Course Catalog

Study Program WiSe 2023/2024

Global Education

Programmes for Exchange Students (Incomings)

Programmes for Exchange Students (Incomings)

Course numberTitle of eventLecturer
08-zsp-GS-1030Urban History and Geography of Bremen and Northern Germany (in English)
Stadtgeschichte und Geographie Bremens und Norddeutschlands

Seminar (Teaching)
ECTS: 3-4

Dates:
weekly (starts in week: 1) Thu. 14:00 - 16:00 FVG O0150 (Seminarraum) (2 Teaching hours per week)

Additional dates:
Sat. 13.01.24 09:00 - 20:00 Meeting at Bremen HBF - 9:05 on track 1 (train RE to hannover leaves at 9:17)

Inhalt: This course is a special offer for international students who are interested in Regional and Urban Geography, and the local history of Bremen and Northwest Germany.
  • Students understand the historical development of cities and the processes connecting historical events and urban development
  • Students understand the basic ideas of (Regional) and Urban Geography and History as a university science
  • Students understand the most important historical events that shaped today’s Germany
  • Students are able to give presentations about topics that they researched on their own (about an excursion destination as well as a unique city quarter of Bremen

Michael Thiele
10-76-1-Basismodul B-01Introduction to English Linguistics 1 (in English)

Seminar (Teaching)
ECTS: 3

Dates:
weekly (starts in week: 1) Wed. 10:15 - 11:45 MZH 1460 (2 Teaching hours per week)

This class will be taught in class on campus .
Linguistics is the scientific study of language and communication. It deals with all aspects of how people use language and what they must know in order to do so. The purpose of this class is to give a systematic introduction to the variety of ways in which language can be examined scientifically. Students will be introduced to and equipped with the fundamental concepts, the adequate terminology and methodology for linguistic analysis. The class will thus provide an overview of the core areas of linguistics – phonetics and phonology (the study of speech sounds), morphology (the structure of words), syntax (the structure of sentences), semantics (the study of meaning) and pragmatics (the study of meaning and language use in context). Taking a contrastive German-English perspective whenever possible, this course will also cater to the needs and interests of students who want to become teachers of English.


RECOMMENDED LITERATURE (please buy this book):
Kortmann, Bernd (2005), English Linguistics: Essentials. Berlin: Cornelsen.

ASSESSMENT

• careful reading and preparation of assigned readings and exercises for each session
• final exam.

Dr. Inke Du Bois
Dr. Anke Schulz
10-76-1-Basismodul B-02Introduction to English Linguistics 1 (in English)

Seminar (Teaching)
ECTS: 3

Dates:
weekly (starts in week: 1) Tue. 10:15 - 11:45 MZH 1460 (2 Teaching hours per week)

This class will be taught in class on campus.
Linguistics is the scientific study of language and communication. It deals with all aspects of how people use language and what they must know in order to do so. The purpose of this class is to give a systematic introduction to the variety of ways in which language can be examined scientifically. Students will be introduced to and equipped with the fundamental concepts, the adequate terminology and methodology for linguistic analysis. The class will thus provide an overview of the core areas of linguistics – phonetics and phonology (the study of speech sounds), morphology (the structure of words), syntax (the structure of sentences), semantics (the study of meaning) and pragmatics (the study of meaning and language use in context). Taking a contrastive German-English perspective whenever possible, this course will also cater to the needs and interests of students who want to become teachers of English.


RECOMMENDED LITERATURE (please buy this book):
Kortmann, Bernd (2005), English Linguistics: Essentials. Berlin: Cornelsen.

ASSESSMENT

• careful reading and preparation of assigned readings and exercises for each session
• final exam.

Dr. Inke Du Bois
Dr. Anke Schulz
10-76-3-D1/WD1-01Key Topics in Cultural History: Caribbean Island Environments and the American Imagination (in English)

Seminar (Teaching)
ECTS: 3

Dates:
weekly (starts in week: 1) Fri. 14:00 - 16:00 GW2 B2880 GW2 B1580

The Caribbean includes more than 7,000 islands that together with islets, cays, and reefs, dot the Caribbean Sea southeast of the Gulf of Mexico, east of Central America and Mexico, and to the north of South America. In pre-colonial times, the islands were inhabited by Indigenous people, such as the Arawak, Carib, Tainos, and Ciboney. Today more than 44 million people populate this biodiverse region. They are descendants of these and other Indigenous peoples as well as African enslaved people; Spanish, British, French, and Dutch colonizers; and indentured laborers from India and China, among others. They live in thirteen sovereign island nations and islands that still remain under the control of the former colonizers, such as France, the Netherlands, the United Kingdom, and the United States.
This class introduces students to the study of the history of Caribbean island environments and their cultural representation between the United States and the Caribbean Sea. With the help of Caribbean Studies, Archipelagic American Studies, Blue Cultural Studies, and Eco-criticism, students study the diverse, intersecting histories of colonialism, slavery, military occupation, and multidirectional migration in conversation with select cultural products (e.g. maps, films, sculptures, paintings, or literary texts) and key cultural and political movements, such as abolitionism, decolonization, maroonage, the Harlem Renaissance, Négritude, and environmental struggles. Using discourse and cultural analysis, students explore the topics, concepts, and (trans)cultural practices that are involved when the environments of Caribbean islands are written into the cultural history of North America and when Caribbean islanders and their American descendants share their own perspectives on the islands, the United States, and the sea in-between. Key concerns are, among others, racial, ethnic, or national identities; cultural hybridity; sea migration and borders; and the cultural ecospheres of islands and their beaches, coastal seas, the Caribbean Sea, and the Atlantic Ocean.
The class is open to B.A. E-SC students studying the D1b, D1c, WD1b, and WD1c modules as well as international exchange students and students doing ‘Freiwillige Zusatzleistungen,’ general studies, or ‘Ersatzleistungen.’ To complete this class, students are required not only to regularly and actively participate in seminar sessions but also to actively contribute to our first ‘E-SC Literatures and Cultures Student Conference’ held at the beginning of February 2024. Ungraded assignments will be poster presentations at the conference; graded assignments include a project presentation at the conference and a term paper or portfolio submitted in the teaching-free period, depending on your module choice. Prior enrolment via Stud.IP is mandatory and admission is limited to a maximum of thirty-five students. Further information will be made available on Stud.IP. Please check Stud.IP regularly for updates.

Dr. Paula von Gleich
10-76-3-D1/WD1-02Key Topics in Literature: Of Women and Nature - Ecofeminist Literature in North America (in English)

Seminar (Teaching)
ECTS: 3

Dates:
weekly (starts in week: 1) Thu. 12:15 - 13:45 GW1 B0080 (2 Teaching hours per week)

Ecofeminism is a movement that connects environmental issues with intersectional feminist concerns. In this course we will study ecofeminist theories that deal with: 1) perceptions of nature, 2) interconnections between gender and nature, 3) Indigenous environmental perspectives, 4) perspectives on human-animal relations, 5) responses to capitalism, neoliberalism, and globalization and 6) queer ecologies. Students will examine definitions of ecofeminism, explore various branches within ecofeminist thought, and learn how ecological feminism differs from other branches of feminism.

This seminar will focus on three speculative fiction novels from North America/Turtle Island that delve into the violent histories of the continent: femicide of migrant workers from Mexico, the after-effects of trans-Atlantic slavery, and the governing of female bodies through settler-colonialism. All novels center the importance of ecofeminist theories and literatures in North America while interrogating histories that are often ignored.

Primary Texts:
Castro, V. Queen of the Cicadas/La Reina de las Chicharras. Flame Tree Press, 2021.
Erdrich, Louise. The Future Home of the Living God. Harper Press, 2017.
Solomon, Rivers. The Deep. Gallery, Saga Press, 2019.

Requirements:
• regular attendance
• active participation in class
• in-depth knowledge of the primary and secondary reading materials

PLEASE NOTE: Participation in our E-SC Student Conference held at the beginning of February is obligatory for completing this class with either a graded or ungraded assignment (project/poster presentation & term paper).

Corina Wieser-Cox
10-76-3-D1/WD1-05Key Topics in Cultural History: Gender. Culture. Feminism (in English)

Seminar (Teaching)

Dates:
weekly (starts in week: 1) Wed. 16:15 - 17:45 GW2 B2890 (2 Teaching hours per week)

This is course is a mixture between a lecture course and a regular class. Scholars and teachers both from FB 10 and from other universities will deliver lectures on various aspects of our general topic initiating a transdisciplinary discourse on "Gender - Culture - Feminism". In the sessions between the lectures we will discuss corresponding texts and resources to prepare ourselves for the diverse subject matters of the presentations and to critically reflect on their respective ideas and arguments.
Essential readings will be available for download on Stud-IP. You should also consult the 'Semesterapparat' (SuUB) for further readings.
Requirements:
• regular attendance and oral participation
• in-depth knowledge of the reading material
• oral presentation and handout

Dr. Karin Esders-Angermund
10-76-3-D1/WD1-06Key Topics in Cultural History: Climate Change on Film (in English)

Seminar (Teaching)

Dates:
weekly (starts in week: 1) Tue. 14:15 - 15:45 GW2 B2890 (2 Teaching hours per week)
Dr. Karin Esders-Angermund
10-76-3-D1/WD1-09Key Topics in Literature and Cultural History: From the Middle Ages to the Renaissance: Geoffrey Chaucer and William Shakespeare (in English)

Seminar (Teaching)
ECTS: 3

Dates:
weekly (starts in week: 1) Mon. 16:15 - 17:45 GW2 B3010 (Kleiner Studierraum) (2 Teaching hours per week)
Dr. Jana Nittel
10-76-5-GS-03Lecture Series: Blue Humanities (in English)

Lecture (Teaching)
ECTS: 1 CP

Dates:
weekly (starts in week: 1) Wed. 18:15 - 19:45 CART Rotunde - 0.67 (2 Teaching hours per week)

This lecture series is open to the university public, to general studies (1CP), the M.A. E-SC SusStu Module (1CP), and three specific B.A. E-SC classes taught by Kerstin Knopf, Paula von Gleich and Corina Wieser-Cox.
The lecture series ties together ideas and knowledges in the new burgeoning field of Blue Humanities, now also established at FB 10, U Bremen. This new research field studies oceans, rivers, and coastal areas in terms of (colonial) histories and modernities, migration and travel, sustainability and ecological issues, circulation of people and ideas, marine and Indigenous knowledges, literature and cultures, new geographies, extractivism, energy and economic issues, among others.
For this lecture series we invite experts in this field who will give talks on postcolonial sea fiction, Arab Blue Humanities, refugee literature, environmental destruction, lack of water, digital Black Atlantic, legal status of rivers, marine anthropology and more.

Prof. Dr. Kerstin Knopf
Dr. Paula von Gleich
Corina Wieser-Cox
10-M80-1-OrMo-03Postcolonial Studies: Histories, Theories, Key Concepts (in English)

Seminar (Teaching)

Dates:
weekly (starts in week: 1) Wed. 12:15 - 13:45 MZH 1460 (2 Teaching hours per week)

This class will introduce students to the field of postcolonial studies and will lay the basis for classes with topics relating to postcolonial phenomena, literatures, films, and media. Students who wish to continue their studies in the field of postcolonial anglophone literatures and cultures are strongly advised to take this class.
Through a rather dense reading program and some documentary films we will learn about colonial histories, neocolonial relations in the globalized world, and key concepts in Postcolonial Studies, such as alterity, hybridity, transculturality, manicheanism, dichotomy, colonial discourse, colonized mind, creolization, hegemony, exoticism, orientalism, essentialism, and syncretism. We will read the writings of the foremost thinkers of postcolonial and transcultural theories, including Edward Said, Frantz Fanon, Edouard Glissant, Gayatri Chakravorty Spivak, Stuart Hall, Homi Bhabha, Walter Mignolo, Edward Said, Wolfgang Welsh, Bill Ashcroft, Gareth Griffiths, and Helen Tiffin.
The class will be held in English. All texts will be provided electronically or through Stud IP. Requirements are regular attendance, participation in discussions, and in-depth knowledge of reading materials. Please note that prior enrollment via Stud.IP is mandatory.

Prof. Dr. Kerstin Knopf
10-M80-1-OrMo-05Lecture Series: Studying English-Speaking Cultures - Topics, Theories and Methods (in englischer Sprache) (in English)

Lecture (Teaching)

Dates:
weekly (starts in week: 1) Wed. 14:15 - 15:45 GW2 B1410 (2 Teaching hours per week)

Additional dates:
Wed. 10.04.24 08:00 - 18:00 ZB-B B0490 (Theater)
Dr. Paula von Gleich
Dr. Jana Nittel
Prof. Dr. Marcus Callies
Prof. Dr. Arne Peters
Prof. Dr. Kerstin Knopf
Dr. Karin Esders-Angermund
Dr. Katalina Kopka
Prof. Dr. Claudia Harsch
Dr. Inke Du Bois
10-M80-3-SpecMo-03Sustainability and Gender Equality in Arab-American Fiction (in English)
C2

Seminar (Teaching)

Dates:
weekly (starts in week: 1) Mon. 12:15 - 13:45 SFG 2040 (2 Teaching hours per week)

This specialized course responds to the United Nations' emphasis on sustainable development, revealing that sustainability encompasses various dimensions beyond the environment, notably gender equality. It recognizes the need for equitable, inclusive societies and the elimination of gender disparities, aligning these goals with the literary realm of Arab-American fiction. We explore narratives authored by Arab-American women, who play a pivotal role in offering unique perspectives on the intersection of gender, culture, identity, and environmental issues. By focusing on these diverse voices, the course delves into rich portrayals of women's experiences and resilience, emphasizing the importance of diversity within the global dialogue on sustainability and gender equality.

Dr. Mohammed Abdullah Hussein Muharram
10-M80-3-SpecMo-08Water, Environment and Sustainability in US-American and Canadian Literature (in English)
C2

Seminar (Teaching)

Dates:
weekly (starts in week: 1) Wed. 16:15 - 17:45 SFG 1020 (2 Teaching hours per week)

Additional dates:
Wed. 10.01.24 16:15 - 20:00 SFG 1020

This class will be conducted within the theme teaching year on SUSTAINABILITY and within the research area Blue Humanities. Blue Humanities studies oceans, rivers, and coastal areas in terms of (colonial) histories, migration and travel, sustainability and ecological issues, circulation of people and ideas, marine and Indigenous knowledges, literature and cultures, new geographies, extractivism, energy and economic issues, among others.

Please note that the course will be conducted in connection with a lecture series in the Blue Humanities, which takes place Wednesdays 18.15-19.45 at the Cartesium on campus. You are cordially invited to come and listen to all lectures; however 4 lectures are mandatory for you to attend, which ones will be specified at the start of the course, the first one on 25 Oct.

As well, on 26 October we will do a short study excursion to the MARKK Museum in Hamburg and their exhibition “Wasserbotschaften” with a guided tour: https://markk-hamburg.de/veranstaltungen/wasser-botschaften-9/.
We will leave on a train around 11.30 and have the guided tour in the afternoon. After that you can explore the museum on your own. You will use your semester ticket to use regional trains to go to Hamburg and back for free. This study excursion is not mandatory. And yet all students are invited to join us; there is limited capacity for the tour. Those who wish to go to Hamburg, pls register on the Etherpad here on StudIP with your full name and email address by 3 October.

After discussing sustainability and the sustainable development goals of the UN in the class, we will read and discuss short stories from the collection The Imperiled Ocean: Human Stories from a Changing Sea by Laura Trethewey and the novel People of the Whale by Linda Hogan. The novel is ready for purchase at the University bookstore at the beginning of the semester: People of the Whale (17,50 €). The short story and other texts will be uploaded on StudIP.
Pls note that regular attendance and class participation and preparation are mandatory. You must register on StudIP for this class.

Prof. Dr. Kerstin Knopf