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Veranstaltungsverzeichnis

Lehrveranstaltungen WiSe 2019/2020

Soziologie, B.A.

Veranstaltungen anzeigen: alle | in englischer Sprache | für ältere Erwachsene

Wahlpflichtbereich

Der Wahlpflichtbereich umfasst die Speziellen Soziologien. In jedem Semester steht Ihnen eine Auswahl zur Verfügung. Ein Modul besteht jeweils aus Vorlesung und Seminar.

Studierende des Vollfachs wählen innerhalb ihres Studiums 2 Spezielle Soziologien und absolvieren insgesamt 18 CP. Studierende des Profil- und Komplementärfachs wählen innerhalb ihres Studiums 1 Spezielle Soziologie und absolvieren 9 CP.

Spezielle Soziologien, die darüber hinaus absolviert werden, können im Wahlbereich anerkannt werden. Beachten Sie bitte die Informationen unter "Wahlbereich".

Spezielle Soziologien

Entwicklungssoziologie (Soz-SP12)

VAKTitel der VeranstaltungDozentIn
08-29-3-SP12-1Development Sociology: Theory and Policy in Practice (in englischer Sprache)
[Entwicklungssoziologie: Theorie und Politik in ihrer Umsetzung]

Vorlesung

Termine:
wöchentlich Di 08:00 - 10:00 SFG 2060 (2 SWS)

Development Sociology emerged and was actively developed by scholars in many countries in the 1960s and 1970s and sharpened as a result of emerging tensions between modernisation and dependency theories. It was the disciplinary child of the project of international development, and as such also the child of colonialism, growing up and being shaped by imperial and colonial pasts, Cold War legacies, , together with increasing wealth inequalities both across and between the North and South.
The module ‘Development Sociology’ introduces the students to (1) the different theories of development, (2) the implementation of development theory inspired policies in development practice, as well as (3) the epistemological and methodological tools of development research.
The lecture ‘Development Sociology: Theory and Policy in Practice’ will cover the following development theories and their influences on policy practice:
• Modernisation and Growth
• Dependency and Self-Reliance
• Neoliberalism and Structural Adjustment
• Participation and Sustainability
• Women and Gender
• Post-Development and Alternatives
• Multiple Modernities, Risks and Acceleration

Each theoretical approach will be dealt with in two sessions of the lecture. The first deals with the theory itself and will be based on the obligatory readings, the second deals with its implementation in practice by drawing on key empirical research findings and country examples.
The seminar ‘Development Theory in Practice: Empirical Examples and Methodological Tools’ will deepen and extend reflection of selected key themes engaged with in the lecture by exploring empirical examples. Additionally it introduces the students to the following methodological considerations and tools for empirical development research:
• Relative and Multi-dimensional Poverty analyses, Growth and Well-being Indices and Knowledge Society Indices – capitalist/market-led influences on data collection, sharing and dissemination
• Community-based participatory tools: mixed methods household surveying, group-based interviewing and focus groups, and Participatory Learning & Action (PLA) approaches
• Long term field research: Emic and etic worldviews, embeddedness, participant observation, researcher reflectivity, positionality, ethics and role of local language skills
• Development policy analyses (drawing from Critical Policy Studies)
• Mobile ethnographies and ethnographies of mobility: Follow the Innovation, the Migrant, the Epistemology, non-human natures & multi-sited Research Methodologies
• Audio-visual and inter-textual methods in research

The seminar will utilize varied teaching formats and styles that place emphasis on nurturing students´ independent thinking, the development of their own thematic fields of interest and the ability to write. The experiential element will include features such as situational presentations (e.g. pitching a project idea), poster sharing sessions and experimentation with other self-selected genres (e.g. life history narratives, scripts for short sketches, infographics and political cartoons), together with the development of academic material in the form of short papers and small-project proposals. The students are particularly encouraged to use the seminar to develop their ability to formulate arguments and substantiate these in a written format – also linked to their own thesis topics.
Irrespective of the teaching format, all sessions will substantially build on obligatory readings and the writing samples produced by the students. The completion of individual and group project work is vital to ensuring the quality of in-class discussions. All obligatory and recommended readings will be made available for download via StudIP.

Course requirements:
For 3 CPs: Active participation, having read the obligatory reading for each week, in only the lecture or the seminar (36+36 = 72 hours) and the submission of 3 text summaries (72+30 = 102 hours)
For 6 CPs: Participation in the lecture and the seminar (72+72 = 144 hours), submission of 3 text summaries (144+30 = 174 hours) and the giving of an oral presentation (174+40 = 214 hours).
For 9 CPs: Participation in the lecture and the seminar (72+72 = 144 hours), submission of 3 text summaries (144+30 = 174 hours) and the giving of an oral presentation (174+40 = 214 hours) and the writing of a 10-page-seminar paper (214 + 80 = 294 hours).

The text summaries of obligatory readings have to be submitted always before 8pm on the day before the seminar / lecture in which the reading is obligatory. The seminar paper has to be submittet by 31.3.20 and 30.6.20.

Consultation Hours of Lecturers:
In case of general questions, please arrange an appointment with anna-katharina.hornidge@leibniz-zmt.de.

Prof. Dr. Anna-Katharina Hornidge
08-29-3-SP12-2Development Sociology: Empirical Examples and Methodological Tools (in englischer Sprache)
[Entwicklungstheorie in der Praxis: Empirische Fallstudien und Methoden]

Seminar

Einzeltermine:
Fr 25.10.19 08:00 - 12:00 ZMT, Wiener Str. 7, 3. Ebene, Raum "The BOX"
Fr 22.11.19 08:00 - 16:00 ZMT, Wiener Str. 7, 3. Ebene, Raum "The BOX"
Fr 13.12.19 08:00 - 16:00 ZMT, Wiener Str. 7, 3. Ebene, Raum "The BOX"
Fr 31.01.20 08:00 - 16:00 ZMT, Wiener Str. 7, 3. Ebene, Raum "The BOX"

Development Sociology emerged and was actively developed by scholars in many countries in the 1960s and 1970s and sharpened as a result of emerging tensions between modernisation and dependency theories. It was the disciplinary child of the project of international development, and as such also the child of colonialism, growing up and being shaped by imperial and colonial pasts, Cold War legacies, , together with increasing wealth inequalities both across and between the North and South.
The module ‘Development Sociology’ introduces the students to (1) the different theories of development, (2) the implementation of development theory inspired policies in development practice, as well as (3) the epistemological and methodological tools of development research.
The lecture ‘Development Sociology: Theory and Policy in Practice’ will cover the following development theories and their influences on policy practice:
• Modernisation and Growth
• Dependency and Self-Reliance
• Neoliberalism and Structural Adjustment
• Participation and Sustainability
• Women and Gender
• Post-Development and Alternatives
• Multiple Modernities, Risks and Acceleration

Each theoretical approach will be dealt with in two sessions of the lecture. The first deals with the theory itself and will be based on the obligatory readings, the second deals with its implementation in practice by drawing on key empirical research findings and country examples.
The seminar ‘Development Theory in Practice: Empirical Examples and Methodological Tools’ will deepen and extend reflection of selected key themes engaged with in the lecture by exploring empirical examples. Additionally it introduces the students to the following methodological considerations and tools for empirical development research:
• Relative and Multi-dimensional Poverty analyses, Growth and Well-being Indices and Knowledge Society Indices – capitalist/market-led influences on data collection, sharing and dissemination
• Community-based participatory tools: mixed methods household surveying, group-based interviewing and focus groups, and Participatory Learning & Action (PLA) approaches
• Long term field research: Emic and etic worldviews, embeddedness, participant observation, researcher reflectivity, positionality, ethics and role of local language skills
• Development policy analyses (drawing from Critical Policy Studies)
• Mobile ethnographies and ethnographies of mobility: Follow the Innovation, the Migrant, the Epistemology, non-human natures & multi-sited Research Methodologies
• Audio-visual and inter-textual methods in research

The seminar will utilize varied teaching formats and styles that place emphasis on nurturing students´ independent thinking, the development of their own thematic fields of interest and the ability to write. The experiential element will include features such as situational presentations (e.g. pitching a project idea), poster sharing sessions and experimentation with other self-selected genres (e.g. life history narratives, scripts for short sketches, infographics and political cartoons), together with the development of academic material in the form of short papers and small-project proposals. The students are particularly encouraged to use the seminar to develop their ability to formulate arguments and substantiate these in a written format – also linked to their own thesis topics.
Irrespective of the teaching format, all sessions will substantially build on obligatory readings and the writing samples produced by the students. The completion of individual and group project work is vital to ensuring the quality of in-class discussions. All obligatory and recommended readings will be made available for download via StudIP.

Course requirements:
For 3 CPs: Active participation, having read the obligatory reading for each week, in only the lecture or the seminar (36+36 = 72 hours) and the submission of 3 text summaries (72+30 = 102 hours)
For 6 CPs: Participation in the lecture and the seminar (72+72 = 144 hours), submission of 3 text summaries (144+30 = 174 hours) and the giving of an oral presentation (174+40 = 214 hours).
For 9 CPs: Participation in the lecture and the seminar (72+72 = 144 hours), submission of 3 text summaries (144+30 = 174 hours) and the giving of an oral presentation (174+40 = 214 hours) and the writing of a 10-page-seminar paper (214 + 80 = 294 hours).

The text summaries of obligatory readings have to be submitted always before 8pm on the day before the seminar / lecture in which the reading is obligatory. The seminar paper has to be submittet by 31.3.20 and 30.6.20.

Consultation Hours of Lecturers:
In case of general questions, please arrange an appointment with anna-katharina.hornidge@leibniz-zmt.de.

Prof. Dr. Anna-Katharina Hornidge

Wahlbereich

Studierende des Vollfachs und des Profilfachs können Leistungen aus folgenden Bereichen erbringen:
Module aus dem Wahlpflichtbereich (Spezielle Soziologien), die zuvor nicht belegt wurden
Seminare aus dem Pflichtbereich (FEM, Gesellschaftstheorie, Sozialtheorie), die zuvor nicht belegt wurden
General Studies Angebot aus dem BA Soziologie
General Studies Angebot aus dem Fachbereich 8 / Sozialwissenschaften
Angebote der fächerergänzenden Studien der Universität Bremen (zu finden unter: Veranstaltungsverzeichnis Universität Bremen)

Studierende des Vollfachs können zusätzlich Leistungen aus folgenden Bereichen erbringen:
General Studies Angebot anderer Fächer
Module anderer Fächer der Universität Bremen (zu finden unter: Veranstaltungsverzeichnis Universität Bremen)

Studierende des Komplementärfachs können Leistungen aus folgenden Bereichen erbringen:
Module aus dem Wahlpflichtbereich (Spezielle Soziologien), die zuvor nicht belegt wurden
Module des Pflichtbereichs des BA Studiengangs Soziologie (Statistik/Methoden I, Statistik/Methoden II)
Seminare aus dem Modul Gesellschaftstheorie und Sozialtheorie
General Studies Angebot aus dem BA Soziologie

General Studies Angebot aus dem BA Soziologie

Ergänzung und Vertiefung Soziologischer Theorie

VAKTitel der VeranstaltungDozentIn
08-29-GS-10Introduction to Sociology in English (in englischer Sprache)
[Soziologie auf Englisch - keine Angst vor englischen Texten]

Seminar
ECTS: 3/6

Termine:
wöchentlich Di 08:00 - 12:00 UNICOM 3; 0. Ebene; Seminarraum 2 (2 SWS)

This course is a seminar that introduces students to the study of Sociology. Sociology is the study of the way institutions structure how individuals live as well as the way individuals structure those same institutions. It seeks to ask and examine questions like: What is a society? How have societies developed over time? How and why are different societies more or less equal? This course seeks to examine these questions in ways that provide an introduction to the field of sociology. It focuses on a broad range of theory and research showing how sociologists think about and study these questions.

We have three goals for this course. The first is to provide you with a general overview of the discipline of Sociology. We will explore various social phenomena and discuss the explanations and interpretations of these phenomena offered by sociologists. The second goal is to understand how to look at the social world with a sociological thinking. We will explore what makes sociology different from other types of sciences and how sociologists seek to understand the world. The third goal is to improve your ability to discuss scientific ideas in the common international language of modern scientific publication and discussion, which is English.

Dr. Mandy Boehnke
Simone Tonelli

Ergänzung und Vertiefung Spezieller Soziologien

VAKTitel der VeranstaltungDozentIn
08-29-GS-22Older Workers in Europe: A Group of Growing Importance (in englischer Sprache)
[Ältere Arbeitnehmer*innen in Europa: Ein Gruppe von zunehmender Bedeutung]

Seminar

Termine:
wöchentlich Mo 16:00 - 18:00 UNICOM 7.4680 (SOCIUM - Mary-Somerville-Str. 7) (2 SWS)

Increasing life-expectancies and decreasing fertility rates are resulting in the demographic ageing and a growing number of older people in relative and absolute numbers. This demographic shift is affecting various societal spheres including the labor market. Older workers’ employment rates are increasing rapidly and ageing workforces increasingly become of interested for politicians, trade-unions, employers, human-resource managers and social policy makers alike.
In this seminar different perspectives in regard to these developments are discussed: amongst others trends of older workers’ employment rates, old-age discrimination in the labor market, age(ing)-friendly human resource measures, age appropriate work environments as well as pension and labor market policies aimed at older workers. This will be done in a European perspective with a focus on Germany and outlooks to Asia and North America.
Participants should be generally interested in the sociology of ageing and labor market and the topic of demographic ageing. The aim of the seminar is that participants understand the drivers and determinants behind the trend of increasing older workers’ employment rates and how this affects the institutional and workplace level. The seminar is relevant on the one hand for participants who aim to work in social policy politics and research as well for participants who plan to work in companies and organization with an increasing older and, hence diverse workforce. The seminar will be taught in English, however assignments (Prüfungsleistungen), can be also acquitted in German

Literature for Preparation:
Ebbinghaus, B., & Hofäcker, D. (2013). Reversing early retirement in advanced welfare economies a paradigm shift to overcome push and pull factors. Comparative Population Studies, 38(4).

Moritz Heß
08-29-GS-23Gender Inequality and Stratification (in englischer Sprache)
[Geschlechterungleichheit und soziale Ungleichheit]

Seminar

Termine:
wöchentlich Di 08:00 - 10:00 UNICOM 3.3380 (SOCIUM - Mary-Somerville-Str. 3) (2 SWS)

This seminar will address the relationship between social class and gender-based forms of stratification in modern societies and in historical perspective. Overall, the question of interest is why the inequalities at the intersection of class and gender in paid and unpaid work persist across industrialized societies despite some impressive policy achievements over the past half century. The primary literature source will be the book “Gender-Class Equality in Political Economies”. In this book, Lynn Prince Cooke places gender inequality in a context that is historically shaped by the intersections of multiple inequalities and the particularities of six countries: Germany (East and West), Spain, Australia, the UK and the US. Gender-class inequalities persist in paid work hours, wages, and the division of housework. The study shows how values, choices, and behaviors of individual men and women in various national contexts are enabled and constrained by state policies that effectively structure relative group advantage and disadvantage from birth through old age.

Prof. Sonja Drobnic
08-29-GS-28The power of culture in the economy: Theories and applications of the “moral economy“ (in englischer Sprache)
[Die Macht der Kultur in der Ökonomie: Theorien und Anwendungen des „Moralökonomie“-Konzepts]

Seminar

Termine:
wöchentlich Do 12:00 - 14:00 UNICOM 3.3390 (SOCIUM - Mary-Somerville-Str. 3) (2 SWS)

This course offers an introduction to the concept of moral economy, exploring the relation between economic frameworks and norms, structures of feelings, and cultural perceptions. It first reviews foundational texts from political philosophy and social theory, tracing the moral economy in relation to legitimacy and the political economy, and exploring the tension between redistribution and recognition. Second, it considers contemporary applications, including moral economy and the welfare state, social boundaries and class, the sociology of valuation, relational inequality, and the study of racism. The course maps out ways of thinking about the problem of how, in our contemporary world, economic processes are perceived and evaluated. It has a global scope, featuring examples from the US, Europe, and beyond.

The key competency gained in this course is to connect theoretical concepts and empirical applications. Students can use these tools in a variety of ways, such as analyzing media debates, or studying social problems in work environments. The course covers novel practical applications that can be applied in a range of areas (such as relational methods in economic sociology) and that can also be used to set up a research or media project in this field.

Obligatory requirements: course readings, participating in discussions on the digital course platform (discussion prompts for each session will be provided)

3CP: Input presentation (oral presentation, 10 minutes) and theses paper (2-3 pages) or protocol of the session (2-3 pages)
6CP: Input presentation (oral presentation, 10 minutes), term paper 8 pages.
The course language is English; final projects may be written up in German.

Dr. Till Hilmar

Praxisrelevanz und Berufsorientierung

VAKTitel der VeranstaltungDozentIn
08-29-GS-42Sociology meets Psychology (3): Acting socially sustainably in organisations – Principles, approaches and methods for organisational solutions (in englischer Sprache)
[Soziologie trifft Psychologie (3): Sozial nachhaltigen Handelns in Organisationen – Prinzipien, Ansätze und Methoden für organisationale Lösungen]

Seminar
ECTS: 3/6

Termine:
zweiwöchentlich (Startwoche: 2) Di 16:00 - 19:00 SFG 2070 (2 SWS)

Sustainability research targets issues on the macro-, meso- or micro level (societies, organisations, groups and individuals). While a political or sociological viewpoint focuses on the macro- or meso-level, social sustainability in this course issues the meso- and micro-level of organisations and the people within. Part 1 (in winter terms, alternately with part 3) of this General Studies reflects rising problems in the postmodern organisation, considering the strategic, interactive and individual dimensions (topics: basics on sustainability studies, psychology of work, occupational health management, workaholism, burnout, mobbing, work-life-balance and downshifting). Part 2 (in summer terms) aims for a deeper understanding on topics of further in-depth consideration identified as important for a socially sustainable organisation, chosen by students according to own interests. Part 4 targets the issue of intercultural communication in alternating summer terms. All summer term classes are accompanied by a field exploration besides theoretical knowledge in the classroom enlightenment. All parts described can be studied separately; since students like continuity, a series is offered.

Part 3 spotlights on principles, approaches and methods which enable the postmodern organisation and their actors to support socially sustainable practices at the workplace. The first two sessions are dedicated to the organisation of the seminar and some basic knowledge. The further topics will be prepared in small groups of students. They take care to prepare inputs and interactional parts, shaped as a workshop, which allows for “living learning” (TCI didactic) about the chosen topic for all participants. Suggested topics are: Sustainable leadership, participation and quality of work, communication skills, acknowledgement and work, new practices of time-management, e.g.

The seminar uses English as Lingua Franca – coping with the effects of this setting is part of the reflection within the course, referring to differences between communication, comprehension and understanding within a working environment. Students are supported to express themselves, didactically and by the lecturer. The interactive learning setting combines theoretical and practical elements and allows for reflection on own experiences of participants.
The summer term 2018 and the winter term 2018/19 will offer students part 2 and 1 of the seminar with topics as mentioned above. Please note: all parts can be attended singularly.

Recommended for students in their 3rd semester. Open to first semester students, students from other faculties (BA, MA), and Erasmus students. As a training seminar, this course is limited to 20 participants.

2 SWS: Fortnightly, starting in the 2nd week of the term, 3 hours (s.t.!), Tuesdays, 6-9pm. Please register reliable via Stud.IP for your participation.

References
French W.L. & Bell C. H. (2005). Organizational Development and Transformation – Managing Effective Change. McGraw-Hill.
Kuebel, M. A. (2002). Living Learning: A Reader in Theme Centered Interaction. Dehli: Media House.
Meyerhuber, S. (2013). Trust and Time in Reorganisations and the Role of Middle Management. In G. Becke, Mindful Change in Times of Permanent Reorganisation. Berlin: Springer.

Performance requirement / ECTS (CP)
Preparation of an interactive lecture and its documentary on the topic chosen, in a small group of students. (6 ECTS / 3 ECTS)

Dr. Sylke Meyerhuber
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