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Course Catalog

Study Program WiSe 2020/2021

English-Speaking Cultures / Englisch, B.A.

Show courses: all | in english | for older adults

LEHRVERANSTALTUNGEN DES 1. JAHRES (PO 2011)

Basismodul A: Englische Literaturwissenschaft (6 CP)

6 CP (3 CP + 3 CP)

Modulbeauftragte/r: Dr. Jana Nittel, jnittel@uni-bremen.de
Course numberTitle of eventLecturer
10-76-1-BasismodulA-01Introduction to English Literatures (Part I) (3CP) (in English)
C3

Seminar (Teaching)
ECTS: 3

Dates:
weekly (starts in week: 1) Mon. 14:15 - 15:45 Online (2 Credit hours) Gruppe A (Dr. Nittel)
weekly (starts in week: 1) Tue. 10:15 - 11:45 Online (2 Credit hours) Gruppe B (Dr. Nittel)
weekly (starts in week: 1) Wed. 12:15 - 13:45 Online (2 Credit hours) Gruppe C (Katalina Kopka)

Teaching method: This course will run in three groups. We will meet in weekly online sessions, but students will also have access to weekly self-study units, worksheets and opencast podcasts. All students are required to register on Stud.IP for one of these three groups A, B, or C by selecting the option “Participants/TeilnehmerInnen” on Stud.IP, followed by “Functions/Groups”. Please select only one group and be aware that the number of students who are permitted to sign up for each group is limited and that your registration is mandatory. Deadline for registration for courses offered for first semester students: last Friday before the start of the lecture period.

Course description: This introductory course will offer students access to literary studies at university level and try to balance scholarly considerations with aesthetic enjoyment. It is the first part of a two-semester module, which will continue in the following Summer Term (Part II). In this first semester, we will look at the basic concepts not only of literature itself but also of literary criticism /Literaturwissenschaft. As we read our primary texts, we will be able to look at questions of literary genre (poetry, drama, narrative texts) and literary history (different periods and different national contexts). In addition, we will look at current theories of literature and of course strategies of interpreting and analysing literary texts in a systematic, scholarly way, thus laying the theoretical and terminological groundwork to the study of literature, both from a methodological and a historical perspective.

Please explore the sections “Information” and “Schedule” on Stud. IP. for further details such as requirements, weekly schedule, select bibliography, modes of assessment and the exam schedule.
Module description: http://www.fb10.uni-bremen.de/anglistik/ba2/module.aspx
Departmental extended reading list (Literatures in English): http://www.fb10.uni-bremen.de/anglistik/literaturwissenschaft/default.aspx
Required reading materials:
Nünning, Vera, and Ansgar Nünning. An Introduction to the Study of English and American Literature (Italics). 4. Auflage, Klett Lerntraining, 2018.
Shakespeare, William, and Robert S. Miola. Hamlet (Italics). 1st ed., W.W. Norton & Co, 2011.
Requirements:
• Interest in the topics discussed and ideally a regular attendance (online) and informed participation in class discussion (not part of your formal assessment);
• in-depth knowledge of the selected reading material and course materials,
• final written test (Grade)

Dr. Jana Nittel
Katalina Kopka, M.A.

Basismodul B: Englische Sprachwissenschaft (6 CP)

6 CP (3 CP + 3 CP)

Modulbeauftragte/r: Prof. Dr. John Bateman, bateman@uni-bremen.de
Course numberTitle of eventLecturer
10-76-1-B-01Introduction to English Linguistics 1 (in English)
C

Seminar (Teaching)

Dates:
weekly (starts in week: 1) Tue. 10:15 - 11:45 (2 Credit hours)
Tamara Drummond
10-76-1-B-02Introduction to English Linguistics 1 (in English)
B

Seminar (Teaching)

Dates:
weekly (starts in week: 1) Mon. 10:15 - 11:45 Online (2 Credit hours)

Additional dates:
Wed. 17.02.21 14:00 - 19:30 Testcenter (time TBA)
Dr. Ramona Kreis
10-76-1-B-03Introduction to English Linguistics 1 (in English)
teaching category B

Seminar (Teaching)

Dates:
weekly (starts in week: 1) Wed. 10:15 - 11:45 GW2 B3009 (Großer Studierraum) Online HS 2010 (Großer Hörsaal) (2 Credit hours)

Additional dates:
Wed. 17.02.21 14:00 - 19:30 Testcenter

Hybrid course

This course will take place as a hybrid course involving both online and on-site teaching.

Linguistics is the scientific study of language and communication. It deals with all aspects of how people use language and what they must know in order to do so. The purpose of this class is to give a systematic introduction to the variety of ways in which language can be examined scientifically. Students will be introduced to and equipped with the fundamental concepts, the adequate terminology and methodology for linguistic analysis. The class will thus provide an overview of the core areas of linguistics – phonetics and phonology (the study of speech sounds), morphology (the structure of words), syntax (the structure of sentences), semantics (the study of meaning) and pragmatics (the study of meaning and language use in context). Taking a contrastive German-English perspective whenever possible, this course will also cater to the needs and interests of students who want to become teachers of English.

RECOMMENDED LITERATURE (please buy this book):
Kortmann, Bernd (2005), English Linguistics: Essentials. Berlin: Cornelsen.
Kortmann, Bernd (2020), English Linguistics: Essentials. (2nd edition). Stuttgart: J.B. Metzler.


ASSESSMENT

* regular and active participation both online and in-class
* careful reading and preparation of assigned readings and exercises
* final exam

Nicole Hober, M.A.
10-76-1-B-04Introduction to English Linguistics 1 (in English)
B

Seminar (Teaching)
ECTS: 3

Dates:
weekly (starts in week: 1) Thu. 10:15 - 11:45 Online (2 Credit hours)

This class will be taught both online and in class. You will be expected to present at the live sessions.
Linguistics is the scientific study of language and communication. It deals with all aspects of how people use language and what they must know in order to do so. The purpose of this class is to give a systematic introduction to the variety of ways in which language can be examined scientifically. Students will be introduced to and equipped with the fundamental concepts, the adequate terminology and methodology for linguistic analysis. The class will thus provide an overview of the core areas of linguistics – phonetics and phonology (the study of speech sounds), morphology (the structure of words), syntax (the structure of sentences), semantics (the study of meaning) and pragmatics (the study of meaning and language use in context). Taking a contrastive German-English perspective whenever possible, this course will also cater to the needs and interests of students who want to become teachers of English.


RECOMMENDED LITERATURE (please buy this book):
Kortmann, Bernd (2005), English Linguistics: Essentials. Berlin: Cornelsen.

ASSESSMENT

• careful reading and preparation of assigned readings and exercises for each session
• final exam.

Dr. Inke Du Bois

Basismodul C: Kultur- und Sprachgeschichte der englischsprachigen Welt (6 CP)

6 CP (3 CP + 3 CP)

Modulbeauftragte/r: Dr. Karin Esders, esders@uni-bremen.de und Dr. Inke Du Bois, dubois@uni-bremen.de
Course numberTitle of eventLecturer
10-76-1-BasismodulC-01Übung zum Basismodul: Key Moments in the Cultural History of the English-Speaking World (in English)
C3

Exercises (Teaching)

This tutorial is designed to assist students of the Basismodul C 'Key Moments in Cultural History' in accomplishing the course requirements. Besides offering a forum for the discussion of those questions you were afraid to ask during the seminar sessions, the course will provide advice on the basic skills of academic study and research - tackling complex texts, writing a paper, citation rules, oral presentations, using the library and other research tools.
For the tutorial students will be divided into several parallel groups. Particulars will be explained in the first session of the 'Key Moments' course.

Dr. Karin Esders-Angermund
10-76-1-Basismodul C-02A - Key Moments in the Cultural History of the English-Speaking World (in English)
C3

Seminar (Teaching)
ECTS: 3

Dates:
weekly (starts in week: 1) Wed. 12:15 - 13:45 (2 Credit hours)

This course aims to introduce students to key moments in the social and cultural histories of English-speaking countries. In analyzing selected case studies from early colonial conquest to postcolonialism we will take special interest in cultural encounters and their dynamics of difference and power. A range of texts and artifacts such as scholarly and fictional works, paintings, advertisements, moving pictures and photographs will be examined, employing a choice of influential theoretical and analytical concepts.

The course will run as four groups (A-B-C-D); students have to choose one of them. It is the first part of a two-semester module which will continue in the following summer semester as "Key Moments in the Linguistic History of the English-Speaking World". All primary and secondary texts will be made available for download in Stud. IP.

Please note: The course will take place in the form of asynchronic, weekly study assignments and Stud.IP forum discussions. Occasionally, synchronic meetings will be held in an online conference meeting room

Requirements:
Regular attendance and participation in Stud.IP forum discussions
In-depth knowledge of the reading material
Short group presentation
Five very short papers (mirco papers 250 words) discussing the main ideas of five texts of your choice from our course material

Please note that prior enrollment via Stud. IP is mandatory.

Dr. Karin Esders-Angermund
10-76-1-Basismodul C-03B - Key Moments in the Cultural History of the English-Speaking World (in English)
C3

Seminar (Teaching)
ECTS: 3

Dates:
weekly (starts in week: 1) Thu. 10:15 - 11:45 (2 Credit hours)

This course aims to introduce students to key moments in the social and cultural histories of English-speaking countries. In analyzing selected case studies from early colonial conquest to postcolonialism we will take special interest in cultural encounters and their dynamics of difference and power. A range of texts and artifacts such as scholarly and fictional works, paintings, advertisements, moving pictures and photographs will be examined, employing a choice of influential theoretical and analytical concepts.

The course will run as four groups (A-B-C-D); students have to choose one of them. It is the first part of a two-semester module which will continue in the following summer semester as "Key Moments in the Linguistic History of the English-Speaking World". All primary and secondary texts will be made available for download in Stud. IP.

Please note: The course will take place in the form of asynchronic, weekly study assignments and Stud.IP forum discussions. Occasionally, synchronic meetings will be held in an online conference meeting room

Requirements:
Regular attendance and participation in Stud.IP forum discussions
In-depth knowledge of the reading material
Short group presentation
Five very short papers (mirco papers 250 words) discussing the main ideas of five texts of your choice from our course material

Please note that prior enrollment via Stud. IP is mandatory.

Dr. Karin Esders-Angermund
10-76-1-Basismodul C-04C - Key Moments in the Cultural History of the English-Speaking World (in English)
C3

Seminar (Teaching)

Dates:
weekly (starts in week: 1) Tue. 10:15 - 11:45

This course aims to introduce students to key moments in the social and cultural histories of English-speaking countries. In analyzing selected case studies from early colonial conquest to postcolonialism we will take special interest in cultural encounters and their dynamics of difference and power. A range of texts and artifacts such as scholarly and fictional works, paintings, advertisements, moving pictures and photographs will be examined, employing a choice of influential theoretical and analytical concepts.

The course will run as three groups (A-B-C); students have to choose one of them. It is the first part of a two-semester module which will continue in the following summer semester as "Key Moments in the Linguistic History of the English-Speaking World". All primary and secondary texts will be made available for download in Stud. IP.

Please note: The course will take place in the form of asynchronic, weekly study assignments and Stud.IP forum discussions. Occasionally, synchronic meetings will be held in an online conference meeting room. The full details for the structure of the course will be made available at the beginning of the term.

Requirements include regular attendance and participation in Stud.IP forum discussions, in-depth knowledge of the reading material, and a group presentation.

Please note that prior enrollment via Stud. IP is mandatory.

Dr. René Dietrich ((LB))

SP-1 Basismodul: Sprachpraxis/Practical Language Foundation Module (Part 1) (nur für das Wintersemester) (9 CP)

9 CP (3 CP + 6 CP)

Modulbeauftragte/r: Anne Kirkham, Kontakt: kirkham@uni-bremen.de
Course numberTitle of eventLecturer
10-76-1-SP-1-09University Language Skills 1i (in English)
B/C3

Exercises (Teaching)
ECTS: 3

Dates:
weekly (starts in week: 1) Wed. 14:15 - 15:45 GW2 B3010 (Kleiner Studierraum) GW1-HS H1010 (2 Credit hours)

Hybid course: This course involves both online and on-campus teaching ("Präsenzlehre"); the on-site sessions are in synch with the scheduled times, whereas the online part is asynchronous.

University Language Skills 1 (ULS 1) is the first half of the SP-1 module (“SP-1 Sprachpraxis Basismodul”) taken in the winter semester. It requires 90 hours of work and earns you 3 credit points. University Language Skills 2 (ULS 2) is the second half of this module and will be offered in the summer semester, requiring 180 hours of work and giving you 6 credit points.

Please register for ONE ULS 1 class only.

The focus of this module is on academic writing in English at university level. The emphasis during ULS 1 is on planning and organising an academic essay in an academic context at university level. It emphasizes writing skills in three broad categories: paragraphing, structure, and argumentation. Not only will students practice structural elements (e.g. topic sentences, outlining strategies), but they will also be working on refining their English language skills, including word choice, grammar and syntax. In addition, they will discover the importance of cohesion and coherence as key skills in good writing.

Course requirements:
  • regular (80%) and active participation in class
  • thorough preparation of each class session
  • submission of assignments of approx. 1000 words

Please note that this class is planned as a hybrid course involving both online and on-site teaching. The course will be divided into two groups at the beginning of the semester. Each group will meet every two weeks at the university and spend the other week completing tasks online.

Materials will be provided via StudIP

Recommended material for ULS 1 ( a book which will also be used in ULS 2 in your 2nd semester)
Meyers, Alan Longman, Academic Writing Series (level 5) - Essays to Research Papers. Pearson: 2014. (copies available in the library for reference)

Recommended literature for further language work
McCarthy, Michael & Felicity O’Dell Academic vocabulary in Use
Cornell, Alan & Geoff Parkes What’s the Difference? Englang Books (online quizzes available)
Use the latest edition of either the Langenscheidt/Longman Dictionary of Contemporary English or the Cornelsen/Oxford University Press Advanced Learner’s Dictionary, including the electronic version (CD or DVD as appropriate) or a comparable learner's dictionary.

Katja Müller, M.A.
10-76-1-SP1-01University Language Skills 1 - a (in English)
B / C3

Exercises (Teaching)

Dates:
weekly (starts in week: 1) Tue. 10:15 - 11:45 GW2 B3010 (Kleiner Studierraum) Online (2 Credit hours)

This course takes place both online and on campus ("Präsenzlehre"); the on-site sessions are in synch with the scheduled times, whereas the online part is asynchronous.

University Language Skills 1 (ULS 1) is the first half of the SP-1 module (“SP-1 Sprachpraxis Basismodul”) taken in the winter semester. It requires 90 hours of work and earns you 3 credit points. University Language Skills 2 (ULS 2) is the second half of this module and will be offered in the summer semester, requiring 180 hours of work and giving you 6 credit points.

The focus of this module is on academic writing in English at university level. The emphasis during ULS 1 is on planning and organising an academic essay in an academic context at university level. It emphasizes writing skills in three broad categories: paragraphing, structure, and argumentation. Not only will students practice structural elements (e.g. topic sentences, outlining strategies), but they will also be working on refining their English language skills, including word choice, grammar and syntax. In addition, they will discover the importance of cohesion and coherence as key skills in good writing.

Please note that this class is planned as a hybrid course involving both online and on-site teaching. The course will be divided into two groups at the beginning of the semester. Each group will meet every two weeks at the university and spend the other week completing tasks online.

Materials will be provided via StudIP.

Dr. Vanessa Herrmann
10-76-1-SP1-02University Language Skills 1 - b (in English)
B / C3

Exercises (Teaching)

Dates:
weekly (starts in week: 1) Tue. 14:15 - 15:45 SH D1020 (2 Credit hours)

This course takes place both online and on campus ("Präsenzlehre"); the on-site sessions are in synch with the scheduled times, whereas the online part is asynchronous.

University Language Skills 1 (ULS 1) is the first half of the SP-1 module (“SP-1 Sprachpraxis Basismodul”) taken in the winter semester. It requires 90 hours of work and earns you 3 credit points. University Language Skills 2 (ULS 2) is the second half of this module and will be offered in the summer semester, requiring 180 hours of work and giving you 6 credit points.

The focus of this module is on academic writing in English at university level. The emphasis during ULS 1 is on planning and organising an academic essay in an academic context at university level. It emphasizes writing skills in three broad categories: paragraphing, structure, and argumentation. Not only will students practice structural elements (e.g. topic sentences, outlining strategies), but they will also be working on refining their English language skills, including word choice, grammar and syntax. In addition, they will discover the importance of cohesion and coherence as key skills in good writing.

Please note that this class is planned as a hybrid course involving both online and on-site teaching. The course will be divided into two groups at the beginning of the semester. Each group will meet every two weeks at the university and spend the other week completing tasks online.

Materials will be provided via StudIP.

Dr. Vanessa Herrmann
10-76-1-SP1-03University Language Skills 1 - c (in English)
C /C3

Exercises (Teaching)

Dates:
weekly (starts in week: 1) Wed. 12:15 - 13:45 (2 Credit hours)

This course only takes place online; it combines elements which are in synch with the scheduled times and elements which are asynchronous.

University Language Skills 1 (ULS 1) is the first half of the SP-1 module (“SP-1 Sprachpraxis Basismodul”) taken in the winter semester. It requires 90 hours of work and earns you 3 credit points. University Language Skills 2 (ULS 2) is the second half of this module and will be offered in the summer semester, requiring 180 hours of work and giving you 6 credit points.

The focus of this module is on academic writing in English at university level. The emphasis during ULS 1 is on planning and organising an academic essay in an academic context at university level. It emphasizes writing skills in three broad categories: paragraphing, structure, and argumentation. Not only will students practice structural elements (e.g. topic sentences, outlining strategies), but they will also be working on refining their English language skills, including word choice, grammar and syntax. In addition, they will discover the importance of cohesion and coherence as key skills in good writing.

Please note that this course is an online course. Students are asked to participate regularly in the video conferences (see course schedule).

Materials will be provided via StudIP.

Dr. Vanessa Herrmann
10-76-1-SP1-04University Language Skills 1 - d (in English)
C / C3

Exercises (Teaching)

Dates:
weekly (starts in week: 1) Thu. 08:15 - 09:45 (2 Credit hours)

This course only takes place online; it combines elements which are in synch with the scheduled times and elements which are asynchronous.

University Language Skills 1 (ULS 1) is the first half of the SP-1 module (“SP-1 Sprachpraxis Basismodul”) taken in the winter semester. It requires 90 hours of work and earns you 3 credit points. University Language Skills 2 (ULS 2) is the second half of this module and will be offered in the summer semester, requiring 180 hours of work and giving you 6 credit points.

The focus of this module is on academic writing in English at university level. The emphasis during ULS 1 is on planning and organising an academic essay in an academic context at university level. It emphasizes writing skills in three broad categories: paragraphing, structure, and argumentation. Not only will students practice structural elements (e.g. topic sentences, outlining strategies), but they will also be working on refining their English language skills, including word choice, grammar and syntax. In addition, they will discover the importance of cohesion and coherence as key skills in good writing.

Please note that this course is an online course. Students are asked to participate regularly in the video conferences (see course schedule).

Materials will be provided via StudIP.

Dr. Vanessa Herrmann
10-76-1-SP1-05University Language Skills 1e
B/C2

Exercises (Teaching)
ECTS: 3

Dates:
weekly (starts in week: 1) Fri. 10:15 - 11:45 GW2 B3009 (Großer Studierraum) (2 Credit hours)

***Hybrid course:

Please note that this class is planned as a hybrid course involving both online and on-site teaching. The course will be divided into two groups at the beginning of the semester. Each group will meet every two weeks at the university and spend the other week completing tasks online.

University Language Skills 1 (ULS 1) is the first half of the SP-1 module (“SP-1 Sprachpraxis Basismodul”) taken in the winter semester. It requires 90 hours of work and earns you 3 credit points. University Language Skills 2 (ULS 2) is the second half of this module and will be offered in the summer semester, requiring 180 hours of work and giving you 6 credit points.

The focus of this module is on academic writing in English at university level. The emphasis during ULS 1 is on planning and organising an academic essay in an academic context at university level. It emphasizes writing skills in three broad categories: paragraphing, structure, and argumentation. Not only will students practice structural elements (e.g. topic sentences, outlining strategies), but they will also be working on refining their English language skills, including word choice, grammar and syntax. In addition, they will discover the importance of cohesion and coherence as key skills in good writing.
Materials will be provided via StudIP.

Lisa Nehls, M.A.
10-76-1-SP1-06University Language Skills 1f (in English)
B/C2

Exercises (Teaching)
ECTS: 3

Dates:
weekly (starts in week: 1) Fri. 12:15 - 13:45 GW2 B3009 (Großer Studierraum) (2 Credit hours)

**Hybrid course:
Please note that this class is planned as a hybrid course involving both online and on-site teaching. The course will be divided into two groups at the beginning of the semester. Each group will meet every two weeks at the university and spend the other week completing tasks online.

University Language Skills 1 (ULS 1) is the first half of the SP-1 module (“SP-1 Sprachpraxis Basismodul”) taken in the winter semester. It requires 90 hours of work and earns you 3 credit points. University Language Skills 2 (ULS 2) is the second half of this module and will be offered in the summer semester, requiring 180 hours of work and giving you 6 credit points.

The focus of this module is on academic writing in English at university level. The emphasis during ULS 1 is on planning and organising an academic essay in an academic context at university level. It emphasizes writing skills in three broad categories: paragraphing, structure, and argumentation. Not only will students practice structural elements (e.g. topic sentences, outlining strategies), but they will also be working on refining their English language skills, including word choice, grammar and syntax. In addition, they will discover the importance of cohesion and coherence as key skills in good writing.
Materials will be provided via StudIP.

Lisa Nehls, M.A.
10-76-1-SP1-07University Language Skills 1g (in English)
B/C3

Exercises (Teaching)
ECTS: 3

Dates:
weekly (starts in week: 1) Mon. 08:15 - 09:45 Online (2 Credit hours)

Please note that this course is an online course. Students are asked to participate regularly in the video conferences (see course schedule).

University Language Skills 1 (ULS 1) is the first half of the SP-1 module (“SP-1 Sprachpraxis Basismodul”) taken in the winter semester. It requires 90 hours of work and earns you 3 credit points. University Language Skills 2 (ULS 2) is the second half of this module and will be offered in the summer semester, requiring 180 hours of work and giving you 6 credit points.

The focus of this module is on academic writing in English at university level. The emphasis during ULS 1 is on planning and organising an academic essay in an academic context at university level. It emphasizes writing skills in three broad categories: paragraphing, structure, and argumentation. Not only will students practice structural elements (e.g. topic sentences, outlining strategies), but they will also be working on refining their English language skills, including word choice, grammar and syntax. In addition, they will discover the importance of cohesion and coherence as key skills in good writing.



Materials will be provided via StudIP.

Anne Kirkham, M.A.
10-76-1-SP1-08University Language Skills 1h (in English)
B/C3

Exercises (Teaching)
ECTS: 3

Dates:
weekly (starts in week: 1) Tue. 10:15 - 11:45 SH D1020 (2 Credit hours)

Hybid course: This course involves both online and on-campus teaching ("Präsenzlehre"); the on-site sessions are in synch with the scheduled times, whereas the online part is asynchronous.

University Language Skills 1 (ULS 1) is the first half of the SP-1 module (“SP-1 Sprachpraxis Basismodul”) taken in the winter semester. It requires 90 hours of work and earns you 3 credit points. University Language Skills 2 (ULS 2) is the second half of this module and will be offered in the summer semester, requiring 180 hours of work and giving you 6 credit points.

Please register for ONE ULS 1 class only.

The focus of this module is on academic writing in English at university level. The emphasis during ULS 1 is on planning and organising an academic essay in an academic context at university level. It emphasizes writing skills in three broad categories: paragraphing, structure, and argumentation. Not only will students practice structural elements (e.g. topic sentences, outlining strategies), but they will also be working on refining their English language skills, including word choice, grammar and syntax. In addition, they will discover the importance of cohesion and coherence as key skills in good writing.

Course requirements:
  • regular (80%) and active participation in class
  • thorough preparation of each class session
  • submission of assignments of approx. 1000 words

Please note that this class is planned as a hybrid course involving both online and on-site teaching. The course will be divided into two groups at the beginning of the semester. Each group will meet every two weeks at the university and spend the other week completing tasks online.

Materials will be provided via StudIP

Recommended material for ULS 1 ( a book which will also be used in ULS 2 in your 2nd semester)
Meyers, Alan Longman, Academic Writing Series (level 5) - Essays to Research Papers. Pearson: 2014. (copies available in the library for reference)

Recommended literature for further language work
McCarthy, Michael & Felicity O’Dell Academic vocabulary in Use
Cornell, Alan & Geoff Parkes What’s the Difference? Englang Books (online quizzes available)
Use the latest edition of either the Langenscheidt/Longman Dictionary of Contemporary English or the Cornelsen/Oxford University Press Advanced Learner’s Dictionary, including the electronic version (CD or DVD as appropriate) or a comparable learner's dictionary.

Katja Müller, M.A.
10-76-1-SP1-10University Language Skills 1j (in English)
B/C3

Exercises (Teaching)
ECTS: 3

Dates:
weekly (starts in week: 1) Thu. 10:15 - 11:45 Online (2 Credit hours)

This course is an online course. Some parts will be in synch with the scheduled times, while other parts are asynchronous.

University Language Skills 1 (ULS 1) is the first half of the SP-1 module (“SP-1 Sprachpraxis Basismodul”) taken in the winter semester. It requires 90 hours of work and earns you 3 credit points. University Language Skills 2 (ULS 2) is the second half of this module and will be offered in the summer semester, requiring 180 hours of work and giving you 6 credit points.

Please register for ONE ULS 1 class only.

The focus of this module is on academic writing in English at university level. The emphasis during ULS 1 is on planning and organising an academic essay in an academic context at university level. It emphasizes writing skills in three broad categories: paragraphing, structure, and argumentation. Not only will students practice structural elements (e.g. topic sentences, outlining strategies), but they will also be working on refining their English language skills, including word choice, grammar and syntax. In addition, they will discover the importance of cohesion and coherence as key skills in good writing.

Course requirements:
  • regular (80%) and active participation in class
  • thorough preparation of each class session
  • submission of assignments of approx. 1000 words

Please note that this class is planned as a hybrid course involving both online and on-site teaching. The course will be divided into two groups at the beginning of the semester. Each group will meet every two weeks at the university and spend the other week completing tasks online.

Materials will be provided via StudIP

Recommended material for ULS 1 ( a book which will also be used in ULS 2 in your 2nd semester)
Meyers, Alan Longman, Academic Writing Series (level 5) - Essays to Research Papers. Pearson: 2014. (copies available in the library for reference)

Recommended literature for further language work
McCarthy, Michael & Felicity O’Dell Academic vocabulary in Use
Cornell, Alan & Geoff Parkes What’s the Difference? Englang Books (online quizzes available)
Use the latest edition of either the Langenscheidt/Longman Dictionary of Contemporary English or the Cornelsen/Oxford University Press Advanced Learner’s Dictionary, including the electronic version (CD or DVD as appropriate) or a comparable learner's dictionary.

Katja Müller, M.A.
10-76-1-SP1-11University Language Skills 1k (in English)
C/C2

Exercises (Teaching)
ECTS: 3

Dates:
weekly (starts in week: 1) Wed. 14:15 - 15:45 (2 Credit hours)

Online course
Please note that this course is an online course. Students are asked to participate regularly in the video conferences (see course schedule).

University Language Skills 1 (ULS 1) is the first half of the SP-1 module (“SP-1 Sprachpraxis Basismodul”) taken in the winter semester. It requires 90 hours of work and earns you 3 credit points. University Language Skills 2 (ULS 2) is the second half of this module and will be offered in the summer semester, requiring 180 hours of work and giving you 6 credit points.

The focus of this module is on academic writing in English at university level. The emphasis during ULS 1 is on planning and organising an academic essay in an academic context at university level. It emphasizes writing skills in three broad categories: paragraphing, structure, and argumentation. Not only will students practice structural elements (e.g. topic sentences, outlining strategies), but they will also be working on refining their English language skills, including word choice, grammar and syntax. In addition, they will discover the importance of cohesion and coherence as key skills in good writing.

Materials will be provided via StudIP.

Lisa Nehls, M.A.
10-76-1-SP1-12University Language Skills 1l (in English)
B/C3

Exercises (Teaching)
ECTS: 3

Dates:
weekly (starts in week: 1) Wed. 08:15 - 09:45 Online
Anne Kirkham, M.A.

LEHRVERANSTALTUNGEN DES 2. JAHRES (PO 2011)

D-1a: Aufbaumodul (6 CP) (nur für das Wintersemester)

Literatur- und Sprachwissenschaft (3 CP + 3 CP) (1PL = Term paper/Hausarbeit)

Es gilt zu beachten: Laut SK-Beschluss (E-SC) vom 21.11.2012 ist die Pruefungsleistung im Bereich \"Key Topics in Literature\" zu erbringen = Schriftliche Hausarbeit/Term paper.

Modulbeauftragte/r: Dr. Jana Nittel, jnittel@uni-bremen.de
Course numberTitle of eventLecturer
10-76-1-D1-01Key Topics in Linguistics: Language Change (in English)
teaching category C3

Seminar (Teaching)
ECTS: 3

Dates:
weekly (starts in week: 1) Tue. 12:15 - 13:45 GW2 A3390 (CIP-Labor FB 10) (2 Credit hours)

This course will be taught online. All readings and materials, as well as online lectures, will be made available through the teaching and learning platform Stud.IP. The course will mostly take place asynchronously. Occasionally, however, synchronous meetings will be held in an online conference meeting room.

This course provides students with a general introduction to the study of language change from a usage-based perspective. We will explore linguistic change in World Englishes and systematically examine change on all linguistic levels, i.e. phonological, morphological, syntactic, and lexical, using examples from different varieties of English. References will also be made to grammaticalization theory and language contact. We will not only be concerned with the linguistic mechanisms of language change but also take a look at the sociolinguistic side.

Requirements
• active participation on Stud.IP and attendance of occasional online meetings
• close reading of selected texts for each session
• hand-in of worksheets
• ‘Studien-’ or ‘Prüfungsleistung’ as required by the module descriptions

Nicole Hober, M.A.
10-76-1-D1-02Key Topics in Linguistics: Grammar-based Methods for Textual Analysis and Critical Reading (in English)
C3 [Die digitale Lehre vermischt synchrone und asynchrone Elemente.]

Seminar (Teaching)

Dates:
weekly (starts in week: 1) Mon. 14:15 - 15:45 (2 Credit hours)

In this course participants will be given a thorough grounding in a particular area of the functional grammar of English: transitivity. Transitivity is the part of grammar that encodes the speaker or writer's view of reality--literally the 'who did what' part of grammar. It is the major component of the IDEATIONAL part of the linguistic system. We will explore a wide range of English texts in order to practice recognising the basic types of transitivity patterns in English. The main emphasis will be on doing, so that all success-ful course participants will become proficient in analysing texts according to their transitivity. Particular attention will also be paid to evaluating the reliability of analyses and to demonstrating whether or not bodies of data exhibit statistically significant differences.

Prof. John Arnold Bateman, Ph.D.
10-76-1-D1-03Exploring Spontaneous spoken English: Syntax and Discourse (in English)
C3 [Die digitale Lehre verbindet synchrone und asynchrone Elemente.]

Seminar (Teaching)

Dates:
weekly (starts in week: 1) Tue. 16:15 - 17:45 (2 Credit hours)
Dr. Claudia Lehmann
10-76-1-D1-05Key Topics in Linguistics: Sociolinguistics (in English)
C3

Seminar (Teaching)
ECTS: 3/6

Dates:
weekly (starts in week: 1) Wed. 10:15 - 11:45 (2 Credit hours)

This seminar provides a basic introduction to the field of sociolinguistics. In presenting key concepts and terminologies from variationist sociolinguistics as well as from interactional sociolinguistics, students will be given an overview of different approaches in these fields and their underlying research paradigms.

We will work together on groundbreaking studies as well as newer approaches in order to become acquainted with specific methods of data collection and analysis, their benefits and their limitations, respectively. In line with the subject, the seminar not only encompasses a focus on the social relevance of language in society, but also discusses its implications for social life with reference to contemporary social theory.

The seminar will take place ONLINE and includes video lectures, online discussions, and self-study time.

Henning Vahlenkamp
10-76-1-D1-06Discourse Analysis (in English)
B

Seminar (Teaching)

Dates:
weekly (starts in week: 1) Tue. 10:15 - 11:45 External location: Zoom External location: Asynchronous (work on assigned task) External location: Zoom (individual meetings) (2 Credit hours)
Dr. Ramona Kreis ((LB))
10-76-1-D1/WD1-01Key Topics in Literature: Colonialism, Violence and Mental Disorder (in English)
C2

Seminar (Teaching)

Dates:
weekly (starts in week: 1) Wed. 12:15 - 13:45 (2 Credit hours)
Dr. Sukla Chatterjee
10-76-1-D1/WD1-02Key Topics in Literature: The Victorian Novel - Charles Dickens (in English)
C3

Seminar (Teaching)

Dates:
weekly (starts in week: 1) Tue. 12:15 - 13:45 Online (2 Credit hours)

Teaching method: We will meet in weekly online sessions, but students will also have access to weekly self-study units, worksheets and opencast podcasts. Since some of the participants are required to submit a research paper, we will use parts of our seminar discussions to the development of topics, the formulation of a thesis statement, as well as considerations about the methodological approaches of writing such a paper.
Course description: This seminar focuses predominantly on novels exemplifying the predominance of fictional prose in the Victoria era. We will explore fictional and non-fictional writings by the English writer and social critic Charles Dickens (1812 – 1870), in particular Oliver Twist (February 1837 to April 1839) and Bleak House (March 1852 to September 1853). Using text-centred and contextual approaches, this course wishes to enable students to explore language, form, genre, and style of the novels, as well as to engage critically with themes, issues, and key concerns of Dickens’s writing and corresponding contemporary adaptions. Along with our weekly discussions of selected chapters - reader responses are strongly encouraged - we will also touch upon key developments in the history of nineteen-century novels as well as selected historical and literary contexts of the period.

A reader with selected secondary text materials will be made available for download on Stud. IP. Please be aware that your registration on Stud. IP. is mandatory (deadline September 15th, 2020).
You may wish to check the sections "Information" and "Schedule" further details such as requirements, weekly schedule, select bibliography and modes of assessment.
Requirements and Assessment
• Interest in the topic discussed and ideally a regular online attendance and informed participation in class discussion (not part of your formal assessment);
• in-depth knowledge of the selected reading material,
• homework assignments,
• research-based term paper.
The requirements as formulated above may vary depending on your overall degree program.
Required primary reading materials:
Dickens, Charles, and Fred Kaplan. Oliver Twist (Italics), Norton, 1993.
Dickens, Charles, and Nicola Bradbury. Bleak House (Italics), Penguin, 2003.

Dr. Jana Nittel
10-76-1-D1/WD1-03Key Topics in Literature: Narratives of Slavery (in English)
teaching category C3

Seminar (Teaching)
ECTS: 3

Dates:
weekly (starts in week: 1) Thu. 14:15 - 15:45 External location: virtual meeting room (2 Credit hours)

Please note that this course is already booked beyond capacity and has a waiting list. After Oct. 15, 2020 noon no further enrolements for this waiting list will be accepted. I am sorry for the inconvenience.

The history of the transatlantic slave trade and slavery in North America considerably shaped the US American and Canadian nation states. Unsurprisingly, slavery has been a recurring theme in North American literature since the early colonial period. Autobiographical narratives by formerly enslaved people, the so-called ‘slave narratives,’ are the oldest African American genre and constitutive not only to African American but also North American literary history. Novels of slavery have a similarly long history on the North American continent. This seminar will familiarize students with a selection of narratives of slavery and the history of slavery in North America as a focal point in American literature and culture where race, gender, and sexuality intersect. Using text-centered and contextual approaches, students will explore the language, form, and style of narratives of slavery as well as engage critically with key concerns surrounding North American history and culture.

The seminar will take place primarily in the form of asynchronic, weekly study assignments and Stud.IP forum discussions. Occasionally, synchronic meetings will be held in an online conference meeting room (irregularly on Thursdays 14:15 - 15:45). Assigned course materials, resources, and study assignments will be made available through Stud.IP on a weekly basis.
The seminar is offered for the modules D1a / D1b / WD1a / WD1b.
Please note that prior enrolment via Stud.IP is mandatory. Please check Stud.IP regularly for updates.

Requirements
• regular, active participation on Stud.IP and during online meetings,
• in-depth knowledge of the primary and secondary reading material,
• ‘Studien-,’ or ‘Prüfungsleistung’ as required by the module descriptions.

Paula von Gleich, M.A.
10-76-1-D1/WD1-04The American Short Story from Hawthorne and Poe to Ellison and Mukherjee (in English)
C2

Seminar (Teaching)

Dates:
weekly (starts in week: 1) Tue. 12:15 - 13:45 Online (2 Credit hours)

-Class will be moved to Tuesday 12-14 hours-
This class will be completely taught online and is open to BA students from U Bremen and students participating in student exchange programs. All reading and information material will be made available through the U Bremen teaching and learning platform Stud.IP; hence prior enrollment via Stud.IP is mandatory.

Edgar Allan Poe is considered the father of the American short story and modern detective story. In a review of Nathaniel Hawthorne’s tales he outlined what we now take as his ‘theory’ of the short story. We will discuss this ‘theory’ as well as Joseph Urgo’s take on the American short story upon which we will base the readings of some of the finest examples of American short stories from the Romantic period to the present. They will include classics by Poe, Hawthorne, Herman Melville, Charlotte Perkins Gilman, and Kate Chopin as well as stories by African American, Native American, Hispanic and Asian American authors.

Class requirements are regular attendance, in-depth knowledge of reading material, and active class discussion. Reading the texts is mandatory.

Prof. Dr. Kerstin Knopf
10-76-1-D1/WD1-05The Postcolonial World in Literature and Film: Australia (in English)
C2

Seminar (Teaching)

Dates:
weekly (starts in week: 1) Tue. 14:15 - 15:45 (2 Credit hours)

-Class will be moved to Tuesday 14-16 hours-
This class will be completely taught online and is open to BA students from U Bremen and students participating in student exchange programs. All reading and information material (except the two novels) will be made available through the U Bremen teaching and learning platform Stud.IP; hence prior enrollment via Stud.IP is mandatory. The films will be made available as well.

The class will introduce students to Australia, its colonial history, postcolonial cultures, and contemporary issues with a focus on Australia’s Indigenous population. We will learn about Australia through reading non-fiction texts, short stories, two novels and watching four feature films by non-Indigenous and Indigenous directors.

Class requirements are regular attendance, in-depth knowledge of reading and viewing material, and active class discussion. Reading the texts and watching the films is mandatory. Students are required to purchase and read Kate Grenville The Secret River and Melissa Lucashenko Mullumbimby. Ten copies of each are available at the university bookstore for 11,00 € (Grenville) and 23 € (Lucashenko) at the beginning of October. You can also order them via amazon.de, amazon.com and amazon.marketplace (check delivery times).

Prof. Dr. Kerstin Knopf
10-76-1-D1/WD1-06Key Topics in Literature: West African Literature (in English)
C3 Blockveranstaltung/Blocktermine Jan/Febr. Mon + Die

Seminar (Teaching)

Additional dates:
Mon. 04.01.21 - Tue. 05.01.21 (Mon., Tue.) 12:15 - 13:45
Mon. 11.01.21 - Tue. 12.01.21 (Mon., Tue.) 12:15 - 13:45
Mon. 18.01.21 - Tue. 19.01.21 (Mon., Tue.) 12:15 - 13:45
Mon. 25.01.21 - Tue. 26.01.21 (Mon., Tue.) 12:15 - 13:45
Mon. 01.02.21 - Tue. 02.02.21 (Mon., Tue.) 12:15 - 13:45
Mon. 08.02.21 - Tue. 09.02.21 (Mon., Tue.) 12:15 - 13:45
Mon. 15.02.21 - Tue. 16.02.21 (Mon., Tue.) 12:15 - 13:45
Mon. 22.02.21 - Tue. 23.02.21 (Mon., Tue.) 12:15 - 13:45
Oluseun Tanimomo ((LB))

D-1b: Aufbaumodul (6 CP) (nur für das Wintersemester)

Literatur- und Kulturgeschichte (3 CP + 3 CP) (1PL = Term paper/Hausarbeit)

Es gilt zu beachten: Laut SK-Beschluss (E-SC) vom 21.11.2012 ist die Pruefungsleistung im Bereich \"Key Topics in Cultural History\" zu erbringen = Schriftliche Hausarbeit/Term paper.

Modulbeauftragte/r: Dr. Jana Nittel, jnittel@uni-bremen.de
Course numberTitle of eventLecturer
10-76-1-D1/WD1-01Key Topics in Literature: Colonialism, Violence and Mental Disorder (in English)
C2

Seminar (Teaching)

Dates:
weekly (starts in week: 1) Wed. 12:15 - 13:45 (2 Credit hours)
Dr. Sukla Chatterjee
10-76-1-D1/WD1-02Key Topics in Literature: The Victorian Novel - Charles Dickens (in English)
C3

Seminar (Teaching)

Dates:
weekly (starts in week: 1) Tue. 12:15 - 13:45 Online (2 Credit hours)

Teaching method: We will meet in weekly online sessions, but students will also have access to weekly self-study units, worksheets and opencast podcasts. Since some of the participants are required to submit a research paper, we will use parts of our seminar discussions to the development of topics, the formulation of a thesis statement, as well as considerations about the methodological approaches of writing such a paper.
Course description: This seminar focuses predominantly on novels exemplifying the predominance of fictional prose in the Victoria era. We will explore fictional and non-fictional writings by the English writer and social critic Charles Dickens (1812 – 1870), in particular Oliver Twist (February 1837 to April 1839) and Bleak House (March 1852 to September 1853). Using text-centred and contextual approaches, this course wishes to enable students to explore language, form, genre, and style of the novels, as well as to engage critically with themes, issues, and key concerns of Dickens’s writing and corresponding contemporary adaptions. Along with our weekly discussions of selected chapters - reader responses are strongly encouraged - we will also touch upon key developments in the history of nineteen-century novels as well as selected historical and literary contexts of the period.

A reader with selected secondary text materials will be made available for download on Stud. IP. Please be aware that your registration on Stud. IP. is mandatory (deadline September 15th, 2020).
You may wish to check the sections "Information" and "Schedule" further details such as requirements, weekly schedule, select bibliography and modes of assessment.
Requirements and Assessment
• Interest in the topic discussed and ideally a regular online attendance and informed participation in class discussion (not part of your formal assessment);
• in-depth knowledge of the selected reading material,
• homework assignments,
• research-based term paper.
The requirements as formulated above may vary depending on your overall degree program.
Required primary reading materials:
Dickens, Charles, and Fred Kaplan. Oliver Twist (Italics), Norton, 1993.
Dickens, Charles, and Nicola Bradbury. Bleak House (Italics), Penguin, 2003.

Dr. Jana Nittel
10-76-1-D1/WD1-03Key Topics in Literature: Narratives of Slavery (in English)
teaching category C3

Seminar (Teaching)
ECTS: 3

Dates:
weekly (starts in week: 1) Thu. 14:15 - 15:45 External location: virtual meeting room (2 Credit hours)

Please note that this course is already booked beyond capacity and has a waiting list. After Oct. 15, 2020 noon no further enrolements for this waiting list will be accepted. I am sorry for the inconvenience.

The history of the transatlantic slave trade and slavery in North America considerably shaped the US American and Canadian nation states. Unsurprisingly, slavery has been a recurring theme in North American literature since the early colonial period. Autobiographical narratives by formerly enslaved people, the so-called ‘slave narratives,’ are the oldest African American genre and constitutive not only to African American but also North American literary history. Novels of slavery have a similarly long history on the North American continent. This seminar will familiarize students with a selection of narratives of slavery and the history of slavery in North America as a focal point in American literature and culture where race, gender, and sexuality intersect. Using text-centered and contextual approaches, students will explore the language, form, and style of narratives of slavery as well as engage critically with key concerns surrounding North American history and culture.

The seminar will take place primarily in the form of asynchronic, weekly study assignments and Stud.IP forum discussions. Occasionally, synchronic meetings will be held in an online conference meeting room (irregularly on Thursdays 14:15 - 15:45). Assigned course materials, resources, and study assignments will be made available through Stud.IP on a weekly basis.
The seminar is offered for the modules D1a / D1b / WD1a / WD1b.
Please note that prior enrolment via Stud.IP is mandatory. Please check Stud.IP regularly for updates.

Requirements
• regular, active participation on Stud.IP and during online meetings,
• in-depth knowledge of the primary and secondary reading material,
• ‘Studien-,’ or ‘Prüfungsleistung’ as required by the module descriptions.

Paula von Gleich, M.A.
10-76-1-D1/WD1-04The American Short Story from Hawthorne and Poe to Ellison and Mukherjee (in English)
C2

Seminar (Teaching)

Dates:
weekly (starts in week: 1) Tue. 12:15 - 13:45 Online (2 Credit hours)

-Class will be moved to Tuesday 12-14 hours-
This class will be completely taught online and is open to BA students from U Bremen and students participating in student exchange programs. All reading and information material will be made available through the U Bremen teaching and learning platform Stud.IP; hence prior enrollment via Stud.IP is mandatory.

Edgar Allan Poe is considered the father of the American short story and modern detective story. In a review of Nathaniel Hawthorne’s tales he outlined what we now take as his ‘theory’ of the short story. We will discuss this ‘theory’ as well as Joseph Urgo’s take on the American short story upon which we will base the readings of some of the finest examples of American short stories from the Romantic period to the present. They will include classics by Poe, Hawthorne, Herman Melville, Charlotte Perkins Gilman, and Kate Chopin as well as stories by African American, Native American, Hispanic and Asian American authors.

Class requirements are regular attendance, in-depth knowledge of reading material, and active class discussion. Reading the texts is mandatory.

Prof. Dr. Kerstin Knopf
10-76-1-D1/WD1-05The Postcolonial World in Literature and Film: Australia (in English)
C2

Seminar (Teaching)

Dates:
weekly (starts in week: 1) Tue. 14:15 - 15:45 (2 Credit hours)

-Class will be moved to Tuesday 14-16 hours-
This class will be completely taught online and is open to BA students from U Bremen and students participating in student exchange programs. All reading and information material (except the two novels) will be made available through the U Bremen teaching and learning platform Stud.IP; hence prior enrollment via Stud.IP is mandatory. The films will be made available as well.

The class will introduce students to Australia, its colonial history, postcolonial cultures, and contemporary issues with a focus on Australia’s Indigenous population. We will learn about Australia through reading non-fiction texts, short stories, two novels and watching four feature films by non-Indigenous and Indigenous directors.

Class requirements are regular attendance, in-depth knowledge of reading and viewing material, and active class discussion. Reading the texts and watching the films is mandatory. Students are required to purchase and read Kate Grenville The Secret River and Melissa Lucashenko Mullumbimby. Ten copies of each are available at the university bookstore for 11,00 € (Grenville) and 23 € (Lucashenko) at the beginning of October. You can also order them via amazon.de, amazon.com and amazon.marketplace (check delivery times).

Prof. Dr. Kerstin Knopf
10-76-1-D1/WD1-06Key Topics in Literature: West African Literature (in English)
C3 Blockveranstaltung/Blocktermine Jan/Febr. Mon + Die

Seminar (Teaching)

Additional dates:
Mon. 04.01.21 - Tue. 05.01.21 (Mon., Tue.) 12:15 - 13:45
Mon. 11.01.21 - Tue. 12.01.21 (Mon., Tue.) 12:15 - 13:45
Mon. 18.01.21 - Tue. 19.01.21 (Mon., Tue.) 12:15 - 13:45
Mon. 25.01.21 - Tue. 26.01.21 (Mon., Tue.) 12:15 - 13:45
Mon. 01.02.21 - Tue. 02.02.21 (Mon., Tue.) 12:15 - 13:45
Mon. 08.02.21 - Tue. 09.02.21 (Mon., Tue.) 12:15 - 13:45
Mon. 15.02.21 - Tue. 16.02.21 (Mon., Tue.) 12:15 - 13:45
Mon. 22.02.21 - Tue. 23.02.21 (Mon., Tue.) 12:15 - 13:45
Oluseun Tanimomo ((LB))
10-76-1-D1/WD1-06Key Topics in Cultural History: Key Concepts in American Cultural History (in English)
C3

Seminar (Teaching)

Dates:
weekly (starts in week: 1) Wed. 10:15 - 11:45

This class will be completely taught online and is open to students who participate in exchange programs. All reading and information material will be made available through the U Bremen teaching and learning platform Stud.IP; hence prior enrollment via Stud.IP is mandatory.

This course seeks to consider key concepts in American cultural studies as they manifest in American cultural history—and as they also impact the current cultural, social, and political moment. American cultural studies has developed a number of key concepts that can be traced within the history of the United States, from its beginning of a European settlement on Indigenous lands, its constitution as a nation-state, the number of inequalities engrained within this constitution, and the struggles of various social movements towards greater emancipation within the dominant system that are still ongoing today. Among those the course will chiefly consider are: white supremacy, settler colonialism and Indigeneity, enslavement and anti-blackness, gender and sexuality, emancipation and liberation. Along with historical sources and contemporary scholarship, we will consider in the course how some of these concepts animate the current moment in US history and how they are reflected in literature and other media.
Class requirements are regular attendance, in-depth knowledge of reading material, and active class discussion. Reading the assigned texts is mandatory.

Dr. René Dietrich ((LB))
10-76-1-D1/WD1-07Key Topics in Cultural History: Shakespeare's London (in English)
C3

Seminar (Teaching)

Dates:
weekly (starts in week: 1) Mon. 16:15 - 17:45 Online (2 Credit hours)

Teaching method: We will meet in weekly online sessions, but students will also have access to weekly study units and worksheets. Since some of the participants are required to submit a research paper, we will use parts of our seminar discussions to the development of topics, the formulation of a thesis statement, as well as considerations about the methodological approaches of writing such a paper.
Course description: William Shakespeare’s London, and in this seminar, London in the Elizabethan Age as well as at his time in the city (c.1560 – 1616), was a rapidly growing and bustling metropolis. In the duration of this course, we will travel back in time seeking to explore the history and social geography of this largest city in England. Based on a research-based learning methodology, we will attempt to map out London’s key locations as the centre of government, the law and the church as well as being the focus of politics and culture during a time of intense political and religious upheaval. In addition, this course focuses on the following topics: Stage history, playhouses; the fundamental features of dramatic composition to issues such as political structures in Renaissance England, gender roles and relations, love and sexuality, constructions of nationhood, global expansion and their representation in Shakespeare’s plays.

A reader with selected secondary text materials will be made available for download on Stud. IP. Please be aware that your registration on Stud. IP. is mandatory (deadline September 15th, 2020). You may wish to check the sections "Information" and "Schedule" further details such as requirements, weekly schedule, select bibliography and modes of assessment.
Requirements and Assessment
• Interest in the topic discussed and ideally a regular online attendance and informed participation in class discussion (not part of your formal assessment);
• in-depth knowledge of the selected reading material,
• homework assignments,
• research-based term paper.
The requirements as formulated above may vary depending on your overall degree program.
Reading materials
MacGregor, Neil. Shakespeare's Restless World, Penguin Books, 2014.

Dr. Jana Nittel
10-76-1-D1/WD1-10Key Topics in Cultural History: Intersectionality and Representation (in English)
C3

Seminar (Teaching)

Dates:
weekly (starts in week: 1) Thu. 12:15 - 13:45 (2 Credit hours)

In this online seminar, we will take a look at how marginalization and discrimination along such lines as gender, sex, sexuality, race, class, ableism etc. are interrelated and can lead to compounded, multiple oppressions. For our intersectional explorations, we will use examples from (science-fictionally inflected) pop culture, e.g. Janelle Monáe's concept-album-turned-movie Dirty Computer or the episode "Good Hunting" from Netflix's animated anthology series Love, Death + Robots, with the aim to approach them from various theoretical angles, e.g. feminism, queer studies, critical race studies, or postcolonialism.
Discrimination is so pervasive in our culture, being part of the fabric of our reality, that often, in our everyday lives, we aren't even aware of it because we've simply become too used to it – we've developed 'cultural blind spots', so to speak. Therefore, we will use examples from science fiction that pick up these very aspects of our reality and put it in a context that, in its futuristic, dystopian, fantastic setting, looks unfamiliar to us, makes us look at everything with fresh eyes, and thereby makes these dynamics of oppression all the more visible to us. (Self-)Representation of marginalized groups is key to raise awareness for the persistent and today ever more resurgent forms of oppression in our culture. More than that, it gives marginalized groups back their voices – voices that, in the past, all too often have been silenced by the oppressive system.
Since we will be following an intersectional approach, we will not only focus on the various factors of discrimination in isolation but consider them in combination as it is this very combination that leads to unique forms of marginalization and oppression. As a result of the interlocking systems of power, the ways in which black women, for example, experience discrimination are very different from those of white women or black men – a difference that results from the interplay of patriarchal and racial oppression that is more than just the sum of the two. In order to arrive at a better understanding of the dynamics of discrimination and privilege in our culture, it is essential to look both at the common causes of oppression as well as the differences in the experiences of individuals due to their particular identity constellations.
Because of the still unclear situation concerning the COVID-19 pandemic, this will be an online seminar with some synchronous sessions in an online conference meeting room (irregularly on Thursdays from 12:14 to 13:45) and some weeks during which students will work asynchronously. In the course of the semester, students will formulate their individual research interests for their final term papers and work towards it in the form of milestones, chat group discussions of secondary material, and possibly a short presentation of intermediate research results. Essential reading materials will be made available for download on Stud-IP.

Requirements:
• regular attendance and active participation during our Zoom-sessions
• in-depth knowledge of the selected reading and other course materials (optional screening sessions might be scheduled to give students access to video material);
• weekly written contributions in chat group discussions of assigned texts
• completion of milestones at specified points during the course of the semester
• final term paper (10-12 pages)

Julia Gatermann ((LB))

D-1c: Aufbaumodul (6 CP) (nur für das Wintersemester)

Sprachwissenschaft und Kulturgeschichte (3 CP + 3 CP) (1PL = Term paper/Hausarbeit)

Es gilt zu beachten: Laut SK-Beschluss (E-SC) vom 21.11.2012 ist die Pruefungsleistung im Bereich \"Key Topics in Linguistics\" zu erbringen = Schriftliche Hausarbeit/Term paper.

Modulbeauftragte/r: Dr. Jana Nittel, jnittel@uni-bremen.de
Course numberTitle of eventLecturer
10-76-1-D1-01Key Topics in Linguistics: Language Change (in English)
teaching category C3

Seminar (Teaching)
ECTS: 3

Dates:
weekly (starts in week: 1) Tue. 12:15 - 13:45 GW2 A3390 (CIP-Labor FB 10) (2 Credit hours)

This course will be taught online. All readings and materials, as well as online lectures, will be made available through the teaching and learning platform Stud.IP. The course will mostly take place asynchronously. Occasionally, however, synchronous meetings will be held in an online conference meeting room.

This course provides students with a general introduction to the study of language change from a usage-based perspective. We will explore linguistic change in World Englishes and systematically examine change on all linguistic levels, i.e. phonological, morphological, syntactic, and lexical, using examples from different varieties of English. References will also be made to grammaticalization theory and language contact. We will not only be concerned with the linguistic mechanisms of language change but also take a look at the sociolinguistic side.

Requirements
• active participation on Stud.IP and attendance of occasional online meetings
• close reading of selected texts for each session
• hand-in of worksheets
• ‘Studien-’ or ‘Prüfungsleistung’ as required by the module descriptions

Nicole Hober, M.A.
10-76-1-D1-02Key Topics in Linguistics: Grammar-based Methods for Textual Analysis and Critical Reading (in English)
C3 [Die digitale Lehre vermischt synchrone und asynchrone Elemente.]

Seminar (Teaching)

Dates:
weekly (starts in week: 1) Mon. 14:15 - 15:45 (2 Credit hours)

In this course participants will be given a thorough grounding in a particular area of the functional grammar of English: transitivity. Transitivity is the part of grammar that encodes the speaker or writer's view of reality--literally the 'who did what' part of grammar. It is the major component of the IDEATIONAL part of the linguistic system. We will explore a wide range of English texts in order to practice recognising the basic types of transitivity patterns in English. The main emphasis will be on doing, so that all success-ful course participants will become proficient in analysing texts according to their transitivity. Particular attention will also be paid to evaluating the reliability of analyses and to demonstrating whether or not bodies of data exhibit statistically significant differences.

Prof. John Arnold Bateman, Ph.D.
10-76-1-D1-03Exploring Spontaneous spoken English: Syntax and Discourse (in English)
C3 [Die digitale Lehre verbindet synchrone und asynchrone Elemente.]

Seminar (Teaching)

Dates:
weekly (starts in week: 1) Tue. 16:15 - 17:45 (2 Credit hours)
Dr. Claudia Lehmann
10-76-1-D1-05Key Topics in Linguistics: Sociolinguistics (in English)
C3

Seminar (Teaching)
ECTS: 3/6

Dates:
weekly (starts in week: 1) Wed. 10:15 - 11:45 (2 Credit hours)

This seminar provides a basic introduction to the field of sociolinguistics. In presenting key concepts and terminologies from variationist sociolinguistics as well as from interactional sociolinguistics, students will be given an overview of different approaches in these fields and their underlying research paradigms.

We will work together on groundbreaking studies as well as newer approaches in order to become acquainted with specific methods of data collection and analysis, their benefits and their limitations, respectively. In line with the subject, the seminar not only encompasses a focus on the social relevance of language in society, but also discusses its implications for social life with reference to contemporary social theory.

The seminar will take place ONLINE and includes video lectures, online discussions, and self-study time.

Henning Vahlenkamp
10-76-1-D1-06Discourse Analysis (in English)
B

Seminar (Teaching)

Dates:
weekly (starts in week: 1) Tue. 10:15 - 11:45 External location: Zoom External location: Asynchronous (work on assigned task) External location: Zoom (individual meetings) (2 Credit hours)
Dr. Ramona Kreis ((LB))
10-76-1-D1/WD1-06Key Topics in Cultural History: Key Concepts in American Cultural History (in English)
C3

Seminar (Teaching)

Dates:
weekly (starts in week: 1) Wed. 10:15 - 11:45

This class will be completely taught online and is open to students who participate in exchange programs. All reading and information material will be made available through the U Bremen teaching and learning platform Stud.IP; hence prior enrollment via Stud.IP is mandatory.

This course seeks to consider key concepts in American cultural studies as they manifest in American cultural history—and as they also impact the current cultural, social, and political moment. American cultural studies has developed a number of key concepts that can be traced within the history of the United States, from its beginning of a European settlement on Indigenous lands, its constitution as a nation-state, the number of inequalities engrained within this constitution, and the struggles of various social movements towards greater emancipation within the dominant system that are still ongoing today. Among those the course will chiefly consider are: white supremacy, settler colonialism and Indigeneity, enslavement and anti-blackness, gender and sexuality, emancipation and liberation. Along with historical sources and contemporary scholarship, we will consider in the course how some of these concepts animate the current moment in US history and how they are reflected in literature and other media.
Class requirements are regular attendance, in-depth knowledge of reading material, and active class discussion. Reading the assigned texts is mandatory.

Dr. René Dietrich ((LB))
10-76-1-D1/WD1-07Key Topics in Cultural History: Shakespeare's London (in English)
C3

Seminar (Teaching)

Dates:
weekly (starts in week: 1) Mon. 16:15 - 17:45 Online (2 Credit hours)

Teaching method: We will meet in weekly online sessions, but students will also have access to weekly study units and worksheets. Since some of the participants are required to submit a research paper, we will use parts of our seminar discussions to the development of topics, the formulation of a thesis statement, as well as considerations about the methodological approaches of writing such a paper.
Course description: William Shakespeare’s London, and in this seminar, London in the Elizabethan Age as well as at his time in the city (c.1560 – 1616), was a rapidly growing and bustling metropolis. In the duration of this course, we will travel back in time seeking to explore the history and social geography of this largest city in England. Based on a research-based learning methodology, we will attempt to map out London’s key locations as the centre of government, the law and the church as well as being the focus of politics and culture during a time of intense political and religious upheaval. In addition, this course focuses on the following topics: Stage history, playhouses; the fundamental features of dramatic composition to issues such as political structures in Renaissance England, gender roles and relations, love and sexuality, constructions of nationhood, global expansion and their representation in Shakespeare’s plays.

A reader with selected secondary text materials will be made available for download on Stud. IP. Please be aware that your registration on Stud. IP. is mandatory (deadline September 15th, 2020). You may wish to check the sections "Information" and "Schedule" further details such as requirements, weekly schedule, select bibliography and modes of assessment.
Requirements and Assessment
• Interest in the topic discussed and ideally a regular online attendance and informed participation in class discussion (not part of your formal assessment);
• in-depth knowledge of the selected reading material,
• homework assignments,
• research-based term paper.
The requirements as formulated above may vary depending on your overall degree program.
Reading materials
MacGregor, Neil. Shakespeare's Restless World, Penguin Books, 2014.

Dr. Jana Nittel
10-76-1-D1/WD1-08Key Topics in Cultural History: Analyzing Hollywood Cinema (in English)
C3

Seminar (Teaching)

Dates:
weekly (starts in week: 1) Tue. 16:15 - 17:45 (2 Credit hours)

Cinema as a dominant cultural institution participates in an ongoing “struggle over meaning”. Frequently, however, social and cultural contradictions are not directly displayed in the movies but remain unexpressed or denied. This course will analyze the subtle and often not so subtle ways in which American movies deal with social conflicts and predicaments.
Essential readings will be available for download on Stud-IP. You may also consult the 'Semesterapparat' (SuUB) for further readings.
Requirements:
• regular attendance and participation in Stud.IP forum discussions
• in-depth knowledge of the reading material
• group presentation and handout
Prior enrollment via Stud.IP is mandatory.
Please note: The course will take place in the form of asynchronic, weekly study assignments and Stud.IP forum discussions. Occasionally, synchronic meetings will be held in an online conference meeting room

Dr. Karin Esders-Angermund
10-76-1-D1/WD1-09Key Topics in Cultural History: Gender - Culture - Feminism (in English)
C3

Lecture (Teaching)

Dates:
weekly (starts in week: 1) Wed. 16:15 - 17:45 (2 Credit hours)

In this course we will discuss a number of online lectures by influential feminist scholars. We will discuss corresponding texts and resources to prepare ourselves for the diverse subject matters of the presentations and to critically reflect on their respective ideas and arguments.
Essential readings will be available for download on Stud-IP.
Requirements:
  • regular attendance and participation in Stud.IP forum discussions
  • in-depth knowledge of the reading material
  • group presentation and handout
Please note that prior enrollment via Stud.IP is mandatory.

Dr. Karin Esders-Angermund
10-76-1-D1/WD1-10Key Topics in Cultural History: Intersectionality and Representation (in English)
C3

Seminar (Teaching)

Dates:
weekly (starts in week: 1) Thu. 12:15 - 13:45 (2 Credit hours)

In this online seminar, we will take a look at how marginalization and discrimination along such lines as gender, sex, sexuality, race, class, ableism etc. are interrelated and can lead to compounded, multiple oppressions. For our intersectional explorations, we will use examples from (science-fictionally inflected) pop culture, e.g. Janelle Monáe's concept-album-turned-movie Dirty Computer or the episode "Good Hunting" from Netflix's animated anthology series Love, Death + Robots, with the aim to approach them from various theoretical angles, e.g. feminism, queer studies, critical race studies, or postcolonialism.
Discrimination is so pervasive in our culture, being part of the fabric of our reality, that often, in our everyday lives, we aren't even aware of it because we've simply become too used to it – we've developed 'cultural blind spots', so to speak. Therefore, we will use examples from science fiction that pick up these very aspects of our reality and put it in a context that, in its futuristic, dystopian, fantastic setting, looks unfamiliar to us, makes us look at everything with fresh eyes, and thereby makes these dynamics of oppression all the more visible to us. (Self-)Representation of marginalized groups is key to raise awareness for the persistent and today ever more resurgent forms of oppression in our culture. More than that, it gives marginalized groups back their voices – voices that, in the past, all too often have been silenced by the oppressive system.
Since we will be following an intersectional approach, we will not only focus on the various factors of discrimination in isolation but consider them in combination as it is this very combination that leads to unique forms of marginalization and oppression. As a result of the interlocking systems of power, the ways in which black women, for example, experience discrimination are very different from those of white women or black men – a difference that results from the interplay of patriarchal and racial oppression that is more than just the sum of the two. In order to arrive at a better understanding of the dynamics of discrimination and privilege in our culture, it is essential to look both at the common causes of oppression as well as the differences in the experiences of individuals due to their particular identity constellations.
Because of the still unclear situation concerning the COVID-19 pandemic, this will be an online seminar with some synchronous sessions in an online conference meeting room (irregularly on Thursdays from 12:14 to 13:45) and some weeks during which students will work asynchronously. In the course of the semester, students will formulate their individual research interests for their final term papers and work towards it in the form of milestones, chat group discussions of secondary material, and possibly a short presentation of intermediate research results. Essential reading materials will be made available for download on Stud-IP.

Requirements:
• regular attendance and active participation during our Zoom-sessions
• in-depth knowledge of the selected reading and other course materials (optional screening sessions might be scheduled to give students access to video material);
• weekly written contributions in chat group discussions of assigned texts
• completion of milestones at specified points during the course of the semester
• final term paper (10-12 pages)

Julia Gatermann ((LB))

SP-2 Aufbaumodul: Sprachpraxis/ Practical-Language Proficiency Module (Part 1) (6 CP) (nur für das Wintersemester)

6 CP (3 CP+ 3 CP)

Modulbeauftragte: Dr. Vanessa Herrmann, vanessa.herrmann@uni-bremen.de
Course numberTitle of eventLecturer
10-76-3-SP-2-04Content-Based Integrated Skills d (in English)
B/C2

Exercises (Teaching)
ECTS: 3

Dates:
weekly (starts in week: 1) Mon. 12:15 - 13:45 SH D1020 (2 Credit hours)

CBIS (hybrid)
Content-Based Integrated Skills (CBIS) is the first part of the SP-2 module (“SP-2 Sprachpraxis Aufbaumodul”) to be taken in the winter semester. Culture & Communication (C&C) is taken as the second part of the module in the summer semester. The aim of both parts of the module is to prepare you final oral exam which you can take once you have completed SP-2.

Content-Based Integrated Skills (CBIS) permits students to implement all four core language skills (speaking, writing, listening, reading) while turning a theoretical challenge into a practical success. This course is designed to give you an insight into academic research, to develop the skill of critical thinking as well as providing you with the opportunity to work on your language skills. The course content revolves around English-speaking countries and cultures. Students will learn about politics, traditions, accents and histories of the countries connected to the English language or/and the Commonwealth. Each country will be critically analysed with the goal of expanding their knowledge about an “English-speaking Culture.” Students will have the opportunity to make decisions, solve problems, and at the end of the course, present the fruits of your labours as you put your own unique ideas into practice.

Please note that this course uses a “hybrid” format this term. That means although the preparation will take place online, the final presentations are held on-site at university. There will be video conferences to attend as stated in the timetable made available at the beginning of the semester.

Lisa Nehls, M.A.
10-76-3-SP2-01Content-based Integrated Skills - a (in English)
B / C2

Exercises (Teaching)

Dates:
weekly (starts in week: 1) Wed. 08:15 - 09:45 Online GW2 A4020 (2 Credit hours)

This course takes place both online and on campus ("Präsenzlehre"); both elements are in synch with the scheduled times.

Content-Based Integrated Skills (CBIS) is the first part of the SP-2 module (“SP-2 Sprachpraxis Aufbaumodul”) to be taken in the winter semester. Culture & Communication (C&C) is taken as the second part of the module in the summer semester. The aim of both parts of the module is to prepare you final oral exam which you can take once you have completed SP-2.

Content-Based Integrated Skills (CBIS) permits students to implement all four core language skills (speaking, writing, listening, reading) while turning a theoretical challenge into a practical success. This course is designed to give you an insight into academic research, to develop the skill of critical thinking as well as providing you with the opportunity to work on your language skills. The course content revolves around English-speaking countries and cultures. Students will learn about politics, traditions, accents and histories of the countries connected to the English language or/and the Commonwealth. Each country will be critically analysed with the goal of expanding their knowledge about an “English-speaking Culture.” Students will have the opportunity to make decisions, solve problems, and at the end of the course, present the fruits of your labours as you put your own unique ideas into practice.

Please note that this course uses a “hybrid” format this term. That means although the preparation will take place online, the final presentations are held on-site at university. There will be video conferences to attend as stated in the timetable made available at the beginning of the semester.

Dr. Vanessa Herrmann
10-76-3-SP2-02Culture & Communication extra 2 - Speaking Practice for the Oral Exam (in English)
B / C2

Exercises (Teaching)

Dates:
weekly (starts in week: 1) Thu. 10:15 - 11:45 Online SH D1020 (2 Credit hours)

This course takes place both online and on campus ("Präsenzlehre"); both elements are in synch with the scheduled times.

This class is designed for students who did not pass the oral exam in the SoSo2020. You may have felt that you were not able to practice speaking English sufficiently during the online semester and did not have the confidence you needed to pass the exam. You will now have the opportunity to gain fluency in your specialised area by expanding your ideas and conducting further research if necessary. The other members of the group will encourage you to express your concepts and develop your skills both in terms of language and content while you do the same for them. Exchanging ideas with one another on your own topic and that of other group members, and any further subjects that capture our interest, will help to increase your fluency and confidence for the next attempt at the exam.

Dr. Vanessa Herrmann
10-76-3-SP2-03Content-Based Integrated Skills c (in English)
B/C2

Exercises (Teaching)
ECTS: 3

Dates:
weekly (starts in week: 1) Mon. 10:15 - 11:45 SH D1020 (2 Credit hours)

CBIS (hybrid)
Content-Based Integrated Skills (CBIS) is the first part of the SP-2 module (“SP-2 Sprachpraxis Aufbaumodul”) to be taken in the winter semester. Culture & Communication (C&C) is taken as the second part of the module in the summer semester. The aim of both parts of the module is to prepare you final oral exam which you can take once you have completed SP-2.

Content-Based Integrated Skills (CBIS) permits students to implement all four core language skills (speaking, writing, listening, reading) while turning a theoretical challenge into a practical success. This course is designed to give you an insight into academic research, to develop the skill of critical thinking as well as providing you with the opportunity to work on your language skills. The course content revolves around English-speaking countries and cultures. Students will learn about politics, traditions, accents and histories of the countries connected to the English language or/and the Commonwealth. Each country will be critically analysed with the goal of expanding their knowledge about an “English-speaking Culture.” Students will have the opportunity to make decisions, solve problems, and at the end of the course, present the fruits of your labours as you put your own unique ideas into practice.

Please note that this course uses a “hybrid” format this term. That means although the preparation will take place online, the final presentations are held on-site at university. There will be video conferences to attend as stated in the timetable made available at the beginning of the semester.

Lisa Nehls, M.A.
10-76-3-SP2-04Culture & Communication extra: Speaking Practice for the Oral Exam (in English)

Exercises (Teaching)

Dates:
weekly (starts in week: 1) Wed. 16:15 - 17:45 Online

This class is designed for students who did not pass the oral exam in the SoSo2020. You may have felt that you were not able to practice speaking English sufficiently during the online semester and didn´t have the confidence you needed to pass the exam. You will now have the opportunity to gain fluency in your specialised area by expanding your ideas and conducting further research if necessary. The other members of the group will encourage you to express your concepts and develop your skills both in terms of language and content while you do the same for them. Exchanging ideas with one another on your own topic and that of other group members, and any further subjects that capture our interest, will help to increase your fluency and confidence for the next attempt at the exam.

Lisa Nehls, M.A.
10-76-3-SP2-05Content-Based Integrated Skills e (in English)
B/C3

Exercises (Teaching)
ECTS: 3

Dates:
weekly (starts in week: 1) Tue. 14:15 - 15:45 GW2 A4020 (2 Credit hours)

CBIS (hybrid: on-site and online teaching)
Content-Based Integrated Skills (CBIS) is the first part of the SP-2 module (“SP-2 Sprachpraxis Aufbaumodul”) to be taken in the winter semester. Culture & Communication (C&C) is taken as the second part of the module in the summer semester. The aim of both parts of the module is to prepare you final oral exam which you can take once you have completed SP-2.

Content-Based Integrated Skills (CBIS) permits students to implement all four core language skills (speaking, writing, listening, reading) while turning a theoretical challenge into a practical success. This course is designed to give you an insight into academic research, to develop the skill of critical thinking as well as providing you with the opportunity to work on your language skills. The course content revolves around English-speaking countries and cultures. Students will learn about politics, traditions, accents and histories of the countries connected to the English language or/and the Commonwealth. Each country will be critically analysed with the goal of expanding their knowledge about an “English-speaking Culture.” Students will have the opportunity to make decisions, solve problems, and at the end of the course, present the fruits of your labours as you put your own unique ideas into practice.

Please note that this course uses a “hybrid” format this term. That means although some of the preparation will take place online, the final presentations are held on-site at university. There will be video conferences to attend as stated in the timetable made available at the beginning of the semester.

Registration: Please register for ONE CBIS class only - therefore not blocking registration for other students (or yourself).

Katja Müller, M.A.
10-76-3-SP2-06Content-Based Integrated Skills f (in English)
B/C3

Exercises (Teaching)
ECTS: 3

Dates:
weekly (starts in week: 1) Thu. 14:15 - 15:45 Online (2 Credit hours)

CBIS (hybrid: on-site and online teaching)
Content-Based Integrated Skills (CBIS) is the first part of the SP-2 module (“SP-2 Sprachpraxis Aufbaumodul”) to be taken in the winter semester. Culture & Communication (C&C) is taken as the second part of the module in the summer semester. The aim of both parts of the module is to prepare you final oral exam which you can take once you have completed SP-2.

Content-Based Integrated Skills (CBIS) permits students to implement all four core language skills (speaking, writing, listening, reading) while turning a theoretical challenge into a practical success. This course is designed to give you an insight into academic research, to develop the skill of critical thinking as well as providing you with the opportunity to work on your language skills. The course content revolves around English-speaking countries and cultures. Students will learn about politics, traditions, accents and histories of the countries connected to the English language or/and the Commonwealth. Each country will be critically analysed with the goal of expanding their knowledge about an “English-speaking Culture.” Students will have the opportunity to make decisions, solve problems, and at the end of the course, present the fruits of your labours as you put your own unique ideas into practice.

Please note that this course uses a “hybrid” format this term. That means although some of the preparation will take place online, the final presentations are held on-site at university. There will be video conferences to attend as stated in the timetable made available at the beginning of the semester.

Registration: Please register for ONE CBIS class only - therefore not blocking registration for other students (or yourself).

Katja Müller, M.A.
10-76-3-SP2-07Content-Based Integrated Skills g (in English)
B/C3

Exercises (Teaching)

Dates:
weekly (starts in week: 1) Wed. 12:15 - 13:45 (2 Credit hours)

Please note that this course is an online course. Students are asked to participate regularly in the video conferences (see course schedule).

Content-Based Integrated Skills (CBIS) is the first part of the SP-2 module (“SP-2 Sprachpraxis Aufbaumodul”) to be taken in the winter semester. Culture & Communication (C&C) is taken as the second part of the module in the summer semester. The aim of both parts of the module is to prepare you final oral exam which you can take once you have completed SP-2.

Content-Based Integrated Skills (CBIS) permits students to implement all four core language skills (speaking, writing, listening, reading) while turning a theoretical challenge into a practical success. This course is designed to give you an insight into academic research, to develop the skill of critical thinking as well as providing you with the opportunity to work on your language skills. The course content revolves around English-speaking countries and cultures. Students will learn about politics, traditions, accents and histories of the countries connected to the English language or/and the Commonwealth. Each country will be critically analysed with the goal of expanding their knowledge about an “English-speaking Culture.” Students will have the opportunity to make decisions, solve problems, and at the end of the course, present the fruits of your labours as you put your own unique ideas into practice.

Materials will be provided via StudIP

Anne Kirkham, M.A.
10-76-3-SP2-08Content-Based Integrated Skills h (in English)
B/C3

Exercises (Teaching)

Dates:
weekly (starts in week: 1) Tue. 14:15 - 15:45 Online (2 Credit hours)

Please note that this course is an online course. Students are asked to participate regularly in the video conferences (see course schedule).

Content-Based Integrated Skills (CBIS) is the first part of the SP-2 module (“SP-2 Sprachpraxis Aufbaumodul”) to be taken in the winter semester. Culture & Communication (C&C) is taken as the second part of the module in the summer semester. The aim of both parts of the module is to prepare you final oral exam which you can take once you have completed SP-2.

Content-Based Integrated Skills (CBIS) permits students to implement all four core language skills (speaking, writing, listening, reading) while turning a theoretical challenge into a practical success. This course is designed to give you an insight into academic research, to develop the skill of critical thinking as well as providing you with the opportunity to work on your language skills. The course content revolves around English-speaking countries and cultures. Students will learn about politics, traditions, accents and histories of the countries connected to the English language or/and the Commonwealth. Each country will be critically analysed with the goal of expanding their knowledge about an “English-speaking Culture.” Students will have the opportunity to make decisions, solve problems, and at the end of the course, present the fruits of your labours as you put your own unique ideas into practice.

Materials will be provided via StudIP.

Anne Kirkham, M.A.

WD-1a: Aufbaumodul: Literatur- und Sprachwissenschaft (Wahlpflichtmodul 6 CP) (nur für das Wintersemester)

(3 CP + 3 CP)

Es gilt zu beachten: Laut SK-Beschluss (E-SC) vom 21.11.2012 ist die Pruefungsleistung im Bereich "Key Topics in Literature" zu erbringen = Klausur/Written test oder benotete Präsentationsleistung/presentation.

Modulbeauftragte/r: Dr. Jana Nittel, jnittel@uni-bremen.de
Course numberTitle of eventLecturer
10-76-1-D1-01Key Topics in Linguistics: Language Change (in English)
teaching category C3

Seminar (Teaching)
ECTS: 3

Dates:
weekly (starts in week: 1) Tue. 12:15 - 13:45 GW2 A3390 (CIP-Labor FB 10) (2 Credit hours)

This course will be taught online. All readings and materials, as well as online lectures, will be made available through the teaching and learning platform Stud.IP. The course will mostly take place asynchronously. Occasionally, however, synchronous meetings will be held in an online conference meeting room.

This course provides students with a general introduction to the study of language change from a usage-based perspective. We will explore linguistic change in World Englishes and systematically examine change on all linguistic levels, i.e. phonological, morphological, syntactic, and lexical, using examples from different varieties of English. References will also be made to grammaticalization theory and language contact. We will not only be concerned with the linguistic mechanisms of language change but also take a look at the sociolinguistic side.

Requirements
• active participation on Stud.IP and attendance of occasional online meetings
• close reading of selected texts for each session
• hand-in of worksheets
• ‘Studien-’ or ‘Prüfungsleistung’ as required by the module descriptions

Nicole Hober, M.A.
10-76-1-D1/WD1-01Key Topics in Literature: Colonialism, Violence and Mental Disorder (in English)
C2

Seminar (Teaching)

Dates:
weekly (starts in week: 1) Wed. 12:15 - 13:45 (2 Credit hours)
Dr. Sukla Chatterjee
10-76-1-D1/WD1-02Key Topics in Literature: The Victorian Novel - Charles Dickens (in English)
C3

Seminar (Teaching)

Dates:
weekly (starts in week: 1) Tue. 12:15 - 13:45 Online (2 Credit hours)

Teaching method: We will meet in weekly online sessions, but students will also have access to weekly self-study units, worksheets and opencast podcasts. Since some of the participants are required to submit a research paper, we will use parts of our seminar discussions to the development of topics, the formulation of a thesis statement, as well as considerations about the methodological approaches of writing such a paper.
Course description: This seminar focuses predominantly on novels exemplifying the predominance of fictional prose in the Victoria era. We will explore fictional and non-fictional writings by the English writer and social critic Charles Dickens (1812 – 1870), in particular Oliver Twist (February 1837 to April 1839) and Bleak House (March 1852 to September 1853). Using text-centred and contextual approaches, this course wishes to enable students to explore language, form, genre, and style of the novels, as well as to engage critically with themes, issues, and key concerns of Dickens’s writing and corresponding contemporary adaptions. Along with our weekly discussions of selected chapters - reader responses are strongly encouraged - we will also touch upon key developments in the history of nineteen-century novels as well as selected historical and literary contexts of the period.

A reader with selected secondary text materials will be made available for download on Stud. IP. Please be aware that your registration on Stud. IP. is mandatory (deadline September 15th, 2020).
You may wish to check the sections "Information" and "Schedule" further details such as requirements, weekly schedule, select bibliography and modes of assessment.
Requirements and Assessment
• Interest in the topic discussed and ideally a regular online attendance and informed participation in class discussion (not part of your formal assessment);
• in-depth knowledge of the selected reading material,
• homework assignments,
• research-based term paper.
The requirements as formulated above may vary depending on your overall degree program.
Required primary reading materials:
Dickens, Charles, and Fred Kaplan. Oliver Twist (Italics), Norton, 1993.
Dickens, Charles, and Nicola Bradbury. Bleak House (Italics), Penguin, 2003.

Dr. Jana Nittel
10-76-1-D1/WD1-03Key Topics in Literature: Narratives of Slavery (in English)
teaching category C3

Seminar (Teaching)
ECTS: 3

Dates:
weekly (starts in week: 1) Thu. 14:15 - 15:45 External location: virtual meeting room (2 Credit hours)

Please note that this course is already booked beyond capacity and has a waiting list. After Oct. 15, 2020 noon no further enrolements for this waiting list will be accepted. I am sorry for the inconvenience.

The history of the transatlantic slave trade and slavery in North America considerably shaped the US American and Canadian nation states. Unsurprisingly, slavery has been a recurring theme in North American literature since the early colonial period. Autobiographical narratives by formerly enslaved people, the so-called ‘slave narratives,’ are the oldest African American genre and constitutive not only to African American but also North American literary history. Novels of slavery have a similarly long history on the North American continent. This seminar will familiarize students with a selection of narratives of slavery and the history of slavery in North America as a focal point in American literature and culture where race, gender, and sexuality intersect. Using text-centered and contextual approaches, students will explore the language, form, and style of narratives of slavery as well as engage critically with key concerns surrounding North American history and culture.

The seminar will take place primarily in the form of asynchronic, weekly study assignments and Stud.IP forum discussions. Occasionally, synchronic meetings will be held in an online conference meeting room (irregularly on Thursdays 14:15 - 15:45). Assigned course materials, resources, and study assignments will be made available through Stud.IP on a weekly basis.
The seminar is offered for the modules D1a / D1b / WD1a / WD1b.
Please note that prior enrolment via Stud.IP is mandatory. Please check Stud.IP regularly for updates.

Requirements
• regular, active participation on Stud.IP and during online meetings,
• in-depth knowledge of the primary and secondary reading material,
• ‘Studien-,’ or ‘Prüfungsleistung’ as required by the module descriptions.

Paula von Gleich, M.A.
10-76-1-D1/WD1-04The American Short Story from Hawthorne and Poe to Ellison and Mukherjee (in English)
C2

Seminar (Teaching)

Dates:
weekly (starts in week: 1) Tue. 12:15 - 13:45 Online (2 Credit hours)

-Class will be moved to Tuesday 12-14 hours-
This class will be completely taught online and is open to BA students from U Bremen and students participating in student exchange programs. All reading and information material will be made available through the U Bremen teaching and learning platform Stud.IP; hence prior enrollment via Stud.IP is mandatory.

Edgar Allan Poe is considered the father of the American short story and modern detective story. In a review of Nathaniel Hawthorne’s tales he outlined what we now take as his ‘theory’ of the short story. We will discuss this ‘theory’ as well as Joseph Urgo’s take on the American short story upon which we will base the readings of some of the finest examples of American short stories from the Romantic period to the present. They will include classics by Poe, Hawthorne, Herman Melville, Charlotte Perkins Gilman, and Kate Chopin as well as stories by African American, Native American, Hispanic and Asian American authors.

Class requirements are regular attendance, in-depth knowledge of reading material, and active class discussion. Reading the texts is mandatory.

Prof. Dr. Kerstin Knopf
10-76-1-D1/WD1-05The Postcolonial World in Literature and Film: Australia (in English)
C2

Seminar (Teaching)

Dates:
weekly (starts in week: 1) Tue. 14:15 - 15:45 (2 Credit hours)

-Class will be moved to Tuesday 14-16 hours-
This class will be completely taught online and is open to BA students from U Bremen and students participating in student exchange programs. All reading and information material (except the two novels) will be made available through the U Bremen teaching and learning platform Stud.IP; hence prior enrollment via Stud.IP is mandatory. The films will be made available as well.

The class will introduce students to Australia, its colonial history, postcolonial cultures, and contemporary issues with a focus on Australia’s Indigenous population. We will learn about Australia through reading non-fiction texts, short stories, two novels and watching four feature films by non-Indigenous and Indigenous directors.

Class requirements are regular attendance, in-depth knowledge of reading and viewing material, and active class discussion. Reading the texts and watching the films is mandatory. Students are required to purchase and read Kate Grenville The Secret River and Melissa Lucashenko Mullumbimby. Ten copies of each are available at the university bookstore for 11,00 € (Grenville) and 23 € (Lucashenko) at the beginning of October. You can also order them via amazon.de, amazon.com and amazon.marketplace (check delivery times).

Prof. Dr. Kerstin Knopf
10-76-1-D1/WD1-06Key Topics in Literature: West African Literature (in English)
C3 Blockveranstaltung/Blocktermine Jan/Febr. Mon + Die

Seminar (Teaching)

Additional dates:
Mon. 04.01.21 - Tue. 05.01.21 (Mon., Tue.) 12:15 - 13:45
Mon. 11.01.21 - Tue. 12.01.21 (Mon., Tue.) 12:15 - 13:45
Mon. 18.01.21 - Tue. 19.01.21 (Mon., Tue.) 12:15 - 13:45
Mon. 25.01.21 - Tue. 26.01.21 (Mon., Tue.) 12:15 - 13:45
Mon. 01.02.21 - Tue. 02.02.21 (Mon., Tue.) 12:15 - 13:45
Mon. 08.02.21 - Tue. 09.02.21 (Mon., Tue.) 12:15 - 13:45
Mon. 15.02.21 - Tue. 16.02.21 (Mon., Tue.) 12:15 - 13:45
Mon. 22.02.21 - Tue. 23.02.21 (Mon., Tue.) 12:15 - 13:45
Oluseun Tanimomo ((LB))
10-76-1-WD1-09Key Topics in Linguistics: English with an accent: Language ideology in the US and New Zealand (in English)
C3 Online Course

Seminar (Teaching)

Dates:
weekly (starts in week: 1) Tue. 10:15 - 11:45 (2 Credit hours)

This class will be taught online. It deals with the ways that linguistic diversity might be related to the linguistic discrimination. We will begin with the studies on 'linguistic profiling' based on experimental studies of housing discrimination, and expand upon those findings to promote equity in education, employment, medicine and the law. This class deals with these studies, devoted to the advancement of equality and justice globally. You will give an online group presentation in this class via Zoom.

Dr. Inke Du Bois
10-76-1-WD1-10Key Topics in Linguistics: Humor and Linguistics: Gender, Age and the Pandemic (in English)
C3 Asynchronous Online Course

Seminar (Teaching)

Dates:
weekly (starts in week: 1) Wed. 10:15 - 11:45 (2 Credit hours)

This class is a project oriented online class. We read recent texts about humor as a coping mechanism and Covid 19 communication. In the next step, we will use Maxqda Software to analyse and code multimodal data. You will give a zoom group presentation about a self selected research project regarding Covid 19 and humor using your Maxqda data analyses.
Abdel-Raheem, A. (2018). Multimodal humour: Integrating blending model, relevance theory, and incongruity theory. Multimodal Communication, 7(1).
Bülow, L., Marie-Luis Merten, & Johann, M. (2018). Internet-memes als zugang zu multimodalen konstruktionen. Zeitschrift Für Angewandte Linguistik, 2018(69), 1-32. doi:http://dx.doi.org/10.1515/zfal-2018-0015

Dean, R. A. K., & Gregory, D. M. (2005). More than trivial: strategies for using humor in palliative care. Cancer nursing, 28(4), 292-300.

Dynel, M. (2020). Language, creativity and humour online. Language in Society, 49(1), 149-152. doi:http://dx.doi.org/10.1017/S0047404519000836
Harvey, L., & Palese, E. (2018). #NeverthelessMemesPersisted: Building critical memetic literacy in the classroom. Journal of Adolescent & Adult Literacy, 62(3), 259-270. doi:http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/jaal.898

Yang, S. (2017). An analysis of factors influencing transmission of internet memes of english-speaking origin in chinese online communities. Journal of Language Teaching and Research, 8(5), 969-977. doi:http://dx.doi.org/10.17507/jltr.0805.19

Dr. Inke Du Bois
10-76-3-WD1-07Key Topics in Linguistics: Uses and Abuses of Social and News Media: Linguistic Perspectives (in English)
C3

Seminar (Teaching)

Dates:
weekly (starts in week: 1) Tue. 14:15 - 15:45 (2 Credit hours)

This course will run entirely online. In the course we cast a critical eye over the ways in which contemporary media can come to derail democratic processes. This will stretch across all media which currently make use of digital forms of distribution, spanning social media, channels of various kinds, regular newspapers, news videos, and so on. The methods to be learnt and practised in concrete analyses are linguistic and multimodal. That is: we will pay particular attention to how various forms of expression, images, written text, video, sound, and so on may be combined for persuasive effect. The course will draw on current discussions from the Research Group on Multimodal Rhetoric in Online Media running at the Bielefeld Centre for Interdisciplinary Research: https://www.uni-bielefeld.de/(en)/ZIF/FG/2020Multimodal/.

Prof. John Arnold Bateman, Ph.D.
10-76-3-WD1-08Analysing (visual) Persuasion in Advertisements (in English)
C

Seminar (Teaching)

Dates:
weekly (starts in week: 1) Thu. 10:15 - 11:45 (2 Credit hours)
Tamara Drummond

WD-1b Aufbaumodul: Literaturwissenschaft und Kulturgeschichte (Wahlpflichtmodul 6 CP) - (nur für das Wintersemester)

(3 CP + 3 CP)

Es gilt zu beachten: Laut SK-Beschluss (E-SC) vom 21.11.2012 ist die Pruefungsleistung im Bereich "Key Topics in Cultural History" zu erbringen = Klausur/Written test oder benotete Präsentationsleistung/presentation.

Modulbeauftragte/r: Dr. Jana Nittel, jnittel@uni-bremen.de
Course numberTitle of eventLecturer
10-76-1-D1/WD1-01Key Topics in Literature: Colonialism, Violence and Mental Disorder (in English)
C2

Seminar (Teaching)

Dates:
weekly (starts in week: 1) Wed. 12:15 - 13:45 (2 Credit hours)
Dr. Sukla Chatterjee
10-76-1-D1/WD1-02Key Topics in Literature: The Victorian Novel - Charles Dickens (in English)
C3

Seminar (Teaching)

Dates:
weekly (starts in week: 1) Tue. 12:15 - 13:45 Online (2 Credit hours)

Teaching method: We will meet in weekly online sessions, but students will also have access to weekly self-study units, worksheets and opencast podcasts. Since some of the participants are required to submit a research paper, we will use parts of our seminar discussions to the development of topics, the formulation of a thesis statement, as well as considerations about the methodological approaches of writing such a paper.
Course description: This seminar focuses predominantly on novels exemplifying the predominance of fictional prose in the Victoria era. We will explore fictional and non-fictional writings by the English writer and social critic Charles Dickens (1812 – 1870), in particular Oliver Twist (February 1837 to April 1839) and Bleak House (March 1852 to September 1853). Using text-centred and contextual approaches, this course wishes to enable students to explore language, form, genre, and style of the novels, as well as to engage critically with themes, issues, and key concerns of Dickens’s writing and corresponding contemporary adaptions. Along with our weekly discussions of selected chapters - reader responses are strongly encouraged - we will also touch upon key developments in the history of nineteen-century novels as well as selected historical and literary contexts of the period.

A reader with selected secondary text materials will be made available for download on Stud. IP. Please be aware that your registration on Stud. IP. is mandatory (deadline September 15th, 2020).
You may wish to check the sections "Information" and "Schedule" further details such as requirements, weekly schedule, select bibliography and modes of assessment.
Requirements and Assessment
• Interest in the topic discussed and ideally a regular online attendance and informed participation in class discussion (not part of your formal assessment);
• in-depth knowledge of the selected reading material,
• homework assignments,
• research-based term paper.
The requirements as formulated above may vary depending on your overall degree program.
Required primary reading materials:
Dickens, Charles, and Fred Kaplan. Oliver Twist (Italics), Norton, 1993.
Dickens, Charles, and Nicola Bradbury. Bleak House (Italics), Penguin, 2003.

Dr. Jana Nittel
10-76-1-D1/WD1-03Key Topics in Literature: Narratives of Slavery (in English)
teaching category C3

Seminar (Teaching)
ECTS: 3

Dates:
weekly (starts in week: 1) Thu. 14:15 - 15:45 External location: virtual meeting room (2 Credit hours)

Please note that this course is already booked beyond capacity and has a waiting list. After Oct. 15, 2020 noon no further enrolements for this waiting list will be accepted. I am sorry for the inconvenience.

The history of the transatlantic slave trade and slavery in North America considerably shaped the US American and Canadian nation states. Unsurprisingly, slavery has been a recurring theme in North American literature since the early colonial period. Autobiographical narratives by formerly enslaved people, the so-called ‘slave narratives,’ are the oldest African American genre and constitutive not only to African American but also North American literary history. Novels of slavery have a similarly long history on the North American continent. This seminar will familiarize students with a selection of narratives of slavery and the history of slavery in North America as a focal point in American literature and culture where race, gender, and sexuality intersect. Using text-centered and contextual approaches, students will explore the language, form, and style of narratives of slavery as well as engage critically with key concerns surrounding North American history and culture.

The seminar will take place primarily in the form of asynchronic, weekly study assignments and Stud.IP forum discussions. Occasionally, synchronic meetings will be held in an online conference meeting room (irregularly on Thursdays 14:15 - 15:45). Assigned course materials, resources, and study assignments will be made available through Stud.IP on a weekly basis.
The seminar is offered for the modules D1a / D1b / WD1a / WD1b.
Please note that prior enrolment via Stud.IP is mandatory. Please check Stud.IP regularly for updates.

Requirements
• regular, active participation on Stud.IP and during online meetings,
• in-depth knowledge of the primary and secondary reading material,
• ‘Studien-,’ or ‘Prüfungsleistung’ as required by the module descriptions.

Paula von Gleich, M.A.
10-76-1-D1/WD1-04The American Short Story from Hawthorne and Poe to Ellison and Mukherjee (in English)
C2

Seminar (Teaching)

Dates:
weekly (starts in week: 1) Tue. 12:15 - 13:45 Online (2 Credit hours)

-Class will be moved to Tuesday 12-14 hours-
This class will be completely taught online and is open to BA students from U Bremen and students participating in student exchange programs. All reading and information material will be made available through the U Bremen teaching and learning platform Stud.IP; hence prior enrollment via Stud.IP is mandatory.

Edgar Allan Poe is considered the father of the American short story and modern detective story. In a review of Nathaniel Hawthorne’s tales he outlined what we now take as his ‘theory’ of the short story. We will discuss this ‘theory’ as well as Joseph Urgo’s take on the American short story upon which we will base the readings of some of the finest examples of American short stories from the Romantic period to the present. They will include classics by Poe, Hawthorne, Herman Melville, Charlotte Perkins Gilman, and Kate Chopin as well as stories by African American, Native American, Hispanic and Asian American authors.

Class requirements are regular attendance, in-depth knowledge of reading material, and active class discussion. Reading the texts is mandatory.

Prof. Dr. Kerstin Knopf
10-76-1-D1/WD1-05The Postcolonial World in Literature and Film: Australia (in English)
C2

Seminar (Teaching)

Dates:
weekly (starts in week: 1) Tue. 14:15 - 15:45 (2 Credit hours)

-Class will be moved to Tuesday 14-16 hours-
This class will be completely taught online and is open to BA students from U Bremen and students participating in student exchange programs. All reading and information material (except the two novels) will be made available through the U Bremen teaching and learning platform Stud.IP; hence prior enrollment via Stud.IP is mandatory. The films will be made available as well.

The class will introduce students to Australia, its colonial history, postcolonial cultures, and contemporary issues with a focus on Australia’s Indigenous population. We will learn about Australia through reading non-fiction texts, short stories, two novels and watching four feature films by non-Indigenous and Indigenous directors.

Class requirements are regular attendance, in-depth knowledge of reading and viewing material, and active class discussion. Reading the texts and watching the films is mandatory. Students are required to purchase and read Kate Grenville The Secret River and Melissa Lucashenko Mullumbimby. Ten copies of each are available at the university bookstore for 11,00 € (Grenville) and 23 € (Lucashenko) at the beginning of October. You can also order them via amazon.de, amazon.com and amazon.marketplace (check delivery times).

Prof. Dr. Kerstin Knopf
10-76-1-D1/WD1-06Key Topics in Literature: West African Literature (in English)
C3 Blockveranstaltung/Blocktermine Jan/Febr. Mon + Die

Seminar (Teaching)

Additional dates:
Mon. 04.01.21 - Tue. 05.01.21 (Mon., Tue.) 12:15 - 13:45
Mon. 11.01.21 - Tue. 12.01.21 (Mon., Tue.) 12:15 - 13:45
Mon. 18.01.21 - Tue. 19.01.21 (Mon., Tue.) 12:15 - 13:45
Mon. 25.01.21 - Tue. 26.01.21 (Mon., Tue.) 12:15 - 13:45
Mon. 01.02.21 - Tue. 02.02.21 (Mon., Tue.) 12:15 - 13:45
Mon. 08.02.21 - Tue. 09.02.21 (Mon., Tue.) 12:15 - 13:45
Mon. 15.02.21 - Tue. 16.02.21 (Mon., Tue.) 12:15 - 13:45
Mon. 22.02.21 - Tue. 23.02.21 (Mon., Tue.) 12:15 - 13:45
Oluseun Tanimomo ((LB))
10-76-1-D1/WD1-06Key Topics in Cultural History: Key Concepts in American Cultural History (in English)
C3

Seminar (Teaching)

Dates:
weekly (starts in week: 1) Wed. 10:15 - 11:45

This class will be completely taught online and is open to students who participate in exchange programs. All reading and information material will be made available through the U Bremen teaching and learning platform Stud.IP; hence prior enrollment via Stud.IP is mandatory.

This course seeks to consider key concepts in American cultural studies as they manifest in American cultural history—and as they also impact the current cultural, social, and political moment. American cultural studies has developed a number of key concepts that can be traced within the history of the United States, from its beginning of a European settlement on Indigenous lands, its constitution as a nation-state, the number of inequalities engrained within this constitution, and the struggles of various social movements towards greater emancipation within the dominant system that are still ongoing today. Among those the course will chiefly consider are: white supremacy, settler colonialism and Indigeneity, enslavement and anti-blackness, gender and sexuality, emancipation and liberation. Along with historical sources and contemporary scholarship, we will consider in the course how some of these concepts animate the current moment in US history and how they are reflected in literature and other media.
Class requirements are regular attendance, in-depth knowledge of reading material, and active class discussion. Reading the assigned texts is mandatory.

Dr. René Dietrich ((LB))
10-76-1-D1/WD1-07Key Topics in Cultural History: Shakespeare's London (in English)
C3

Seminar (Teaching)

Dates:
weekly (starts in week: 1) Mon. 16:15 - 17:45 Online (2 Credit hours)

Teaching method: We will meet in weekly online sessions, but students will also have access to weekly study units and worksheets. Since some of the participants are required to submit a research paper, we will use parts of our seminar discussions to the development of topics, the formulation of a thesis statement, as well as considerations about the methodological approaches of writing such a paper.
Course description: William Shakespeare’s London, and in this seminar, London in the Elizabethan Age as well as at his time in the city (c.1560 – 1616), was a rapidly growing and bustling metropolis. In the duration of this course, we will travel back in time seeking to explore the history and social geography of this largest city in England. Based on a research-based learning methodology, we will attempt to map out London’s key locations as the centre of government, the law and the church as well as being the focus of politics and culture during a time of intense political and religious upheaval. In addition, this course focuses on the following topics: Stage history, playhouses; the fundamental features of dramatic composition to issues such as political structures in Renaissance England, gender roles and relations, love and sexuality, constructions of nationhood, global expansion and their representation in Shakespeare’s plays.

A reader with selected secondary text materials will be made available for download on Stud. IP. Please be aware that your registration on Stud. IP. is mandatory (deadline September 15th, 2020). You may wish to check the sections "Information" and "Schedule" further details such as requirements, weekly schedule, select bibliography and modes of assessment.
Requirements and Assessment
• Interest in the topic discussed and ideally a regular online attendance and informed participation in class discussion (not part of your formal assessment);
• in-depth knowledge of the selected reading material,
• homework assignments,
• research-based term paper.
The requirements as formulated above may vary depending on your overall degree program.
Reading materials
MacGregor, Neil. Shakespeare's Restless World, Penguin Books, 2014.

Dr. Jana Nittel
10-76-1-D1/WD1-10Key Topics in Cultural History: Intersectionality and Representation (in English)
C3

Seminar (Teaching)

Dates:
weekly (starts in week: 1) Thu. 12:15 - 13:45 (2 Credit hours)

In this online seminar, we will take a look at how marginalization and discrimination along such lines as gender, sex, sexuality, race, class, ableism etc. are interrelated and can lead to compounded, multiple oppressions. For our intersectional explorations, we will use examples from (science-fictionally inflected) pop culture, e.g. Janelle Monáe's concept-album-turned-movie Dirty Computer or the episode "Good Hunting" from Netflix's animated anthology series Love, Death + Robots, with the aim to approach them from various theoretical angles, e.g. feminism, queer studies, critical race studies, or postcolonialism.
Discrimination is so pervasive in our culture, being part of the fabric of our reality, that often, in our everyday lives, we aren't even aware of it because we've simply become too used to it – we've developed 'cultural blind spots', so to speak. Therefore, we will use examples from science fiction that pick up these very aspects of our reality and put it in a context that, in its futuristic, dystopian, fantastic setting, looks unfamiliar to us, makes us look at everything with fresh eyes, and thereby makes these dynamics of oppression all the more visible to us. (Self-)Representation of marginalized groups is key to raise awareness for the persistent and today ever more resurgent forms of oppression in our culture. More than that, it gives marginalized groups back their voices – voices that, in the past, all too often have been silenced by the oppressive system.
Since we will be following an intersectional approach, we will not only focus on the various factors of discrimination in isolation but consider them in combination as it is this very combination that leads to unique forms of marginalization and oppression. As a result of the interlocking systems of power, the ways in which black women, for example, experience discrimination are very different from those of white women or black men – a difference that results from the interplay of patriarchal and racial oppression that is more than just the sum of the two. In order to arrive at a better understanding of the dynamics of discrimination and privilege in our culture, it is essential to look both at the common causes of oppression as well as the differences in the experiences of individuals due to their particular identity constellations.
Because of the still unclear situation concerning the COVID-19 pandemic, this will be an online seminar with some synchronous sessions in an online conference meeting room (irregularly on Thursdays from 12:14 to 13:45) and some weeks during which students will work asynchronously. In the course of the semester, students will formulate their individual research interests for their final term papers and work towards it in the form of milestones, chat group discussions of secondary material, and possibly a short presentation of intermediate research results. Essential reading materials will be made available for download on Stud-IP.

Requirements:
• regular attendance and active participation during our Zoom-sessions
• in-depth knowledge of the selected reading and other course materials (optional screening sessions might be scheduled to give students access to video material);
• weekly written contributions in chat group discussions of assigned texts
• completion of milestones at specified points during the course of the semester
• final term paper (10-12 pages)

Julia Gatermann ((LB))

WD-1c: Aufbaumodul: Sprachwissenschaft und Kulturgeschichte (Wahlpflichtmodul 6 CP) - (nur für das Wintersemester)

(3 CP + 3 CP)

Es gilt zu beachten: Laut SK-Beschluss (E-SC) vom 21.11.2012 ist die Pruefungsleistung im Bereich "Key Topics in Linguistics" zu erbringen = Klausur/Written test oder benotete Praesentationsleistung/Presentation.

Modulbeauftragte/r: Dr. Jana Nittel, jnittel@uni-bremen.de
Course numberTitle of eventLecturer
10-76-1-D1-01Key Topics in Linguistics: Language Change (in English)
teaching category C3

Seminar (Teaching)
ECTS: 3

Dates:
weekly (starts in week: 1) Tue. 12:15 - 13:45 GW2 A3390 (CIP-Labor FB 10) (2 Credit hours)

This course will be taught online. All readings and materials, as well as online lectures, will be made available through the teaching and learning platform Stud.IP. The course will mostly take place asynchronously. Occasionally, however, synchronous meetings will be held in an online conference meeting room.

This course provides students with a general introduction to the study of language change from a usage-based perspective. We will explore linguistic change in World Englishes and systematically examine change on all linguistic levels, i.e. phonological, morphological, syntactic, and lexical, using examples from different varieties of English. References will also be made to grammaticalization theory and language contact. We will not only be concerned with the linguistic mechanisms of language change but also take a look at the sociolinguistic side.

Requirements
• active participation on Stud.IP and attendance of occasional online meetings
• close reading of selected texts for each session
• hand-in of worksheets
• ‘Studien-’ or ‘Prüfungsleistung’ as required by the module descriptions

Nicole Hober, M.A.
10-76-1-D1/WD1-06Key Topics in Cultural History: Key Concepts in American Cultural History (in English)
C3

Seminar (Teaching)

Dates:
weekly (starts in week: 1) Wed. 10:15 - 11:45

This class will be completely taught online and is open to students who participate in exchange programs. All reading and information material will be made available through the U Bremen teaching and learning platform Stud.IP; hence prior enrollment via Stud.IP is mandatory.

This course seeks to consider key concepts in American cultural studies as they manifest in American cultural history—and as they also impact the current cultural, social, and political moment. American cultural studies has developed a number of key concepts that can be traced within the history of the United States, from its beginning of a European settlement on Indigenous lands, its constitution as a nation-state, the number of inequalities engrained within this constitution, and the struggles of various social movements towards greater emancipation within the dominant system that are still ongoing today. Among those the course will chiefly consider are: white supremacy, settler colonialism and Indigeneity, enslavement and anti-blackness, gender and sexuality, emancipation and liberation. Along with historical sources and contemporary scholarship, we will consider in the course how some of these concepts animate the current moment in US history and how they are reflected in literature and other media.
Class requirements are regular attendance, in-depth knowledge of reading material, and active class discussion. Reading the assigned texts is mandatory.

Dr. René Dietrich ((LB))
10-76-1-D1/WD1-07Key Topics in Cultural History: Shakespeare's London (in English)
C3

Seminar (Teaching)

Dates:
weekly (starts in week: 1) Mon. 16:15 - 17:45 Online (2 Credit hours)

Teaching method: We will meet in weekly online sessions, but students will also have access to weekly study units and worksheets. Since some of the participants are required to submit a research paper, we will use parts of our seminar discussions to the development of topics, the formulation of a thesis statement, as well as considerations about the methodological approaches of writing such a paper.
Course description: William Shakespeare’s London, and in this seminar, London in the Elizabethan Age as well as at his time in the city (c.1560 – 1616), was a rapidly growing and bustling metropolis. In the duration of this course, we will travel back in time seeking to explore the history and social geography of this largest city in England. Based on a research-based learning methodology, we will attempt to map out London’s key locations as the centre of government, the law and the church as well as being the focus of politics and culture during a time of intense political and religious upheaval. In addition, this course focuses on the following topics: Stage history, playhouses; the fundamental features of dramatic composition to issues such as political structures in Renaissance England, gender roles and relations, love and sexuality, constructions of nationhood, global expansion and their representation in Shakespeare’s plays.

A reader with selected secondary text materials will be made available for download on Stud. IP. Please be aware that your registration on Stud. IP. is mandatory (deadline September 15th, 2020). You may wish to check the sections "Information" and "Schedule" further details such as requirements, weekly schedule, select bibliography and modes of assessment.
Requirements and Assessment
• Interest in the topic discussed and ideally a regular online attendance and informed participation in class discussion (not part of your formal assessment);
• in-depth knowledge of the selected reading material,
• homework assignments,
• research-based term paper.
The requirements as formulated above may vary depending on your overall degree program.
Reading materials
MacGregor, Neil. Shakespeare's Restless World, Penguin Books, 2014.

Dr. Jana Nittel
10-76-1-D1/WD1-08Key Topics in Cultural History: Analyzing Hollywood Cinema (in English)
C3

Seminar (Teaching)

Dates:
weekly (starts in week: 1) Tue. 16:15 - 17:45 (2 Credit hours)

Cinema as a dominant cultural institution participates in an ongoing “struggle over meaning”. Frequently, however, social and cultural contradictions are not directly displayed in the movies but remain unexpressed or denied. This course will analyze the subtle and often not so subtle ways in which American movies deal with social conflicts and predicaments.
Essential readings will be available for download on Stud-IP. You may also consult the 'Semesterapparat' (SuUB) for further readings.
Requirements:
• regular attendance and participation in Stud.IP forum discussions
• in-depth knowledge of the reading material
• group presentation and handout
Prior enrollment via Stud.IP is mandatory.
Please note: The course will take place in the form of asynchronic, weekly study assignments and Stud.IP forum discussions. Occasionally, synchronic meetings will be held in an online conference meeting room

Dr. Karin Esders-Angermund
10-76-1-D1/WD1-09Key Topics in Cultural History: Gender - Culture - Feminism (in English)
C3

Lecture (Teaching)

Dates:
weekly (starts in week: 1) Wed. 16:15 - 17:45 (2 Credit hours)

In this course we will discuss a number of online lectures by influential feminist scholars. We will discuss corresponding texts and resources to prepare ourselves for the diverse subject matters of the presentations and to critically reflect on their respective ideas and arguments.
Essential readings will be available for download on Stud-IP.
Requirements:
  • regular attendance and participation in Stud.IP forum discussions
  • in-depth knowledge of the reading material
  • group presentation and handout
Please note that prior enrollment via Stud.IP is mandatory.

Dr. Karin Esders-Angermund
10-76-1-D1/WD1-10Key Topics in Cultural History: Intersectionality and Representation (in English)
C3

Seminar (Teaching)

Dates:
weekly (starts in week: 1) Thu. 12:15 - 13:45 (2 Credit hours)

In this online seminar, we will take a look at how marginalization and discrimination along such lines as gender, sex, sexuality, race, class, ableism etc. are interrelated and can lead to compounded, multiple oppressions. For our intersectional explorations, we will use examples from (science-fictionally inflected) pop culture, e.g. Janelle Monáe's concept-album-turned-movie Dirty Computer or the episode "Good Hunting" from Netflix's animated anthology series Love, Death + Robots, with the aim to approach them from various theoretical angles, e.g. feminism, queer studies, critical race studies, or postcolonialism.
Discrimination is so pervasive in our culture, being part of the fabric of our reality, that often, in our everyday lives, we aren't even aware of it because we've simply become too used to it – we've developed 'cultural blind spots', so to speak. Therefore, we will use examples from science fiction that pick up these very aspects of our reality and put it in a context that, in its futuristic, dystopian, fantastic setting, looks unfamiliar to us, makes us look at everything with fresh eyes, and thereby makes these dynamics of oppression all the more visible to us. (Self-)Representation of marginalized groups is key to raise awareness for the persistent and today ever more resurgent forms of oppression in our culture. More than that, it gives marginalized groups back their voices – voices that, in the past, all too often have been silenced by the oppressive system.
Since we will be following an intersectional approach, we will not only focus on the various factors of discrimination in isolation but consider them in combination as it is this very combination that leads to unique forms of marginalization and oppression. As a result of the interlocking systems of power, the ways in which black women, for example, experience discrimination are very different from those of white women or black men – a difference that results from the interplay of patriarchal and racial oppression that is more than just the sum of the two. In order to arrive at a better understanding of the dynamics of discrimination and privilege in our culture, it is essential to look both at the common causes of oppression as well as the differences in the experiences of individuals due to their particular identity constellations.
Because of the still unclear situation concerning the COVID-19 pandemic, this will be an online seminar with some synchronous sessions in an online conference meeting room (irregularly on Thursdays from 12:14 to 13:45) and some weeks during which students will work asynchronously. In the course of the semester, students will formulate their individual research interests for their final term papers and work towards it in the form of milestones, chat group discussions of secondary material, and possibly a short presentation of intermediate research results. Essential reading materials will be made available for download on Stud-IP.

Requirements:
• regular attendance and active participation during our Zoom-sessions
• in-depth knowledge of the selected reading and other course materials (optional screening sessions might be scheduled to give students access to video material);
• weekly written contributions in chat group discussions of assigned texts
• completion of milestones at specified points during the course of the semester
• final term paper (10-12 pages)

Julia Gatermann ((LB))
10-76-1-WD1-09Key Topics in Linguistics: English with an accent: Language ideology in the US and New Zealand (in English)
C3 Online Course

Seminar (Teaching)

Dates:
weekly (starts in week: 1) Tue. 10:15 - 11:45 (2 Credit hours)

This class will be taught online. It deals with the ways that linguistic diversity might be related to the linguistic discrimination. We will begin with the studies on 'linguistic profiling' based on experimental studies of housing discrimination, and expand upon those findings to promote equity in education, employment, medicine and the law. This class deals with these studies, devoted to the advancement of equality and justice globally. You will give an online group presentation in this class via Zoom.

Dr. Inke Du Bois
10-76-1-WD1-10Key Topics in Linguistics: Humor and Linguistics: Gender, Age and the Pandemic (in English)
C3 Asynchronous Online Course

Seminar (Teaching)

Dates:
weekly (starts in week: 1) Wed. 10:15 - 11:45 (2 Credit hours)

This class is a project oriented online class. We read recent texts about humor as a coping mechanism and Covid 19 communication. In the next step, we will use Maxqda Software to analyse and code multimodal data. You will give a zoom group presentation about a self selected research project regarding Covid 19 and humor using your Maxqda data analyses.
Abdel-Raheem, A. (2018). Multimodal humour: Integrating blending model, relevance theory, and incongruity theory. Multimodal Communication, 7(1).
Bülow, L., Marie-Luis Merten, & Johann, M. (2018). Internet-memes als zugang zu multimodalen konstruktionen. Zeitschrift Für Angewandte Linguistik, 2018(69), 1-32. doi:http://dx.doi.org/10.1515/zfal-2018-0015

Dean, R. A. K., & Gregory, D. M. (2005). More than trivial: strategies for using humor in palliative care. Cancer nursing, 28(4), 292-300.

Dynel, M. (2020). Language, creativity and humour online. Language in Society, 49(1), 149-152. doi:http://dx.doi.org/10.1017/S0047404519000836
Harvey, L., & Palese, E. (2018). #NeverthelessMemesPersisted: Building critical memetic literacy in the classroom. Journal of Adolescent & Adult Literacy, 62(3), 259-270. doi:http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/jaal.898

Yang, S. (2017). An analysis of factors influencing transmission of internet memes of english-speaking origin in chinese online communities. Journal of Language Teaching and Research, 8(5), 969-977. doi:http://dx.doi.org/10.17507/jltr.0805.19

Dr. Inke Du Bois
10-76-3-WD1-07Key Topics in Linguistics: Uses and Abuses of Social and News Media: Linguistic Perspectives (in English)
C3

Seminar (Teaching)

Dates:
weekly (starts in week: 1) Tue. 14:15 - 15:45 (2 Credit hours)

This course will run entirely online. In the course we cast a critical eye over the ways in which contemporary media can come to derail democratic processes. This will stretch across all media which currently make use of digital forms of distribution, spanning social media, channels of various kinds, regular newspapers, news videos, and so on. The methods to be learnt and practised in concrete analyses are linguistic and multimodal. That is: we will pay particular attention to how various forms of expression, images, written text, video, sound, and so on may be combined for persuasive effect. The course will draw on current discussions from the Research Group on Multimodal Rhetoric in Online Media running at the Bielefeld Centre for Interdisciplinary Research: https://www.uni-bielefeld.de/(en)/ZIF/FG/2020Multimodal/.

Prof. John Arnold Bateman, Ph.D.
10-76-3-WD1-08Analysing (visual) Persuasion in Advertisements (in English)
C

Seminar (Teaching)

Dates:
weekly (starts in week: 1) Thu. 10:15 - 11:45 (2 Credit hours)
Tamara Drummond

FD 1 - Basismodul Fachdidaktik 10-76-3-204 (nur für das Wintersemester)

Pflichtmodul: Gy, BIPEB
ECTS: 6

Modulbeauftragte/r: Tim Giesler, giesler@uni-bremen.de
Course numberTitle of eventLecturer
10-76-1-FD1-01Introduction to English Language Education (BiPEB/Gy) (in English)
C3

Seminar (Teaching)
ECTS: 3

Dates:
weekly (starts in week: 1) Tue. 14:15 - 15:45 (2 Credit hours)

This introductory course will provide an insight into important aspects and theoretical foundations of English Language Teaching (ELT) which is an indispensable part of every teacher's knowledge base. Participants will get an overview of theoretical as well as practical issues. Starting from a look at the history of ELT we will then move on to Foreign Language Politics in Germany and Europe before we begin to discuss more practical concerns, for example:
  • In how far do the different varieties of English in the world take an effect on ELT?
  • How can teachers foster the development of the students' language skills?

Apart from that, we will be looking at special forms of ELT, for example English in Primary Schools and Content and Language Integrated Learning (CLIL), and also the role of course books and literature in the classroom will be investigated. It is most important that participants actively engage with these topics, as it is crucial for teacher trainees to form an opinion about their future way of teaching.

Dr. Tim Giesler
10-76-1-FD1-02Introduction to English Language Education (Gy/BiPEB) (in English)
Category C3 (online only)

Seminar (Teaching)
ECTS: 3

Dates:
weekly (starts in week: 1) Tue. 10:15 - 11:45 Online (2 Credit hours)

This introductory course will provide an insight into important aspects and theoretical foundations of English Language Teaching (ELT) which is an indispensable part of every teacher's knowledge base. Participants will get an overview of theoretical as well as practical issues. Starting from a look at the history of ELT we will then move on to Foreign Language Politics in Germany and Europe before we begin to discuss more practical concerns, for example:
  • In how far do the different varieties of English in the world take an effect on ELT?
  • How can teachers foster the development of the students' language skills?

Apart from that, we will be looking at special forms of ELT, for example English in Primary Schools and Content and Language Integrated Learning (CLIL), and also the role of course books and literature in the classroom will be investigated. It is most important that participants actively engage with these topics, as it is crucial for teacher trainees to form an opinion about their future way of teaching.

Heather Haase
10-76-1-FD1-03Introduction to English Language Education (Gy/BiPEB) (in English)
C3

Seminar (Teaching)
ECTS: 3

Dates:
weekly (starts in week: 1) Thu. 10:15 - 11:45 (2 Credit hours)

This introductory course will provide an insight into important aspects and theoretical foundations of English Language Teaching (ELT) which is an indispensable part of every teacher's knowledge base. Participants will get an overview of theoretical as well as practical issues. Starting from a look at the history of ELT we will then move on to Foreign Language Politics in Germany and Europe before we begin to discuss more practical concerns, for example:
  • In how far do the different varieties of English in the world take an effect on ELT?
  • How can teachers foster the development of the students' language skills?

Apart from that, we will be looking at special forms of ELT, for example English in Primary Schools and Content and Language Integrated Learning (CLIL), and also the role of course books and literature in the classroom will be investigated. It is most important that participants actively engage with these topics, as it is crucial for teacher trainees to form an opinion about their future way of teaching.

Irina Pavlovic
10-76-1-FD1-04Introduction to English Language Teaching Practice (BiPEB) (in English)
(B) Blockveranstaltung: Termine folgen!

Seminar (Teaching)
ECTS: 3

Begleitseminar in Verbindung mit den Praxisorientierten Elementen im Fach Englisch.

Bitte melden Sie sich über das Zentrum für Lehrerbildung (Startseite stud.IP: Schulpraktika) für die Praxisorientierten Elemente an. Sie werden dann nach der Schulzuweisung automatisch einem der Begleitseminare zugewiesen.

Ina Schünhof ((LB))
10-76-1-FD1-05Introduction to English Language Teaching Practice (Gy) (in English)
(B) Blockveranstaltung: Termine folgen!

Seminar (Teaching)
ECTS: 3

Begleitseminar in Verbindung mit den Praxisorientierten Elementen im Fach Englisch.

Bitte melden Sie sich über das Zentrum für Lehrerbildung (Startseite stud.IP: Schulpraktika) für die Praxisorientierten Elemente an. Sie werden dann nach der Schulzuweisung automatisch einem der Begleitseminare zugewiesen.

Dr. Tim Giesler
10-76-1-FD1-06Introduction to English Language Teaching Practice (Gy) (in English)

Seminar (Teaching)
ECTS: 3

Begleitseminar in Verbindung mit den Praxisorientierten Elementen im Fach Englisch.

Bitte melden Sie sich über das Zentrum für Lehrerbildung (Startseite stud.IP: Schulpraktika) für die Praxisorientierten Elemente an. Sie werden dann nach der Schulzuweisung automatisch einem der Begleitseminare zugewiesen.

Heather Haase
10-76-1-FD1-07Introduction to English Language Teaching Practice (Gy) (in English)
Blockseminar: Termine folgen!

Seminar (Teaching)
ECTS: 3

Begleitseminar in Verbindung mit den Praxisorientierten Elementen im Fach Englisch.

Bitte melden Sie sich über das Zentrum für Lehrerbildung (Startseite stud.IP: Schulpraktika) für die Praxisorientierten Elemente an. Sie werden dann nach der Schulzuweisung automatisch einem der Begleitseminare zugewiesen.

N. N.
10-76-1-FD1-08Introduction to English Language Teaching Practice (Gy) (in English)

Seminar (Teaching)
ECTS: 3

Begleitseminar in Verbindung mit den Praxisorientierten Elementen im Fach Englisch.

Bitte melden Sie sich über das Zentrum für Lehrerbildung (Startseite stud.IP: Schulpraktika) für die Praxisorientierten Elemente an. Sie werden dann nach der Schulzuweisung automatisch einem der Begleitseminare zugewiesen.

Angela Hamilton ((LB))
10-76-1-FD1-09Introduction to English Language Teaching Practice (Gy) (in English)
Blockseminar: Termine folgen!

Seminar (Teaching)
ECTS: 3

Begleitseminar in Verbindung mit den Praxisorientierten Elementen im Fach Englisch.

Bitte melden Sie sich über das Zentrum für Lehrerbildung (Startseite stud.IP: Schulpraktika) für die Praxisorientierten Elemente an. Sie werden dann nach der Schulzuweisung automatisch einem der Begleitseminare zugewiesen.

Tobias Peter Carus
10-76-1-FD1-10Introduction to English Language Teaching Practice (Gy) (in English)
Blockseminar: Termine folgen!

Seminar (Teaching)
ECTS: 3

Begleitseminar in Verbindung mit den Praxisorientierten Elementen im Fach Englisch.

Bitte melden Sie sich über das Zentrum für Lehrerbildung (Startseite stud.IP: Schulpraktika) für die Praxisorientierten Elemente an. Sie werden dann nach der Schulzuweisung automatisch einem der Begleitseminare zugewiesen.

Matthias Myrczek ((LB))

Zusatzqualifikation Bilinguales Lehren und Lernen

Interessenten an der Zusatzqualifikation belegen im Wintersemester die unten stehende Einführungsveranstaltung.
Nähere Informationen erhalten Sie unter giesler@uni-bremen.de
Course numberTitle of eventLecturer
10-76-1-FD1-11Grundbegriffe der Didaktik des bilingualen Sachfachunterrichts (in English)
C3

Seminar (Teaching)
ECTS: 3

Dates:
weekly (starts in week: 1) Fri. 10:15 - 11:45 (2 Credit hours)

Einführungsveranstaltung für die Zusatzqualifikation "Bilinguales Lernen und Lehren". Mehr Infos dazu finden Sie hier: http://www.fb10.uni-bremen.de/anglistik/fd/studieninfos.aspx

Das Angebot richtet sich an Lehramtsstudierende des Studiengangs English-Speaking Cultures, die ein Sachfach als Zeitfach studieren.

Bei ausreichend freien Plätzen können auch weitere interessierte Studierende aufgenommen werden.

Bitte beachten Sie: Aufgrund der aktuellen Pandemielage wird das Seminar komplett online stattfinden. Näheres zum Ablauf erfahren Sie in dem (verpflichtenden) ZOOM-Meeting in der ersten Semesterwoche.

Dr. Tim Giesler

LEHRVERANSTALTUNGEN DES 3. JAHRES:

P Abschlussmodul Profilfach (15 CP) "Sprachwissenschaft" oder "Literaturwissenschaft" oder "Kulturgeschichte"

Modulbeauftragte/r: Prof. Dr. John Bateman, bateman@uni-bremen.de

Laut PO des BA ESC von 2011 (§6;1 werden die 3 CP des Begleitseminars (im Profilfach obligatorisch) im Bereich General Studies angerechnet; die Studierenden, die bestanden haben, sind daher Irmgard Maassen (maassen@uni-bremen.de), der Modulbeauftragten für General Studies, zu melden.
Course numberTitle of eventLecturer
10-76-1-AP-01Colloquim Research and Writing (in English)
C3

Colloquium (Teaching)

Dates:
weekly (starts in week: 1) Thu. 14:15 - 15:45 (2 Credit hours)

Diese Veranstaltung richtet sich besonders an Studierende, die in diesem Semester Hausarbeiten oder Abschlussarbeiten schreiben wollen. Die Studierenden werden in die Grundlagen des wissenschaftlichen Arbeitens eingeführt. Sie werden selbständig für eigene größere und kleinere Arbeiten bibliographieren, Thesen und Fragestellungen entwickeln, strukturierte Gliederungen entwerfen etc. Gemeinsam werden wir die Projekte im Forum oder Stud.IPad diskutieren und voranbringen.

Dr. Karin Esders-Angermund
10-76-1-AP-02Begleitveranstaltung Sprachwissenschaft (in English)
Kategorie C2 Die digitale Lehre findet im Wesentlichen synchron statt

Seminar (Teaching)
ECTS: 3

Dates:
weekly (starts in week: 1) Wed. 14:15 - 15:45 (2 Credit hours)

We will use BigBlueButton for our meetings. The meetings will be every week; we start on 4 November 2020.
This colloquium is for all students who plan to write their BA thesis in Linguistics in the winter term. Together we will find a topic for you and go through all the steps towards your final thesis: search for literature in the library catalogue and linguistic databases, find or collect the data for the analysis, choose an appropriate methodology, and do the actual research. You will learn how to plan your time realistically (and stick to the plan), how to structure your BA thesis, and you will write your thesis in less than one semester.
Recommended literature:
Cottrell, Stella. 2008/2013. The Study Skills Handbook. Palgrave Macmillan. 3rd or 4th ed.
Frank, Andrea & Stefanie Haacke & Swantje Lahm. 2013. Schlüsselkompetenzen: Schreiben in Studium und Beruf. 2. Auflage. Stuttgart: Metzler.
Rothstein, Björn. 2011. Wissenschaftliches Arbeiten für Linguisten. Tübingen: Narr.

Dr. Anke Schulz

GENERAL STUDIES - siehe auch die Veranstaltungen von General Studies - Sprach- und Literaturwissenschaften

Modulbeauftragte/r: Irmgard Maassen, maassen@uni-bremen.de
Course numberTitle of eventLecturer
10-76-1-AP-01Colloquim Research and Writing (in English)
C3

Colloquium (Teaching)

Dates:
weekly (starts in week: 1) Thu. 14:15 - 15:45 (2 Credit hours)

Diese Veranstaltung richtet sich besonders an Studierende, die in diesem Semester Hausarbeiten oder Abschlussarbeiten schreiben wollen. Die Studierenden werden in die Grundlagen des wissenschaftlichen Arbeitens eingeführt. Sie werden selbständig für eigene größere und kleinere Arbeiten bibliographieren, Thesen und Fragestellungen entwickeln, strukturierte Gliederungen entwerfen etc. Gemeinsam werden wir die Projekte im Forum oder Stud.IPad diskutieren und voranbringen.

Dr. Karin Esders-Angermund
10-76-1-D1/WD1-06Key Topics in Cultural History: Key Concepts in American Cultural History (in English)
C3

Seminar (Teaching)

Dates:
weekly (starts in week: 1) Wed. 10:15 - 11:45

This class will be completely taught online and is open to students who participate in exchange programs. All reading and information material will be made available through the U Bremen teaching and learning platform Stud.IP; hence prior enrollment via Stud.IP is mandatory.

This course seeks to consider key concepts in American cultural studies as they manifest in American cultural history—and as they also impact the current cultural, social, and political moment. American cultural studies has developed a number of key concepts that can be traced within the history of the United States, from its beginning of a European settlement on Indigenous lands, its constitution as a nation-state, the number of inequalities engrained within this constitution, and the struggles of various social movements towards greater emancipation within the dominant system that are still ongoing today. Among those the course will chiefly consider are: white supremacy, settler colonialism and Indigeneity, enslavement and anti-blackness, gender and sexuality, emancipation and liberation. Along with historical sources and contemporary scholarship, we will consider in the course how some of these concepts animate the current moment in US history and how they are reflected in literature and other media.
Class requirements are regular attendance, in-depth knowledge of reading material, and active class discussion. Reading the assigned texts is mandatory.

Dr. René Dietrich ((LB))
10-76-1-D1/WD1-08Key Topics in Cultural History: Analyzing Hollywood Cinema (in English)
C3

Seminar (Teaching)

Dates:
weekly (starts in week: 1) Tue. 16:15 - 17:45 (2 Credit hours)

Cinema as a dominant cultural institution participates in an ongoing “struggle over meaning”. Frequently, however, social and cultural contradictions are not directly displayed in the movies but remain unexpressed or denied. This course will analyze the subtle and often not so subtle ways in which American movies deal with social conflicts and predicaments.
Essential readings will be available for download on Stud-IP. You may also consult the 'Semesterapparat' (SuUB) for further readings.
Requirements:
• regular attendance and participation in Stud.IP forum discussions
• in-depth knowledge of the reading material
• group presentation and handout
Prior enrollment via Stud.IP is mandatory.
Please note: The course will take place in the form of asynchronic, weekly study assignments and Stud.IP forum discussions. Occasionally, synchronic meetings will be held in an online conference meeting room

Dr. Karin Esders-Angermund
10-76-1-D1/WD1-09Key Topics in Cultural History: Gender - Culture - Feminism (in English)
C3

Lecture (Teaching)

Dates:
weekly (starts in week: 1) Wed. 16:15 - 17:45 (2 Credit hours)

In this course we will discuss a number of online lectures by influential feminist scholars. We will discuss corresponding texts and resources to prepare ourselves for the diverse subject matters of the presentations and to critically reflect on their respective ideas and arguments.
Essential readings will be available for download on Stud-IP.
Requirements:
  • regular attendance and participation in Stud.IP forum discussions
  • in-depth knowledge of the reading material
  • group presentation and handout
Please note that prior enrollment via Stud.IP is mandatory.

Dr. Karin Esders-Angermund
10-GS-1-02How to evaluate source-based text products – rater training in a research project (in English)

Seminar (Teaching)
ECTS: 9

Additional dates:
Thu. 12.11.20 12:00 - 16:00 Online
Thu. 19.11.20 12:00 - 16:00 Online
Thu. 03.12.20 12:00 - 16:00 online
Thu. 17.12.20 12:00 - 16:00 Online
Thu. 07.01.21 12:00 - 16:00 Online
Thu. 21.01.21 12:00 - 16:00 online
Prof. Dr. Claudia Harsch
Valeriia Koval
10-GS-9-01Vorbereitung und Durchführung einer wissenschaftlichen Abschlußarbeit (in English)

Exercises (Teaching)
ECTS: 2

Additional dates:
Wed. 03.03.21 - Thu. 04.03.21 (Wed., Thu.) 09:00 - 16:00 GW2 B3010 (Kleiner Studierraum)

In dieser Übung sollen die Studierenden mit den wichtigsten Techniken des wissenschaftlichen Arbeitens vertraut gemacht werden. Von der Themenfindung und dem Formulieren einer Forschungsfrage über die Literaturrecherche, -beschaffung und –auswertung bis hin zum Manuskript mit Schreibstil, Zitierregeln und Literaturverzeichnis werden alle relevanten Phasen beim Verfassen einer Abschlussarbeit beleuchtet.

Cornelia Stroh
10-M80-3-SuStMo-01Vocabulary & Pronunciation (Part1) /A

Exercises (Teaching)
ECTS: 3

Additional dates:
Sat. 05.12.20 10:00 - 15:00 MZH 1470
Sat. 12.12.20 10:00 - 15:00 MZH 1470
Sat. 09.01.21 10:00 - 15:00 MZH 1470
Sat. 23.01.21 10:00 - 15:00 MZH 1470

This course offered blended learning and will combine on-campus teaching (pronunciation and vocabulary discussions) with synchronous online meetings and asynchronous tutored self-study units (vocabulary and pronunciation practice).

This course is highly recommendable for first-semester students, students preparing for oral presentations, students who wish to expand their vocabulary, and any students who after the last rather difficult semester wish to catch up on aspects of pronunciation and vocabulary.

The course is designed to give you further insight into pronunication and vocabulary work. For pronunciation we will look at different aspects of pronunciation and intonation. This includes pronunciation of individual sounds and words, and intonation of chunks and whole sentences with special attention to connected speech. For vocabulary we will refresh our knowledge of typical 'confusables' ('economic' or 'economical'?), academic vocabulary, and useful phrases for specific language functions such as linking, adding, comparing, summarising, concluding. You will be introduced to all aspects of pronunciation and vocabulary, and will be asked to evaluate your own status quo. After the evaluation you will be given the opportunity to choose your own learning focus.

You will be asked to work with dictionaries (electronic/digital) and pronunciation and vocabulary material (print and digital). You will also provide me with recordings (mp3/mp4/ogg or another suitable format) of your pronunciation work.

Recommended material
Hollingsworth, Keith and Laura Park
The Englang Pronunciation Course (BE) (available from my office)

Katja Müller, M.A.
10-M83-1-PRAII-S-1Analysing Film (in English)
C / C2

Exercises (Teaching)
ECTS: 3

Dates:
weekly (starts in week: 1) Thu. 14:15 - 15:45 Online (2 Credit hours)

This course only takes place online; it is in synch with the scheduled times.

This course is all about films, and thus, it is for film lovers. But we will not just "sit around and watch films" (Sorry!). "Analysing Films" is rather about film language. Not only will we look at the language of films (sound, cinematography, editing etc.), but we will also look at the language used to talk/write about films.

The goal of this course is to learn to talk and write about films in a knowledgable, professional and academic way. In order to do so, we discuss selected films as a basis to write film-related texts (review, analysis etc.). And maybe we might have to sit around and watch a film or two...

Dr. Vanessa Herrmann