language intersect. Analyzing a range of texts and artifacts, such as scholarly, fictional, and artistic works, the meaning of borders and borderlands and the related themes of oppression, resistance, and subversion will be examined.
The seminar (teaching category C3) will take place primarily in the form of asynchronic weekly study assignments and Stud.IP forum discussions. Occasionally, synchronic meetings will be held in a virtual conference meeting room (irregularly on Thursdays 10:15 - 11:45). Assigned course materials, resources, and study assignments will be made available through Stud.IP on a weekly basis. The seminar is offered for the modules D2a, WD2b, and WD2c. Prior enrolment via Stud.IP is mandatory. Please check Stud.IP regularly for updates.

Requirements
• regular, active participation on Stud.IP and during online meetings,
• in-depth knowledge of the assigned reading and study material,
• ‘Studien-,’ or ‘Prüfungsleistung’ as required by the module descriptions.

Dr. Paula von Gleich
10-76-4-D2/WD2-11Key Topics in Cultural History: Muslim American Cultures in Visual and Textual Products (in English)

Seminar (Teaching)

Dates:
weekly (starts in week: 3) Wed. 16:15 - 17:45 (2 Credit hours)
Alena Cicholewski

D2-b Aufbaumodul: Sprachwissenschaft (6 CP) (nur für das Sommersemester)

6 CP (3 CP + 3 CP)

1 PL = Term paper/Hausarbeit

Modulbeautragte/r: Dr. Jana Nittel, jnittel@uni-bremen.de
Course numberTitle of eventLecturer
10-76-4-D2b-01Key Topics in Linguistics: Sociolinguistics /C3 (in English)

Seminar (Teaching)

Dates:
weekly (starts in week: 1) Wed. 08:15 - 09:45 (2 Credit hours)

This seminar provides a basic introduction to the field of sociolinguistics. In presenting key concepts and terminologies from variationist sociolinguistics as well as from interactional sociolinguistics, stu-dents will be given an overview of different approaches in these fields and their underlying research paradigms.

We will work together on groundbreaking studies as well as newer approaches in order to become acquainted with specific methods of data collection and analysis, their benefits and their limitations, respectively. In line with the subject, the seminar not only encompasses a focus on the social relevance of language in society, but also discusses its implications for social life with reference to contemporary social theory.

Henning Vahlenkamp
10-76-4-D2b-02Key Topics in Linguistics: Introduction to text linguistics (in English)
C3: synchronous and asynchronous digital sessions

Seminar (Teaching)

Dates:
weekly (starts in week: 1) Mon. 14:15 - 15:45 External location: online (2 Credit hours)

In the last decades, linguistics has ‘jumped the border’ of the sentence and moved towards larger units of description such as text and discourse. In this seminar we will cover some principal linguistic approaches to text, addressing frameworks such as cohesion, rhetorical structure theory and introductory segmented discourse representation theory. Class work will consist of overviews of the theoretical approaches (supported by readings) followed by group-based analysis and discussion of example texts. Final credit for the module can be obtained by carrying out a more detailed analysis of a collection of short texts (possibly in groups) and motivating the decisions made. Considerations of corpus linguistic approaches to discourse structure and organisation will also be addressed and some particular tools for supporting such analyses introduced. Successful participation in the course should enable the analysis and critical discussion of texts in general, as well as raising awareness of current open topics and issues in linguistic discourse research.

Prof. John Arnold Bateman, Ph.D.
10-76-6-D2b-02Key Topics in Linguistics: Language and Gender (in English)
C

Seminar (Teaching)

Dates:
weekly (starts in week: 1) Mon. 10:15 - 11:45 (2 Credit hours)
Tamara Drummond
10-76-6-D2b-03Key Topics in Linguistics: Varieties of English and Language Contact / C3 (in English)

Seminar (Teaching)

Dates:
weekly (starts in week: 1) Wed. 10:15 - 11:45 External location: Online (Zoom) External location: Online (Opencast) (2 Credit hours)

Throughout its history, the English language has come into contact with different languages. Crucially, since the spread of English beginning in the 17th century, new varieties of English have emerged all around the world. The lexicon and grammar of these varieties have been influenced and shaped by the languages they encountered. In this course, we will examine the similarities and difference between the various varieties of English while considering their socio-historical contexts at the same time.

This course provides students with a systematic introduction to World Englishes and language contact. Students are expected to carry out small-scale empirical research projects in which they examine selected aspects of World Englishes to gain hands-on experience working with linguistics data.

This course will be taught online combining synchronous and asynchronous elements. All readings and materials as well as online lectures will be made available through the teaching and learning platform Stud.IP.

Nicole Hober, M.A.
10-76-6-D2b-04Key Topics in Linguistics: Pragmatics for Language Teaching (in English)

Seminar (Teaching)

Dates:
weekly (starts in week: 1) Tue. 12:15 - 13:45 External location: Zoom External location: Asynchronous External location: online (2 Credit hours)

This course provides you with an introduction to issues in intercultural communication, with a major emphasis on variation in realization of various speech acts. You will leave this course with an understanding of the ways in which our linguistic and cultural backgrounds may influence how we realize social functions using language, or – in other words – how speakers and listeners make meaning, and how they “do things with words.” You are introduced to the theoretical foundations of an applied approach to pragmatics as well as to implications for language teaching.
We will attempt to answer questions such as the following:
  • Why does "It’s cold in here" sometimes mean "Please close the window" and other times "I don’t like this room"?
  • Why are compliments sometimes interpreted the wrong way?
  • Why is it sometimes polite to use formal language and other times offensive?
  • What do we do to “read between the lines”?
  • Why did the defense attorney object when the prosecutor asked the defendant when he had stopped abusing his wife?

Assessment: Portfolio

Literature: Scollon, R., Scollon, S. W., & Jones, R. (2012). (3rd Edition). Intercultural communication: A discourse approach. Malden, MA: Blackwell Publishing.

Dr. Ramona Kreis

D2-c Aufbaumodul: Literaturwissenschaft (nur für das Sommersemester) (6 CP)

6 CP (3 CP + 3 CP)

1 PL = Term paper/Hausarbeit

Modulbeautragte/r: Dr. Jana Nittel, jnittel@uni-bremen.de
Course numberTitle of eventLecturer
10-76-4-D2/WD2-02Key Topics in Literature: The Victorian Novel - Robert Louis Stevenson/ C3 (in English)

Seminar (Teaching)

Dates:
weekly (starts in week: 1) Tue. 12:15 - 13:45 External location: online (2 Credit hours)

This course welcomes students who wish to complete the following modules:
B.A. E-SC “Key Topics in Literature”- D2-c; WD-2a and WD-2b
Erasmus students and General Studies

Online course in the summer term 2021 – Due to the COVID 19 pandemic we will meet in weekly ZOOM sessions. This seminar focuses predominantly on novels exemplifying the predominance of fictional prose in the Victoria era. We will explore fictional and non-fictional writings by the Scottish novelist and travel writer Robert Louis Stevenson (1850 – 1894), in particular Treasure Island (1883), The Strange Case of Dr Jekyll and Mr Hyde (1886) and South Sea Tales (1893). Using text-centred and contextual approaches, this course wishes to enable students to explore language, form, genre, and style of the selected stories and novels, as well as to engage critically with themes, issues, and key concerns of Stevenson’s writing and corresponding contemporary adaptions. We will also touch upon key developments in the history of nineteen-century novels as well as selected historical and literary contexts of the period. Please register on Stud. IP and explore the sections “Information” and “Schedule” on Stud. IP. for further details.

Requirements:
  • work through the weekly study units (ZOOM and Podcasts);
  • in-depth knowledge of the selected reading material and course materials,
  • final exam according to module choice.

Reading materials (please read before the beginning of term):
Stevenson, Robert Louis. Treasure Island, 1883 - https://www.gutenberg.org/files/120/120-h/120-h.htm
Stevenson, Robert Louis. The Strange Case of Dr Jekyll and Mr Hyde, 1886 - https://www.gutenberg.org/files/43/43-h/43-h.htm
Stevenson, Robert Louis. South Sea Tales, Oxford Univ. Press, 1893, 2008. (Excerpts available on Stud. IP)

Dr. Jana Nittel
10-76-4-D2/WD2-03Key Topics in Literature and Cultural History: Contemporary Crime Fiction/ C3 (in English)

Seminar (Teaching)

Dates:
weekly (starts in week: 1) Tue. 14:15 - 15:45 External location: online (2 Credit hours)

This course welcomes students who wish to complete the following modules:
B.A. E-SC “Key Topics in Literature”- D2-c; WD-2a and WD-2b
B.A. E-SC “Key Topics in Cultural History” – D2-a
Erasmus students and General Studies
Online course in the summer term 2021 – Due to the COVID 19 pandemic we will meet in weekly ZOOM sessions. Crime Fiction is overwhelmingly popular and yet, much of the narrative literature that involves crime of some kind or another is often not regarded as ‘literature’ at all. This course is designed to familiarise students with the contemporary critical and theoretical arguments concerning popular fiction and genre studies, as well as to enable all participants of this course to relate to the genre’s wider social, historical and political contexts while discussing the individual narratives in terms of form, language and imagery. Seeking to promote an analytical, creative and imaginative engagement with the complexities of literary and cultural discourses, we will focus on excerpts of both detective- or transgressor-centred narratives from the second half of the 20th Century onwards. These narratives include examples of the police novel (e.g. Ian Rankin); of female detectives and the feminist appropriations of the hard-boiled story (e.g. Sara Paretsky); of the psychothriller (e.g. Patricia Highsmith), of Afro-American crime fiction, here the examination of literary representations and other cultural manifestations of the Black Diaspora, discussing the relevance of this form of genre fiction to the Black experience of American Life (e.g. Walter Mosley), of Indigenous crime fiction (e.g. Thomas King), of the postmodern mystery (e.g. Paul Auster), and of representations of disability in crime fiction (e.g. Jeffrey Deaver’s Lincoln Rhyme series).

Please register on Stud. IP and explore the sections “Information” and “Schedule” on Stud. IP. for further details.
Requirements:
  • work through the weekly study units (ZOOM and podacsts);
  • in-depth knowledge of the selected reading material and course materials,
  • final exam according to module choice.

Reading materials (we will read excerpts of these novels but you are welcome to read these novels in full especially when planning a research project):
Auster, Paul. The New York Trilogy, Faber and Faber, 1987.
Deaver, Jeffrey. The Bone Collector, Hodder and Stoughton, 1997.
Highsmith, Patricia. Strangers on a Train, Vintage, 1999, 1950.
King, Thomas. The Red Power Murders: A DreadfulWater Mystery, Harper Perennial, 2006.
Mosley, Walter. Devil in a Blue Dress, Serpent's Tail, 2001, 1991.
Paretsky, Sara. Blacklist: A V.I. Warshawski Novel, Signet Book, 2004.
Rankin, Ian. Knots & Crosses: Inspector Rebus Novel, Orion, 2005, 1998.

Dr. Jana Nittel
10-76-4-D2/WD2-04Key Topics in Literature: Speculative Queer Fiction in Contemporary US Literature - C3 (in English)

Seminar (Teaching)
ECTS: 3

Dates:
weekly (starts in week: 1) Fri. 12:15 - 13:45 Online

This is an introductory class that will delve into the many intricacies of speculative and queer fiction in literature from the United States. We will explore the novels of Carmen Maria Machado (Her Body and Other Parties) and Akwaeke Emezi (Freshwater), two authors who explore gendered and sexual differences in American (as well as Nigerian/Cuban) culture through a fantastical, dark, and mythical lens.

We will also be reading selected works from Love After the End: An Anthology of Two-Spirit and Indigiqueer Speculative Fiction. These stories revolve around Indigenous Two-Spirt and Nonbinary realities in relation to apocalyptic fiction. Indigenous authors from the United States include Linden Apache writer Darcie Little Badger’s “Story for a Bottle,” Red River Métis author Kai Minosh Pyle’s “How to Survive the Apocalypse for Native Girls” and Ojibwe and Californian author Mari Kurisato’s “Seed Children.”

Both novels and all three short stories deal with heavy and traumatizing subjects that are attributed to queer life, yet they also present — through form and function — the subversive nature of existing outside of colonial binaries in the settler nation of the United States.

Please Note: This class will take place online synchronously with weekly Zoom sessions. Prior enrolment via Stud.IP is mandatory. Machado's Her Body and Other Parties and Emezi's Freshwater must be bought by students while I will provide the short stories from Love After the End.

Requirements:
• Regular attendance, participation in weekly discussion boards
• In-depth knowledge of the reading materials
• Journal Entries and Participation (Studienleistung)
• Term Paper (Prüfungsleistung)

Corina Wieser-Cox, M.A.
10-76-4-D2/WD2-06Key Topics in Literature: Narratives of New York City / C3 (in English)

Seminar (Teaching)
ECTS: 3

Dates:
weekly (starts in week: 1) Thu. 14:15 - 15:45 External location: online (2 Credit hours)

    • Please note that this class is already fully booked.--
New York City, also known as The Big Apple, The City That Never Sleeps, Empire City, and Gotham City, is the most populous city in the United States. Its many neighborhoods, such as Harlem, Little Italy, SoHo, and Chinatown, and its five boroughs, especially Manhattan, but also Brooklyn, the Bronx, Queens, and Staten Island, are popular settings and contexts of countless narratives. This seminar will familiarize students with a selection of narratives set in and focusing on New York City and the diverse cultures and histories it has become a home to. Using text-centered and contextual approaches, students will engage critically with issues of race and gender in narratives of New York City as well as explore the narratives’ formal characteristics and styles.
The seminar (teaching category C3) will take place primarily in the form of asynchronic weekly study assignments and Stud.IP forum discussions. Occasionally, synchronic meetings will be held in a virtual conference meeting room (irregularly on Thursdays 14:15 - 15:45). Assigned course materials, resources, and study assignments will be made available through Stud.IP on a weekly basis.
The seminar is offered for the modules D2c, WD2a, and WD2b. Please note that prior enrolment via Stud.IP is mandatory. Please check Stud.IP regularly for your assigned primary and secondary material as well as study assignments and further updates.

Requirements
• regular, active participation on Stud.IP and during online meetings,
• in-depth knowledge of the primary and secondary reading material,
• ‘Studien-,’ or ‘Prüfungsleistung’ as required by the module descriptions.

Dr. Paula von Gleich
10-M80-2-ExMo1+2-03Literary London - London in Literature/ C3 (in English)

Seminar (Teaching)

Dates:
weekly (starts in week: 1) Mon. 16:15 - 17:45 External location: online (2 Credit hours)

This course welcomes students who wish to complete the following modules:
M.A. E-SC ExMo 1 – Extension Module 1
M.A. E-SC ExMo 2 - Extension Module 2
B.A. E-SC “Key Topics in Literature”- D2-c; WD-2a and WD-2b
Erasmus students and General Studies

Online course in the summer term 2021 – Due to the COVID 19 pandemic we will meet in weekly ZOOM sessions. This course seeks to familiarise students with a number of selected authors, poets and writers, in general, who have held lifelong connections with London, may it be historic or contemporary. We will aim to discuss their continued engagement with the city by exploring a selections of excerpts clustered around five major topic choices: Queer London; Women Writers and London; London’s Imperial Past and Postcolonial Present; London Theatreland and the Shakespearean Stage; London and Crime, and London and the Long Eighteen Century. By virtually tracing forgotten as well as prominent landmarks of the urban centre, we seek to connect the literary representations of the city with historical and cultural developments, present and past.
Please register on Stud. IP and explore the sections “Information” and “Schedule” on Stud. IP. for further details.
Requirements:
  • work through the weekly study units (ZOOM and Podcasts);
  • in-depth knowledge of the selected reading material and course materials,
  • final exam according to module choice.

Dr. Jana Nittel

SP-2 Aufbaumodul: Sprachpraxis/ Practical-Language Proficiency Module (Part 2) (6 CP) (nur für das Sommersemester)

6 CP (3 CP+ 3 CP)

Modulbeauftragte: Dr. Vanessa Herrmann, vanessa.herrmann@uni-bremen.de

Core language classes for BA „E-SC“ - 2nd year, Semester 4 („Aufbaumodul“ SP-2 BAPO 2011, Part 2)
Course numberTitle of eventLecturer
10-76-6-SP2-01Culture and Communication a / C3 (in English)
Kat. B C3 Synchrone/ Asynchrone Lehre

Exercises (Teaching)

Dates:
weekly (starts in week: 1) Tue. 12:15 - 13:45 External location: online (2 Credit hours)

Online with synchronous and asynchronous elements

Anne Kirkham, M.A.
10-76-6-SP2-02Culture and Communication b / B/C3 (in English)

Exercises (Teaching)

Dates:
weekly (starts in week: 1) Tue. 14:15 - 15:45 SH D1020 (2 Credit hours)

This course takes place both online and on campus ("Präsenzlehre"); the on-site sessions are in synch with the scheduled times, whereas the online part is asynchronous.

The aim of the Culture & Communication classes is to help you to prepare for the final SP-2 module oral exam taken when you have completed the SP-2 module. This particular class will look at different moments which have greatly influenced events within the English-speaking world. We will investigate the processes which led to a particular event, define the event itself and explore the long-term and short-term implications that came about as a consequence. You will be required to think critically and research a topic of your own choice in detail in order to prepare for the Proficiency Interview ⇐ oral exam) at the end of the semester during which you will explain how this moment has been defining. You will also work on presentation skills and familiarise yourselves with the situation of speaking in front of others.

Materials are provided in due time via StudIP.

Dr. Vanessa Herrmann
10-76-6-SP2-03Culture and Communication c / C3 (in English)

Exercises (Teaching)

Dates:
weekly (starts in week: 1) Thu. 12:15 - 13:45 External location: online (2 Credit hours)

This course only takes place online; it combines elements which are in synch with the scheduled times and elements which are asynchronous.

The aim of the Culture & Communication classes is to help you to prepare for the final SP-2 module oral exam taken when you have completed the SP-2 module. This particular class will look at different moments which have greatly influenced events within the English-speaking world. We will investigate the processes which led to a particular event, define the event itself and explore the long-term and short-term implications that came about as a consequence. You will be required to think critically and research a topic of your own choice in detail in order to prepare for the Proficiency Interview ⇐ oral exam) at the end of the semester during which you will explain how this moment has been defining. You will also work on presentation skills and familiarise yourselves with the situation of speaking in front of others.

Materials are provided in due time via StudIP.

Dr. Vanessa Herrmann
10-76-6-SP2-04Culture & Communication d B/C1 (in English)

Exercises (Teaching)
ECTS: 3

Dates:
weekly (starts in week: 1) Mon. 10:15 - 11:45 SH D1020 (2 Credit hours)

The aim of the Culture and Communication class is to help you prepare for the final SP2 module oral exam taken when you have completed the SP2 module. This class will deal with two different areas from which you will be able to develop ONE research project as the basis for your oral exam.
One option will be to look at defining moments which have greatly influenced events within the English-speaking world. You will investigate the processes which led to a particular event, define the event itself and explore the long-term and short-term consequences.
Some of you may prefer to take a detailed look at a research topic related to sustainability. Again, the critical analytic approach be will necessary as you explore the causes and implications of the topic of your choice.
In addition, we will work on improving important aspects of grammar, pronunciation, intonation as well as developing the confidence and fluency needed to successfully pass the exam. Whereas CBIS was more about collaboration and teamwork, Culture and Communication allows you to build upon the research skills developed last semester as you move forward with your own project.

Lisa Nehls, M.A.
10-76-6-SP2-05Culture and Communication e B/C1 (in English)

Exercises (Teaching)
ECTS: 3

Dates:
weekly (starts in week: 1) Mon. 12:15 - 13:45 SH D1020 (2 Credit hours)

The aim of the Culture and Communication class is to help you prepare for the final SP2 module oral exam taken when you have completed the SP2 module. This class will deal with two different areas from which you will be able to develop ONE research project as the basis for your oral exam.
One option will be to look at defining moments which have greatly influenced events within the English-speaking world. You will investigate the processes which led to a particular event, define the event itself and explore the long-term and short-term consequences.
Some of you may prefer to take a detailed look at a research topic related to sustainability. Again, the critical analytic approach be will necessary as you explore the causes and implications of the topic of your choice.
In addition, we will work on improving important aspects of grammar, pronunciation, intonation as well as developing the confidence and fluency needed to successfully pass the exam. Whereas CBIS was more about collaboration and teamwork, Culture and Communication allows you to build upon the research skills developed last semester as you move forward with your own project.

Lisa Nehls, M.A.
10-76-6-SP2-06Culture and Communication f (in English)
B/C3 Synchrone/ Asynchrone Lehre

Exercises (Teaching)

Dates:
weekly (starts in week: 1) Mon. 10:15 - 11:45 External location: online (2 Credit hours)

Online with synchronous and asynchronous elements

Anne Kirkham, M.A.
10-76-6-SP2-07Culture and Communication g /Kategorie A (in English)
Kategorie A = on-campus teaching (only if the situation allows it)

Exercises (Teaching)
ECTS: 3

Dates:
weekly (starts in week: 1) Wed. 12:15 - 13:45 GW2 A4020 (2 Credit hours)

Critical Thinking – and Defining Moments in History

The main focus of this Culture & Communication course is to prepare you for your 15-minute SP-2 'Sprachpraxis Aufbaumodul' module proficiency exam. We will start by going back-to-the-basics regarding pronunciation, intonation, and transition signals.

In addition to these language skills, you will also expand your speaking skills for the exam with regard to audience-focus. You will then apply your skills to several mini-group presentations on given topics before delivering your own chosen topic. You are required to critically analyse your topic, to shed light on the breadth and depth of your topic and to demonstrate accuracy, precision, and cautious language in your fifteen-minute exam.

The topic you choose, will focus on one defining moment in the history of the English-speaking world. You are invited to explore historical, social, cultural or other reasons for why a specific event happend to turn into his/her/ourstory. You may wish to compare, exemplify, list, critically analyse discourse or classify the information you can compile by researching your topic.


General information
This class is open for ERASMUS/exchange students with a level of English ranging B2 - C1 (GER, CEFR). ERASMUS students on a level below C1 but above B2 wishing to attend this class need to contact the lecturer before joining this class.

Katja Müller, M.A.
10-76-6-SP2-08Culture and Communication h /Kategorie A (in English)
Kategorie A = on-campus teaching (only if the situation allows it)

Exercises (Teaching)
ECTS: 3

Dates:
weekly (starts in week: 1) Wed. 14:15 - 15:45 GW2 A4020 (2 Credit hours)

Critical Thinking – and Defining Moments in History

The main focus of this Culture & Communication course is to prepare you for your 15-minute SP-2 'Sprachpraxis Aufbaumodul' module proficiency exam. We will start by going back-to-the-basics regarding pronunciation, intonation, and transition signals.

In addition to these language skills, you will also expand your speaking skills for the exam with regard to audience-focus. You will then apply your skills to several mini-group presentations on given topics before delivering your own chosen topic. You are required to critically analyse your topic, to shed light on the breadth and depth of your topic and to demonstrate accuracy, precision, and cautious language in your fifteen-minute exam.

The topic you choose, will focus on one defining moment in the history of the English-speaking world. You are invited to explore historical, social, cultural or other reasons for why a specific event happend to turn into his/her/ourstory. You may wish to compare, exemplify, list, critically analyse discourse or classify the information you can compile by researching your topic.


General information
This class is open for ERASMUS/exchange students with a level of English ranging B2 - C1 (GER, CEFR). ERASMUS students on a level below C1 but above B2 wishing to attend this class need to contact the lecturer before joining this class.

Katja Müller, M.A.

FD-2 Aufbaumodul Fachdidaktik 10-76-4-204 (nur für das Sommersemester)

Pflichtmodul: Gy, BIPEB

6 CP

Modulbeauftragte/r: Tim Giesler, Link-extern giesler@uni-bremen.de
Course numberTitle of eventLecturer
10-76-6-FD2-01Historical and Theoretical Foundations of Second Language Acquisition (BiPEB/Gy) (in English)
C3

Seminar (Teaching)

Dates:
weekly (starts in week: 1) Tue. 10:15 - 11:45 (2 Credit hours)
Dr. Tim Giesler
10-76-6-FD2-02Historical and Theoretical Foundations of Second Language Acquisition (Gy/BiPEB) (in English)
C3

Seminar (Teaching)

Dates:
weekly (starts in week: 1) Thu. 10:15 - 11:45 (2 Credit hours)
Dr. Tim Giesler
10-76-6-FD2-04ELT: Primary Activities, Resources and Materials (BIPEB) (in English)
C3

Seminar (Teaching)

Dates:
weekly (starts in week: 1) Tue. 14:15 - 15:45 (2 Credit hours)
Dr. Tim Giesler
10-76-6-FD2-05ELT: CLIL Activities, Resources and Materials (Gy) (in English)

Seminar (Teaching)

Dates:
weekly (starts in week: 1) Tue. 14:15 - 15:45
Heather Haase
10-76-6-FD2-06ELT: Activities, Resources and Materials (Gy) / C3 (in English)

Seminar (Teaching)

Dates:
weekly (starts in week: 1) Tue. 16:15 - 17:45
Nelli Mehlmann
10-76-6-FD2-07ELT: Activities, Resources and Materials (Gy) / C3 (in English)

Seminar (Teaching)

Dates:
weekly (starts in week: 1) Fri. 14:15 - 15:45
Irina Pavlovic

WD-2a Aufbaumodul: Literatur- und Sprachwissenschaft (6 CP) (Wahlpflichtmodul) (nur für das Sommersemester)

(6 CP = 3 CP und 3 CP)

Es gilt zu beachten: Laut SK-Beschluss (E-SC) vom 21.12.2012 ist die Prüfungsleistung im Bereich "Key Topics in Literature" zu erbringen =
Klausur/Written Test oder benotete Präsentationsleistung/Presentation

Modulbeauftragte/r: Dr. Inke du Bois, dubois@uni-bremen.de und Prof. Dr. Marcus Callies, callies@uni-bremen.de
Course numberTitle of eventLecturer
10-76-4-D2/WD2-02Key Topics in Literature: The Victorian Novel - Robert Louis Stevenson/ C3 (in English)

Seminar (Teaching)

Dates:
weekly (starts in week: 1) Tue. 12:15 - 13:45 External location: online (2 Credit hours)

This course welcomes students who wish to complete the following modules:
B.A. E-SC “Key Topics in Literature”- D2-c; WD-2a and WD-2b
Erasmus students and General Studies

Online course in the summer term 2021 – Due to the COVID 19 pandemic we will meet in weekly ZOOM sessions. This seminar focuses predominantly on novels exemplifying the predominance of fictional prose in the Victoria era. We will explore fictional and non-fictional writings by the Scottish novelist and travel writer Robert Louis Stevenson (1850 – 1894), in particular Treasure Island (1883), The Strange Case of Dr Jekyll and Mr Hyde (1886) and South Sea Tales (1893). Using text-centred and contextual approaches, this course wishes to enable students to explore language, form, genre, and style of the selected stories and novels, as well as to engage critically with themes, issues, and key concerns of Stevenson’s writing and corresponding contemporary adaptions. We will also touch upon key developments in the history of nineteen-century novels as well as selected historical and literary contexts of the period. Please register on Stud. IP and explore the sections “Information” and “Schedule” on Stud. IP. for further details.

Requirements:
  • work through the weekly study units (ZOOM and Podcasts);
  • in-depth knowledge of the selected reading material and course materials,
  • final exam according to module choice.

Reading materials (please read before the beginning of term):
Stevenson, Robert Louis. Treasure Island, 1883 - https://www.gutenberg.org/files/120/120-h/120-h.htm
Stevenson, Robert Louis. The Strange Case of Dr Jekyll and Mr Hyde, 1886 - https://www.gutenberg.org/files/43/43-h/43-h.htm
Stevenson, Robert Louis. South Sea Tales, Oxford Univ. Press, 1893, 2008. (Excerpts available on Stud. IP)

Dr. Jana Nittel
10-76-4-D2/WD2-03Key Topics in Literature and Cultural History: Contemporary Crime Fiction/ C3 (in English)

Seminar (Teaching)

Dates:
weekly (starts in week: 1) Tue. 14:15 - 15:45 External location: online (2 Credit hours)

This course welcomes students who wish to complete the following modules:
B.A. E-SC “Key Topics in Literature”- D2-c; WD-2a and WD-2b
B.A. E-SC “Key Topics in Cultural History” – D2-a
Erasmus students and General Studies
Online course in the summer term 2021 – Due to the COVID 19 pandemic we will meet in weekly ZOOM sessions. Crime Fiction is overwhelmingly popular and yet, much of the narrative literature that involves crime of some kind or another is often not regarded as ‘literature’ at all. This course is designed to familiarise students with the contemporary critical and theoretical arguments concerning popular fiction and genre studies, as well as to enable all participants of this course to relate to the genre’s wider social, historical and political contexts while discussing the individual narratives in terms of form, language and imagery. Seeking to promote an analytical, creative and imaginative engagement with the complexities of literary and cultural discourses, we will focus on excerpts of both detective- or transgressor-centred narratives from the second half of the 20th Century onwards. These narratives include examples of the police novel (e.g. Ian Rankin); of female detectives and the feminist appropriations of the hard-boiled story (e.g. Sara Paretsky); of the psychothriller (e.g. Patricia Highsmith), of Afro-American crime fiction, here the examination of literary representations and other cultural manifestations of the Black Diaspora, discussing the relevance of this form of genre fiction to the Black experience of American Life (e.g. Walter Mosley), of Indigenous crime fiction (e.g. Thomas King), of the postmodern mystery (e.g. Paul Auster), and of representations of disability in crime fiction (e.g. Jeffrey Deaver’s Lincoln Rhyme series).

Please register on Stud. IP and explore the sections “Information” and “Schedule” on Stud. IP. for further details.
Requirements:
  • work through the weekly study units (ZOOM and podacsts);
  • in-depth knowledge of the selected reading material and course materials,
  • final exam according to module choice.

Reading materials (we will read excerpts of these novels but you are welcome to read these novels in full especially when planning a research project):
Auster, Paul. The New York Trilogy, Faber and Faber, 1987.
Deaver, Jeffrey. The Bone Collector, Hodder and Stoughton, 1997.
Highsmith, Patricia. Strangers on a Train, Vintage, 1999, 1950.
King, Thomas. The Red Power Murders: A DreadfulWater Mystery, Harper Perennial, 2006.
Mosley, Walter. Devil in a Blue Dress, Serpent's Tail, 2001, 1991.
Paretsky, Sara. Blacklist: A V.I. Warshawski Novel, Signet Book, 2004.
Rankin, Ian. Knots & Crosses: Inspector Rebus Novel, Orion, 2005, 1998.

Dr. Jana Nittel
10-76-4-D2/WD2-04Key Topics in Literature: Speculative Queer Fiction in Contemporary US Literature - C3 (in English)

Seminar (Teaching)
ECTS: 3

Dates:
weekly (starts in week: 1) Fri. 12:15 - 13:45 Online

This is an introductory class that will delve into the many intricacies of speculative and queer fiction in literature from the United States. We will explore the novels of Carmen Maria Machado (Her Body and Other Parties) and Akwaeke Emezi (Freshwater), two authors who explore gendered and sexual differences in American (as well as Nigerian/Cuban) culture through a fantastical, dark, and mythical lens.

We will also be reading selected works from Love After the End: An Anthology of Two-Spirit and Indigiqueer Speculative Fiction. These stories revolve around Indigenous Two-Spirt and Nonbinary realities in relation to apocalyptic fiction. Indigenous authors from the United States include Linden Apache writer Darcie Little Badger’s “Story for a Bottle,” Red River Métis author Kai Minosh Pyle’s “How to Survive the Apocalypse for Native Girls” and Ojibwe and Californian author Mari Kurisato’s “Seed Children.”

Both novels and all three short stories deal with heavy and traumatizing subjects that are attributed to queer life, yet they also present — through form and function — the subversive nature of existing outside of colonial binaries in the settler nation of the United States.

Please Note: This class will take place online synchronously with weekly Zoom sessions. Prior enrolment via Stud.IP is mandatory. Machado's Her Body and Other Parties and Emezi's Freshwater must be bought by students while I will provide the short stories from Love After the End.

Requirements:
• Regular attendance, participation in weekly discussion boards
• In-depth knowledge of the reading materials
• Journal Entries and Participation (Studienleistung)
• Term Paper (Prüfungsleistung)

Corina Wieser-Cox, M.A.
10-76-4-D2/WD2-06Key Topics in Literature: Narratives of New York City / C3 (in English)

Seminar (Teaching)
ECTS: 3

Dates:
weekly (starts in week: 1) Thu. 14:15 - 15:45 External location: online (2 Credit hours)

    • Please note that this class is already fully booked.--
New York City, also known as The Big Apple, The City That Never Sleeps, Empire City, and Gotham City, is the most populous city in the United States. Its many neighborhoods, such as Harlem, Little Italy, SoHo, and Chinatown, and its five boroughs, especially Manhattan, but also Brooklyn, the Bronx, Queens, and Staten Island, are popular settings and contexts of countless narratives. This seminar will familiarize students with a selection of narratives set in and focusing on New York City and the diverse cultures and histories it has become a home to. Using text-centered and contextual approaches, students will engage critically with issues of race and gender in narratives of New York City as well as explore the narratives’ formal characteristics and styles.
The seminar (teaching category C3) will take place primarily in the form of asynchronic weekly study assignments and Stud.IP forum discussions. Occasionally, synchronic meetings will be held in a virtual conference meeting room (irregularly on Thursdays 14:15 - 15:45). Assigned course materials, resources, and study assignments will be made available through Stud.IP on a weekly basis.
The seminar is offered for the modules D2c, WD2a, and WD2b. Please note that prior enrolment via Stud.IP is mandatory. Please check Stud.IP regularly for your assigned primary and secondary material as well as study assignments and further updates.

Requirements
• regular, active participation on Stud.IP and during online meetings,
• in-depth knowledge of the primary and secondary reading material,
• ‘Studien-,’ or ‘Prüfungsleistung’ as required by the module descriptions.

Dr. Paula von Gleich
10-76-4-WD2-01Key Topics in Linguistics: The Sounds of English Around the World / C3

Seminar (Teaching)
ECTS: 3

Dates:
fortnightly (starts in week: 1) Wed. 10:15 - 13:45 External location: online (4 Credit hours)
Antorlina Mandal
10-76-6-WD2-01Key Topics in Linguistics: The Pragmatics of Humour / C3 (in English)

Seminar (Teaching)

Dates:
weekly (starts in week: 1) Thu. 12:15 - 13:45 External location: online (2 Credit hours)

Course description
If you’ve ever asked yourself if the Gricean maxims are really that important then the answer is clearly: “I like sandwiches!” … So, obviously, toying with pragmatic expectations can lead to humorous effects. In this course, then, we will go into the depths of basic notions in pragmatics and mainstream pragmatic theories and apply these to humorous artefacts. In particular, we will cover the following topics:
• Reference and deixis
• Speech act theory
• The co-operative principle
• (Im)politeness
• Relevance theory
In the remainder of this class, we will discuss a much-debated use case: irony, adopting several viewpoints on this phenomenon.

Course requirements
WD2a/c – 3CP – ungraded: weekly assignments on EduWorks (excluding discussions)
WD2a/c – 3CP – graded: weekly assignments on EduWorks

EMII – 6CP – graded: weekly assignments on EduWorks + project report

Weekly assignments and Zoom meetings
Assignments are asynchronous, can be found on EduWorks and are due Thursdays, 2pm. In addition to these assignments, we’ll meet on a bi-weekly basis on Zoom. In these Zoom meetings, we will cover unresolved issues, discuss your analyses and provide you with food-for-thought. Note that these meetings are not mandatory and that this class can also be studied as a purely asynchronously course, if necessary.

Project report (LLS)
The project report is a piece of writing of about 7 to 10 pages. It is supposed to report on an empirical project revolving around one of the topics covered in class. Further details will be given in class.

Dr. Claudia Lehmann
10-76-6-WD2-02Key Topics in Linguistics: Linguistics Analysis of Literary Texts C1 (in English)
C1 Digitale Lehre, asynchron

Seminar (Teaching)
ECTS: 3

Dates:
weekly (starts in week: 1) Mon. 12:15 - 13:45 External location: online (2 Credit hours)

In this seminar, we want to apply linguist theories and methods to investigate different kinds of literary texts, e.g. novels, plays and poems. This is a branch of applied linguistics often called ‘stylistics’. We will use corpus linguistic methods, e.g. word frequencies, keywords and collocations, to describe the style of a literary text. You will learn how to use the Corpus Linguistics in Context (CLiC) web interface and do automatic analyses with the AntConc software (Laurence).
Finally, each student will do analyses of different linguistic aspects of a text of their choice. In the end, you will be able to find, analyse and present aspects of literary texts that exceed what we can describe with methods from literature studies alone.

Category C1 Asynchronous online learning, meaning no video meetings at any time. You work on the tasks in your own pace and place.

Please be aware that this is a class in the WD module. Only students in ESC Profilfach are required to take the WD module. Students in ESC Komplementärfach and ESC Lehramtsoption do not study the WD module. You cannot take this class for the D module. It is possible to choose this class as “Ersatzleistung für das Auslandssemester”, but only if places are available.

Form of assessment
BA ESC WD 2 a: An analysis + presentation (Studienleistung, not graded, 3 CP)
BA ESC WD 2 c: An analysis + presentation (Prüfungsleistung, graded, 3 CP)
Erasmus students can gain either 3 CP (see option WD2a, graded or ungraded) or 6 CP (see option WD2c, graded).

Literature
McEnery, Tony & Richard Xiao & Yukio Tono. 2006. Corpus-based Language Studies: An Advanced Resource Book. Routledge.
McIntyre, Dan & Beatrix Busse (eds.) 2010. Language and Style: In Honour of Mick Short. Palgrave Macmillan.

Dr. Anke Schulz
10-76-6-WD2-05Key Topics in Linguistics: Contrastive Linguistics C1 (in English)
C1 Digitale Lehre, asynchron

Seminar (Teaching)

Dates:
weekly (starts in week: 1) Thu. 14:15 - 15:45 External location: online (2 Credit hours)

Why is English English, and what makes German German? How are, for example, case and gender realized in these languages? How is the word order different? Why does one language have words that the other does not have, and how do speakers deal with that fact?
In this class, we will investigate several grammatical and lexical differences. Where it is useful, we will work with corpora. In addition, we will study practical applications of our findings, e.g. in translation equivalence or for language teaching.

Category C1 Asynchronous online learning, meaning no video meetings at any time. You work on the tasks in your own pace and place.

Requirements
Module WD2a: Studienleistung, not graded: Portfolio consisting of two assignments
Module WD2c: Prüfungsleistung, graded: Portfolio consisting of three assignments
Please be aware that you cannot take this class for the D2 module. It is possible to choose this class as “Ersatzleistung für das Auslandssemester”, but only if places are available.
Erasmus students can gain either 3 CP (see option WD2a, graded) or 6 CP (see option WD2c, graded).

Dr. Anke Schulz
10-M80-2-ExMo1+2-03Literary London - London in Literature/ C3 (in English)

Seminar (Teaching)

Dates:
weekly (starts in week: 1) Mon. 16:15 - 17:45 External location: online (2 Credit hours)

This course welcomes students who wish to complete the following modules:
M.A. E-SC ExMo 1 – Extension Module 1
M.A. E-SC ExMo 2 - Extension Module 2
B.A. E-SC “Key Topics in Literature”- D2-c; WD-2a and WD-2b
Erasmus students and General Studies

Online course in the summer term 2021 – Due to the COVID 19 pandemic we will meet in weekly ZOOM sessions. This course seeks to familiarise students with a number of selected authors, poets and writers, in general, who have held lifelong connections with London, may it be historic or contemporary. We will aim to discuss their continued engagement with the city by exploring a selections of excerpts clustered around five major topic choices: Queer London; Women Writers and London; London’s Imperial Past and Postcolonial Present; London Theatreland and the Shakespearean Stage; London and Crime, and London and the Long Eighteen Century. By virtually tracing forgotten as well as prominent landmarks of the urban centre, we seek to connect the literary representations of the city with historical and cultural developments, present and past.
Please register on Stud. IP and explore the sections “Information” and “Schedule” on Stud. IP. for further details.
Requirements:
  • work through the weekly study units (ZOOM and Podcasts);
  • in-depth knowledge of the selected reading material and course materials,
  • final exam according to module choice.

Dr. Jana Nittel

WD-2b Aufbaumodul: Literaturwissenschaft und Kulturgeschichte (6 CP) (Wahlpflichtmodul) - (nur für das Sommersemester)

(6 CP = 3 CP und 3 CP)

Es gilt zu beachten: Laut SK-Beschluss (E-SC) vom 21.12.2012 ist die Prüfungsleistung im Bereich "Key Topics in Cultural History" zu erbringen =
Klausur/Written Test oder benotete Praesentationsleistung/Presentation

Modulbeauftragte/r: Dr. Inke du Bois, dubois@uni-bremen.de und Prof. Dr. Marcus Callies, callies@uni-bremen.de
Course numberTitle of eventLecturer
10-76-4-D2/WD2-01Key Topics in Cultural History: Female Scientists on Screen / C1 (in English)

Seminar (Teaching)

Dates:
weekly (starts in week: 1) Tue. 14:15 - 15:45 External location: Thema: Key Topics in Cultural History: Female Scientists on Screen Uhrzeit: 13.Juli.2021 02:00 PM Amsterdam, Berlin, Rom, Stockholm, Wien Zoom-Meeting beitreten https://uni-bremen.zoom.us/j/920 (2 Credit hours)

The aim of this course is to familiarise students with the larger issues surrounding historical female
scientists and their representation on film today. Focusing on two recent films, Radioactive (2018)
and Hidden Figures (2016), the lives and challenges of Marie Curie as well Katherine Johnson,
Dorothy Vaughan and Mary Jackson will be analysed. Matters of gender discrimination, scientist
stereotypes, social responsibility, funding and increasing scientific competition will be discussed
after the basic theoretical framework of film analysis has been established.

Please note: This course will take place in the form of asynchronic, weekly study assignments and
Stud.IP forum discussions. Synchronic meetings will only be held in the first and last session via
Zoom, affording students a flexible working schedule. Prior enrolment via Stud.IP is mandatory.
Students are expected to either purchase both films or view them online.

Requirements:
• Regular assignments and participation in Stud.IP forum discussions
• In-depth knowledge of the reading materials and films
• Portfolio (Studienleistung) or portfolio and a short paper (Prüfungsleistung)

Cora Övermann ((LB))
10-76-4-D2/WD2-02Key Topics in Literature: The Victorian Novel - Robert Louis Stevenson/ C3 (in English)

Seminar (Teaching)

Dates:
weekly (starts in week: 1) Tue. 12:15 - 13:45 External location: online (2 Credit hours)

This course welcomes students who wish to complete the following modules:
B.A. E-SC “Key Topics in Literature”- D2-c; WD-2a and WD-2b
Erasmus students and General Studies

Online course in the summer term 2021 – Due to the COVID 19 pandemic we will meet in weekly ZOOM sessions. This seminar focuses predominantly on novels exemplifying the predominance of fictional prose in the Victoria era. We will explore fictional and non-fictional writings by the Scottish novelist and travel writer Robert Louis Stevenson (1850 – 1894), in particular Treasure Island (1883), The Strange Case of Dr Jekyll and Mr Hyde (1886) and South Sea Tales (1893). Using text-centred and contextual approaches, this course wishes to enable students to explore language, form, genre, and style of the selected stories and novels, as well as to engage critically with themes, issues, and key concerns of Stevenson’s writing and corresponding contemporary adaptions. We will also touch upon key developments in the history of nineteen-century novels as well as selected historical and literary contexts of the period. Please register on Stud. IP and explore the sections “Information” and “Schedule” on Stud. IP. for further details.

Requirements:
  • work through the weekly study units (ZOOM and Podcasts);
  • in-depth knowledge of the selected reading material and course materials,
  • final exam according to module choice.

Reading materials (please read before the beginning of term):
Stevenson, Robert Louis. Treasure Island, 1883 - https://www.gutenberg.org/files/120/120-h/120-h.htm
Stevenson, Robert Louis. The Strange Case of Dr Jekyll and Mr Hyde, 1886 - https://www.gutenberg.org/files/43/43-h/43-h.htm
Stevenson, Robert Louis. South Sea Tales, Oxford Univ. Press, 1893, 2008. (Excerpts available on Stud. IP)

Dr. Jana Nittel
10-76-4-D2/WD2-03Key Topics in Literature and Cultural History: Contemporary Crime Fiction/ C3 (in English)

Seminar (Teaching)

Dates:
weekly (starts in week: 1) Tue. 14:15 - 15:45 External location: online (2 Credit hours)

This course welcomes students who wish to complete the following modules:
B.A. E-SC “Key Topics in Literature”- D2-c; WD-2a and WD-2b
B.A. E-SC “Key Topics in Cultural History” – D2-a
Erasmus students and General Studies
Online course in the summer term 2021 – Due to the COVID 19 pandemic we will meet in weekly ZOOM sessions. Crime Fiction is overwhelmingly popular and yet, much of the narrative literature that involves crime of some kind or another is often not regarded as ‘literature’ at all. This course is designed to familiarise students with the contemporary critical and theoretical arguments concerning popular fiction and genre studies, as well as to enable all participants of this course to relate to the genre’s wider social, historical and political contexts while discussing the individual narratives in terms of form, language and imagery. Seeking to promote an analytical, creative and imaginative engagement with the complexities of literary and cultural discourses, we will focus on excerpts of both detective- or transgressor-centred narratives from the second half of the 20th Century onwards. These narratives include examples of the police novel (e.g. Ian Rankin); of female detectives and the feminist appropriations of the hard-boiled story (e.g. Sara Paretsky); of the psychothriller (e.g. Patricia Highsmith), of Afro-American crime fiction, here the examination of literary representations and other cultural manifestations of the Black Diaspora, discussing the relevance of this form of genre fiction to the Black experience of American Life (e.g. Walter Mosley), of Indigenous crime fiction (e.g. Thomas King), of the postmodern mystery (e.g. Paul Auster), and of representations of disability in crime fiction (e.g. Jeffrey Deaver’s Lincoln Rhyme series).

Please register on Stud. IP and explore the sections “Information” and “Schedule” on Stud. IP. for further details.
Requirements:
  • work through the weekly study units (ZOOM and podacsts);
  • in-depth knowledge of the selected reading material and course materials,
  • final exam according to module choice.

Reading materials (we will read excerpts of these novels but you are welcome to read these novels in full especially when planning a research project):
Auster, Paul. The New York Trilogy, Faber and Faber, 1987.
Deaver, Jeffrey. The Bone Collector, Hodder and Stoughton, 1997.
Highsmith, Patricia. Strangers on a Train, Vintage, 1999, 1950.
King, Thomas. The Red Power Murders: A DreadfulWater Mystery, Harper Perennial, 2006.
Mosley, Walter. Devil in a Blue Dress, Serpent's Tail, 2001, 1991.
Paretsky, Sara. Blacklist: A V.I. Warshawski Novel, Signet Book, 2004.
Rankin, Ian. Knots & Crosses: Inspector Rebus Novel, Orion, 2005, 1998.

Dr. Jana Nittel
10-76-4-D2/WD2-04Key Topics in Literature: Speculative Queer Fiction in Contemporary US Literature - C3 (in English)

Seminar (Teaching)
ECTS: 3

Dates:
weekly (starts in week: 1) Fri. 12:15 - 13:45 Online

This is an introductory class that will delve into the many intricacies of speculative and queer fiction in literature from the United States. We will explore the novels of Carmen Maria Machado (Her Body and Other Parties) and Akwaeke Emezi (Freshwater), two authors who explore gendered and sexual differences in American (as well as Nigerian/Cuban) culture through a fantastical, dark, and mythical lens.

We will also be reading selected works from Love After the End: An Anthology of Two-Spirit and Indigiqueer Speculative Fiction. These stories revolve around Indigenous Two-Spirt and Nonbinary realities in relation to apocalyptic fiction. Indigenous authors from the United States include Linden Apache writer Darcie Little Badger’s “Story for a Bottle,” Red River Métis author Kai Minosh Pyle’s “How to Survive the Apocalypse for Native Girls” and Ojibwe and Californian author Mari Kurisato’s “Seed Children.”

Both novels and all three short stories deal with heavy and traumatizing subjects that are attributed to queer life, yet they also present — through form and function — the subversive nature of existing outside of colonial binaries in the settler nation of the United States.

Please Note: This class will take place online synchronously with weekly Zoom sessions. Prior enrolment via Stud.IP is mandatory. Machado's Her Body and Other Parties and Emezi's Freshwater must be bought by students while I will provide the short stories from Love After the End.

Requirements:
• Regular attendance, participation in weekly discussion boards
• In-depth knowledge of the reading materials
• Journal Entries and Participation (Studienleistung)
• Term Paper (Prüfungsleistung)

Corina Wieser-Cox, M.A.
10-76-4-D2/WD2-05Key Concepts in Postcolonial Studies: Histories and Concepts / C2 (in English)

Seminar (Teaching)

Dates:
weekly (starts in week: 1) Tue. 12:15 - 13:45 External location: online (2 Credit hours)
Dr. Sukla Chatterjee
10-76-4-D2/WD2-06Key Topics in Literature: Narratives of New York City / C3 (in English)

Seminar (Teaching)
ECTS: 3

Dates:
weekly (starts in week: 1) Thu. 14:15 - 15:45 External location: online (2 Credit hours)

    • Please note that this class is already fully booked.--
New York City, also known as The Big Apple, The City That Never Sleeps, Empire City, and Gotham City, is the most populous city in the United States. Its many neighborhoods, such as Harlem, Little Italy, SoHo, and Chinatown, and its five boroughs, especially Manhattan, but also Brooklyn, the Bronx, Queens, and Staten Island, are popular settings and contexts of countless narratives. This seminar will familiarize students with a selection of narratives set in and focusing on New York City and the diverse cultures and histories it has become a home to. Using text-centered and contextual approaches, students will engage critically with issues of race and gender in narratives of New York City as well as explore the narratives’ formal characteristics and styles.
The seminar (teaching category C3) will take place primarily in the form of asynchronic weekly study assignments and Stud.IP forum discussions. Occasionally, synchronic meetings will be held in a virtual conference meeting room (irregularly on Thursdays 14:15 - 15:45). Assigned course materials, resources, and study assignments will be made available through Stud.IP on a weekly basis.
The seminar is offered for the modules D2c, WD2a, and WD2b. Please note that prior enrolment via Stud.IP is mandatory. Please check Stud.IP regularly for your assigned primary and secondary material as well as study assignments and further updates.

Requirements
• regular, active participation on Stud.IP and during online meetings,
• in-depth knowledge of the primary and secondary reading material,
• ‘Studien-,’ or ‘Prüfungsleistung’ as required by the module descriptions.

Dr. Paula von Gleich
10-76-4-D2/WD2-07Key Topics in Cultural History - Critical Race Studies / C3 (in English)

Seminar (Teaching)
ECTS: 3

Dates:
weekly (starts in week: 1) Tue. 10:15 - 11:45 External location: online (2 Credit hours)
Dr. Karin Esders-Angermund
10-76-4-D2/WD2-08Key Topics in Cultural History - US American Art as Cultural Practice / C3 (in English)

Seminar (Teaching)
ECTS: 3

Dates:
weekly (starts in week: 1) Thu. 10:15 - 11:45 External location: online (2 Credit hours)

This course will introduce students to a broad range of US-American visual art with a specific focus on the 20th century. We will develop a critical understanding of art and of the writing and debates surrounding it. Positioning artists and art-making firmly within cultural history we will discuss works of art both as material artifacts and cultural practices. Since the subject field itself is so broad, we will select representative works to be studied carefully.
Students are recommended to consult Bjelajac’s and Pohl’s surveys on American art in order to discover their own interests and preferences well before the beginning of the course. Selected chapters can be found on Stud.IP

Bjelajac, David. American art: a cultural history. Upper Saddle River: Prentice Hall, 2005
Pohl, Frances K. Framing America: A social history of American Art. London: Thames and Hudson, 2002.

Dr. Karin Esders-Angermund
10-76-4-D2/WD2-09Key Topics in Cultural History: Black Rights Struggle from Abolition to Black Lives Matter (in English)

Seminar (Teaching)

Dates:
weekly (starts in week: 1) Mon. 10:15 - 11:45

Departing from the Black Lives Matter Movement and the mass demonstrations for racial justice in the U.S. and beyond in the summer of 2020, this course considers the historical trajectories of Black rights struggles from the beginning of the U.S. to the current moment. It traces the struggles of Black people in the U.S. for emancipation, for civil rights, for equality, for liberation through the histories of enslavement and abolition, reconstruction and Jim Crow, white terror in the South and segregation, Civil Rights movement and Black Power, to Mass Incarceration and the Movement for Black Lives. We will investigate these moments in an ongoing struggle for racial justice through key thinkers and activists such as Frederick Douglass, Harriet Jacobs, W.E.B. DuBois, Martin Luther King, Malcolm X, the Combahee River Collective, Michelle Alexander, and Keenga Yamahtta Taylor. A key objective of the class is to discuss how these examined histories resonate in the current moment and how the present moment can be better understood as part of this long history of Black rights struggles.

Class requirements are regular attendance, in-depth knowledge of reading material, and active class discussion. Reading the assigned texts is mandatory.

This class will be completely taught online synchronously and is open to students who participate in exchange programs. All reading and information material will be made available through the U Bremen teaching and learning platform Stud.IP; hence prior enrollment via Stud.IP is mandatory.

Dr. René Dietrich
10-76-4-D2/WD2-10Key Topics in Cultural History: North American Borderlands / C3 (in English)

Seminar (Teaching)
ECTS: 3

Dates:
weekly (starts in week: 1) Thu. 10:15 - 11:45 External location: online (2 Credit hours)

    • Please note that this class is already fully booked.--
Borders and Borderlands have significantly shaped the North American continent and its diverse history and culture since the early colonial period. This class will familiarize students with key border concepts and the cultures and histories they are associated with in North America. Concepts of borders and borderlands represent key entry points into Latinx, Indigenous, and migratory North American histories and cultures in which issues of race, ethnicity, class, origin, gender, sexuality, and language intersect. Analyzing a range of texts and artifacts, such as scholarly, fictional, and artistic works, the meaning of borders and borderlands and the related themes of oppression, resistance, and subversion will be examined.
The seminar (teaching category C3) will take place primarily in the form of asynchronic weekly study assignments and Stud.IP forum discussions. Occasionally, synchronic meetings will be held in a virtual conference meeting room (irregularly on Thursdays 10:15 - 11:45). Assigned course materials, resources, and study assignments will be made available through Stud.IP on a weekly basis. The seminar is offered for the modules D2a, WD2b, and WD2c. Prior enrolment via Stud.IP is mandatory. Please check Stud.IP regularly for updates.

Requirements
• regular, active participation on Stud.IP and during online meetings,
• in-depth knowledge of the assigned reading and study material,
• ‘Studien-,’ or ‘Prüfungsleistung’ as required by the module descriptions.

Dr. Paula von Gleich
10-76-4-D2/WD2-11Key Topics in Cultural History: Muslim American Cultures in Visual and Textual Products (in English)

Seminar (Teaching)

Dates:
weekly (starts in week: 3) Wed. 16:15 - 17:45 (2 Credit hours)
Alena Cicholewski
10-M80-2-ExMo1+2-03Literary London - London in Literature/ C3 (in English)

Seminar (Teaching)

Dates:
weekly (starts in week: 1) Mon. 16:15 - 17:45 External location: online (2 Credit hours)

This course welcomes students who wish to complete the following modules:
M.A. E-SC ExMo 1 – Extension Module 1
M.A. E-SC ExMo 2 - Extension Module 2
B.A. E-SC “Key Topics in Literature”- D2-c; WD-2a and WD-2b
Erasmus students and General Studies

Online course in the summer term 2021 – Due to the COVID 19 pandemic we will meet in weekly ZOOM sessions. This course seeks to familiarise students with a number of selected authors, poets and writers, in general, who have held lifelong connections with London, may it be historic or contemporary. We will aim to discuss their continued engagement with the city by exploring a selections of excerpts clustered around five major topic choices: Queer London; Women Writers and London; London’s Imperial Past and Postcolonial Present; London Theatreland and the Shakespearean Stage; London and Crime, and London and the Long Eighteen Century. By virtually tracing forgotten as well as prominent landmarks of the urban centre, we seek to connect the literary representations of the city with historical and cultural developments, present and past.
Please register on Stud. IP and explore the sections “Information” and “Schedule” on Stud. IP. for further details.
Requirements:
  • work through the weekly study units (ZOOM and Podcasts);
  • in-depth knowledge of the selected reading material and course materials,
  • final exam according to module choice.

Dr. Jana Nittel

WD-2c Aufbaumodul: Sprachwissenschaft und Kulturgeschichte (Wahlpflichtmodul) (6 CP)- (nur für das Sommersemester)

(6 CP = 3 CP und 3 CP)

Es gilt zu beachten: Laut SK-Beschluss (E-SC) vom 21.12.2012 ist die Prüfungsleistung im Bereich "Key Topics in Linguistics" zu erbringen =
Klausur/Written Test oder benotete Präsentationsleistung/Presentation

Modulbeauftragte/r: Dr. Inke du Bois, dubois@uni-bremen.de und Prof. Dr. Marcus Callies, callies@uni-bremen.de
Course numberTitle of eventLecturer
10-76-4-D2/WD2-01Key Topics in Cultural History: Female Scientists on Screen / C1 (in English)

Seminar (Teaching)

Dates:
weekly (starts in week: 1) Tue. 14:15 - 15:45 External location: Thema: Key Topics in Cultural History: Female Scientists on Screen Uhrzeit: 13.Juli.2021 02:00 PM Amsterdam, Berlin, Rom, Stockholm, Wien Zoom-Meeting beitreten https://uni-bremen.zoom.us/j/920 (2 Credit hours)

The aim of this course is to familiarise students with the larger issues surrounding historical female
scientists and their representation on film today. Focusing on two recent films, Radioactive (2018)
and Hidden Figures (2016), the lives and challenges of Marie Curie as well Katherine Johnson,
Dorothy Vaughan and Mary Jackson will be analysed. Matters of gender discrimination, scientist
stereotypes, social responsibility, funding and increasing scientific competition will be discussed
after the basic theoretical framework of film analysis has been established.

Please note: This course will take place in the form of asynchronic, weekly study assignments and
Stud.IP forum discussions. Synchronic meetings will only be held in the first and last session via
Zoom, affording students a flexible working schedule. Prior enrolment via Stud.IP is mandatory.
Students are expected to either purchase both films or view them online.

Requirements:
• Regular assignments and participation in Stud.IP forum discussions
• In-depth knowledge of the reading materials and films
• Portfolio (Studienleistung) or portfolio and a short paper (Prüfungsleistung)

Cora Övermann ((LB))
10-76-4-D2/WD2-05Key Concepts in Postcolonial Studies: Histories and Concepts / C2 (in English)

Seminar (Teaching)

Dates:
weekly (starts in week: 1) Tue. 12:15 - 13:45 External location: online (2 Credit hours)
Dr. Sukla Chatterjee
10-76-4-D2/WD2-07Key Topics in Cultural History - Critical Race Studies / C3 (in English)

Seminar (Teaching)
ECTS: 3

Dates:
weekly (starts in week: 1) Tue. 10:15 - 11:45 External location: online (2 Credit hours)
Dr. Karin Esders-Angermund
10-76-4-D2/WD2-08Key Topics in Cultural History - US American Art as Cultural Practice / C3 (in English)

Seminar (Teaching)
ECTS: 3

Dates:
weekly (starts in week: 1) Thu. 10:15 - 11:45 External location: online (2 Credit hours)

This course will introduce students to a broad range of US-American visual art with a specific focus on the 20th century. We will develop a critical understanding of art and of the writing and debates surrounding it. Positioning artists and art-making firmly within cultural history we will discuss works of art both as material artifacts and cultural practices. Since the subject field itself is so broad, we will select representative works to be studied carefully.
Students are recommended to consult Bjelajac’s and Pohl’s surveys on American art in order to discover their own interests and preferences well before the beginning of the course. Selected chapters can be found on Stud.IP

Bjelajac, David. American art: a cultural history. Upper Saddle River: Prentice Hall, 2005
Pohl, Frances K. Framing America: A social history of American Art. London: Thames and Hudson, 2002.

Dr. Karin Esders-Angermund
10-76-4-D2/WD2-09Key Topics in Cultural History: Black Rights Struggle from Abolition to Black Lives Matter (in English)

Seminar (Teaching)

Dates:
weekly (starts in week: 1) Mon. 10:15 - 11:45

Departing from the Black Lives Matter Movement and the mass demonstrations for racial justice in the U.S. and beyond in the summer of 2020, this course considers the historical trajectories of Black rights struggles from the beginning of the U.S. to the current moment. It traces the struggles of Black people in the U.S. for emancipation, for civil rights, for equality, for liberation through the histories of enslavement and abolition, reconstruction and Jim Crow, white terror in the South and segregation, Civil Rights movement and Black Power, to Mass Incarceration and the Movement for Black Lives. We will investigate these moments in an ongoing struggle for racial justice through key thinkers and activists such as Frederick Douglass, Harriet Jacobs, W.E.B. DuBois, Martin Luther King, Malcolm X, the Combahee River Collective, Michelle Alexander, and Keenga Yamahtta Taylor. A key objective of the class is to discuss how these examined histories resonate in the current moment and how the present moment can be better understood as part of this long history of Black rights struggles.

Class requirements are regular attendance, in-depth knowledge of reading material, and active class discussion. Reading the assigned texts is mandatory.

This class will be completely taught online synchronously and is open to students who participate in exchange programs. All reading and information material will be made available through the U Bremen teaching and learning platform Stud.IP; hence prior enrollment via Stud.IP is mandatory.

Dr. René Dietrich
10-76-4-D2/WD2-10Key Topics in Cultural History: North American Borderlands / C3 (in English)

Seminar (Teaching)
ECTS: 3

Dates:
weekly (starts in week: 1) Thu. 10:15 - 11:45 External location: online (2 Credit hours)

    • Please note that this class is already fully booked.--
Borders and Borderlands have significantly shaped the North American continent and its diverse history and culture since the early colonial period. This class will familiarize students with key border concepts and the cultures and histories they are associated with in North America. Concepts of borders and borderlands represent key entry points into Latinx, Indigenous, and migratory North American histories and cultures in which issues of race, ethnicity, class, origin, gender, sexuality, and language intersect. Analyzing a range of texts and artifacts, such as scholarly, fictional, and artistic works, the meaning of borders and borderlands and the related themes of oppression, resistance, and subversion will be examined.
The seminar (teaching category C3) will take place primarily in the form of asynchronic weekly study assignments and Stud.IP forum discussions. Occasionally, synchronic meetings will be held in a virtual conference meeting room (irregularly on Thursdays 10:15 - 11:45). Assigned course materials, resources, and study assignments will be made available through Stud.IP on a weekly basis. The seminar is offered for the modules D2a, WD2b, and WD2c. Prior enrolment via Stud.IP is mandatory. Please check Stud.IP regularly for updates.

Requirements
• regular, active participation on Stud.IP and during online meetings,
• in-depth knowledge of the assigned reading and study material,
• ‘Studien-,’ or ‘Prüfungsleistung’ as required by the module descriptions.

Dr. Paula von Gleich
10-76-4-D2/WD2-11Key Topics in Cultural History: Muslim American Cultures in Visual and Textual Products (in English)

Seminar (Teaching)

Dates:
weekly (starts in week: 3) Wed. 16:15 - 17:45 (2 Credit hours)
Alena Cicholewski
10-76-4-WD2-01Key Topics in Linguistics: The Sounds of English Around the World / C3

Seminar (Teaching)
ECTS: 3

Dates:
fortnightly (starts in week: 1) Wed. 10:15 - 13:45 External location: online (4 Credit hours)
Antorlina Mandal
10-76-6-WD2-01Key Topics in Linguistics: The Pragmatics of Humour / C3 (in English)

Seminar (Teaching)

Dates:
weekly (starts in week: 1) Thu. 12:15 - 13:45 External location: online (2 Credit hours)

Course description
If you’ve ever asked yourself if the Gricean maxims are really that important then the answer is clearly: “I like sandwiches!” … So, obviously, toying with pragmatic expectations can lead to humorous effects. In this course, then, we will go into the depths of basic notions in pragmatics and mainstream pragmatic theories and apply these to humorous artefacts. In particular, we will cover the following topics:
• Reference and deixis
• Speech act theory
• The co-operative principle
• (Im)politeness
• Relevance theory
In the remainder of this class, we will discuss a much-debated use case: irony, adopting several viewpoints on this phenomenon.

Course requirements
WD2a/c – 3CP – ungraded: weekly assignments on EduWorks (excluding discussions)
WD2a/c – 3CP – graded: weekly assignments on EduWorks

EMII – 6CP – graded: weekly assignments on EduWorks + project report

Weekly assignments and Zoom meetings
Assignments are asynchronous, can be found on EduWorks and are due Thursdays, 2pm. In addition to these assignments, we’ll meet on a bi-weekly basis on Zoom. In these Zoom meetings, we will cover unresolved issues, discuss your analyses and provide you with food-for-thought. Note that these meetings are not mandatory and that this class can also be studied as a purely asynchronously course, if necessary.

Project report (LLS)
The project report is a piece of writing of about 7 to 10 pages. It is supposed to report on an empirical project revolving around one of the topics covered in class. Further details will be given in class.

Dr. Claudia Lehmann
10-76-6-WD2-02Key Topics in Linguistics: Linguistics Analysis of Literary Texts C1 (in English)
C1 Digitale Lehre, asynchron

Seminar (Teaching)
ECTS: 3

Dates:
weekly (starts in week: 1) Mon. 12:15 - 13:45 External location: online (2 Credit hours)

In this seminar, we want to apply linguist theories and methods to investigate different kinds of literary texts, e.g. novels, plays and poems. This is a branch of applied linguistics often called ‘stylistics’. We will use corpus linguistic methods, e.g. word frequencies, keywords and collocations, to describe the style of a literary text. You will learn how to use the Corpus Linguistics in Context (CLiC) web interface and do automatic analyses with the AntConc software (Laurence).
Finally, each student will do analyses of different linguistic aspects of a text of their choice. In the end, you will be able to find, analyse and present aspects of literary texts that exceed what we can describe with methods from literature studies alone.

Category C1 Asynchronous online learning, meaning no video meetings at any time. You work on the tasks in your own pace and place.

Please be aware that this is a class in the WD module. Only students in ESC Profilfach are required to take the WD module. Students in ESC Komplementärfach and ESC Lehramtsoption do not study the WD module. You cannot take this class for the D module. It is possible to choose this class as “Ersatzleistung für das Auslandssemester”, but only if places are available.

Form of assessment
BA ESC WD 2 a: An analysis + presentation (Studienleistung, not graded, 3 CP)
BA ESC WD 2 c: An analysis + presentation (Prüfungsleistung, graded, 3 CP)
Erasmus students can gain either 3 CP (see option WD2a, graded or ungraded) or 6 CP (see option WD2c, graded).

Literature
McEnery, Tony & Richard Xiao & Yukio Tono. 2006. Corpus-based Language Studies: An Advanced Resource Book. Routledge.
McIntyre, Dan & Beatrix Busse (eds.) 2010. Language and Style: In Honour of Mick Short. Palgrave Macmillan.

Dr. Anke Schulz
10-76-6-WD2-05Key Topics in Linguistics: Contrastive Linguistics C1 (in English)
C1 Digitale Lehre, asynchron

Seminar (Teaching)

Dates:
weekly (starts in week: 1) Thu. 14:15 - 15:45 External location: online (2 Credit hours)

Why is English English, and what makes German German? How are, for example, case and gender realized in these languages? How is the word order different? Why does one language have words that the other does not have, and how do speakers deal with that fact?
In this class, we will investigate several grammatical and lexical differences. Where it is useful, we will work with corpora. In addition, we will study practical applications of our findings, e.g. in translation equivalence or for language teaching.

Category C1 Asynchronous online learning, meaning no video meetings at any time. You work on the tasks in your own pace and place.

Requirements
Module WD2a: Studienleistung, not graded: Portfolio consisting of two assignments
Module WD2c: Prüfungsleistung, graded: Portfolio consisting of three assignments
Please be aware that you cannot take this class for the D2 module. It is possible to choose this class as “Ersatzleistung für das Auslandssemester”, but only if places are available.
Erasmus students can gain either 3 CP (see option WD2a, graded) or 6 CP (see option WD2c, graded).

Dr. Anke Schulz

SP-K Basismodul: Sprachpraxis/Practical-Language Foundation (BIPEP Klein) (3 CP)

Modulbeauftragte/r

Modulbeauftragte/r: Katja Müller, kamueller@uni-bremen
Course numberTitle of eventLecturer
10-76-6-SP-K-01University Language Skills 1 for BiPeB /Kategorie A (in English)
Kategorie A = on-campus teaching (only if the situation allows it...)

Exercises (Teaching)
ECTS: 3

Dates:
weekly (starts in week: 1) Thu. 12:15 - 13:45 SH D1020 (2 Credit hours)

Should the covid regulations allow this, the class will be taught on campus.

Registration for this University Language Skills 1 (BIPEB): SEE BELOW

Participation
1) This class is usually open to students studying under the BiPEb 'Großes Fach' regulations, 4th semester and BiPEb 'Kleines Fach' students in their 2nd semester.
2) ERASMUS or other exchange students can participate in this class if they can provide me with proof of a C1 level (GER, CEFR) in English. Exchange students wishing to participate who have a level below C1, but above B2 need to contact Katja Müller before joining a class. (kamueller(at)uni-bremen.de)


BiPEb 'Großes Fach' will also have to take 'Classroom discourse', offered this semester.

Coursework
This (BiPEb) 'University Language Skills 1' class offers you the opportunity to analyse and evaluate your own language skills in English to enable you to choose areas in which you see room for improvement. Starting from there, we will move on to cover some basic and, nonetheless, grammatically challenging areas, to introduce you to different rhetorical writing strategies and essay planning structures. Last but not least, we will focus on sentence structure and try out several strategies to further improve your writing style.

REGISTRATION
Online registration is manadatory.
ERASMUS or other exchange students please send me an email to register for this class (kamueller@uni-bremen.de)

Katja Müller, M.A.

SP-G Basismodul: Sprachpraxis/Practical-Language Foundation (BIPEP Groß) (6 CP)

6 CP (3 CP + 3 CP)

Modulbeauftragte/r

Modulbeauftragte/r: Katja Müller, kamueller@uni-bremen
Course numberTitle of eventLecturer
10-76-6-SP-K-01University Language Skills 1 for BiPeB /Kategorie A (in English)
Kategorie A = on-campus teaching (only if the situation allows it...)

Exercises (Teaching)
ECTS: 3

Dates:
weekly (starts in week: 1) Thu. 12:15 - 13:45 SH D1020 (2 Credit hours)

Should the covid regulations allow this, the class will be taught on campus.

Registration for this University Language Skills 1 (BIPEB): SEE BELOW

Participation
1) This class is usually open to students studying under the BiPEb 'Großes Fach' regulations, 4th semester and BiPEb 'Kleines Fach' students in their 2nd semester.
2) ERASMUS or other exchange students can participate in this class if they can provide me with proof of a C1 level (GER, CEFR) in English. Exchange students wishing to participate who have a level below C1, but above B2 need to contact Katja Müller before joining a class. (kamueller(at)uni-bremen.de)


BiPEb 'Großes Fach' will also have to take 'Classroom discourse', offered this semester.

Coursework
This (BiPEb) 'University Language Skills 1' class offers you the opportunity to analyse and evaluate your own language skills in English to enable you to choose areas in which you see room for improvement. Starting from there, we will move on to cover some basic and, nonetheless, grammatically challenging areas, to introduce you to different rhetorical writing strategies and essay planning structures. Last but not least, we will focus on sentence structure and try out several strategies to further improve your writing style.

REGISTRATION
Online registration is manadatory.
ERASMUS or other exchange students please send me an email to register for this class (kamueller@uni-bremen.de)

Katja Müller, M.A.
10-76-6-SPG-01Classroom Discourse for BiPeB /Kategorie A (in English)
Kategorie A = on-campus teaching (only if the situation allows it)

Exercises (Teaching)
ECTS: 3

Dates:
weekly (starts in week: 1) Thu. 10:15 - 11:45 SH D1020 (2 Credit hours)

Registration for Classroom Discourse: SEE BELOW

Participation
1) This class is open to students studying under the BiPEb 'Großes Fach' regulations, 4th semester
BiPEb 'Großes Fach' will also have to take "University Language Skills 1 (BiPEb)", offered this semester.
2) BiPEb 'Kleines Fach', GTW and FaBiWi students interested in taking an additional class with focus on teaching language are very welcome to join in.
3) This class is not recommended for Erasmus or other exchange students, unless they have an English language level ranging from B2 - C1/C2 (GER, CEFR) AND are studying English to become a teacher. Any exchange student with a level below C1 but above B2 wishing to attend Classroom Discourse needs to contact Katja Müller before joining a class. (kamueller(at)uni-bremen.de).

This class is designed to foster your communicative skills in the classroom - here at university and in any school you might be teaching, now or in the future. The focus will be on how to communicate effectively. On the one hand you will be working on expanding your own knowledge of the English language, working on sentence construction, grammar in general, or improving your vocabulary; on the other hand you will be planning to speak and teach "simple" English in class. For future teachers in a primary school this could mean to paraphrase a difficult word, give synonyms to improve the pupils' vocabulary, or to show/draw/mimic situations/actions/people or animals.
Trying out games is also part of the plan, introducing a fun factor to the classroom while at the same time testing the pupils' listening and speaking skills, ensuring that pupils understand instructions, and can communicate appropiately in English themselves, for example when exchanging information or ideas.

REGISTRATION
Online registration is manadatory. ERASMUS or other exchange students please send me an email to register for this class (kamueller@uni-bremen.de)

Katja Müller, M.A.

LEHRVERANSTALTUNGEN DES 3. JAHRES:

P Abschlussmodul Profilfach (15 CP) "Sprachwissenschaft" oder "Literaturwissenschaft" oder "Kulturgeschichte"

Modulbeauftragte/r: Prof. Dr. John Bateman, bateman@uni-bremen.de

Laut PO des BA ESC von 2011 (§6;1 werden die 3 CP des Begleitseminars (im Profilfach obligatorisch) im Bereich General Studies angerechnet; die Studierenden, die bestanden haben, sind daher Irmgard Maassen (maassen@uni-bremen.de), der Modulbeauftragten für General Studies, zu melden.
Course numberTitle of eventLecturer
10-76-4-AP-01Begleitveranstaltung Literaturwissenschaft - Research Colloquium in Literatures in English/ C3 (in English)

Colloquium (Teaching)

Dates:
weekly (starts in week: 1) Thu. 12:15 - 13:45 External location: online (2 Credit hours)

Online course in the summer term 2021 – Due to the COVID 19 pandemic we will meet in weekly ZOOM sessions. This course is one of the specific colloquia designed for students planning their final dissertation either on undergraduate or graduate level in the field of literary studies (Module choices: Bachelor thesis module P or Master thesis module MA The). We shall look at a number of strategies for planning, structuring and writing longer pieces of work and this course will include formal issues such as format and layout of the final assignment. Please register on Stud. IP and explore the sections “Information” and “Schedule” on Stud. IP. for further details.
All students, who are planning to write their final dissertations in the field of literary studies, are welcome to join my course. In addition, I am happy to take on the role of a supervisor or co-supervisor for projects that correspond to my research and teaching focus, in other words, students who have a supervisor or co-supervisor that is not me are also welcome to join this course.

Dr. Jana Nittel
10-76-4-AP-02Begleitveranstaltung Literaturwissenschaft - Research Colloquium in English Literatures, C1 (in English)

Colloquium (Teaching)

Dates:
weekly (starts in week: 1) Fri. 10:15 - 11:45 External location: online (2 Credit hours)

Online.

This module is one of the specific colloquia designed for Bachelor students writing their BA-thesis in the field of literature or film studies. We shall look at a number of strategies for planning, structuring and producing longer pieces of work, and this programme will also include formal issues such as format and layout of the final thesis. As of today, the seminar has to be organised as an asynchronous digital course.

In view of my expertise, I can offer to supervise BA-theses in the following areas:

British theatre and drama, including the work of William Shakespeare,
the literature of the 20th and 21st century,
and film.

Prior enrolment via Stud.IP is mandatory. Since no more than 15 students can participate in the final course, early registration is strongly recommended.

Prof. Dr. Norbert Schaffeld
10-76-6-AP-03Current Research in Cultural History / C3 (in English)

Colloquium (Teaching)

Dates:
weekly (starts in week: 1) Thu. 14:15 - 15:45 External location: online (2 Credit hours)
Dr. Karin Esders-Angermund
10-76-6-AP-04Begleitveranstaltung Sprachwissenschaft /C (in English)

Colloquium (Teaching)

Dates:
weekly (starts in week: 1) Wed. 12:15 - 13:45 External location: online (2 Credit hours)

We will use Zoom and asynchronous methods and padlet for our meetings. This colloquium focuses on key issues, principles, methodological tools, and procedures for the scientific analysis of language. You will be introduced to various types of empirical methods, combining quantitative and qualitative research designs. We will address data collection, corpus analysis, simple statistical procedures, discourse analytic approaches, multimodal analysis, linguistic ethnography, and narrative analysis, and learn how these methods work in practice in each case. Further we will apply several writing techniques, mindmapping on how to find a thesis topic and apply appropriate methods.
Recommended literature:

Swales, John and Feak, Christine (2019) Academic Writing for graduate students. Michigan: Mac Millan
Further literature will be announced on padlet
Recommended Sources:
https://www.sketchengine.eu/elexis-terms/

Dr. Inke Du Bois
10-76-6-AP-05Begleitveranstaltung Sprachwissenschaft: Topics in and around Multimodal Linguistics /C3 (in English)
C3: synchronous and asynchronous digital sessions

Colloquium (Teaching)

Dates:
weekly (starts in week: 1) Tue. 14:15 - 15:45 External location: online (2 Credit hours)

This colloquium is designed for Bachelor and MA students planning to write their BA/MA-thesis in the fields of multimodal linguistics and its application to treatments of mixed media artefacts or performances and for critical discourse analysis, particularly empirically based studies. Examples of media that might be targetted include: film, comics, graphic novels, advertisements and so on. Particularly of interest will be areas where language (spoken or written) works together with visual representations of any kind. We will discuss theoretical and methodological approaches for characterising combinations of language and visual information, consider practical methods for corpus work (particularly involving mixed media, but not only), develop outlines and structures of the thesis, and consider how to construct strong thesis statements in order to focus your search for information, to tackle your subject and to construct your argument. Students will be expected to present and discuss their project in various stages of progression both in class as well as in individual monitoring sessions as well as to give input to others. Standard styles of presenting work within linguistics will be discussed as well as ways of addressing and analysing data and showing that analyses are adequate.

Prof. John Arnold Bateman, Ph.D.

Abschlussmodul L - Lehramt (12 CP) - 10-76-6-314 (nur für das Sommersemester)

Modulbeauftragte/r: Tim Giesler, giesler@uni-bremen.de
Course numberTitle of eventLecturer
10-76-6-AL-01Begleitveranstaltung: Fachdidaktik

Seminar (Teaching)

Dates:
weekly (starts in week: 1) Wed. 14:15 - 15:45
Dr. Joanna Pfingsthorn

GENERAL STUDIES - siehe auch die Veranstaltungen von General Studies - Sprach- und Literaturwissenschaften

Modulbeauftragte/r: Dr. Anke Schulz, anke.schulz@uni-bremen.de
Course numberTitle of eventLecturer
10-76-4-AP-01Begleitveranstaltung Literaturwissenschaft - Research Colloquium in Literatures in English/ C3 (in English)

Colloquium (Teaching)

Dates:
weekly (starts in week: 1) Thu. 12:15 - 13:45 External location: online (2 Credit hours)

Online course in the summer term 2021 – Due to the COVID 19 pandemic we will meet in weekly ZOOM sessions. This course is one of the specific colloquia designed for students planning their final dissertation either on undergraduate or graduate level in the field of literary studies (Module choices: Bachelor thesis module P or Master thesis module MA The). We shall look at a number of strategies for planning, structuring and writing longer pieces of work and this course will include formal issues such as format and layout of the final assignment. Please register on Stud. IP and explore the sections “Information” and “Schedule” on Stud. IP. for further details.
All students, who are planning to write their final dissertations in the field of literary studies, are welcome to join my course. In addition, I am happy to take on the role of a supervisor or co-supervisor for projects that correspond to my research and teaching focus, in other words, students who have a supervisor or co-supervisor that is not me are also welcome to join this course.

Dr. Jana Nittel
10-76-4-AP-02Begleitveranstaltung Literaturwissenschaft - Research Colloquium in English Literatures, C1 (in English)

Colloquium (Teaching)

Dates:
weekly (starts in week: 1) Fri. 10:15 - 11:45 External location: online (2 Credit hours)

Online.

This module is one of the specific colloquia designed for Bachelor students writing their BA-thesis in the field of literature or film studies. We shall look at a number of strategies for planning, structuring and producing longer pieces of work, and this programme will also include formal issues such as format and layout of the final thesis. As of today, the seminar has to be organised as an asynchronous digital course.

In view of my expertise, I can offer to supervise BA-theses in the following areas:

British theatre and drama, including the work of William Shakespeare,
the literature of the 20th and 21st century,
and film.

Prior enrolment via Stud.IP is mandatory. Since no more than 15 students can participate in the final course, early registration is strongly recommended.

Prof. Dr. Norbert Schaffeld
10-GS-9-03Fit für die Abschlussarbeit

Exercises (Teaching)
ECTS: 2

Additional dates:
Wed. 15.09.21 - Thu. 16.09.21 (Wed., Thu.) 09:00 - 17:00 GW2 B3010 (Kleiner Studierraum)

Kursinhalt:
• Themenfindung und Forschungsfrage
• Literaturrecherche und –bewertung
• Lesetechniken und Exzerpieren
• Materialablage
• Zitieren/Plagiatsvermeidung
• Gliederung
• Literaturverzeichnis
• Schreibtechniken
• Schlusskorrektur

Cornelia Stroh
10-M80-2-Thea-1Theatre Workshop (in English)

Exercises (Teaching)

Dates:
weekly (starts in week: 1) Mon. 14:00 - 16:15 SH D1020 SFG 0140 (3 Credit hours)

In this workshop we will explore and experiment with contemporary methods of improvisational theater, which is the art of making up theatrical moments on the spot, without a script. It is one of the liveliest and most current forms of theater of today and ingrained in US popular culture. You will first learn the basic principles of improvisational theater and then apply them to improvised scenework. We will also reflect on the impact of improvisational theater on popular culture, its applications e.g. in teaching and explore its practical approaches to comedic as well as dramatic narrative structures.

There will be a regular meeting on Monday 2 - 4.15pm during the semester, in which we will cover the basics of improvisational theater, followed by an intensive in the lecture-free period, in which we will work on a specific form and prepare for a performance. If you only want to participate in the intensive you need to have some experience, either from this or a previous semester. There is no obligation to be part of the performances. You can also support the performances by helping with the organization.

https://us02web.zoom.us/j/82373956264?pwd=aTJJRk5VR3phRG1mV0IraGNGWEFmZz09

Tobias Sailer
10-M80-2-Thea-2Theatre Workshop - Presentation & Performance (in English)

Exercises (Teaching)

Additional dates:
Mon. 27.09.21 - Thu. 30.09.21 (Mon., Tue., Wed., Thu.) 10:00 - 13:00 GW2 B3009 (Großer Studierraum)
Fri. 01.10.21 10:00 - 13:00 GW2 B2900
Mon. 04.10.21 10:00 - 13:00 GW2 B3009 (Großer Studierraum)
Tue. 05.10.21 10:00 - 13:00 GW2 B3770
Wed. 06.10.21 10:00 - 13:00 GW2 B2900
Thu. 07.10.21 - Fri. 08.10.21 (Thu., Fri.) 10:00 - 13:00 GW2 B3009 (Großer Studierraum)

This part of the theatre workshop is based on our introductory work during the semester. Requirement is previous participation in the theatre workshop or some experience with long form improvisational theatre. If you have any questions, please don't hesitate to contact me.

Tobias Sailer