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Veranstaltungsverzeichnis

Lehrveranstaltungen WiSe 2021/2022

English-Speaking Cultures: Language, Text, Media, M. A.

OrMo - Orientation Module (15 CP)

In this module participants are given an overview of the major research areas of the MA, spanning the three interrelated areas: language, text and
media. Read more... https://blogs.uni-bremen.de/maesc/modules/

Modulverantwortlicher: John Bateman
VAKTitel der VeranstaltungDozentIn
10-M80-1-OrMo-01On the Move: Narratives of Travel and Mobility (ZOOM only) (in englischer Sprache)

Seminar

Termine:
wöchentlich Di 14:15 - 15:45 SFG 1020

This course welcomes students who wish to complete the following modules:
M.A. E-SC: OrMO (Orientierungsmodul 1. Semester)
M.A. E-SC SpecMo (Spezialisierungsmodul 3. Semester);
M.A. TnL Vertiefungsmodul und Profilmodul Literatur
Academic Exchange students

This course is now taught online due to temporary shortages in seminar room allocations. Narratives of Travel and Mobility have a long-standing history and are increasingly popular in terms of text production and commercial success, encompassing a fascinating diversity of literary forms, modes and itineraries. As a repository for factual and fictional accounts of mobility and cross-cultural exchange, however, these narratives have long been underestimated for their potential to contribute to a broad range of cultural, political and historical debates that seek to reassess the role of travel writing as a "vehicle for geographic, ethnographic and sociological knowledge." (Thompson 4). This seminar discusses diverse themes and characteristics of historic and contemporary travel narratives, including postcolonial travel accounts and refugee writings and thus aims to map contemporary critical concepts regarding transnational and postcolonial perspectives in weekly readings of excerpts of selected travel narratives.

We will meet in weekly seminar sessions online via ZOOM. Since some of the participants are required to submit a research paper, we will use parts of our seminar discussions to the development of topics, the formulation of a thesis statement, as well as considerations about the methodological approaches of writing such a paper. A reader with selected secondary text materials will be made available for download on Stud. IP. You may wish to check the sections "Information" and "Schedule" further details such as requirements, weekly schedule, select bibliography and modes of assessment. You will need access to Stud.IP and a laptop or tablet with sound and audio capabilities.

Requirements and Assessment
• Interest in the topic discussed and ideally a regular attendance and informed participation in class discussion (not part of your formal assessment);
• in-depth knowledge of the selected reading material,
• homework assignments,
• group projects and presentation of research paper proposals;
• research-based term paper.
The requirements as formulated above may vary depending on your overall degree program.

Dr. Jana Nittel
10-M80-1-OrMo-02Media Aesthetics, Media Genres and Media History (ZOOM only) (in englischer Sprache)

Seminar

Termine:
wöchentlich Do 12:15 - 13:45 Online

This course welcomes students who wish to complete the following modules:
M.A. E-SC: OrMO (Orientierungsmodul 1. Semester)
M.A. E-SC SpecMo (Spezialisierungsmodul 3. Semester);
M.A. TnL Vertiefungsmodul und Profilmodul Literatur
Zertifikatsstudium Grundlagen Digitaler Medien in pädagogischen Kontexten > Digitale Medien in Lernumgebungen

We are thoroughly surrounded by media on a daily basis, living, so to speak, in a “mediatized” society (Voigts-Virchow, 2005: 5), where the majority of information and knowledge is not perceived through a first-hand experience, i.e. somatically, but information that came to us via a medium, in other words, symbolically (Ott and Mack, 2010: 1). According to a number of critical textbooks in Media studies in English, a course on media aesthetics can supply the basis for media literacy by examining the meaning of visual images for use in film and electronic media.

Delineating from a quintessential understanding of media aesthetics as a study in sensory perception, as a study in value, and a study in the stylistic and formal properties of artistic products, the course will maintain a more philosophically minded orientation in the first half of the course by providing students with an extensive overview of the field of old, new and hybrid forms of media (print, painting, and photography, broadcast, radio play, TV, film, hypertext, simulation systems, videogames and digital art). The sessions on film analysis (narratological and dramatic composition) will however incorporate some aspects of applied media aesthetics by exploring major aesthetic image elements including light, colour and sound in greater detail.

We will meet in weekly online ZOOM seminar sessions, but students will also have access to weekly study units. Since some of the participants are required to submit a research-based term paper, we will use parts of our seminar discussions to the development of topics, the formulation of a thesis statement, as well as considerations about the methodological approaches of writing such a paper. A reader with selected secondary text materials will be made available for download on Stud. IP. You will need access to Stud.IP and a laptop or tablet with sound and audio capabilities. You may wish to check the sections "Information" and "Schedule" further details such as requirements, weekly schedule, select bibliography and modes of assessment.

Requirements and Assessment
• Interest in the topic discussed and ideally a regular attendance and informed participation in class discussion (not part of your formal assessment);
• in-depth knowledge of the selected reading material,
• homework assignments,
• Portfolio presentation or research-based term paper.
The requirements as formulated above may vary depending on your module choices and your overall degree program.

Dr. Jana Nittel
10-M80-1-OrMo-03Lecture Series: Studying English-Speaking Cultures - Topics, Theories and Methods (in englischer Sprache) (in englischer Sprache)

Vorlesung

Termine:
wöchentlich Mi 14:15 - 15:45 CART Rotunde - 0.67

In this obligatory course for the MA E-SC participants gain an overview of the particular approaches and areas covered in the Masters programme as a whole so that they can consider their subsequent areas of specialisation.

Dr. Inke Du Bois
Prof. Dr. Marcus Callies
Dr. Sukla Chatterjee
Dr. Karin Esders-Angermund
Prof. Dr. Kerstin Knopf
Prof. John Arnold Bateman, Ph.D.
Prof. Dr. Norbert Schaffeld
Prof. Dr. Claudia Harsch
10-M80-1-OrMo-04From Newspapers to Twitter: Discourse and Ideology in the News (in englischer Sprache)

Seminar

Termine:
wöchentlich Mo 10:15 - 11:45 GW2 B1410
Tamara Drummond
10-M80-1-OrMo-05Current Topics in research on World Englishes (in englischer Sprache)
Modultyp A-D im Studiengang Language Sciences, M.A.

Seminar

Termine:
wöchentlich Fr 10:15 - 11:45 GW2 A3390 (CIP-Labor FB 10)

In the last decades, the research paradigm of World Englishes has experienced a proliferation of detailed studies of different aspects of Englishes across the world. These descriptions have largely focused on phonological, lexical, morphosyntactic, and, more recently, also pragmatic and cultural-cognitive aspects of World Englishes. In this seminar we will review recent trends and current research topics and methods in the field (e.g. model formation, lexico-grammatical variation and innovation, pragmatics, and metaphor and idioms). Students will then develop and work on corpus-based empirical research projects in which they examine selected aspects of World Englishes.

Obligatory preparatory reading (can be downloaded as PDF from folder "Readings"):

Bolton, K. 2013. Varieties of World Englishes. In C. A. Chapelle (ed.), The Encyclopedia of Applied Linguistics. Oxford: Wiley-Blackwell. https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1002/9781405198431.wbeal1260

Prof. Dr. Marcus Callies
10-M80-1-OrMo-06Language, culture and gender (in englischer Sprache)

Seminar

Termine:
wöchentlich Mi 12:15 - 13:45 SFG 0140

This course will deal with the principles underlying language use, with a specific focus on differences and the construction of gender and sexual orientation. We will learn that gender is seen as a dichotomy in some research such as sociolinguistics and that other research claims that gender interactional patterns are not a reflection of the individual’s nature but rather of some performance that the individual is accomplishing. According to this view, "gender is doing, not being." But also there is more to know about the different research methodologies of language, sex and gender categories. These include Sociolinguistics, Conversation analysis, Corpus linguistics, Critical discourse analysis, Discursive Psychology, Feminist Post-Structuralist Discourse Analysis and Queer Theory. Subsequently, students will be required to develop a project of their own, analysing the language used by people of different gender, sex or sexual orientation in a particular communication situation of their own choice.

Dr. Inke Du Bois
10-M80-1-OrMo-07Introduction to the study of multimodality (in englischer Sprache)
synchronous and asynchronous digital sessions and face-to-face as allowed and wished. Modultyp A-D im Studiengang Language Sciences, M.A.

Seminar

Termine:
wöchentlich Fr 16:00 - 18:00 GW2 B3010 (Kleiner Studierraum)

In the course a detailed overview of the growing field of multimodality will be given, examining how different expressive resources (text, pictures, diagrams, layout, movement, sound, ...) combine productively for effective communication, and how problems and failures of communication can be analysed. The course will be example driven, looking at particular kinds of multimodal communication in order to introduce some of the basic theoretical and practical methods developed for state of the art multimodality research. The course is a prerequisite for taking up further more advanced studies of mixed mode communication forms later in the MA programme. Participants will engage with analytic methods from film theory, design theory, comics and sequential art, psychological approaches, rhetoric, advertising and more, all critically reassessed and extended through modern multimodality theory and method. A broad interdisciplinary textbook introducing the field is Bateman/Wildfeuer/Hiippala (2017, de Gruyter) "Multimodality: foundations, research and analysis. a problem-oriented introduction", available from the university library. It will be possible to study the course online; face-to-face meetings may be organised as the situation allows.

Prof. John Arnold Bateman, Ph.D.
10-M80-1-OrMo-08Language with an accent in New Zealand, Europe and the US (in englischer Sprache)

Seminar

Termine:
wöchentlich Mi 10:15 - 11:45

This class deals with the ways that linguistic diversity might be related to linguistic discrimination. We will begin with the studies on 'linguistic profiling' based on experimental studies of housing discrimination, and expand upon those findings to promote equity in education, employment, medicine and the law. This class deals with these studies, devoted to the advancement of equality and justice globally. You will give an online group presentation in this class via Zoom.
https://suche.suub.uni-bremen.de/peid=B101510957

Dr. Inke Du Bois
10-M82-1-4-EM-2Cognitive Linguistics and Multimodal Communication at the Crossroads
synchronous and asynchronous digital sessions

Seminar

Termine:
wöchentlich Mi 18:00 - 20:00 SFG 2060 (2 SWS)

This course is an examination of the fundamental processes underlying people’s political/economic judgments and attitude formation. Topics include multimodal metaphor, blending, framing and framing effects, mental models and discourse, embodied cognition and moral reasoning; the inadequacies of the rational actor model; the difference between reflexive and reflective thought; individual differences in morality and their role in individual differences in political attitudes and everyday economic decision-making and problem-solving; the moral roots of conservatives and liberals; financial crises (e.g., the 2008 American financial crisis and the Eurozone crisis), bailouts, empathy, and selfishness; self-change and brain change; belief, desire, ideology, and moral motivation; and culture, cognition, and moral-political reasoning.

Ahmed Elsayed

UEP Part 1 - Using English in the Professional World (6 CP)

The module provides the more practically-focused language, presentation and negotiation skills foundation for the other modules in the study programme.
Read more... https://blogs.uni-bremen.de/maesc/modules/

Modulverantwortliche: Dr. Vanessa Herrmann
VAKTitel der VeranstaltungDozentIn
10-M80-1-UEP 1-01Using English in the Professional World 1 - Group 1 (in englischer Sprache)

Seminar

Termine:
wöchentlich Mo 10:15 - 13:45 Online

+ This course takes place online +

This four-hour course is designed to give students an insight into academic writing at a professional level. We will not only discuss the fundamental aspects of academic writing (e.g. thesis statements, paragraphing etc.), but also look at various text types used in academia (abstract, summary, essay etc.). Apart from structural devices, we will furthermore focus on how to apply critical thinking/writing within the boundaries given by the text types. In addition, we will focus on the needed language skills to communicate the complex concepts that permeate academic writing in preparation for the MA dissertation.

Dr. Vanessa Herrmann
10-M80-1-UEP 1-02Using English in the Professional World 1 - Group 2 (in englischer Sprache)

Seminar
ECTS: 6

Termine:
wöchentlich Mo 10:15 - 13:45 GW2 B2900

This four-hour course will take place on campus.

You will take part in video conferences that are within the scheduled time frame of the course as well as elements that you will be expected to prepare asynchronously.

The course is designed to develop academic writing skills at a professional level. We will review the fundamental aspects of academic wrting at the structural level, including thesis statements, paragraphing, developing cohesion etc. as we explore different text types that you will be expected to use in your academic studies. In addition, emphasis will be placed on further developing the necessary language skills to express complex concepts in both written and spoken form as you move forward in developing critical thinking and writing skills.

Lisa Nehls, M.A.

SuStMo - Supplementary Studies Module (9 CP)

Students may opt for language courses offered both by Faculty 10 and the Foreign Language Centre (Fremdsprachenzentrum Bremen - FZHB), relevant courses and lecture series offered both by Faculty 10 and other faculties, or receive credit points for additional internships and academic exchange to Anglophone countries.
Read more... https://blogs.uni-bremen.de/maesc/modules/

Modulverantwortliche: Jana Wachsmuth
VAKTitel der VeranstaltungDozentIn
10-M80-1-SuStMo-01Vocabulary & Pronunciation (Part1)/ ON CAMPUS

Übung
ECTS: 3

Termine:
wöchentlich Mi 16:15 - 17:45 GW2 A4020

This course offeres blended learning and will combine synchronous on-campus meetings and asynchronous tutored self-study units (vocabulary and pronunciation practice).

This course is highly recommendable for first-semester students, students preparing for oral presentations, students who wish to expand their academic vocabulary, and any students who after the last rather difficult semester wish to catch up on aspects of pronunciation and vocabulary.

Mind the Gap!
The course is designed to give you further insight into pronunication and vocabulary work. For pronunciation we will look into different aspects of pronunciation and intonation. This includes pronunciation of individual sounds and words, and intonation of chunks and whole sentences with special attention to connected speech. For vocabulary we will refresh our knowledge of typical 'confusables' ('economic' or 'economical'?), academic vocabulary, and useful phrases for specific language functions such as linking, adding, comparing, summarising, concluding. You will be introduced to diverse aspects of pronunciation and vocabulary, and will be asked to evaluate your own status quo.
You will be asked to work with dictionaries (electronic/digital/online) and pronunciation and vocabulary material (print and digital). You will also provide me with recordings (mp3/mp4/ogg or another suitable format) of your pronunciation work.

Technical prerequisites
Computer/laptop/tablet + (functioning) headset (headphones and microphone)
You will be asked to work with dictionaries (electronic/digital/online) and pronunciation and vocabulary material (print and digital). You will also provide me with recordings (mp3/mp4/ogg or another suitable format) of your pronunciation work.

You can earn 3 CPs for 90 hours of work (of which you will spend only 28 hours in class (online). The rest of the time is dedicated to completing self-study units as homework.

Materials for this course will be provided.

Recommended material

Vocabulary
Cornell, Alan & Geoff Parkes What’s the Difference? A Guide to Tricky Vocabulary Areas in English, Englang Books.
McCarthy, Michael & Felicity O’Dell English Collocations in Use, Intermediate/Advanced edition. Self-study edition with key. Cambridge University Press/Klett.
McCarthy, Michael & Felicity O’Dell. English Vocabulary in Use, upper-intermediate & advanced. Cambridge UP.
McCarthy, Michael & Felicity O’Dell. Academic Vocabulary in Use, Cambridge UP/Klett. 2nd Ed. 2016

Pronunciation
Hollingsworth, Keith and Laura Park
The Englang Pronunciation Course(BE)
Hewings, Martin, English pronunciation in use : self-study and classroom use (Book, advanced), Cambridge Univ. Press, 2007
Hewings, Martin, English pronunciation in use : self-study and classroom use (advanced, CDs, now also available as mp3 download!), Cambridge Univ. Press
Hancock, Mark, English pronunciation in use: self-study and classroom use (Book, intermediate), Cambridge Univ. Press, 2006,
Hancock, Mark, English pronunciation in use: self-study and classroom use (CDs, intermediate), Cambridge Univ. Press, 2006

Katja Müller, M.A.

ReMo - Research Module (9 CP)

In this module, students prepare their MA thesis with regard to content and methodology.
Read more... https://blogs.uni-bremen.de/maesc/modules/

Modulbeauftragte: Claudia Harsch
VAKTitel der VeranstaltungDozentIn
10-M80-3-ReMo-01Research Module: Literature (and Film) (in englischer Sprache)
B

Colloquium

Termine:
wöchentlich Fr 10:15 - 11:45 GW1 A0010

This research module is one of the colloquia designed for Master students writing their thesis in the field of literary or film studies. This module will assist you in preparing your MA thesis in terms of both content and methodological approach. This includes identifying a research topic, formulating research questions, and providing the theoretical background for the thesis. The major objective of this colloquium is to plan and design the MA thesis by means of completing a research proposal that includes the underlying theoretical insights, a literature review, a methodological design, and a bibliography.

In view of my expertise, I can offer to supervise MA-theses in the following areas:

British theatre and drama, including the work of William Shakespeare,
the literature of the 20th and 21st century,
and film.

Prior enrolment via Stud.IP is mandatory.

Prof. Dr. Norbert Schaffeld
10-M80-3-ReMo-02Researching Postcolonial Literatures and Cultures (in englischer Sprache)

Seminar

Termine:
wöchentlich Mi 16:15 - 17:45 Externer Ort: online

This class will be completely taught online and is open to MA students from the E-SC Master Program at U Bremen, who plan to write their MA Thesis in the Summer Semester 2022. As well it is open to a limited number of BA students who plan to write tehir thesis in the Summer Semester 2022. All reading and information material will be made available through the U Bremen teaching and learning platform Stud.IP; hence prior enrollment via Stud.IP is mandatory.

In this class students will learn how to develop a research topic, collect bibliographical material, develop a theoretical background and formulate research questions. They will then individually develop the research topic for their master’s or bachelor's thesis. Finally students will write research proposals and individually present these in class for peer-review.
Class requirements are regular attendance, developing theoretical and historical backgrounds of topic, reading secondary sources at home, and active class participation.

Prof. Dr. Kerstin Knopf
10-M80-3-ReMo-03Research Colloquium for MA and PhD Students (in englischer Sprache)

Colloquium

Termine:
wöchentlich Do 09:00 - 11:00 GW2 A3390 (CIP-Labor FB 10)

This is a research colloquium for MA and PhD students who are planning on writing or are currently working on their final theses in the fields of (applied) English linguistics, World Englishes or SLA.

Prof. Dr. Marcus Callies
10-M80-3-ReMo-04Research colloquium for MA and PhD students: Multimodality (in englischer Sprache)
synchronous and asynchronous digital sessions and face-to-face as allowed and wished

Colloquium

Termine:
wöchentlich Mo 12:15 - 13:45 GW2 B3010 (Kleiner Studierraum)

This course can be studied entirely online; face-to-face meetings may also be held as the situation allows and as participants wish. The course is for all Master's students (as well as advanced BA and doctoral candidates) who are planning a research project in the general area of multimodality. This includes all media, film, TV, comics, dance, music, spoken language, social media and combinations, as well as particularly experimental or corpus-based methods. Basic research methods will be reviewed, corpus-techniques and methods for evaluating data will be discussed. Attendees will be expected to develop their own ideas for projects and to explore the methods and literature relevant, reporting back regularly to the group as a whole for maximal synergies. The result of participation should be a detailed workplan that can then be carried out for the final MA thesis.

Prof. John Arnold Bateman, Ph.D.
10-M80-3-ReMo-05by invitation only: Colloquium for PhD / MA students who are currently pursuing their thesis with me (in Englisch) (in englischer Sprache)

Colloquium

Termine:
wöchentlich Di 09:00 - 10:30 GW2 B1630
Prof. Dr. Claudia Harsch
10-M80-3-ReMo-06Masterworkshop I for Phd and Post-Doc students: Writing Race – Workshop on Academic Writing in Critical Race Studies (in englischer Sprache)

Forschungsgruppe

Einzeltermine:
Mi 24.11.21 13:00 - 16:00 GW2 B1820
N. N.
10-M80-3-ReMo-07Masterworkshop II for Phd and Post-Doc students: Decoloniality and Decolonial Education (in englischer Sprache)

Forschungsgruppe

Einzeltermine:
Do 25.11.21 10:00 - 15:00
N. N.
10-M80-3-SpecMo-01Fun with Data - Research Methods in Language, Linguistics and Cultural Studies (in English Language) (in englischer Sprache)

Seminar

Termine:
zweiwöchentlich (Startwoche: 2) Mo 10:15 - 13:45 Online
Prof. Dr. Claudia Harsch

SpecMo - Specialisation Module (12 CP)

In this module students will choose two seminars either from different profile areas or from only one profile area to specialise in the respective field of interest.
Read more... https://blogs.uni-bremen.de/maesc/modules/

Modulbeauftragte: Karin Esders
VAKTitel der VeranstaltungDozentIn
10-E76-3-LIT-02Ian McEwan's Android Novel Machines Like Me (ONLINE) (in englischer Sprache)

Seminar

Termine:
wöchentlich Fr 14:15 - 15:45 Externer Ort: online

The aim of this course is to discuss Ian McEwan's android novel Machines Like Me (2019), a narrative that can be described as a piece of speculative fiction set in a counterfactual Britain of the 1980s. We are confronted with an alternative course of history, which at times even anticipates topical political developments. In a highly computerised context, some androids represent the latest achievements. One of them, Adam, oscillates between his two functions of servant and intelligent superior. Yet it is the uncompromising decision logic of the machine mind that tends to miss the nuances of a serious moral dilemma. The corresponding ethical questions will surely dominate our debate about McEwan's disturbing vision.

requirements:
• active participation
• in-depth knowledge of the reading material
• oral presentation (handout) or
• research in progress and final paper

Please note that prior enrolment via Stud.IP is mandatory.


text:
McEwan, Ian. Machines Like Me. London: Jonathan Cape, 2019.

Prof. Dr. Norbert Schaffeld
10-E76-3-LIT-03Shakespeare's The Merchant of Venice (ONLINE) (in englischer Sprache)

Seminar

Termine:
wöchentlich Di 16:15 - 17:45 Externer Ort: online

In this course we shall analyse and discuss the transnational quality of Shakespeare's dramatic work. Taking his tragic comedy The Merchant of Venice (c. 1596-1598) as the primary example, we shall have a close look at the theatrical representation of the Venetian society, particularly the conflict between the moneylender Shylock and the merchant Antonio. Against the backdrop of the dominant racial stereotypes and prejudices of the 16th century, the course is going to address diverse modes of transnational discourse.

requirements:
• active participation
• in-depth knowledge of the reading material
• oral presentation (handout) or
• research in progress and final paper

Please note that prior enrolment via Stud.IP is mandatory.

text:
Shakespeare, William. The Merchant of Venice. The Arden Shakespeare. London: Bloomsbury, 2010.

Prof. Dr. Norbert Schaffeld
10-M80-1-OrMo-01On the Move: Narratives of Travel and Mobility (ZOOM only) (in englischer Sprache)

Seminar

Termine:
wöchentlich Di 14:15 - 15:45 SFG 1020

This course welcomes students who wish to complete the following modules:
M.A. E-SC: OrMO (Orientierungsmodul 1. Semester)
M.A. E-SC SpecMo (Spezialisierungsmodul 3. Semester);
M.A. TnL Vertiefungsmodul und Profilmodul Literatur
Academic Exchange students

This course is now taught online due to temporary shortages in seminar room allocations. Narratives of Travel and Mobility have a long-standing history and are increasingly popular in terms of text production and commercial success, encompassing a fascinating diversity of literary forms, modes and itineraries. As a repository for factual and fictional accounts of mobility and cross-cultural exchange, however, these narratives have long been underestimated for their potential to contribute to a broad range of cultural, political and historical debates that seek to reassess the role of travel writing as a "vehicle for geographic, ethnographic and sociological knowledge." (Thompson 4). This seminar discusses diverse themes and characteristics of historic and contemporary travel narratives, including postcolonial travel accounts and refugee writings and thus aims to map contemporary critical concepts regarding transnational and postcolonial perspectives in weekly readings of excerpts of selected travel narratives.

We will meet in weekly seminar sessions online via ZOOM. Since some of the participants are required to submit a research paper, we will use parts of our seminar discussions to the development of topics, the formulation of a thesis statement, as well as considerations about the methodological approaches of writing such a paper. A reader with selected secondary text materials will be made available for download on Stud. IP. You may wish to check the sections "Information" and "Schedule" further details such as requirements, weekly schedule, select bibliography and modes of assessment. You will need access to Stud.IP and a laptop or tablet with sound and audio capabilities.

Requirements and Assessment
• Interest in the topic discussed and ideally a regular attendance and informed participation in class discussion (not part of your formal assessment);
• in-depth knowledge of the selected reading material,
• homework assignments,
• group projects and presentation of research paper proposals;
• research-based term paper.
The requirements as formulated above may vary depending on your overall degree program.

Dr. Jana Nittel
10-M80-1-OrMo-02Media Aesthetics, Media Genres and Media History (ZOOM only) (in englischer Sprache)

Seminar

Termine:
wöchentlich Do 12:15 - 13:45 Online

This course welcomes students who wish to complete the following modules:
M.A. E-SC: OrMO (Orientierungsmodul 1. Semester)
M.A. E-SC SpecMo (Spezialisierungsmodul 3. Semester);
M.A. TnL Vertiefungsmodul und Profilmodul Literatur
Zertifikatsstudium Grundlagen Digitaler Medien in pädagogischen Kontexten > Digitale Medien in Lernumgebungen

We are thoroughly surrounded by media on a daily basis, living, so to speak, in a “mediatized” society (Voigts-Virchow, 2005: 5), where the majority of information and knowledge is not perceived through a first-hand experience, i.e. somatically, but information that came to us via a medium, in other words, symbolically (Ott and Mack, 2010: 1). According to a number of critical textbooks in Media studies in English, a course on media aesthetics can supply the basis for media literacy by examining the meaning of visual images for use in film and electronic media.

Delineating from a quintessential understanding of media aesthetics as a study in sensory perception, as a study in value, and a study in the stylistic and formal properties of artistic products, the course will maintain a more philosophically minded orientation in the first half of the course by providing students with an extensive overview of the field of old, new and hybrid forms of media (print, painting, and photography, broadcast, radio play, TV, film, hypertext, simulation systems, videogames and digital art). The sessions on film analysis (narratological and dramatic composition) will however incorporate some aspects of applied media aesthetics by exploring major aesthetic image elements including light, colour and sound in greater detail.

We will meet in weekly online ZOOM seminar sessions, but students will also have access to weekly study units. Since some of the participants are required to submit a research-based term paper, we will use parts of our seminar discussions to the development of topics, the formulation of a thesis statement, as well as considerations about the methodological approaches of writing such a paper. A reader with selected secondary text materials will be made available for download on Stud. IP. You will need access to Stud.IP and a laptop or tablet with sound and audio capabilities. You may wish to check the sections "Information" and "Schedule" further details such as requirements, weekly schedule, select bibliography and modes of assessment.

Requirements and Assessment
• Interest in the topic discussed and ideally a regular attendance and informed participation in class discussion (not part of your formal assessment);
• in-depth knowledge of the selected reading material,
• homework assignments,
• Portfolio presentation or research-based term paper.
The requirements as formulated above may vary depending on your module choices and your overall degree program.

Dr. Jana Nittel
10-M80-3-SpecMo-01Fun with Data - Research Methods in Language, Linguistics and Cultural Studies (in English Language) (in englischer Sprache)

Seminar

Termine:
zweiwöchentlich (Startwoche: 2) Mo 10:15 - 13:45 Online
Prof. Dr. Claudia Harsch
10-M80-3-SpecMo-02Multimodal analysis of audiovisual media: film, TV, videos, ... (in englischer Sprache)
synchronous and asynchronous digital sessions and face-to-face as allowed and wished. Modultyp A-D im Studiengang Language Sciences, M.A.

Seminar

Termine:
wöchentlich Di 14:15 - 15:45

In this course participants will learn how to analyse audiovisual media, i.e., any kind of media where communication combines moving images, sound, language, music and so on. We will work through the standard challenges that audiovisual media raise and approaches taken in, for example, film studies and media communication. We will then show how explicitly multimodal models of analysis can refine results in order to see how the media function communicatively. Assessment for the course will primarily be based on practical analyses addressing particular research questions to be worked out during the course by each participant. Group work will also be possible. Analyses can serve many purposes, from aesthetic to critical sociocultural discourse analysis.

Information will be available online and the entire course may be studied online. Face-to-face meetings will be held to the extent that circumstances allow and are wanted by participants.

Prof. John Arnold Bateman, Ph.D.
10-M80-3-SpecMo-03The prosodic structure of English (in englischer Sprache)

Seminar

Termine:
wöchentlich Mo 18:00 - 20:00 GW2 B1216

Prosody saves lives. Depending on how you say "let’s eat grandma", you either invite your female ancestor to have a meal or you invite someone else to have your grandma as a meal. To save all grandmothers out there, this class will focus on describing the forms and functions of prosody in English. In particular, at the end of this class you will:
• know the key terms used to describe prosody
• be able to describe some selected prosodic forms and their function in English
• gain experience in reading research articles and presenting them to an audience
• get an overview on the state of the art of the ‘ironic tone of voice’
• know how analyse prosody using Praat
• do some research yourselves

Course requirements
SpecMo – 6 CP – ungraded: oral presentation (pre-recorded, if necessary)
SpecMo – 6 CP – graded: research paper

Dr. Claudia Lehmann
10-M82-1-4-EM-2Cognitive Linguistics and Multimodal Communication at the Crossroads
synchronous and asynchronous digital sessions

Seminar

Termine:
wöchentlich Mi 18:00 - 20:00 SFG 2060 (2 SWS)

This course is an examination of the fundamental processes underlying people’s political/economic judgments and attitude formation. Topics include multimodal metaphor, blending, framing and framing effects, mental models and discourse, embodied cognition and moral reasoning; the inadequacies of the rational actor model; the difference between reflexive and reflective thought; individual differences in morality and their role in individual differences in political attitudes and everyday economic decision-making and problem-solving; the moral roots of conservatives and liberals; financial crises (e.g., the 2008 American financial crisis and the Eurozone crisis), bailouts, empathy, and selfishness; self-change and brain change; belief, desire, ideology, and moral motivation; and culture, cognition, and moral-political reasoning.

Ahmed Elsayed