Course Catalog

Study Program SoSe 2023

English-Speaking Cultures / Englisch, B.A.

LEHRVERANSTALTUNGEN DES 1. JAHRES (PO 2011)

Basismodul A: Englische Literaturwissenschaft (6 CP)

6 CP (3 CP + 3 CP)

Modulbeauftragte/r: Dr. Jana Nittel, jnittel@uni-bremen.de
Course numberTitle of eventLecturer
10-76-2-Basismodul A-01Introduction to English Literatures (Part II) (3 CP) (in English)

Seminar (Teaching)
ECTS: 3

Dates:
weekly (starts in week: 1) Mon. 14:15 - 15:45 MZH 1380/1400 (2 Teaching hours per week)

Teaching method: We will meet in weekly face to face sessions on campus. You will need access to Stud.IP. and a laptop or tablet with sound and audio capabilities.

This introductory course will attempt to offer students access to literary studies in English at university level and try to balance scholarly considerations with aesthetic enjoyment. As this is a continuation of the foundation module course “Introduction to English Literatures, Part I”, students will review the methodology of poetry, drama and narrative analysis. Having gathered historical and textual skills in dealing with various genres, this course will explore a considerable range of theoretical key concepts in literary and cultural studies.

Please register on Stud. IP and explore the sections “Information” and “Schedule” on Stud. IP. for further detail. Strongly recommended, but not mandatory: Please sign up on Stud. IP. for our weekly tutorial sessions offered by a tutor “10-76-2-Basismodul A-02 - Übung Introduction to English Literatures (Part II) (Online Angebot) )” Friday 10:15 a. m. – 11:45 a. m. - https://elearning.uni-bremen.de/dispatch.php/course/details?sem_id=86bfaa014aab3995489cdaf524094f89&again=yes

Requirements:
• Interest in the topics discussed and ideally a regular attendance and informed participation in class discussion (not part of your formal assessment);
• in-depth knowledge of the selected reading material and course materials,
• final written test at Test Center (University Boulevard)

Dr. Jana Nittel
10-76-2-Basismodul A-02Übung/Tutorial: Introduction to English Literatures (Part II) (Online Angebot) (in English)

Exercises (Teaching)
ECTS: 3

Dates:
weekly (starts in week: 1) Fri. 10:15 - 11:45 (2 Teaching hours per week)

These tutorial sessions correspond to the weekly study units of the course "Foundation Module A: Introduction to English Literature (Part II) and it will provide participants with the opportunity to ask questions regarding the weekly theoretical explorations and cultural movements, complete excercises and quizz sessions as exam preparation.
Students may gain credit points for General Studies.

Dr. Jana Nittel

Basismodul B: Englische Sprachwissenschaft (6 CP)

6 CP (3 CP + 3 CP)

Modulbeauftragte/r: Prof. Dr. Arne Peters, arne.peters@uni-bremen.de
Course numberTitle of eventLecturer
10-76-4-B-01Introduction to English Linguistics 2 - Research Methods (in English)

Seminar (Teaching)

Dates:
weekly (starts in week: 1) Tue. 10:15 - 11:45 GW2 B1820 (2 Teaching hours per week)

This course continues the general introduction to English linguistics from last semester, focusing on how to do empirical research in linguistics. You will be introduced to research methodology and design, different types of data collection and preparation, and various data analysis approaches. The coursework will focus on real-life linguistic data and exercises which are designed to help you apply selected methods and tools and critically discuss their usefulness.

By the end of the semester, you will be able to
● formulate research questions and hypotheses,
● identify quality criteria for linguistics research,
● describe ethical issues related to linguistics research,
● apply various research methods in applied linguistics,
● evaluate various research methods in applied linguistics,
● develop a research proposal.

Basic introductory textbooks:
Sealey, A. (2010). Researching English Language. A resource book for students. Routledge.
Voelkel, S., & Kretzschmar, F. (Eds.) (2021). Introducing Linguistic Research. Cambridge University Press. E-book available at https://doi.org/10.1017/9781316884485
Wray, A., & Bloomer, A. (2012). Projects in Linguistics and Language Studies (3rd ed.). Hodder Education. E-book at http://lib.myilibrary.com/Open.aspx?id=368803

Dr. Ramona Kreis
10-76-4-B-02Introduction to English Linguistics 2 - Research Methods (in English)

Seminar (Teaching)

Dates:
weekly (starts in week: 1) Wed. 14:15 - 15:45 MZH 1460 (2 Teaching hours per week)

This course continues the Introduction to English Linguistics 1 from last semester, focusing on how to do empirical work in linguistics. We will look at the basic requirements to do empirical studies, and different ways to collect linguistic data. We will investigate existing sources like corpora and dictionaries, and learn how to analyze and interpret language data.

In the course of the semester, there will be reading assignments and databased tasks in the form of worksheets that address a certain empirical problem. You tackle these by making use of one of the research methods that we have worked with in class. You need to choose two out of three reading assignments and three worksheets ⇐ five pieces) to work on and complete throughout the semester.
I teach one class on campus (Wednesday at 2pm) and one class online (Thursday at 2pm). The online class is an asynchronous class. There will be no live video sessions at any time. I provide you with all the material and you can work on it at a time that is convenient for you. From week 4 on, you will be allowed to switch between the online class and the on campus class if you want. Please register for only ONE class, the one you prefer to take.
Literature
Wray, Alison & Aileen Bloomer. 2012. Projects in Linguistics and Language Studies: A Practical Guide to Researching Language. 3rd ed. Hodder Education. Available as e-book from the library.

Dr. Anke Schulz
10-76-4-B-03Introduction to English Linguistics 2 - Research Methods (in English)

Seminar (Teaching)

Dates:
weekly (starts in week: 1) Thu. 14:15 - 15:45 (2 Teaching hours per week)

This course continues the Introduction to English Linguistics 1 from last semester, focusing on how to do empirical work in linguistics. We will look at the basic requirements to do empirical studies, and different ways to collect linguistic data. We will investigate existing sources like corpora and dictionaries, and learn how to analyze and interpret language data.

In the course of the semester, there will be reading assignments and databased tasks in the form of worksheets that address a certain empirical problem. You tackle these by making use of one of the research methods that we have worked with in class. You need to choose two out of three reading assignments and three worksheets ⇐ five pieces) to work on and complete throughout the semester.
I teach one class on campus (Wednesday at 2pm) and one class online (Thursday at 2pm). The online class is an asynchronous class. There will be no live video sessions at any time. I provide you with all the material and you can work on it at a time that is convenient for you. From week 4 on, you will be allowed to switch between the online class and the on campus class if you want. Please register for only ONE class, the one you prefer to take.
Literature
Wray, Alison & Aileen Bloomer. 2012. Projects in Linguistics and Language Studies: A Practical Guide to Researching Language. 3rd ed. Hodder Education. Available as e-book from the library.

Dr. Anke Schulz

Basismodul C: Kultur- und Sprachgeschichte der englischsprachigen Welt (6 CP)

6 CP (3 CP + 3 CP)

Modulbeauftragte/r: Dr. Karin Esders, esders@uni-bremen.de und Dr. Inke Du Bois, dubois@uni-bremen.de
Course numberTitle of eventLecturer
10-76-6-C-01Key Moments in the Linguistic History of the English-Speaking World (in English)

Seminar (Teaching)

Dates:
weekly (starts in week: 1) Wed. 10:15 - 11:45 GW2 B2890 (2 Teaching hours per week)
Dr. Inke Du Bois
10-76-6-C-02Key Moments in the Linguistic History of the English-Speaking World (in English)

Seminar (Teaching)

Dates:
weekly (starts in week: 1) Thu. 14:15 - 15:45 GW2 B2890 (2 Teaching hours per week)

In this course we will look at some key historical events that have impacted the historical development, standardisation, global expansion and diversification of the English language around the world. The course aims to help you to understand and explain how the linguistic development of the English language is related to events in the political and social history of the British Isles and beyond, and, as a future teacher, how apparent irregularities in Present-Day English which are, in many cases, remnants of earlier, regular patterns, can be explained historically. We will also examine the reasons for the the global expansion and diversification of English in various cultural contexts that has given rise to an enormous linguistic variation across English-speaking cultures around the world.

For an entertaining and insightful quick introduction see the series of short videos "The History of English in Ten Minutes" produced by the Open University: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLA03075BAD88B909E

Prof. Dr. Marcus Callies
10-76-6-C-03Key Moments in the Linguistic History of the English-Speaking World (in English)

Seminar (Teaching)

Dates:
weekly (starts in week: 1) Tue. 10:15 - 11:45 MZH 1460 (2 Teaching hours per week)
Dr. Inke Du Bois

SP-1 Basismodul: Sprachpraxis/Practical Language Foundation Module (Part 2) (6 CP) (nur für das Sommersemester)

6 CP (3 CP + 3 CP)

Modulbeauftragte/r: Lisa Nels, Kontakt: lnehls@uni-bremen.de

Core ULS2 language classes for BA „E-SC“ - 1st year, Semester 2 („Basismodul Sprachpraxis“ SP-1 BAPO 2011, Part 2)
N.B. This class has TWO parts; you MUST attend BOTH the a AND the b part of the SAME class (i.e. 2-1a + 2-1b OR 2-2a + 2-2b OR 2-3a + 2-3b etc.)
Course numberTitle of eventLecturer
10-76-2-SP1-01University Language Skills 2-1 (in English)

Exercises (Teaching)

Dates:
weekly (starts in week: 1) Tue. 12:15 - 15:45 GW2 A3390 (CIP-Labor FB 10) (4 Teaching hours per week)

University Language Skills 2 (ULS 2) is a four-hour class. You have to attend the entire class. ULS 2 is the second half of the SP-1 module. As such it builds on the basic knowledge of academic writing established in ULS 1.

While the focus during the winter semester is on the basic structure of an academic essay, during the summer semester you will be introduced to key rhetorical strategies. These strategies include essays of argumentation, cause & effect as well as comparison & contrast. Furthermore, grammatical structures needed for writing (e.g. syntax, passive voice, conditionals) will be part of the course’s syllabus.

Requirements:
• Regular and active participation
• Thorough preparation of each session
• Written assignments (approx. 2000 words)

Materials are provided via StudIP

Dr. Vanessa Herrmann
10-76-2-SP1-02University Language Skills 2-2 (in English)

Exercises (Teaching)

Dates:
weekly (starts in week: 1) Wed. 12:15 - 15:45 GW2 A3390 (CIP-Labor FB 10) (4 Teaching hours per week)

University Language Skills 2 (ULS 2) is a four-hour class. You have to attend the entire class. ULS 2 is the second half of the SP-1 module. As such it builds on the basic knowledge of academic writing established in ULS 1.

While the focus during the winter semester is on the basic structure of an academic essay, during the summer semester you will be introduced to key rhetorical strategies. These strategies include essays of argumentation, cause & effect as well as comparison & contrast. Furthermore, grammatical structures needed for writing (e.g. syntax, passive voice, conditionals) will be part of the course’s syllabus.

Requirements:
• Regular and active participation
• Thorough preparation of each session
• Written assignments (approx. 2000 words)

Materials are provided via StudIP

Dr. Vanessa Herrmann
10-76-2-SP1-03University Language Skills 2-3 (in English)

Exercises (Teaching)

Dates:
weekly (starts in week: 1) Thu. 08:15 - 11:45 GW2 B3010 (Kleiner Studierraum) GW1 B2070 (4 Teaching hours per week)

University Language Skills 2 (ULS 2) is a four-hour class. You have to attend the entire class. ULS 2 is the second half of the SP-1 module. As such it builds on the basic knowledge of academic writing established in ULS 1.

While the focus during the winter semester is on the basic structure of an academic essay, during the summer semester you will be introduced to key rhetorical strategies. These strategies include essays of argumentation, cause & effect as well as comparison & contrast. Furthermore, grammatical structures needed for writing (e.g. syntax, passive voice, conditionals) will be part of the course’s syllabus.

Requirements:
• Regular and active participation
• Thorough preparation of each session
• Written assignments (approx. 2000 words)

Materials are provided via StudIP

Dr. Vanessa Herrmann
10-76-2-SP1-04University Language Skills 2-4

Exercises (Teaching)
ECTS: 6

Dates:
weekly (starts in week: 1) Wed. 14:15 - 15:45 GW2 B1820 (4 Teaching hours per week)
weekly (starts in week: 1) Wed. 16:15 - 17:45 SFG 0150

University Language Skills 2 is the second part of the SP1 module and will earn you a total of 6CPs. It is a four-hour class with two consecutive time slots, both of which MUST be attended.
The following seminar will build on skills acquired in ULS1. We will review and further develop writing skills regarding the different phases in writing, essay structure and good writing style. In addition, we will explore and develop more complex writing strategies including problem/solution, argumentation, cause/effect, and comparison/contrast.
Emphasis will be placed on the ability to recognize individual errors and work on challenging aspects of language. You will therefore continue to work on grammar and lexis at an individual, needs-based level and will be able to access self-study material to work on independently according to your own requirements outside of the classroom. This is essential in developing an autonomous learning style which will subsequently enable you to critically assess and correct your own work.
Students will be required to hand in TWO assignments based on TWO different writing strategies dealt with during the semester. These assignments will be graded and constitute the grade for the SP1 module. In addition, you will be expected to attend class regularly and actively participate in group discussions and activities. Task assigned to be completed between sessions must also be completed on time.
This class is planned to take place on campus.

Lisa Nehls, M.A.
10-76-2-SP1-05University Language Skills 2-5

Exercises (Teaching)
ECTS: 6

Dates:
weekly (starts in week: 1) Fri. 10:15 - 13:45 SFG 2070 (4 Teaching hours per week)

University Language Skills 2 is the second part of the SP1 module and will earn you a total of 6CPs. It is a four-hour class with two consecutive time slots, both of which MUST be attended.
The following seminar will build on skills acquired in ULS1. We will review and further develop writing skills regarding the different phases in writing, essay structure and good writing style. In addition, we will explore and develop more complex writing strategies including problem/solution, argumentation, cause/effect, and comparison/contrast.
Emphasis will be placed on the ability to recognize individual errors and work on challenging aspects of language. You will therefore continue to work on grammar and lexis at an individual, needs-based level and will be able to access self-study material to work on independently according to your own requirements outside of the classroom. This is essential in developing an autonomous learning style which will subsequently enable you to critically assess and correct your own work.
Students will be required to hand in TWO assignments based on TWO different writing strategies dealt with during the semester. These assignments will be graded and constitute the grade for the SP1 module. In addition, you will be expected to attend class regularly and actively participate in group discussions and activities. Task assigned to be completed between sessions must also be completed on time.
This class is planned to take place on campus.

Lisa Nehls, M.A.
10-76-2-SP1-06University Language Skills 2-6

Exercises (Teaching)
ECTS: 3

Dates:
weekly (starts in week: 1) Mon. 10:15 - 13:45 GW1 B2070 (4 Teaching hours per week)

University Language Skills 2 (ULS 2) is a four-hour class. You have to attend the entire class. ULS 2 is the second half of the SP-1 module. As such it builds on the basic knowledge of academic writing established in ULS 1.

While the focus during the winter semester is on the basic structure of an academic essay, during the summer semester you will be introduced to key rhetorical strategies. These strategies include essays of argumentation, cause & effect as well as comparison & contrast. Furthermore, grammatical structures needed for writing will be part of the course’s syllabus.

Requirements:
• Regular and active participation
• Thorough preparation of each session
• Written assignments (approx. 2000 words)

Ana Carolina Fernandes Pires Rovai (LB)
10-76-2-SP1-07University Language Skills 2-7

Exercises (Teaching)
ECTS: 6

Dates:
weekly (starts in week: 1) Tue. 10:15 - 13:45 GW2 A4020 (4 Teaching hours per week)

PLEASE REGISTER FOR ONLY ONE ULS 2 COURSE!

Course description
University Language Skills 2 ⇐ ULS 2) forms the second part of the 'SP-1 Basismodul Sprachpraxis'
It is a FOUR-hour class (4 SWS; 6 CP for ULS 2 - 8ab) with TWO consecutive time slots each week. This ULS 2 class is taught as a four-hour block, while others might be offered with two separate two-hour time slots.

Coursework
Having practiced the planning and structuring of academic essays in “ULS 1” last semester, you will now be moving on to explore different key writing strategies. Starting with the yet familiar descriptive writing, you will then familiarise yourself with other strategies, for example problem/solution, cause & effect, comparison & contrast and argumentation. Analysing a wide variety of texts will improve your reading skills, while applying the key strategies as well as aspects of cohesion and coherence to your own texts will help you practice and develop your own academic style in writing.
Additionally, mini-group peer review will give you (and your readers) the opportunity to evaluate and improve your reading and listening skills in terms of audience-focus and reader-friendliness.

Course requirements
  • regular attendance and active participation in class
  • active participation in discussions
  • thorough preparation of each class session
  • completion of homework tasks and self-study work
  • a portfolio comprised of two written assignments based on two different writing strategies (all in all ca. 1500-2000 words). These assignments will be graded and constitute the grade for the SP1 module.

Required Literature
Meyers, Alan Longman. Academic Writing Series (level 5) - Essays to Research Papers. Pearson: 2014 (or the newer edition). Print and E-Reader edition available (print copy available in the library for reference). Discount code negotiable (see StudiP).
Additional hand-out material provided via StudIP.

Further recommended material for language work
McCarthy, Michael & Felicity O’Dell. Academic Vocabulary in Use
Cornell, Alan & Geoff Parkes. What’s the Difference? Englang Books (online quizzes available)
Langenscheidt/Longman Dictionary of Contemporary English OR the Cornelsen/Oxford University Press, Advanced Learner’s Dictionary, including the electronic version (CD or DVD as appropriate) or a comparable learner's dictionary.

To earn credit for the SP-1 MODULE (9 CP in total), you are required
  • to have completed University Language Skills 1 (portfolio comprising of written assignments of 800-1000 words; 3 CP)
  • to earn 60% or more on written assignments given in ULS 2 (1500-2000 words; 6 CP).

NB: To have the graded course requirements (Prüfungsleistung) for the SP-1 module recognised, you are required to register on PABO in the semester in which you intend to successfully complete the module (usually the summer semester).

Katja Müller, M.A.
10-76-2-SP1-08University Language Skills 2-8

Exercises (Teaching)
ECTS: 6

Dates:
weekly (starts in week: 1) Fri. 10:15 - 13:45 GW2 B1630 (4 Teaching hours per week)

PLEASE REGISTER FOR ONLY ONE ULS 2 COURSE!

Course description
University Language Skills 2 ⇐ ULS 2) forms the second part of the 'SP-1 Basismodul Sprachpraxis'
It is a FOUR-hour class (4 SWS; 6 CP for ULS 2 - 8ab) with TWO consecutive time slots each week. This ULS 2 class is taught as a four-hour block, while others might be offered with two separate two-hour time slots.

Coursework
Having practiced the planning and structuring of academic essays in “ULS 1” last semester, you will now be moving on to explore different key writing strategies. Starting with the yet familiar descriptive writing, you will then familiarise yourself with other strategies, for example problem/solution, cause & effect, comparison & contrast and argumentation. Analysing a wide variety of texts will improve your reading skills, while applying the key strategies as well as aspects of cohesion and coherence to your own texts will help you practice and develop your own academic style in writing.
Additionally, mini-group peer review will give you (and your readers) the opportunity to evaluate and improve your reading and listening skills in terms of audience-focus and reader-friendliness.

Course requirements
  • regular attendance and active participation in class
  • active participation in discussions
  • thorough preparation of each class session
  • completion of homework tasks and self-study work
  • a portfolio comprised of two written assignments based on two different writing strategies (all in all ca. 1500-2000 words). These assignments will be graded and constitute the grade for the SP1 module.

Required Literature
Meyers, Alan Longman. Academic Writing Series (level 5) - Essays to Research Papers. Pearson: 2014 (or the newer edition). Print and E-Reader edition available (print copy available in the library for reference). Discount code negotiable (see StudiP).
Additional hand-out material provided via StudIP.

Further recommended material for language work
McCarthy, Michael & Felicity O’Dell. Academic Vocabulary in Use
Cornell, Alan & Geoff Parkes. What’s the Difference? Englang Books (online quizzes available)
Langenscheidt/Longman Dictionary of Contemporary English OR the Cornelsen/Oxford University Press, Advanced Learner’s Dictionary, including the electronic version (CD or DVD as appropriate) or a comparable learner's dictionary.

To earn credit for the SP-1 MODULE (9 CP in total), you are required
  • to have completed University Language Skills 1 (portfolio comprising of written assignments of 800-1000 words; 3 CP)
  • to earn 60% or more on written assignments given in ULS 2 (1500-2000 words; 6 CP).

NB: To have the graded course requirements (Prüfungsleistung) for the SP-1 module recognised, you are required to register on PABO in the semester in which you intend to successfully complete the module (usually the summer semester).

Katja Müller, M.A.

LEHRVERANSTALTUNGEN DES 2. JAHRES (PO 2011)

D2-a Aufbaumodul: Kulturgeschichte (6 CP) (nur für das Sommersemester)

6 CP (3 CP + 3 CP)

1 PL = Term paper/Hausarbeit

Modulbeautragte/r: Dr. Anke Schulz, Kontakt: anke.schulz@uni-bremen.de
Course numberTitle of eventLecturer
10-76-4-D2-01Key Topics in Literature and Cultural History: Contemporary Crime Fiction (in English)

Seminar (Teaching)

Dates:
weekly (starts in week: 1) Tue. 12:15 - 13:45 SFG 2070 (2 Teaching hours per week)

This course welcomes students who wish to complete the following modules:
B.A. E-SC “Key Topics in Literature”- D2-c; WD-2a and WD-2b
B.A. E-SC “Key Topics in Cultural History” – D2-a
Academic Exchange students

Teaching method: We will meet in weekly face to face sessions on campus. You will need access to Stud.IP. and a laptop or tablet with sound and audio capabilities. Please make sure to attend our first session if you wish a placement in this class.

Crime Fiction is overwhelmingly popular and yet, much of the narrative literature that involves crime of some kind or another is often not regarded as ‘literature’ at all. This course is designed to familiarise students with the contemporary critical and theoretical arguments concerning popular fiction and genre studies, as well as to enable all participants of this course to relate to the genre’s wider social, historical and political contexts while discussing the individual narratives in terms of form, language and imagery.
Seeking to promote an analytical, creative and imaginative engagement with the complexities of literary and cultural discourses, we will focus on excerpts of both detective- or transgressor-centred narratives from the second half of the 20th Century onwards. These narratives include examples of the police novel (e.g. Ian Rankin); of female detectives and the feminist appropriations of the hard-boiled story (e.g. Sara Paretsky); of the psychothriller (e.g. Patricia Highsmith), of Afro-American crime fiction, here the examination of literary representations and other cultural manifestations of the Black Diaspora, discussing the relevance of this form of genre fiction to the Black experience of North American Life (e.g. Walter Mosley), of Indigenous crime fiction (e.g. Thomas King), of the postmodern mystery (e.g. Paul Auster), and of representations of disability in crime fiction (e.g. Jeffrey Deaver’s Lincoln Rhyme series).

Please register on Stud. IP and explore the sections “Information” and “Schedule” on Stud. IP. for further details.

Requirements:
• Interest in the topics discussed and ideally a regular attendance and informed participation in class discussion (not part of your formal assessment);
• in-depth knowledge of the selected reading material and course materials,
• final exam according to module choice.

Reading materials (we will read excerpts of these novels but you are welcome to read these novels in full especially when planning a research project):

Auster, Paul. The New York Trilogy, Faber and Faber, 1987.
Deaver, Jeffrey. The Bone Collector, Hodder and Stoughton, 1997.
Highsmith, Patricia. Strangers on a Train, Vintage, 1999, 1950.
King, Thomas. The Red Power Murders: A DreadfulWater Mystery, Harper Perennial, 2006.
Mosley, Walter. Devil in a Blue Dress, Serpent's Tail, 2001, 1991.
Paretsky, Sara. Blacklist: A V.I. Warshawski Novel, Signet Book, 2004.
Rankin, Ian. Knots & Crosses: Inspector Rebus Novel, Orion, 2005, 1998.

Copies of some but not all novels are available for purchase at the bookstore on our campus (Universitätsbuchhandlung Bremen: www.unibuch-bremen.de)

Dr. Jana Nittel
10-76-4-D2-02Key Topics in Cultural History: U.S. American Culture of Science (in English)

Seminar (Teaching)

Dates:
weekly (starts in week: 1) Fri. 16:15 - 17:45 GW2 A4020

In recent decades, science has become an increasingly competitive and capitalistic enterprise. Depictions of the scientist in literature, film and TV these days frequently portray the new pressures that researchers in science, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM) find themselves under.
This course aims to explore the beginnings of this trend by examining the U.S. American culture of science of the 1980s on basis of two novels:

▪ Carbon Dreams by Susan M. Gaines (2001), which follows an early career female scientist on her quest for funding and professional success, and
▪ Intuition by Allegra Goodman (2006), which revolves around a number of scientist characters working at the impoverished Philpott Institute.

Both works are excellent grounds for discussing prominent themes, including the shifting funding scene, federal funding institutes, and science’s relation to society. Related to U.S. American culture, entrepreneurship and capitalism will be critically reviewed.

Students will be familiarized with relevant cultural theories and the interconnections that often arise between science and society. Adopting an intersectional perspective, this course also discusses inequalities in science. Thereby, students’ comprehension of connections and diversities inherent in the English-speaking world will be fostered.

Students are expected to purchase both novels. Class requirements further include:
▪ Active participation
▪ In-depth knowledge of all primary and secondary reading materials
▪ A presentation and/or term paper (depending on the chosen module)

Cora Övermann (LB)
10-76-4-D2-03Key Topics in Cultural History: Arab-American Narratives of Sea Migration (in English)
This course is filled to its capcaity

Seminar (Teaching)

Dates:
weekly (starts in week: 1) Wed. 12:00 - 14:00 GW2 B3850 GW2 B1170

Narratives of Sea Migration will deal with the cultural history of Britain and Ireland from the 18th to the 21st century from an oceanic rather than terrestrial perspective. It thus falls at the meeting point between postcolonial cultural studies and the new field of the blue humanities (we will spend two classes on this emerging field).

Migration is the lens that we will use to learn about the cultural history of the countries. An example is the Great Famine, which lasted in Ireland from 1845 until 1852 and resulted in the death of one million people and the forced migration of more than one million others to the US via the ocean. The year 1847 became known in history as Black '47 and hence, the title of the film Black’s '47 (2018).

Another example is the fleet of British ships that brought convicts to New South Wales, the penal colony which would become the first British settlement in Australia. The ship becomes an interesting social and cultural space of stories of survival, death and relationships. A documentary film about this issue will be discussed.

The course will also deal with Post-Brexit Britain and Britishness when we explore the sea migration of Africans and Arabs to Britain as well as tales of refugees about their sea journeys and arrival. We will discuss this theme as it is framed in art and refugee tales. We will also analyze Tayeb Saleh’s postcolonial Arabic novel, Season of Migration to the North (1969) which ‘writes back’ to British Orientalism, history and the canon. Please get your copy of this novel before coming to class.

Dr. Mohammed Abdullah Hussein Muharram (LB)
10-76-4-D2/WD2-04Key Topics Cultural History: Critical Race Studies (in English)

Seminar (Teaching)

Dates:
weekly (starts in week: 1) Wed. 14:15 - 15:45 GW2 B3010 (Kleiner Studierraum) GW1-HS H1000 (2 Teaching hours per week)
Dr. Karin Esders-Angermund
10-76-4-D2/WD2-05Key Topics Cultural History: Sugar, Culture, and History (in English)

Seminar (Teaching)

Dates:
weekly (starts in week: 1) Thu. 12:15 - 13:45 GW2 B2890 (2 Teaching hours per week)
Dr. Karin Esders-Angermund
10-76-4-D2/WD2-08Key Topics Cultural History: Women, Art and Society (in English)

Seminar (Teaching)

Dates:
weekly (starts in week: 1) Tue. 10:15 - 11:45 GW2 B2890 (2 Teaching hours per week)
Dr. Karin Esders-Angermund

D2-b Aufbaumodul: Sprachwissenschaft (6 CP) (nur für das Sommersemester)

6 CP (3 CP + 3 CP)

1 PL = Term paper/Hausarbeit

Modulbeautragte/r: Dr. Anke Schulz, Kontakt: anke.schulz@uni-bremen.de
Course numberTitle of eventLecturer
10-76-6-D2b-01Key Topics in Linguistics: Cultural differences in digital humor: Covid-19 memes (in English)

Seminar (Teaching)

Dates:
weekly (starts in week: 1) Wed. 14:15 - 15:45 SFG 1020 (2 Teaching hours per week)

his class is a project oriented class. We read recent texts about humor as a coping mechanism and Covid 19 communication. In the next step, we will use Maxqda Software to analyse and code multimodal data. You will give a zoom group presentation about a self selected research project regarding Covid 19 and humor using your Maxqda data analyses.
Abdel-Raheem, A. (2018). Multimodal humour: Integrating blending model, relevance theory, and incongruity theory. Multimodal Communication, 7(1).
Bülow, L., Marie-Luis Merten, & Johann, M. (2018). Internet-memes als zugang zu multimodalen konstruktionen. Zeitschrift Für Angewandte Linguistik, 2018(69), 1-32. doi:http://dx.doi.org/10.1515/zfal-2018-0015

Dean, R. A. K., & Gregory, D. M. (2005). More than trivial: strategies for using humor in palliative care. Cancer nursing, 28(4), 292-300.

Dynel, M. (2020). Language, creativity and humour online. Language in Society, 49(1), 149-152. doi:http://dx.doi.org/10.1017/S0047404519000836
Harvey, L., & Palese, E. (2018). #NeverthelessMemesPersisted: Building critical memetic literacy in the classroom. Journal of Adolescent & Adult Literacy, 62(3), 259-270. doi:http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/jaal.898

Yang, S. (2017). An analysis of factors influencing transmission of internet memes of english-speaking origin in chinese online communities. Journal of Language Teaching and Research, 8(5), 969-977. doi:http://dx.doi.org/10.17507/jltr.0805.19

Dr. Inke Du Bois
10-76-6-D2b-02Key Topics in Linguistics: Language, culture and gender (in English)

Seminar (Teaching)

Dates:
weekly (starts in week: 1) Thu. 10:15 - 11:45 GW2 A4020 (2 Teaching hours per week)
Dr. Inke Du Bois
10-76-6-D2b-03Key Topics in Linguistics: The lesser‐known varieties of English (in English)

Seminar (Teaching)

Dates:
weekly (starts in week: 1) Thu. 08:00 - 10:00 GW1 A1260

Although "English is probably the best researched language in the world’ (Schreier et al. 2010, pp. 1-2), the different varieties of English spoken across the globe have not received equal attention. This seminar focuses on the lesser-known varieties of English. We will not only look at the socio-historical contexts in which these varieties emerged but also study their morphosyntactic and lexical features. Special attention will be paid to the lesser-known African and Caribbean varieties, in particular, Belizean English (BZE), a variety of English spoken in the small Central American country on the Caribbean Coast.

Students will carry out empirical research projects examining selected ‎aspects of a lesser-known variety of English.‎ The results will also be presented at the 4th Bremen Student Conference in English Linguistics at the end of the semester.

Required reading:
Schreier et al. (2010). The Lesser-Known Varieties of English: An Introduction. Cambridge: CUP.

Nicole Hober, M.A.
10-76-6-D2b-06Key Topics in Linguistics: Introduction to Multilingualism (in English)

Seminar (Teaching)

Dates:
weekly (starts in week: 1) Tue. 16:15 - 17:45 GW2 B1400 NUR Mo. + Di. (2 Teaching hours per week)
Stephanie Bergmann, M.A.
10-82-2-LS1-2Introduction to the linguistics of text and discourse (in English)

Seminar (Teaching)

Dates:
weekly (starts in week: 1) Tue. 08:00 - 10:00 GW1 B0100 (2 Teaching hours per week)

In the last decades, linguistics has ‘jumped the border’ of the sentence and moved towards larger units of description such as text and discourse. In this seminar we will cover some principal linguistic approaches to text, addressing frameworks such as cohesion, rhetorical structure theory and introductory segmented discourse representation theory. Class work will consist of overviews of the theoretical approaches (supported by readings) followed by group-based analysis and discussion of example texts. Final credit for the module can be obtained by carrying out a more detailed analysis of a collection of short texts (possibly in groups) and motivating the decisions made. Considerations of corpus linguistic approaches to discourse structure and organisation will also be addressed and some particular tools for supporting such analyses introduced. Successful participation in the course should enable the analysis and critical discussion of texts in general, as well as raising awareness of current open topics and issues in linguistic discourse research.

Leandra Thiele, M.A.

D2-c Aufbaumodul: Literaturwissenschaft (nur für das Sommersemester) (6 CP)

6 CP (3 CP + 3 CP)

1 PL = Term paper/Hausarbeit

Modulbeautragte/r: Dr. Anke Schulz, Kontakt: anke.schulz@uni-bremen.de
Course numberTitle of eventLecturer
10-76-4-D2-01Key Topics in Literature and Cultural History: Contemporary Crime Fiction (in English)

Seminar (Teaching)

Dates:
weekly (starts in week: 1) Tue. 12:15 - 13:45 SFG 2070 (2 Teaching hours per week)

This course welcomes students who wish to complete the following modules:
B.A. E-SC “Key Topics in Literature”- D2-c; WD-2a and WD-2b
B.A. E-SC “Key Topics in Cultural History” – D2-a
Academic Exchange students

Teaching method: We will meet in weekly face to face sessions on campus. You will need access to Stud.IP. and a laptop or tablet with sound and audio capabilities. Please make sure to attend our first session if you wish a placement in this class.

Crime Fiction is overwhelmingly popular and yet, much of the narrative literature that involves crime of some kind or another is often not regarded as ‘literature’ at all. This course is designed to familiarise students with the contemporary critical and theoretical arguments concerning popular fiction and genre studies, as well as to enable all participants of this course to relate to the genre’s wider social, historical and political contexts while discussing the individual narratives in terms of form, language and imagery.
Seeking to promote an analytical, creative and imaginative engagement with the complexities of literary and cultural discourses, we will focus on excerpts of both detective- or transgressor-centred narratives from the second half of the 20th Century onwards. These narratives include examples of the police novel (e.g. Ian Rankin); of female detectives and the feminist appropriations of the hard-boiled story (e.g. Sara Paretsky); of the psychothriller (e.g. Patricia Highsmith), of Afro-American crime fiction, here the examination of literary representations and other cultural manifestations of the Black Diaspora, discussing the relevance of this form of genre fiction to the Black experience of North American Life (e.g. Walter Mosley), of Indigenous crime fiction (e.g. Thomas King), of the postmodern mystery (e.g. Paul Auster), and of representations of disability in crime fiction (e.g. Jeffrey Deaver’s Lincoln Rhyme series).

Please register on Stud. IP and explore the sections “Information” and “Schedule” on Stud. IP. for further details.

Requirements:
• Interest in the topics discussed and ideally a regular attendance and informed participation in class discussion (not part of your formal assessment);
• in-depth knowledge of the selected reading material and course materials,
• final exam according to module choice.

Reading materials (we will read excerpts of these novels but you are welcome to read these novels in full especially when planning a research project):

Auster, Paul. The New York Trilogy, Faber and Faber, 1987.
Deaver, Jeffrey. The Bone Collector, Hodder and Stoughton, 1997.
Highsmith, Patricia. Strangers on a Train, Vintage, 1999, 1950.
King, Thomas. The Red Power Murders: A DreadfulWater Mystery, Harper Perennial, 2006.
Mosley, Walter. Devil in a Blue Dress, Serpent's Tail, 2001, 1991.
Paretsky, Sara. Blacklist: A V.I. Warshawski Novel, Signet Book, 2004.
Rankin, Ian. Knots & Crosses: Inspector Rebus Novel, Orion, 2005, 1998.

Copies of some but not all novels are available for purchase at the bookstore on our campus (Universitätsbuchhandlung Bremen: www.unibuch-bremen.de)

Dr. Jana Nittel
10-76-4-D2/WD2-01Key Topics in Literature: Women and Fiction – Virginia Woolf (in English)

Seminar (Teaching)
ECTS: Depending on module choice

Dates:
weekly (starts in week: 1) Tue. 10:15 - 11:45 SFG 2070 (2 Teaching hours per week)

This course welcomes students who wish to complete the following modules:
B.A. E-SC D-2c; WD-2a und WD-2b
Academic Exchange Students

Teaching method: We will meet in weekly face to face sessions on campus. You will need access to Stud.IP. and a laptop or tablet with sound and audio capabilities. Please make sure to attend our first session if you wish a placement in this class.

According to Bonnie Kime Scott, modernist women “actively transformed the novel to reflect their unique perceptions of everyday life […] as critics and creative writers”. This course is designed to aesthetically appreciate and to critically explore selected works by the 20th-Century British female author and critic Virginia Woolf using text-centred and contextual approaches. We will explore the relation of women and fiction in the first three decades of the 20th century in Woolf’s feminist literary criticism, revisit modernist writing strategies and discuss several gender-related aspects of the novels, which have remained highly topical, then and now. Please register on Stud. IP and explore the sections “Information” and “Schedule” on Stud. IP. for further details.

Requirements:
• Interest in the topics discussed and ideally a regular attendance and informed participation in class discussion (not part of your formal assessment);
• in-depth knowledge of the selected reading material and course materials,
• final exam according to module choice.

Required reading materials (you need a copy of these publications for class):

Woolf, Virginia. Mrs. Dalloway: with a foreword by Maureen Howard (Italics). 1st Harvest/HBJ ed., Harcourt Brace Jovanovich, 1990.

Woolf, Virginia. Orlando. Introduction and notes by Merry M. Pawlowski (Italics), Wordsworth Classics, 2003.

Woolf, Virginia, and Morag Shiach. A Room of One's Own; Three guineas (Italics), Oxford University Press, 1992.

Copies can be purchased at the bookstore on our campus (Universitätsbuchhandlung Bremen: www.unibuch-bremen.de)

Dr. Jana Nittel
10-76-4-D2/WD2-02Key Topics in Literature: Literary London – London in Literature (in conjunction with the London Excursion 2023) (in English)

Seminar (Teaching)
ECTS: Depending on module choice

Dates:
weekly (starts in week: 1) Mon. 16:15 - 17:45 GW2 B2890 (2 Teaching hours per week)

This course welcomes students who wish to complete the following modules:
M.A. E_SC ExMo 1 – Extension Module 1
M.A. E-SC ExMo 2 - Extension Module 2
M.A. TnL Profilmodul I: Literatur
B.A. E-SC “Key Topics in Literature”- D2-c; WD-2a and WD-2b
Academic Exchange Students

Teaching method: We will meet in weekly face to face sessions on campus. You will need access to Stud.IP. and a laptop or tablet with sound and audio capabilities. Please make sure to attend our first session if you wish a placement in this class.

This course seeks to familiarise students with a number of selected authors, poets and writers, in general, who have held lifelong connections with London, may it be historic or contemporary. We will aim to discuss their continued engagement with the city by exploring a selections of excerpts clustered around five major topic choices: Green London; Women Writers and London; London’s Imperial Past and Postcolonial Present; London Theatreland and the Shakespearean Stage; and London and Crime. By virtually tracing forgotten as well as prominent landmarks of the urban centre, we seek to connect the literary representations of the city with historical and cultural developments, present and past. Primary and secondary reading materials will be available for download on Stud.IP.

Please register on Stud. IP and explore the sections “Information” and “Schedule” on Stud. IP. for further details.

Requirements:
• Interest in the topics discussed and ideally a regular attendance and informed participation in class discussion (not part of your formal assessment);
• in-depth knowledge of the selected reading material and course materials,
• final exam according to module choice.

Dr. Jana Nittel
10-76-4-D2/WD2-06Key Topics in Literature: Female Poets of the 19th Century (in English)

Seminar (Teaching)

Dates:
weekly (starts in week: 1) Thu. 08:15 - 09:45 SFG 2070

Have you ever ridden in death's carriage or walked among the nightingales? Female poets of the 19th century have used the literary safe space of poetry to visit a world outside of their own limited one with spectacular imagination. In this class, we will discuss the works of Emily Dickinson, Frances Ellen Watkins Harper and Elizabeth Barrett Browning. This course additionally provides an insight into the basic analysis of poetry and into the cultural history of female authorship in the 19th century. A detailed course plan as well as further reading material will be provided by the beginning of April.

Requirements:
• regular attendance (not mandatory)
• active participation in class
• in-depth knowledge of the primary and secondary reading materials
• term paper or oral presentation (depending on your module)

Please note that prior enrolment via Stud. IP is mandatory.

Kim-Nicola Kück, M.A.
10-76-4-D2/WD2-07Key Topics in Literature: Indigiqueer and Two-Spirit Fiction and Poetry in North America (in English)

Seminar (Teaching)

Dates:
weekly (starts in week: 1) Mon. 12:15 - 13:45 GW2 B2890 SFG 2070 (2 Teaching hours per week)

This seminar will focus on both fiction and poetry from the North American continent (Turtle Island) produced by its many Indigenous Two-Spirit and/or queer peoples. We will read various texts that reveal what it means to be Two-Spirit and/or queer within different tribes in North America and explore theoretical concepts such as Qwo-Li Driskill's "sovereign erotic," "colonized sexualities," and "Two-Spirit Critiques". This seminar also aims to explore the answers to questions such as: What does it mean to be Two-Spirit? Who is Two-Spirit and why is this term only applicable to Indigenous peoples? How does speculative fiction help Indigenous peoples imagine futures outside of the limits of heteronormativity and western binaries?

The texts we will be analyzing throughout the semester are:
1. Johnny Appleseed by Joshua Whitehead
2. Love After the End edited by Joshua Whitehead, with various Indigenous Two-Spirit authors
3. Postcolonial Love Poem by Natalie Diaz

Requirements for this class include active class participation, in-depth knowledge of all primary and secondary reading materials, and a presentation and/or term paper (depending on the chosen module)

Corina Wieser-Cox

SP-2 Aufbaumodul: Sprachpraxis/ Practical-Language Proficiency Module (Part 2) (6 CP) (nur für das Sommersemester)

6 CP (3 CP+ 3 CP)

Modulbeauftragte: Dr. Vanessa Herrmann, vanessa.herrmann@uni-bremen.de

Core language classes for BA „E-SC“ - 2nd year, Semester 4 („Aufbaumodul“ SP-2 BAPO 2011, Part 2)
Course numberTitle of eventLecturer
10-76-4-SP2-01Culture and Communication a (in English)

Exercises (Teaching)

Dates:
weekly (starts in week: 1) Mon. 10:15 - 11:45 SFG 2070 (2 Teaching hours per week)

Additional dates:
Tue. 18.07.23 - Wed. 19.07.23 (Tue., Wed.) 09:00 - 12:00 GW2 B3770
Thu. 20.07.23 09:00 - 14:00 GW2 B3770
Fri. 21.07.23 09:00 - 12:00 GW2 B3770

The aim of the Culture & Communication classes is to help you to prepare for the final SP-2 module oral exam to be taken to complete the SP-2 module.

This particular class will look at different moments which have greatly influenced events within the English-speaking world. We will investigate the processes which led to a particular event, define the event itself and explore the long-term and short-term implications that came about as a consequence. You will be required to think critically and research a topic of your own choice in detail in order to prepare for the Proficiency Interview ⇐ oral exam) at the end of the semester during which you will explain how this moment has been defining. You will also work on presentation skills and familiarise yourselves with the situation of speaking in front of others.

Materials are provided via StudIP.

Dr. Vanessa Herrmann
10-76-4-SP2-02Culture and Communication b (in English)

Exercises (Teaching)

Dates:
weekly (starts in week: 1) Tue. 08:15 - 09:45 GW2 B3009 (Großer Studierraum) GW2 B1630 (2 Teaching hours per week)

Additional dates:
Tue. 09.05.23 08:00 - 10:00 SFG 0150

The aim of the Culture & Communication classes is to help you to prepare for the final SP-2 module oral exam to be taken to complete the SP-2 module.

This particular class will look at different moments which have greatly influenced events within the English-speaking world. We will investigate the processes which led to a particular event, define the event itself and explore the long-term and short-term implications that came about as a consequence. You will be required to think critically and research a topic of your own choice in detail in order to prepare for the Proficiency Interview ⇐ oral exam) at the end of the semester during which you will explain how this moment has been defining. You will also work on presentation skills and familiarise yourselves with the situation of speaking in front of others.

Materials are provided via StudIP.

Dr. Vanessa Herrmann
10-76-4-SP2-03Culture and Communication c (in English)

Exercises (Teaching)
ECTS: 3

Dates:
weekly (starts in week: 1) Thu. 10:15 - 11:45 SFG 2070 (2 Teaching hours per week)

Additional dates:
Fri. 02.06.23 14:00 - 16:00 SFG 1080

The aim of the Culture and Communication class is to help you prepare for the final SP2 module oral exam taken when you have completed the SP2 module. This class will deal with two different areas from which you will be able to develop ONE research project as the basis for your oral exam.
You will be looking at defining moments which have greatly influenced events within the English-speaking world. Your task will be to investigate the processes which led to a particular event, define the event itself and explore the long-term and short-term consequences. A critical analytic approach be will necessary as you explore the causes and implications of the topic of your choice.
In addition, we will work on improving important aspects of grammar, pronunciation, intonation as well as developing the confidence and fluency needed to successfully pass the exam. Whereas CBIS was more about collaboration and teamwork, Culture and Communication allows you to build upon the research skills developed last semester as you move forward with your own project.

Lisa Nehls, M.A.
10-76-4-SP2-04Culture and Communication d (in English)

Exercises (Teaching)
ECTS: 3

Dates:
weekly (starts in week: 1) Thu. 12:15 - 13:45 GW2 B1630 GW1 B0080 (2 Teaching hours per week)

The aim of the Culture and Communication class is to help you prepare for the final SP2 module oral exam taken when you have completed the SP2 module. This class will deal with two different areas from which you will be able to develop ONE research project as the basis for your oral exam.
You will be looking at defining moments which have greatly influenced events within the English-speaking world. Your task will be to investigate the processes which led to a particular event, define the event itself and explore the long-term and short-term consequences. A critical analytic approach be will necessary as you explore the causes and implications of the topic of your choice.
In addition, we will work on improving important aspects of grammar, pronunciation, intonation as well as developing the confidence and fluency needed to successfully pass the exam. Whereas CBIS was more about collaboration and teamwork, Culture and Communication allows you to build upon the research skills developed last semester as you move forward with your own project.

Lisa Nehls, M.A.
10-76-4-SP2-05Culture and Communication e (in English)

Exercises (Teaching)
ECTS: 3

Dates:
weekly (starts in week: 1) Wed. 12:15 - 13:45 GW2 A4020 (2 Teaching hours per week)

Critical Thinking – and Defining Moments in History
(This class is planned to take place on campus.)

The main focus of this Culture & Communication course is to prepare you for your 15-minute SP-2 'Sprachpraxis Aufbaumodul' module proficiency exam. We will start by going back-to-the-basics regarding pronunciation, intonation, and transition signals.

In addition to these language skills, you will also expand your speaking skills for the exam with regard to audience-focus. You will then apply your skills to several mini-group presentations on given topics before delivering your own chosen topic. You are required to critically analyse your topic, to shed light on the breadth and depth of your topic and to demonstrate accuracy, precision, and cautious language in your fifteen-minute exam.

The topic you choose will focus on one defining moment in the history of the English-speaking world. You are invited to explore historical, social, cultural or other reasons for why a specific event happend to turn into his/her/ourstory. You may wish to compare, exemplify, list, critically analyse discourse or classify the information you can compile by researching your topic.


General information
This class is open for ERASMUS/exchange students with a level of English ranging B2 - C1 (GER, CEFR). ERASMUS students on a level below C1 but above B2 wishing to attend this class need to contact the lecturer before joining this class. Send an email to (kamueller(at)uni-bremen.de). Please replace (at) by @.

Katja Müller, M.A.
10-76-4-SP2-06Culture and Communication f (in English)

Exercises (Teaching)
ECTS: 3

Dates:
weekly (starts in week: 1) Wed. 14:15 - 15:45 GW1 B2070 (2 Teaching hours per week)

Critical Thinking – and Defining Moments in History
(This class is planned to take place on campus.)

The main focus of this Culture & Communication course is to prepare you for your 15-minute SP-2 'Sprachpraxis Aufbaumodul' module proficiency exam. We will start by going back-to-the-basics regarding pronunciation, intonation, and transition signals.

In addition to these language skills, you will also expand your speaking skills for the exam with regard to audience-focus. You will then apply your skills to several mini-group presentations on given topics before delivering your own chosen topic. You are required to critically analyse your topic, to shed light on the breadth and depth of your topic and to demonstrate accuracy, precision, and cautious language in your fifteen-minute exam.

The topic you choose will focus on one defining moment in the history of the English-speaking world. You are invited to explore historical, social, cultural or other reasons for why a specific event happend to turn into his/her/ourstory. You may wish to compare, exemplify, list, critically analyse discourse or classify the information you can compile by researching your topic.


General information
This class is open for ERASMUS/exchange students with a level of English ranging B2 - C1 (GER, CEFR). ERASMUS students on a level below C1 but above B2 wishing to attend this class need to contact the lecturer before joining this class. Send an email to (kamueller(at)uni-bremen.de). Please replace (at) by @.

Katja Müller, M.A.
10-76-4-SP2-07Culture and Communication g (in English)

Exercises (Teaching)
ECTS: 3

Dates:
weekly (starts in week: 1) Tue. 16:15 - 17:45 GW1-HS H1010 (2 Teaching hours per week)

Critical Thinking – and Defining Moments in History
(This class is planned to take place on campus.)

The main focus of this Culture & Communication course is to prepare you for your 15-minute SP-2 'Sprachpraxis Aufbaumodul' module proficiency exam. We will start by going back-to-the-basics regarding pronunciation, intonation, and transition signals.

In addition to these language skills, you will also expand your speaking skills for the exam with regard to audience-focus. You will then apply your skills to several mini-group presentations on given topics before delivering your own chosen topic. You are required to critically analyse your topic, to shed light on the breadth and depth of your topic and to demonstrate accuracy, precision, and cautious language in your fifteen-minute exam.

The topic you choose will focus on one defining moment in the history of the English-speaking world. You are invited to explore historical, social, cultural or other reasons for why a specific event happend to turn into his/her/ourstory. You may wish to compare, exemplify, list, critically analyse discourse or classify the information you can compile by researching your topic.


General information
This class is open for ERASMUS/exchange students with a level of English ranging B2 - C1 (GER, CEFR). ERASMUS students on a level below C1 but above B2 wishing to attend this class need to contact the lecturer before joining this class. Send an email to (kamueller(at)uni-bremen.de). Please replace (at) by @.

Katja Müller, M.A.
10-76-4-SP2-08Culture and Communication h (in English)

Exercises (Teaching)
ECTS: 3

Dates:
weekly (starts in week: 1) Thu. 14:15 - 15:45 IW3 0200 (2 Teaching hours per week)

The aim of the Culture & Communication classes is to help you to prepare for the final SP-2 module oral exam to be taken to complete the SP-2 module.

This particular class will look at different moments which have greatly influenced events within the English-speaking world. We will investigate the processes which led to a particular event, define the event itself and explore the long-term and short-term implications that came about as a consequence. You will be required to think critically and research a topic of your own choice in detail in order to prepare for the Proficiency Interview ⇐ oral exam) at the end of the semester during which you will explain how this moment has been defining. You will also work on presentation skills and familiarise yourselves with the situation of speaking in front of others.

Materials are provided via StudIP.

Alessandra Furlani (LB)
10-76-4-SP2-09Culture and Communication i (in English)

Exercises (Teaching)
ECTS: 3

Additional dates:
Thu. 07.09.23 10:00 - 15:00 GW2 B3770
Fri. 08.09.23 10:00 - 15:00 SFG 2080
Mon. 11.09.23 - Wed. 13.09.23 (Mon., Tue., Wed.) 10:00 - 15:00 GW2 B3770
Lisa Nehls, M.A.

FD-2 Aufbaumodul Fachdidaktik 10-76-4-204 (nur für das Sommersemester)

Pflichtmodul: Gy, BIPEB

6 CP

Modulbeauftragte/r: Dr. Joanna Pfingsthorn, Kontakt: pfingsthorn@uni-bremen.de
Course numberTitle of eventLecturer
10-76-6-FD2-01Historical and Theoretical Foundations of Second Language Acquisition (BiPEB/Gy) (in English)

Seminar (Teaching)
ECTS: 3

Dates:
weekly (starts in week: 1) Tue. 14:15 - 15:45 GW2 B2890 (2 Teaching hours per week)
Dr. Tim Giesler
10-76-6-FD2-03Historical and Theoretical Foundations of Second Language Acquisition (Gy/BiPEB) (in English)

Seminar (Teaching)
ECTS: 3

Dates:
weekly (starts in week: 1) Thu. 10:15 - 11:45 MZH 1460 (2 Teaching hours per week)
Dr. Tim Giesler
10-76-6-FD2-04ELT: Activities, Resources and Materials (Gy) (in English)

Seminar (Teaching)
ECTS: 3

Dates:
weekly (starts in week: 1) Tue. 16:15 - 17:45 IW3 0200 (2 Teaching hours per week)
Dr. Larena Schäfer
10-76-6-FD2-05ELT: CLIL Activities, Resources and Materials (Gy) (in English)

Seminar (Teaching)
ECTS: 3

Dates:
weekly (starts in week: 1) Tue. 08:30 - 10:00 GW2 B2890 (2 Teaching hours per week)

When teaching a foreign language class, teachers have to decide which materials, resources and activities to use in a specific context, i.e. within a specific school, with specific students, within a specific class dynamic etc. They need to be able to act autonomously in that regard as they should be the expert for their respective context. In this class we will first take a look at available teaching materials, analyze them, and discuss their structure and layout. Second, we are striving to evaluate these materials when put into practice in how well they served their in-tended purpose within a specific classroom (e.g. with regard to fostering speaking skills). For that reason, we are also going to look at action research studies and methodologies which might be used as starting points for students' own projects. All this is designed to help students become reflective and autonomous practitioners.

Matthias Myrczek
10-76-6-FD2-06ELT: Primary Activities, Resources and Materials (BIPEB/Gy) (in English)

Seminar (Teaching)
ECTS: 3

Dates:
weekly (starts in week: 1) Mon. 12:00 - 14:00 GW1 B0100
Dr. Larena Schäfer

WD-2a Aufbaumodul: Literatur- und Sprachwissenschaft (6 CP) (Wahlpflichtmodul) (nur für das Sommersemester)

(6 CP = 3 CP und 3 CP)

Es gilt zu beachten: Laut SK-Beschluss (E-SC) vom 21.12.2012 ist die Prüfungsleistung im Bereich \"Key Topics in Literature\" zu erbringen =
Klausur/Written Test oder benotete Präsentationsleistung/Presentation

Modulbeauftragte/r: Prof. Dr. Marcus Callies, Kontakt: callies@uni-bremen.de
Course numberTitle of eventLecturer
10-76-4-D2/WD2-01Key Topics in Literature: Women and Fiction – Virginia Woolf (in English)

Seminar (Teaching)
ECTS: Depending on module choice

Dates:
weekly (starts in week: 1) Tue. 10:15 - 11:45 SFG 2070 (2 Teaching hours per week)

This course welcomes students who wish to complete the following modules:
B.A. E-SC D-2c; WD-2a und WD-2b
Academic Exchange Students

Teaching method: We will meet in weekly face to face sessions on campus. You will need access to Stud.IP. and a laptop or tablet with sound and audio capabilities. Please make sure to attend our first session if you wish a placement in this class.

According to Bonnie Kime Scott, modernist women “actively transformed the novel to reflect their unique perceptions of everyday life […] as critics and creative writers”. This course is designed to aesthetically appreciate and to critically explore selected works by the 20th-Century British female author and critic Virginia Woolf using text-centred and contextual approaches. We will explore the relation of women and fiction in the first three decades of the 20th century in Woolf’s feminist literary criticism, revisit modernist writing strategies and discuss several gender-related aspects of the novels, which have remained highly topical, then and now. Please register on Stud. IP and explore the sections “Information” and “Schedule” on Stud. IP. for further details.

Requirements:
• Interest in the topics discussed and ideally a regular attendance and informed participation in class discussion (not part of your formal assessment);
• in-depth knowledge of the selected reading material and course materials,
• final exam according to module choice.

Required reading materials (you need a copy of these publications for class):

Woolf, Virginia. Mrs. Dalloway: with a foreword by Maureen Howard (Italics). 1st Harvest/HBJ ed., Harcourt Brace Jovanovich, 1990.

Woolf, Virginia. Orlando. Introduction and notes by Merry M. Pawlowski (Italics), Wordsworth Classics, 2003.

Woolf, Virginia, and Morag Shiach. A Room of One's Own; Three guineas (Italics), Oxford University Press, 1992.

Copies can be purchased at the bookstore on our campus (Universitätsbuchhandlung Bremen: www.unibuch-bremen.de)

Dr. Jana Nittel
10-76-4-D2/WD2-02Key Topics in Literature: Literary London – London in Literature (in conjunction with the London Excursion 2023) (in English)

Seminar (Teaching)
ECTS: Depending on module choice

Dates:
weekly (starts in week: 1) Mon. 16:15 - 17:45 GW2 B2890 (2 Teaching hours per week)

This course welcomes students who wish to complete the following modules:
M.A. E_SC ExMo 1 – Extension Module 1
M.A. E-SC ExMo 2 - Extension Module 2
M.A. TnL Profilmodul I: Literatur
B.A. E-SC “Key Topics in Literature”- D2-c; WD-2a and WD-2b
Academic Exchange Students

Teaching method: We will meet in weekly face to face sessions on campus. You will need access to Stud.IP. and a laptop or tablet with sound and audio capabilities. Please make sure to attend our first session if you wish a placement in this class.

This course seeks to familiarise students with a number of selected authors, poets and writers, in general, who have held lifelong connections with London, may it be historic or contemporary. We will aim to discuss their continued engagement with the city by exploring a selections of excerpts clustered around five major topic choices: Green London; Women Writers and London; London’s Imperial Past and Postcolonial Present; London Theatreland and the Shakespearean Stage; and London and Crime. By virtually tracing forgotten as well as prominent landmarks of the urban centre, we seek to connect the literary representations of the city with historical and cultural developments, present and past. Primary and secondary reading materials will be available for download on Stud.IP.

Please register on Stud. IP and explore the sections “Information” and “Schedule” on Stud. IP. for further details.

Requirements:
• Interest in the topics discussed and ideally a regular attendance and informed participation in class discussion (not part of your formal assessment);
• in-depth knowledge of the selected reading material and course materials,
• final exam according to module choice.

Dr. Jana Nittel
10-76-4-D2/WD2-06Key Topics in Literature: Female Poets of the 19th Century (in English)

Seminar (Teaching)

Dates:
weekly (starts in week: 1) Thu. 08:15 - 09:45 SFG 2070

Have you ever ridden in death's carriage or walked among the nightingales? Female poets of the 19th century have used the literary safe space of poetry to visit a world outside of their own limited one with spectacular imagination. In this class, we will discuss the works of Emily Dickinson, Frances Ellen Watkins Harper and Elizabeth Barrett Browning. This course additionally provides an insight into the basic analysis of poetry and into the cultural history of female authorship in the 19th century. A detailed course plan as well as further reading material will be provided by the beginning of April.

Requirements:
• regular attendance (not mandatory)
• active participation in class
• in-depth knowledge of the primary and secondary reading materials
• term paper or oral presentation (depending on your module)

Please note that prior enrolment via Stud. IP is mandatory.

Kim-Nicola Kück, M.A.
10-76-4-D2/WD2-07Key Topics in Literature: Indigiqueer and Two-Spirit Fiction and Poetry in North America (in English)

Seminar (Teaching)

Dates:
weekly (starts in week: 1) Mon. 12:15 - 13:45 GW2 B2890 SFG 2070 (2 Teaching hours per week)

This seminar will focus on both fiction and poetry from the North American continent (Turtle Island) produced by its many Indigenous Two-Spirit and/or queer peoples. We will read various texts that reveal what it means to be Two-Spirit and/or queer within different tribes in North America and explore theoretical concepts such as Qwo-Li Driskill's "sovereign erotic," "colonized sexualities," and "Two-Spirit Critiques". This seminar also aims to explore the answers to questions such as: What does it mean to be Two-Spirit? Who is Two-Spirit and why is this term only applicable to Indigenous peoples? How does speculative fiction help Indigenous peoples imagine futures outside of the limits of heteronormativity and western binaries?

The texts we will be analyzing throughout the semester are:
1. Johnny Appleseed by Joshua Whitehead
2. Love After the End edited by Joshua Whitehead, with various Indigenous Two-Spirit authors
3. Postcolonial Love Poem by Natalie Diaz

Requirements for this class include active class participation, in-depth knowledge of all primary and secondary reading materials, and a presentation and/or term paper (depending on the chosen module)

Corina Wieser-Cox
10-76-6-WD2-01Key Topics in Linguistics: Ecolinguistics (in English)

Seminar (Teaching)

Dates:
weekly (starts in week: 1) Thu. 12:15 - 13:45 GW2 B2880 GW1 B0080 (2 Teaching hours per week)

When we look around, it seems that humans try to destroy nature, and nature tries to destroy us back. What if the way we think and speak about nature encourages its destruction? In this class, from a linguistic perspective, we want to analyse the stories we live by. We will study the representation of nature in language. Topics include climate change discourse, animals in discourse, semantic engineering and greenwashing, among others. This approach is called ecological discourse analysis (EDA).
"One of the underlying assumptions of EDA is that highlighting the way that discourse may be inhumane or destructive will create more awareness of the role of language in dealing with the environment. This also includes the hope that discourses that are more harmonious with our natural surroundings will result in more ecologically conscious ways of dealing with the environment." Penz & Fill 2022: 237
We will investigate several grammatical and lexical phenomena, some manually and some with the use of corpora. In the end, you will be aware of what exactly may be wrong with the ‘us versus nature’ approach, and you will be able to create better stories.

Requirements
Active participation, reading and reflecting the literature, a small empirical study of your own that you present either at the Student’s conference or in class.
You can take this class for the WD module (1 or 2) and for 'Ersatzleistung für das Auslandssemester' but not for the D module.

References
Fill, Alwin F. & Hermine Penz (eds.) 2018. The Routledge Handbook of Ecolinguistics. New York: Routledge. ebook.
Penz, Hermine & Alwin Fill. 2022. Ecolinguistics: History, today and tomorrow. Journal of World Languages 8[2]: 232-253. Open Access.
Stibbe, Arran. 2020. Ecolinguistics: Language, Ecology and the Stories We Live by. 2nd ed. London: Routledge. ebook.

Dr. Anke Schulz
10-76-6-WD2-02Key Topics in Linguistics: The language of computer-mediated communication (in English)

Seminar (Teaching)

Dates:
weekly (starts in week: 1) Thu. 12:15 - 13:45 GW2 A3390 (CIP-Labor FB 10) (2 Teaching hours per week)

Additional dates:
Mon. 17.07.23 09:00 - 16:00 SFG

In this course, we will explore different genres of computer-mediated communication, including social networking sites, (micro-)blogs, online comments, and online reviews. We will consider the social practices that occur in these genres, and discuss the ways in which language is variously shaped, re-worked, and constrained by them. Throughout the semester, we will investigate concepts such as identity construction, intertextuality, anonymity and privacy, multimodality, and multilingual practices, to name a few. You will work on small assignments throughout the semester to get hands-on experience with researching digital discourse and social practices online.

By the end of the course, you will be able to
• explain central concepts relevant to the field of CMC
• apply research methods in CMC
• evaluate ethical issues related to CMC
• analyze digital discourse
• describe digital practices across genres and platforms

References:
Jones, R. H., Jaworska, S., & Aslan, E. (2020). Language and media: A resource book for students (2nd ed.). Taylor & Francis.
Page, R. E. et al. (2022). Researching language and social media: A student guide (2nd ed.). Routledge.
Tagg, C. (2015). Exploring digital discourse: Language in action. Routledge.

Dr. Ramona Kreis
10-76-6-WD2-03Key Topics in Linguistics: Language and education through a critical lens (in English)

Seminar (Teaching)

Dates:
weekly (starts in week: 1) Fri. 12:15 - 13:45 GW2 B3010 (Kleiner Studierraum) (2 Teaching hours per week)

Additional dates:
Mon. 17.07.23 09:00 - 16:00 SFG
Dr. Ramona Kreis

WD-2b Aufbaumodul: Literaturwissenschaft und Kulturgeschichte (6 CP) (Wahlpflichtmodul) - (nur für das Sommersemester)

(6 CP = 3 CP und 3 CP)

Es gilt zu beachten: Laut SK-Beschluss (E-SC) vom 21.12.2012 ist die Prüfungsleistung im Bereich \"Key Topics in Cultural History\" zu erbringen =
Klausur/Written Test oder benotete Praesentationsleistung/Presentation

Modulbeauftragte/r: Prof. Dr. Marcus Callies, Kontakt: callies@uni-bremen.de
Course numberTitle of eventLecturer
10-76-4-D2/WD2-01Key Topics in Literature: Women and Fiction – Virginia Woolf (in English)

Seminar (Teaching)
ECTS: Depending on module choice

Dates:
weekly (starts in week: 1) Tue. 10:15 - 11:45 SFG 2070 (2 Teaching hours per week)

This course welcomes students who wish to complete the following modules:
B.A. E-SC D-2c; WD-2a und WD-2b
Academic Exchange Students

Teaching method: We will meet in weekly face to face sessions on campus. You will need access to Stud.IP. and a laptop or tablet with sound and audio capabilities. Please make sure to attend our first session if you wish a placement in this class.

According to Bonnie Kime Scott, modernist women “actively transformed the novel to reflect their unique perceptions of everyday life […] as critics and creative writers”. This course is designed to aesthetically appreciate and to critically explore selected works by the 20th-Century British female author and critic Virginia Woolf using text-centred and contextual approaches. We will explore the relation of women and fiction in the first three decades of the 20th century in Woolf’s feminist literary criticism, revisit modernist writing strategies and discuss several gender-related aspects of the novels, which have remained highly topical, then and now. Please register on Stud. IP and explore the sections “Information” and “Schedule” on Stud. IP. for further details.

Requirements:
• Interest in the topics discussed and ideally a regular attendance and informed participation in class discussion (not part of your formal assessment);
• in-depth knowledge of the selected reading material and course materials,
• final exam according to module choice.

Required reading materials (you need a copy of these publications for class):

Woolf, Virginia. Mrs. Dalloway: with a foreword by Maureen Howard (Italics). 1st Harvest/HBJ ed., Harcourt Brace Jovanovich, 1990.

Woolf, Virginia. Orlando. Introduction and notes by Merry M. Pawlowski (Italics), Wordsworth Classics, 2003.

Woolf, Virginia, and Morag Shiach. A Room of One's Own; Three guineas (Italics), Oxford University Press, 1992.

Copies can be purchased at the bookstore on our campus (Universitätsbuchhandlung Bremen: www.unibuch-bremen.de)

Dr. Jana Nittel
10-76-4-D2/WD2-02Key Topics in Literature: Literary London – London in Literature (in conjunction with the London Excursion 2023) (in English)

Seminar (Teaching)
ECTS: Depending on module choice

Dates:
weekly (starts in week: 1) Mon. 16:15 - 17:45 GW2 B2890 (2 Teaching hours per week)

This course welcomes students who wish to complete the following modules:
M.A. E_SC ExMo 1 – Extension Module 1
M.A. E-SC ExMo 2 - Extension Module 2
M.A. TnL Profilmodul I: Literatur
B.A. E-SC “Key Topics in Literature”- D2-c; WD-2a and WD-2b
Academic Exchange Students

Teaching method: We will meet in weekly face to face sessions on campus. You will need access to Stud.IP. and a laptop or tablet with sound and audio capabilities. Please make sure to attend our first session if you wish a placement in this class.

This course seeks to familiarise students with a number of selected authors, poets and writers, in general, who have held lifelong connections with London, may it be historic or contemporary. We will aim to discuss their continued engagement with the city by exploring a selections of excerpts clustered around five major topic choices: Green London; Women Writers and London; London’s Imperial Past and Postcolonial Present; London Theatreland and the Shakespearean Stage; and London and Crime. By virtually tracing forgotten as well as prominent landmarks of the urban centre, we seek to connect the literary representations of the city with historical and cultural developments, present and past. Primary and secondary reading materials will be available for download on Stud.IP.

Please register on Stud. IP and explore the sections “Information” and “Schedule” on Stud. IP. for further details.

Requirements:
• Interest in the topics discussed and ideally a regular attendance and informed participation in class discussion (not part of your formal assessment);
• in-depth knowledge of the selected reading material and course materials,
• final exam according to module choice.

Dr. Jana Nittel
10-76-4-D2/WD2-04Key Topics Cultural History: Critical Race Studies (in English)

Seminar (Teaching)

Dates:
weekly (starts in week: 1) Wed. 14:15 - 15:45 GW2 B3010 (Kleiner Studierraum) GW1-HS H1000 (2 Teaching hours per week)
Dr. Karin Esders-Angermund
10-76-4-D2/WD2-05Key Topics Cultural History: Sugar, Culture, and History (in English)

Seminar (Teaching)

Dates:
weekly (starts in week: 1) Thu. 12:15 - 13:45 GW2 B2890 (2 Teaching hours per week)
Dr. Karin Esders-Angermund
10-76-4-D2/WD2-06Key Topics in Literature: Female Poets of the 19th Century (in English)

Seminar (Teaching)

Dates:
weekly (starts in week: 1) Thu. 08:15 - 09:45 SFG 2070

Have you ever ridden in death's carriage or walked among the nightingales? Female poets of the 19th century have used the literary safe space of poetry to visit a world outside of their own limited one with spectacular imagination. In this class, we will discuss the works of Emily Dickinson, Frances Ellen Watkins Harper and Elizabeth Barrett Browning. This course additionally provides an insight into the basic analysis of poetry and into the cultural history of female authorship in the 19th century. A detailed course plan as well as further reading material will be provided by the beginning of April.

Requirements:
• regular attendance (not mandatory)
• active participation in class
• in-depth knowledge of the primary and secondary reading materials
• term paper or oral presentation (depending on your module)

Please note that prior enrolment via Stud. IP is mandatory.

Kim-Nicola Kück, M.A.
10-76-4-D2/WD2-07Key Topics in Literature: Indigiqueer and Two-Spirit Fiction and Poetry in North America (in English)

Seminar (Teaching)

Dates:
weekly (starts in week: 1) Mon. 12:15 - 13:45 GW2 B2890 SFG 2070 (2 Teaching hours per week)

This seminar will focus on both fiction and poetry from the North American continent (Turtle Island) produced by its many Indigenous Two-Spirit and/or queer peoples. We will read various texts that reveal what it means to be Two-Spirit and/or queer within different tribes in North America and explore theoretical concepts such as Qwo-Li Driskill's "sovereign erotic," "colonized sexualities," and "Two-Spirit Critiques". This seminar also aims to explore the answers to questions such as: What does it mean to be Two-Spirit? Who is Two-Spirit and why is this term only applicable to Indigenous peoples? How does speculative fiction help Indigenous peoples imagine futures outside of the limits of heteronormativity and western binaries?

The texts we will be analyzing throughout the semester are:
1. Johnny Appleseed by Joshua Whitehead
2. Love After the End edited by Joshua Whitehead, with various Indigenous Two-Spirit authors
3. Postcolonial Love Poem by Natalie Diaz

Requirements for this class include active class participation, in-depth knowledge of all primary and secondary reading materials, and a presentation and/or term paper (depending on the chosen module)

Corina Wieser-Cox

WD-2c Aufbaumodul: Sprachwissenschaft und Kulturgeschichte (Wahlpflichtmodul) (6 CP)- (nur für das Sommersemester)

(6 CP = 3 CP und 3 CP)

Es gilt zu beachten: Laut SK-Beschluss (E-SC) vom 21.12.2012 ist die Prüfungsleistung im Bereich \"Key Topics in Linguistics\" zu erbringen =
Klausur/Written Test oder benotete Präsentationsleistung/Presentation

Modulbeauftragte/r: Prof. Dr. Marcus Callies, Kontakt: callies@uni-bremen.de
Course numberTitle of eventLecturer
10-76-4-D2/WD2-04Key Topics Cultural History: Critical Race Studies (in English)

Seminar (Teaching)

Dates:
weekly (starts in week: 1) Wed. 14:15 - 15:45 GW2 B3010 (Kleiner Studierraum) GW1-HS H1000 (2 Teaching hours per week)
Dr. Karin Esders-Angermund
10-76-4-D2/WD2-05Key Topics Cultural History: Sugar, Culture, and History (in English)

Seminar (Teaching)

Dates:
weekly (starts in week: 1) Thu. 12:15 - 13:45 GW2 B2890 (2 Teaching hours per week)
Dr. Karin Esders-Angermund
10-76-4-D2/WD2-08Key Topics Cultural History: Women, Art and Society (in English)

Seminar (Teaching)

Dates:
weekly (starts in week: 1) Tue. 10:15 - 11:45 GW2 B2890 (2 Teaching hours per week)
Dr. Karin Esders-Angermund
10-76-6-WD2-01Key Topics in Linguistics: Ecolinguistics (in English)

Seminar (Teaching)

Dates:
weekly (starts in week: 1) Thu. 12:15 - 13:45 GW2 B2880 GW1 B0080 (2 Teaching hours per week)

When we look around, it seems that humans try to destroy nature, and nature tries to destroy us back. What if the way we think and speak about nature encourages its destruction? In this class, from a linguistic perspective, we want to analyse the stories we live by. We will study the representation of nature in language. Topics include climate change discourse, animals in discourse, semantic engineering and greenwashing, among others. This approach is called ecological discourse analysis (EDA).
"One of the underlying assumptions of EDA is that highlighting the way that discourse may be inhumane or destructive will create more awareness of the role of language in dealing with the environment. This also includes the hope that discourses that are more harmonious with our natural surroundings will result in more ecologically conscious ways of dealing with the environment." Penz & Fill 2022: 237
We will investigate several grammatical and lexical phenomena, some manually and some with the use of corpora. In the end, you will be aware of what exactly may be wrong with the ‘us versus nature’ approach, and you will be able to create better stories.

Requirements
Active participation, reading and reflecting the literature, a small empirical study of your own that you present either at the Student’s conference or in class.
You can take this class for the WD module (1 or 2) and for 'Ersatzleistung für das Auslandssemester' but not for the D module.

References
Fill, Alwin F. & Hermine Penz (eds.) 2018. The Routledge Handbook of Ecolinguistics. New York: Routledge. ebook.
Penz, Hermine & Alwin Fill. 2022. Ecolinguistics: History, today and tomorrow. Journal of World Languages 8[2]: 232-253. Open Access.
Stibbe, Arran. 2020. Ecolinguistics: Language, Ecology and the Stories We Live by. 2nd ed. London: Routledge. ebook.

Dr. Anke Schulz
10-76-6-WD2-02Key Topics in Linguistics: The language of computer-mediated communication (in English)

Seminar (Teaching)

Dates:
weekly (starts in week: 1) Thu. 12:15 - 13:45 GW2 A3390 (CIP-Labor FB 10) (2 Teaching hours per week)

Additional dates:
Mon. 17.07.23 09:00 - 16:00 SFG

In this course, we will explore different genres of computer-mediated communication, including social networking sites, (micro-)blogs, online comments, and online reviews. We will consider the social practices that occur in these genres, and discuss the ways in which language is variously shaped, re-worked, and constrained by them. Throughout the semester, we will investigate concepts such as identity construction, intertextuality, anonymity and privacy, multimodality, and multilingual practices, to name a few. You will work on small assignments throughout the semester to get hands-on experience with researching digital discourse and social practices online.

By the end of the course, you will be able to
• explain central concepts relevant to the field of CMC
• apply research methods in CMC
• evaluate ethical issues related to CMC
• analyze digital discourse
• describe digital practices across genres and platforms

References:
Jones, R. H., Jaworska, S., & Aslan, E. (2020). Language and media: A resource book for students (2nd ed.). Taylor & Francis.
Page, R. E. et al. (2022). Researching language and social media: A student guide (2nd ed.). Routledge.
Tagg, C. (2015). Exploring digital discourse: Language in action. Routledge.

Dr. Ramona Kreis
10-76-6-WD2-03Key Topics in Linguistics: Language and education through a critical lens (in English)

Seminar (Teaching)

Dates:
weekly (starts in week: 1) Fri. 12:15 - 13:45 GW2 B3010 (Kleiner Studierraum) (2 Teaching hours per week)

Additional dates:
Mon. 17.07.23 09:00 - 16:00 SFG
Dr. Ramona Kreis

SP-K Basismodul: Sprachpraxis/Practical-Language Foundation (BiPEB Klein) (3 CP)

Modulbeauftragte/r

Modulbeauftragte/r: Dr. Vanessa Herrmann, Kontakt: vanessa.herrmann@uni-bremen.de
Course numberTitle of eventLecturer
10-76-4-SP-G-01Classroom Discourse for BIPeB

Exercises (Teaching)
ECTS: 3

Dates:
weekly (starts in week: 1) Thu. 10:15 - 11:45 GW2 B1630 (2 Teaching hours per week)

This class is planned to take place on campus.

Registration for Classroom Discourse: SEE BELOW

Participation
1) This class is open to students studying under the BiPEb 'Großes Fach' regulations, 4th semester
BiPEb 'Großes Fach' will also have to take "University Language Skills 1 (BiPEb)", offered this semester.
2) BiPEb 'Kleines Fach', GTW and FaBiWi students interested in taking an additional class with focus on teaching language are very welcome to join in.
3) This class is not recommended for Erasmus or other exchange students, unless they have an English language level ranging from B2 - C1/C2 (GER, CEFR) AND are studying English to become a teacher. Any exchange student with a level below C1 but above B2 wishing to attend Classroom Discourse needs to contact Katja Müller before joining a class. (kamueller(at)uni-bremen.de).

This class is designed to foster your communicative skills in the classroom - here at university and in any school you might be teaching, now or in the future. The focus will be on how to communicate effectively. On the one hand you will be working on expanding your own knowledge of the English language, working on sentence construction, grammar in general, or improving your vocabulary; on the other hand you will be planning to speak and teach "simple" English in class. For future teachers in a primary school this could mean to paraphrase a difficult word, give synonyms to improve the pupils' vocabulary, or to show/draw/mimic situations/actions/people or animals.
Trying out games is also part of the plan, introducing a fun factor to the classroom while at the same time testing the pupils' listening and speaking skills, ensuring that pupils understand instructions, and can communicate appropiately in English themselves, for example when exchanging information or ideas.

REGISTRATION
Online registration is manadatory. ERASMUS or other exchange students with a level of English ranging from B2-C2 (GER/CEFR) please send me an email to register for this class (kamueller@uni-bremen.de). Please replace (at) by @.

Katja Müller, M.A.
10-76-4-SP-K-01University Language Skills 1 (for BiPeB)

Exercises (Teaching)
ECTS: 3

Dates:
weekly (starts in week: 1) Thu. 12:15 - 13:45 GW1 B2130 (2 Teaching hours per week)

This class is planned to take place on campus.

Participation
1) This class is usually open to students studying under the BiPEb 'Großes Fach' regulations, 4th semester and BiPEb 'Kleines Fach' students in their 2nd semester.
2) ERASMUS or other exchange students can participate in this class if they can provide me with proof of a C1 level (GER, CEFR) in English. Exchange students wishing to participate who have a level below C1, but above B2 need to contact Katja Müller before joining a class. (kamueller(at)uni-bremen.de).Please replace (at) by @.

BiPEb 'Großes Fach' will also have to take 'Classroom discourse', offered this semester.

COURSEWORK
This (BiPEb) 'University Language Skills 1' class offers you the opportunity to analyse and evaluate your own language skills in English to enable you to choose areas in which you see room for improvement. Starting from there, we will move on to cover some basic and, nonetheless, grammatically challenging areas, to introduce you to different rhetorical writing strategies and essay planning structures. Last but not least, we will focus on sentence structure and try out several strategies to further improve your writing style.

REGISTRATION
Online registration is manadatory.
ERASMUS or other exchange students with a level of English ranging from B2-C2 (GER/CEFR) please send me an email to register for this class (kamueller(at)uni-bremen.de). Please replace (at) by @.

Katja Müller, M.A.

SP-G Basismodul: Sprachpraxis/Practical-Language Foundation (BiPEB Groß) (6 CP)

6 CP (3 CP + 3 CP)

Modulbeauftragte/r

Modulbeauftragte/r: Dr. Vanessa Herrmann, Kontakt: vanessa.herrmann@uni-bremen.de
Course numberTitle of eventLecturer
10-76-4-SP-G-01Classroom Discourse for BIPeB

Exercises (Teaching)
ECTS: 3

Dates:
weekly (starts in week: 1) Thu. 10:15 - 11:45 GW2 B1630 (2 Teaching hours per week)

This class is planned to take place on campus.

Registration for Classroom Discourse: SEE BELOW

Participation
1) This class is open to students studying under the BiPEb 'Großes Fach' regulations, 4th semester
BiPEb 'Großes Fach' will also have to take "University Language Skills 1 (BiPEb)", offered this semester.
2) BiPEb 'Kleines Fach', GTW and FaBiWi students interested in taking an additional class with focus on teaching language are very welcome to join in.
3) This class is not recommended for Erasmus or other exchange students, unless they have an English language level ranging from B2 - C1/C2 (GER, CEFR) AND are studying English to become a teacher. Any exchange student with a level below C1 but above B2 wishing to attend Classroom Discourse needs to contact Katja Müller before joining a class. (kamueller(at)uni-bremen.de).

This class is designed to foster your communicative skills in the classroom - here at university and in any school you might be teaching, now or in the future. The focus will be on how to communicate effectively. On the one hand you will be working on expanding your own knowledge of the English language, working on sentence construction, grammar in general, or improving your vocabulary; on the other hand you will be planning to speak and teach "simple" English in class. For future teachers in a primary school this could mean to paraphrase a difficult word, give synonyms to improve the pupils' vocabulary, or to show/draw/mimic situations/actions/people or animals.
Trying out games is also part of the plan, introducing a fun factor to the classroom while at the same time testing the pupils' listening and speaking skills, ensuring that pupils understand instructions, and can communicate appropiately in English themselves, for example when exchanging information or ideas.

REGISTRATION
Online registration is manadatory. ERASMUS or other exchange students with a level of English ranging from B2-C2 (GER/CEFR) please send me an email to register for this class (kamueller@uni-bremen.de). Please replace (at) by @.

Katja Müller, M.A.
10-76-4-SP-K-01University Language Skills 1 (for BiPeB)

Exercises (Teaching)
ECTS: 3

Dates:
weekly (starts in week: 1) Thu. 12:15 - 13:45 GW1 B2130 (2 Teaching hours per week)

This class is planned to take place on campus.

Participation
1) This class is usually open to students studying under the BiPEb 'Großes Fach' regulations, 4th semester and BiPEb 'Kleines Fach' students in their 2nd semester.
2) ERASMUS or other exchange students can participate in this class if they can provide me with proof of a C1 level (GER, CEFR) in English. Exchange students wishing to participate who have a level below C1, but above B2 need to contact Katja Müller before joining a class. (kamueller(at)uni-bremen.de).Please replace (at) by @.

BiPEb 'Großes Fach' will also have to take 'Classroom discourse', offered this semester.

COURSEWORK
This (BiPEb) 'University Language Skills 1' class offers you the opportunity to analyse and evaluate your own language skills in English to enable you to choose areas in which you see room for improvement. Starting from there, we will move on to cover some basic and, nonetheless, grammatically challenging areas, to introduce you to different rhetorical writing strategies and essay planning structures. Last but not least, we will focus on sentence structure and try out several strategies to further improve your writing style.

REGISTRATION
Online registration is manadatory.
ERASMUS or other exchange students with a level of English ranging from B2-C2 (GER/CEFR) please send me an email to register for this class (kamueller(at)uni-bremen.de). Please replace (at) by @.

Katja Müller, M.A.

LEHRVERANSTALTUNGEN DES 3. JAHRES:

P Abschlussmodul Profilfach (15 CP) \"Sprachwissenschaft\" oder \"Literaturwissenschaft\" oder \"Kulturgeschichte\"

Modulbeautragte/r: Dr. Anke Schulz, Kontakt: anke.schulz@uni-bremen.de

Laut PO des BA ESC von 2011 (§6;1 werden die 3 CP des Begleitseminars (im Profilfach obligatorisch) im Bereich General Studies angerechnet; die Studierenden, die bestanden haben, sind daher Irmgard Maassen (maassen@uni-bremen.de), der Modulbeauftragten für General Studies, zu melden.
Course numberTitle of eventLecturer
10-76-6-AP-01Begleitveranstaltung Literaturwissenschaft - Research Colloquium in English Literatures (ZOOM only) (in English)

Colloquium (Teaching)
ECTS: 3

Dates:
weekly (starts in week: 1) Thu. 12:15 - 13:45 (2 Teaching hours per week)

This course is one of the specific colloquia designed for students planning their final dissertation either on undergraduate or graduate level in the field of literary studies (Module choices: Bachelor thesis module P or Master thesis module MA The). We shall look at a number of strategies for planning, structuring and writing longer pieces of work and this course will include formal issues such as format and layout of the final assignment. Please register on Stud. IP and explore the sections “Information” and “Schedule” on Stud. IP. for further details.

All students, who are planning to write their final dissertations in the field of literary studies, are welcome to join my course. In addition, I am happy to take on the role of a supervisor or co-supervisor for projects that correspond to my research and teaching foci, in other words, students who have a supervisor or co-supervisor that is not me are also welcome to join this course.

Dr. Jana Nittel
10-76-6-AP-02Kulturhistorische Begleitveranstaltung (in English)

Colloquium (Teaching)

Dates:
weekly (starts in week: 1) Wed. 10:15 - 11:45 GW2 A4020 (2 Teaching hours per week)
Dr. Karin Esders-Angermund
10-76-6-AP-03Begleitveranstaltung Sprachwissenschaft (in English)

Colloquium (Teaching)

Dates:
weekly (starts in week: 1) Tue. 12:15 - 13:45 GW2 B1630 (2 Teaching hours per week)
Dr. Inke Du Bois
10-M80-4-MaThe-04Research colloquium for MA and PhD students (in English)

Colloquium (Teaching)

Dates:
weekly (starts in week: 1) Tue. 10:15 - 11:45 GW1 B2070 (2 Teaching hours per week)

This colloquium is designed for all students planning to write their thesis in the fields of (i) multimodal linguistics and its application to treatments of mixed media artefacts or performances and (ii) for critical discourse analysis, particularly empirically based studies. Examples of media that might be targetted include: film, comics, graphic novels, advertisements and so on. Particularly of interest will be areas where language (spoken or written) works together with visual representations of any kind. We will discuss theoretical and methodological approaches for characterising combinations of language and visual information, consider practical methods for corpus work (particularly involving mixed media, but not only), develop outlines and structures of the thesis, and consider how to construct strong thesis statements in order to focus your search for information, to tackle your subject and to construct your argument. Students will be expected to present and discuss their project in various stages of progression both in class as well as in individual monitoring sessions as well as to give input to others. Standard styles of presenting work within linguistics will be discussed as well as ways of addressing and analysing data and showing that analyses are adequate.

Prof. John Bateman, Ph.D.

Abschlussmodul L - Lehramt (12 CP) - 10-76-6-314 (nur für das Sommersemester)

Modulbeauftragte/r: Dr. Tim Giesler, Kontakt: giesler@uni-bremen.de
Course numberTitle of eventLecturer
10-76-6-AP-01Begleitveranstaltung Literaturwissenschaft - Research Colloquium in English Literatures (ZOOM only) (in English)

Colloquium (Teaching)
ECTS: 3

Dates:
weekly (starts in week: 1) Thu. 12:15 - 13:45 (2 Teaching hours per week)

This course is one of the specific colloquia designed for students planning their final dissertation either on undergraduate or graduate level in the field of literary studies (Module choices: Bachelor thesis module P or Master thesis module MA The). We shall look at a number of strategies for planning, structuring and writing longer pieces of work and this course will include formal issues such as format and layout of the final assignment. Please register on Stud. IP and explore the sections “Information” and “Schedule” on Stud. IP. for further details.

All students, who are planning to write their final dissertations in the field of literary studies, are welcome to join my course. In addition, I am happy to take on the role of a supervisor or co-supervisor for projects that correspond to my research and teaching foci, in other words, students who have a supervisor or co-supervisor that is not me are also welcome to join this course.

Dr. Jana Nittel
10-76-6-AP-02Kulturhistorische Begleitveranstaltung (in English)

Colloquium (Teaching)

Dates:
weekly (starts in week: 1) Wed. 10:15 - 11:45 GW2 A4020 (2 Teaching hours per week)
Dr. Karin Esders-Angermund

GENERAL STUDIES - siehe auch die Veranstaltungen von General Studies - Sprach- und Literaturwissenschaften

Modulbeauftragte/r: Dr. Ramona Kreis, Kontakt: rkreis@uni-bremen.de
Course numberTitle of eventLecturer
10-76-2-Basismodul A-02Übung/Tutorial: Introduction to English Literatures (Part II) (Online Angebot) (in English)

Exercises (Teaching)
ECTS: 3

Dates:
weekly (starts in week: 1) Fri. 10:15 - 11:45 (2 Teaching hours per week)

These tutorial sessions correspond to the weekly study units of the course "Foundation Module A: Introduction to English Literature (Part II) and it will provide participants with the opportunity to ask questions regarding the weekly theoretical explorations and cultural movements, complete excercises and quizz sessions as exam preparation.
Students may gain credit points for General Studies.

Dr. Jana Nittel
10-76-6-AP-01Begleitveranstaltung Literaturwissenschaft - Research Colloquium in English Literatures (ZOOM only) (in English)

Colloquium (Teaching)
ECTS: 3

Dates:
weekly (starts in week: 1) Thu. 12:15 - 13:45 (2 Teaching hours per week)

This course is one of the specific colloquia designed for students planning their final dissertation either on undergraduate or graduate level in the field of literary studies (Module choices: Bachelor thesis module P or Master thesis module MA The). We shall look at a number of strategies for planning, structuring and writing longer pieces of work and this course will include formal issues such as format and layout of the final assignment. Please register on Stud. IP and explore the sections “Information” and “Schedule” on Stud. IP. for further details.

All students, who are planning to write their final dissertations in the field of literary studies, are welcome to join my course. In addition, I am happy to take on the role of a supervisor or co-supervisor for projects that correspond to my research and teaching foci, in other words, students who have a supervisor or co-supervisor that is not me are also welcome to join this course.

Dr. Jana Nittel
10-76-6-AP-02Kulturhistorische Begleitveranstaltung (in English)

Colloquium (Teaching)

Dates:
weekly (starts in week: 1) Wed. 10:15 - 11:45 GW2 A4020 (2 Teaching hours per week)
Dr. Karin Esders-Angermund
10-76-6-GS-01English Theatre Workshop (in English)

Exercises (Teaching)

Dates:
weekly (starts in week: 1) Fri. 09:45 - 12:00 GW1 A1260 (3 Teaching hours per week)

In this workshop we will explore and experiment with contemporary methods of improvisational theater, which is the art of making up theatrical moments on the spot, without a script. It is one of the liveliest and most current forms of theater of today and ingrained in US popular culture. You will first learn the basic principles of improvisational theater and then apply them to improvised scenework. We will also reflect on the impact of improvisational theater on popular culture, its applications e.g. in teaching, explore its practical approaches to comedic as well as dramatic narrative structures and draw comparisons between communication in improvised dialogue and other types of communication.

There will be a regular meeting on Fridays 9.45 - 12.00 during the semester, in which we will cover the basics of improvisational theater, followed by an intensive in the lecture-free period, in which we will work on a specific form and prepare for a performance. If you only want to participate in the intensive you need to have some experience, either from this or a previous semester. There is no obligation to be part of the performances. You can also support the performances by helping with the organization and marketing.

Tobias Sailer (LB)
10-76-6-GS-02English Theatre Workshop - Presentation & Performance (in English)
(3 SWS)

Exercises (Teaching)

Additional dates:
Mon. 18.09.23 - Thu. 21.09.23 (Mon., Tue., Wed., Thu.) 10:00 - 13:30 ZB-B B0490 (Theater)
Fri. 22.09.23 10:00 - 13:30 GW2 B3770
Mon. 25.09.23 - Thu. 28.09.23 (Mon., Tue., Wed., Thu.) 10:00 - 13:30 ZB-B B0490 (Theater)
Fri. 29.09.23 10:00 - 13:30 GW2 B3770

This part of the theatre workshop is based on our introductory work during the semester. Requirement is previous participation in the theatre workshop or some experience with long form improvisational theatre. If you have any questions, please don't hesitate to contact me.

Tobias Sailer (LB)
10-76-6-GS-03Screening Fantasy Literature (in English)

Exercises (Teaching)
ECTS: 3

Dates:
weekly (starts in week: 1) Thu. 14:15 - 15:45 GW2 A3390 (CIP-Labor FB 10) (2 Teaching hours per week)

The concept of this class is very simple: we will discuss and analyse adaptations based on fantasy literature. Not only will we try to determine what exactly is “fantasy”, but we will also look into the layers of meaning within this vast genre. The goal of this course is to give an overview of what the genre entails, how we can analyse it and what the viewer can take away from it. In order to accomplish this threefold goal, we will look into both the language of film and literary analysis to help us communicate our findings. Students are expected to participate in a presentation and have to submit a film review to receive their grade.

All materials are provided via StudIP.

Dr. Vanessa Herrmann
10-76-6-GS-04Colloquium Research and Writing (in English)

Colloquium (Teaching)
ECTS: 3

Dates:
weekly (starts in week: 1) Thu. 09:00 - 12:00 External location: GW2 A3740 (3 Teaching hours per week)
Dr. Karin Esders-Angermund
10-78-6-C3-4Theatre Workshop with INPUTS artist-in-residence Recaredo Silebo Boturu from Equatorial Guinea

Exercises (Teaching)
ECTS: 2 oder mehr

Additional dates:
Fri. 14.04.23 14:00 - 18:00 ZB-B B0490 (Theater)
Fri. 21.04.23 14:00 - 18:00 ZB-B B0490 (Theater)
Fri. 28.04.23 14:00 - 18:00 ZB-B B0490 (Theater)
Fri. 05.05.23 14:00 - 16:00 ZB-B B0490 (Theater)
Fri. 05.05.23 16:00 - 18:00 GW2 B2880
Fri. 12.05.23 14:00 - 18:00 ZB-B B0490 (Theater)
Fri. 19.05.23 14:00 - 18:00 ZB-B B0490 (Theater)
Mon. 22.05.23 10:00 - 16:00 ZB-B B0490 (Theater)
Wed. 24.05.23 16:00 - 20:00 ZB-B B0490 (Theater)

En abril y mayo de 2022, el poeta, dramaturgo y actor guineoecuatoriano Recaredo Silebo Boturu estará en Bremen durante un periodo de 8 semanas como Artista en Residencia del Instituto de Estudios Poscoloniales y Transculturales (INPUTS) de la Universidad de Bremen. En este contexto dará un taller de creación dramática para estudiantes de la Universidad de Bremen que estén interesado/as en idear y realizar una obra de teatro. La clase será en español. Si están interesado/as, por favor, dirígense a Dr. Julia Borst (FB 10): borst@uni-bremen.de

Im April und Mai 2022 verweilt der äquatorialguineische Dichter, Theaterautor und Schauspieler aus Äquatorialguinea für 8 Wochen als Artist in Residence des Instituts für postkoloniale und transkulturelle Studien (INPUTS) an der Universität Bremen. In diesem Rahmen wird er einen Theater-Workshop als Blockseminar anbieten, der für Studierende der Universität Bremen geöffnet ist, die Lust darauf haben, selbst eine Performance zu konzipieren und dann auf die Bühne zu bringen. Boturu leitet den Kurs auf Spanisch, gute Spanischkenntnisse sind aber keine Teilnahmevoraussetzung. Bei Interesse melden Sie sich bitte bei Dr. Julia Borst (FB 10): borst@uni-bremen.de
Bitte melden Sie sich bei Interesse im Vorfeld über StudIP an, damit wir die Anzahl der Teilnehmer*innen abschätzen können.

Recaredo Silebo Boturu, the Equatorial Guinean poet, playwright, and artist will be in Bremen for 8 weeks, in April and May 2022, as the Artist in Residence of the Institute of Postcolonial and Transcultural Studies (INPUTS) at the University of Bremen. During this time, in collaboration with Boturu, we will organize a theatre workshop (compact course) for the students of the University of Bremen who are interested in conceptualizing and staging a theatre performance. The workshop will be conducted in Spanish, however, good knowledge of Spanish is not mandatory for participation in the workshop. If you are interested, please contact Dr. Julia Borst (FB 10): borst@uni-bremen.de
If interested, register for this workshop in StudIP so that we can estimate the number of participants.

Recaredo Silebo Boturu ((Gastdozent))
Dr. Julia Borst
10-M80-2-SuStMo-01London Excursion - Literary London – London in Literature (July 31st – August 5th, 2023) (in English)

Seminar (Teaching)
ECTS: Depending on module choice

Dates:
fortnightly (starts in week: 2) Mon. 18:00 - 21:00 GW2 B3010 (Kleiner Studierraum) (4 Teaching hours per week)

Additional dates:
Mon. 24.07.23 18:00 - 21:00 GW2 B3010 (Kleiner Studierraum)

Teaching method: We will meet in bi-weekly face to face sessions on campus. You will need access to Stud.IP. and a laptop or tablet with sound and audio capabilities. Please make sure to attend our first session if you wish a placement in this class.

This course is primarily offered to students who wish to join our excursion. CPs may be attained for the module General Studies (BA) and Supplementary Studies module (MA E-SC).

JOIN US FOR THE LONDON EXCURSION JULY 31ST - AUGUST 5TH, 2023
“London in Literature – Literary London” (Dr Jana Nittel with Nadine Schmidt und Darleen Helms)
This trip continues a longstanding tradition (since 2010) which has been established in faculty 10 in that it offers students a five-day excursion tour to London every second or third year. Having adjusted the focus of this trip around five major topic choices: Green London; Women Writers and London; London’s Imperial Past and Postcolonial Present; London and the Shakespearean Stage and London and Crime Fiction, this five-day excursion offers now a variety of research activities and experiential learning, promising this to be a yet another brilliant study experience.
Eligibility:
• All students registered in the following course programmes: M.A. E-SC; Master of Education Englisch and B.A. E-SC.;
• Non-German citizens need to enquire about visa regulations regarding their entry to the UK as we are unable to refund any payments.
• German citizens require a passport.
A first mandatory pre-departure meeting “General Studies course “London Excursion - Literary London – London in Literature (July 31st – August 5th, 2023)” is scheduled for April 17th, 2023 from 6.00 pm. to 09:00 p.m. following the seminar session “Literary London – London in Literature” VAK: 10-76-4-D2/WD2-01.
What would you need to pay for?
• €250,00 per student to be transferred until April 26th, 2023
• Flight to and from London and airport transfer (self-organised),
• Weekly Travel card 1-3 in London (optional)
• Food and Drink.
What do we offer?
• Financial support of faculty 10 = €350,00 per participant
• Accommodation in LSE Bankside Hostel in twin and triple rooms with shared bathroom facilities and breakfast included (5 nights);
• Entry fees to museums, tickets for theatre performances, guided museum tours, Globe Education Workshop, and heritage sites.
How do you apply?
Please send an email to Dr. Jana Nittel (jnittel@uni-bremen.de) and include the following information:
• Full name and the name of your study programme (B.A. or M.A. or M.Ed.);
• Written paragraph outlining your motivation to join the excursion (150 words max. in English).
• Deadline: April 18th, 2023
We look forward to an exciting trip!
All our best wishes,
Jana Nittel with Nadine Schmidt and Darleen Helms

Dr. Jana Nittel