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Course Catalog

Study Program SoSe 2020

Programmes for Exchange Students (Incomings)

Show courses: all | in english | for older adults

Programmes for Exchange Students (Incomings)

Course numberTitle of eventLecturer
10-76-2-B-02Introduction to English Linguistics 2 - Research methods (in English)

Seminar (Teaching)
ECTS: 3

Dates:
weekly (starts in week: 1) Wed. 14:15 - 15:45

This course continues the general introduction to English Linguistics from last semester, focusing on how to do empirical work in linguistics. Students will be introduced to the different ways, methods and tools to obtain, process and analyze linguistic data. The following topics will be covered: research methodology and design, types of data collection, experiments, corpus linguistics, online dictionaries, transcription, and quantitative approaches to data analysis.

Coursework and assessment

You are expected to read and prepare selected texts for each session. The coursework will focus on real-life linguistic data and exercises which are designed to help you apply selected methods and tools and critically discuss their usefulness. You are required to submit a portfolio comprising different data-based tasks ("worksheets") and other assignments that will be worked on in the course of the semester.


Basic introductory textbooks

Sealey, A. (2010), Researching English Language. A resource book for students. London: Routledge.
Wray, A. & A. Bloomer (2012), Projects in Linguistics and Language Studies. 3rd edition. London: Hodder Education.
E-book at http://lib.myilibrary.com/Open.aspx?id=368803

Dr. Anke Schulz
10-76-2-C-01Key Moments in the Linguistic History of the English-Speaking World (in English)

Lecture (Teaching)

Dates:
weekly (starts in week: 1) Tue. 10:15 - 11:45

In this seminar, students get an introduction to the history of English, i.e. Old English, Middle English and Early Modern English. In the second half of the seminar, we study the major varieties of British and North American English as well as other world varieties with a focus on their structural and phonological features. We will follow the debates about English as a cause of language death, and talk about the place of English in language policies and language planning.

Dr. Inke Du Bois
10-76-2-C-02Key Moments in the Linguistic History of the English-Speaking World (in English)

Lecture (Teaching)

Dates:
weekly (starts in week: 1) Mon. 14:15 - 15:45

In this seminar, students get an introduction to the history of English, i.e. Old English, Middle English and Early Modern English. In the second half of the seminar, we study the major varieties of British and North American English as well as other world varieties with a focus on their structural and phonological features. We will follow the debates about English as a cause of language death, and talk about the place of English in language policies and language planning.

Dr. Inke Du Bois
10-76-2-C-04Key Moments in the Linguistic History of the English-Speaking World (in English)

Seminar (Teaching)

Dates:
weekly (starts in week: 1) Tue. 14:15 - 15:45

The English language is more than 1.500 years old. What began in the 5th century as the language spoken by Germanic invaders on the British Isles has developed into a truly global language: English is now spoken as a first and second language in numerous regional contexts, and learned as a foreign language around the globe, by an estimated 1.5bio people. During its eventful history, the English language has changed considerably, shaped by internal and external forces; so much so that Old English is virtually unintelligible to modern speakers. Today, as a result of its history and global spread, English has become so multifaceted and exists in so many different forms that linguists even speak of 'Englishes', rather than a single, uniform language. This seminar will introduce you to the key moments in the fascinating 'biography' of the English language.

In the first half of the seminar, we will trace the history of English, from its beginnings on the British Isles in the 5th century to its modern-day status as a world language. Working in chronological order, we will progress through all major stages of the history of English, from Old English through Middle English and Early Modern English. At each stage, we'll discuss the historical and sociocultural circumstances of its speakers, the major influences on the language, as well as the most important linguistic features of each stage of the English language.

In the second half of the seminar, we will focus on the diversity of Englishes that exists in the world today. We will take a closer look at how English is spoken in some regions of the world (e.g. North America, the Southern Hemisphere, etc.). We will gain a general overview of which linguistic features are shared, and which features diverge across different Englishes (phonology, grammar, lexicon). In a final session, we will discuss English as a possible cause of language death, and talk about the place of English in contemporary issues of language policy and language planning.

The topics in detail:

  • Old English I
  • Old English II
  • Middle English
  • Early Modern English I
  • Early Modern English II
  • Inner, outer and expanding circles
  • English on the British Isles
  • English in North America
  • English in the Southern Hemisphere
  • English as Global Language

Apart from basic knowledge in linguistics (e.g. the Introduction to English Linguistics I), no prior knowledge in English historical linguistics or English variational linguistics is required for participation in this course. The working language of the seminar is English.

Dr. Inke Du Bois